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Evening capital news. (Boise, Idaho) 1901-1927, December 18, 1916, Image 4

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EVENING : CAPITAL : NEWS
AN INDEPENDENT NEWSPAPER
MEMBER OF THE ASSOCIATED PRES*.
Published Every Afternoou and Sunday Morning at Boise. Idaho, a City of
30,000 People, by
THE CAPITAL NEWS PUBLISHING COMPANY. LIMITED.
Entered at the Post Office at Boise, Idaho,
is Second-class Mail Matter.
Society Editor, 1261)
Phones—Business Office, 234,
EdUoiial Rooms, 234;
BOISE, IDAHO, MONDAY, DECEMBER 18, 1916.
WORK FOR IDAHO SOLDIERS.
E do not know liow many of the members of the Idaho
regiment, who will return from the Mexican border this :
. . . f , t
week, according to schedule, will he m need of employ-1
ment, but we know that wc have wrongly gauged the
■ , , , , . . , , , , '.- il
U Idaho people it it shall not he forthcoming if needed.
Most of those who were engaged in regular employment
when they enlisted were promised their positions, or others, up
tin their return to civil life. The patriotism of Idaho employers
was shown in other ways, but perhaps in none more practical than
in that assurance. ,
If there are any' who were not regularly employed then but
who need work when they retire from the service, every effort
should be made to furnish the needed employment.
W e can recall that at times when towns needed basebail
players no difficulty was experienced in placing them in satis
factory positions. How much more consideration should be giv
en our soldier boys, who not only have represented Idaho most
creditably hut who are in line for additional service at any time?
This can he done without interfering with any others if \\c shall
>ur minds to it.
Sir'll
THE PUBLIC IS RESPONSIBLE.
ENRY A. FORSTER, a New York attorney, has made r.
study of criminology in this country and abroad. To a
medical society in the metropolis the other night he re
viewed the results of his investigations. Supporting his
statement by a wealth of statistics, the speaker declared that j
"among the enlightened nations the L'nited States leads the
world in freeing murderers and felons, while Anglo-Saxon coun
tries not under the American flag have the least percentage of
murders and felonies."
The speaker gave the number of homicides, includingjnan
slaughter, in the United States in 1912 as 9152 and the numbei
of executions 145. In 1913 there were S902 such crimes and only
88 executions. In 1914 there were 8251 homicides and man-!
slaughters and 74 executions. In 1915 there were 9230 killings j
and only 119 executions.
The murder rate in the United States was given at from 10!
to 20 times greater than that of the British empire and other 1
northwestern Ivuropean countries. The murder rate in this
country for the period 1909-13 was 6.4 per hundred thousand of
population. In England and Wales it was 0.8, in Prussia 2.1, in
Australia 1.9 and in Italy 3.6.
The speaker then took up the subject of summary executions
and declared that since 1882 there had been around 4000 lynch
rui
ITU
ings in the United States—in 44 states. lie said the only other
place in the world where lynching was practiced was in certain
parts of Russia where there are inadequate penalties.
A fair inference, therefore, is that lynching is more prevalent
where the punishment does not suit the case, assuming that in
non-lynching countries it is adequate. It certainly is not in the
United States, and what the courts overlook executive clemency
supplies.
There is a disposition, as denoted by some of the conclusions
of the New York attorney, to lay most of the blame on the judges.
It is charged that our judges are weak compared to those of other
countries, in most of which the judge presides for life during
good behavior. These judges, it is related, give juries the benefit
of their experience and skill in straight-shoulder advice that stif
fens their backbones and attunes their minds to the stern demands
of justice. On the other hand, our judges are infantile and opin
ionless and allow the jury to be swept about by every emotional
wind of prosecutor and defender.
It is not fair to load the trial judges of this country with the
bulk of the responsibility for failure of crime to be properly pun
ished, for, if the logic we hear is well grounded, then it is tanta
mount to accusing them of responsibility for increase in crime
and in lynchings.
The United States cannot safely be judged along any line
from European standards. Conditions are vastly different, and
there are few procedures over there we would want to adopt, al
though some of them might be transferred with profit.
We have somewhat different ideas of justice. That is im
pressed indelibly upon the courts, who are at no time wholly free
from the influence of public opinion.
The responsibility must rest upon the public—upon the
agency that makes and unmakes judges and that directs them as
to the measure of justice.
If the public desires more convictions and fewer pardons it is
within its power to swell the one and diminish the other.
If the public turns determinedly against lynching, the cow
ardlv practice will lie stopped.
The public is in charge of the ship. If it steers into unsafe
waters, it must hear the blame. It cannot "pass the buck" to its
servants.
Tt must ever he so in a true democracy.
FOOD CORNERS 80 YEARS OLD.
And New York Consumers Stormed
Two Speculators' Warehouse.
These times of corners on eggs and
flour by speculators and owners of re
frigerator plants recall the days of
panic in 1836-37, when banks closed,
and even the government was unable
to meet its obligations. Coal was $10
a ton and flour $12 a barrel, and
great was the distress that a meeting
was held in City Hall Park, the notice
reading: "Bread, wheat, rent, fuel! The
voice of the people shall be heard!"
Eli Hort, in Washington street, who
was holding 60,000 barrels of flour for
higher prices, was denounced and a
mob attacked his warehouse and de
stroyed much of his stock after he
had refused to «ell to the people at
the old price.
Then when the militia arrived the
crowd visited Herrick &■ Co'a. ware
house, and there they were outwitted
said:
by a vprv smart clerk, win
"Boys, don't destroy the flour, but let
who can shoulder a barrel
of flour take It home to his family.**
To this all agreed and hundreds of
homes w'ore immediately amply sup
plied. Herrick saved much of his
stock and quiet was restored to the
town. J. C. Pumpelly in the New York
Tribune.
ev<
Colds Cause Headaches and Grip.
LAXITIVE BROMO QUININE removes
the cause. There Is only one "Brorno
Quinine." E. W. GROVE'S signature is
on box. 25c.
♦ i
The
BY
MRS. EVA
LEONARD
HIGHFLYERS
MPRESSIONS ARE FAVORABLE; WILL THEY REMAIN SO?
FIRST
"What do you think of the house?" J
asked Tom as he helped his mother
from the taxi. Before them stood a
long dark building, sprinkled with
glowing Vi adows.
"The house is lovely. I like tins low,
broad English style very much myself.
You have shown excellent taste in
your selection," was the pleasant, i
swer.
"It is Marjory's taste, and it suits
me," said Tom loyally. "The view from
your window is great. Marjory has
arranged every last detail of that room
' abreast,
and
herself-■"
"Jt w;is certainly very kind of her.
j kno , v . i Hhall love her," wa8 the
cheerful reply.
"Bless you for that! There Is Alar
Jory at HlP wlndow Come on ,» Tom
hurried her up the steps,
fr i"^ 11y , ') ao ^ lo S°7o ! »'n J^theTm
before her nnd laying her hands on
-£ iTn^oXZ
that Tom lost his heart," and taking
j'" fuce between her hands she kissed
Tom saw h1s wife's fice light up
with a smile of rare sweetness as she
put her arms around his mother's neck.
"That ts all right," ho thought. "She
does look lovely tonight."
"Now', let me show you to your room,
for dinner will bo served in about half
.nn hour." said Marjory, and the three
went
The dinner was well
daintily served and as Mrs. Gerard
looked around the elegant dining room
and saw the happy faces of the young
folks, her financial fears died
and she rejoiced in the fulness of life
that was theirs.
"Isn't she the tweetest woman?"
exclaimed Marjory when she and her
p the broad stairei
away
Uncle Walt Has for You
This Evening [
THE PILGRIMAGE.
It is a weary road we wend, through
this dim vale of tears; it harder grows
as we ascend, accumulating years. The
pilgrim murmurs
as he walks, in
voice of doleful
pitch, "I spoiled my
foot on yonder
rocks, and fell into
that ditch. The
dust gets in my
aching glims, I'm
pierced by grievous
thorns; the dogs
come out and bite
my limbs,
hook me with their
horns. All things
terrestrial conspire
to make my life a
cross; I'm frozen,
t
m

drowned, and singed by lire, and 1*
total I os
a
Thus through hia pilgrim
age he goes, the fretful mortal guy;
he's always thinking of his woes, and
so they multiply. I find this life a Joy
ous jaunt, admire its every curve; It
brings me everything I want—or all
that I deserve. For I am looking all
the time for cheerful things and gay,
and I consider It a crime to hunt for
grief all day. A noble painting cheers
my mind, inspires me for the game, and
I don't strain my eyes to find a fly
speck on the frame.
(Copyright by George Matthew Adams.)
Plano moving made easy. Call 73.
Pcnsley Transfer & Storage Co.—Adv.
-I
-
-
i <
WELL BOYS, LET'S QUIT.
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husband were alone. "I know now
pleasant?" asked Marjory after a long
silence.
"There is one thing we will not do,"
said Tom emphatically. "We will not
irvflict our Intimate friends of day
before yesterday upon her. I wt
see something of her
she must meet Aunt Lois. By the w;iy,
when is she coming to stay with us?"
asked Tom, looking up.
"I dont' know," said Marjory In a
changed voice. "T have said all I
mean to about her coming,
at first that she would wait till after
the party, for she could not sleep
with so many people in the house. Now
it Is something else. 1 believe she is
actually attached to those stuffy old
rooms. I can't imagine anyone stay
ing there a night after she had a
chance to get way."
"It is home to her, T suppose. She
has the associations of half a lifetime
built around them. Then too, they
hers. 1 can understand," mur
mured Tom.
"Well, I can't!" snapped his wife.
"Just let her stay if she wants to.
Have her up here all you can and give
her as much change as possible, but
respect her wishes about keeping a
home. She will be happier that way.
I'll telephone her to come to dinner
tomorrow to meet mother," he added.
where you get your pleasant ways;
that Is, when they are pleasant." she
added with a becoming toss of the
head. Tom caught her in his arms and
stooped to kiss her. The girl sudden
ly clasped her hand over her cheek.
"Don't kiss me there; I want to keep
my first mother's kiss." Tom folded
her close and whispered; "She will be
a real mother to you."
"What shall we do to make her stay
t to
self. Of course
She said
a:
be continued.)
(T<




I
DAILY LESSON IN HISTORY.
One Hundred Years Ago Today.
I SI 6—General Arnold Elzy, a
distinguished commander in the
confederate states army, born
at Elmwood, Md. Died in Bal
timore, Feb. 21, 1871.
Seventy-five Years Ago Today
1841—The little British army
besieged in Cabul was threat
ened with destruction by the
Afghan rebels.
Fifty Years Ago Today.
1866—British naval training
ship Chichester foundered at
sea, with loss of many lives.
Twenty-five Year* Aqo Today.
1891—Guion Line steamship
Abyssinia burned at sea, five
days out of New' York; passen
gers and crew' rescued by the
Spree.
One Year Ago Today in tho War.
Ford peace party arrived at
Christiansand, Norway; Ger
man cruiser Bremen reported
sunk In Baltic by British sub
marine; Great Britain sent sin
gle mon of the new volunteers,
from 19 to 22 years old, to the
»ported an intense
bombardment against German
trenches near the Oise river and
effective Are in St. Mihiel re
gion.

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9

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*



eeeeeeeeeeeeeee
I
I
| beautiful toilet sets,
Monday may be too late to get those
manicure sets,
I etc. Come Saturday while the line is
! complete; 25 per cent discount. Con
Hesse, Jeweler, 1002 Main St.
j Adv.
tf
PEPS
• •
New York lias a dairy con
Milking machine
spiraey.
may be back of it.
/►"
A blue law of the vintage
ol 1642 hadn't ought to be,
read to us.
j)Pfl< 0 lliove-j
nient has a mean one of its
own. There's BcmstorlT
again taking the joy out
our dreams.
Every little
Few girls ever get over
the adjective period until
after marriage and then
most of them simply change
adjectives.
—o—
If you positively couldn't
do it earlv, do it late—but!
do it.
Let's make the municipal
tree a munificent treat.
—O
But let us not forget those
who also need some bacon
and coal.
' on ~
TO BE TAKEN BE
FORE OR AFTER
(i;
the Highland railway
In the north of Scotland used to he
painfully slow' and the officials of the
company painfully indifferent to the
fact. Once an Englishman
The. trains
trav
this line,
as important that lie get to Perth
by a certain time to catch the
«ding from the far north
It
.
r
m
IWJ
■v
l ö
V
ô
V
The train crawled until
don express.
finally It slowed up and stopped at a
: little country-side-^Lition, where it re
i.mined suine time. Finally tho Riik
j lishman, in desperation, pot his head
out of the window, shouting: _'"'s
the de\ll d"n t >«u go on . un
beside the track stood the conductor.
who replied to him in 1 choking voice•
[ canna hlan the whistle, ma mouth':';'
'too fooo' biscuits."
the
had proved to be a
b\
A well known bridge player wh
imagined himself an authorit>
ncl wh
'
friends
his
verbal comments, suggestions,
and advice upon methods of play, de
cided to write and publish a
One copy was sent to a famous play
for his opinion about it. In about 10
davs the book was returned to the
perfect bon* a
Ids
y
author with the following note:
"My Dear Sir:
otShth Inst., accompanied
Your favor of tin
sour
-I
by
$ 1 , 000 , 000.00
TO LOAN
ON GOOD SECURITY
The Pacific National Bank
t'
3
'in
Sn
Ej
CAPITAL AND SURPLUS
$4^5,000.00
n
ski
sy
hook duly received,
very carefully. It
very good game, but I di
««oil a samp aa bridge."
ofjweii.
1 have read it
be a
seems t
i't think It ns
have
'Turned you down, did you say?
old chap, it's better to
loved and lost than never to have
loved at all."
"Yes, better. Indeed," replied the
"Better for the post
rejected
office authorities, the florist, the
songer boy, the confectioner, a
waiters, twice as many taxi drivers,
the jeweler, and half the theaters in
<3om.
do Zol
vn!"
t
Polk Directory of fan*
Washington and Adams
off the press.
1 '
ntles now
Write for particulars, R.
Polk A Co., Globe Bldg. Seattle,
äh.— Adv. _ _ tf
• •••••••••••••••'
*

• LINES WORTH REMEMBERING •
The winter's frost must rend •
«
• the burr of the nut before the •
fruit is seen; so adversity tern- •
pers the human heart, to dis- •
cover its real worth.—Balzac.
REAL ESTATE TRANSFERS.
(Burnished by the Security Abstract *
Title Company)
Joseph Gale et ux to James E. Clin-,
, .. , . 4 .
ton, southeast quarter of northeast
uuartcr lot 1, section 16. lot 4 and
.. , e .......k.... .* _
southwest quart' r of northwest q.mr
ter of section 15, township 4 north,
range 1 west..
L P. Clock et ux to Bank of Eagle,
o
*••••••••
Our Parisian Ivory was ordered In
it lie spring before the raiso
We save you the raise and give you
25 per cent discount Saturday. Come
• arly. Con \V. Hesse, Jeweler, 1002
Main.—Adv.
prices.
tf
[ Health is Wealth
l hyJokrvB.Huber. A.M..M D.
The prudent man fortieth the evil and hideth himself. The pass
on and arc punished. —Pbovubs.
i
The Policeman As Sanitary Guardian
» "THE New York City Health Department would hare the policeman *
j Q | sanitary officer. And Indeed, the latter, by reason of his pe'-*:llar!y
III c i 08B relation not only to the evil doer but also to the ynnernl
I 1 public, ought to be able to report unhealthful ae well as unlawful
-,
cont »itions. He can compel obedience to health ordinances, especially as
t0 handling of food, milk, candy and fruit; he can refer the sick tr
tllP proper sources of relief; he can see that quarantine Is observed In
; Infectious cases, that stable manure 1* properly disposed of, that tenements
are not overcrowded; he can In a hundred ways further the community's
betterment. Already our moral guardian, he should act also as a friendly
neighborhood adviser In health matters. Nor need any such duty take
him from hia beat, nor Interfere with his work as an officer of Justice.
Health Commissioner S. S. Goldwater and Police Commissioner Arthur
, .... .
, have successfully been unified with the savin* of effort and expense
Here is the scheme, in which "the policemen are Interested": Complainte
Wood began sometime ago a co-operative system In "Health Dlstriot No. 1,"
] on the lower East Ride of Manhattan Borough in the Metropolis. There
all functions, elsewhere performed by various bureaus of the Health Depart
and requests for assistance of various kinds, submitted by the physician*.
: hold nurses, and food and sanitary Inspectors of the district, are assigned,
with brief verbal explanations, to the out-going squad of patrolmen at th«
: station house of the police precinct, by the physician In charge of Haaltb
District No. 1. The assignments are In the simplest language, and only
call for an "O. K." or "Not O. K." by the policeman. Clerical work Is
thus eliminated. The policemen are also Instructed as to sanitary nuisance«
of various kinds, and what action to take. The time required for »uch
assignments and talks Is not over ten minutes dally.
The Introduction of this co-operative procedure Into other and den«ely
populated sections of the city is contemplated And the Bureau of Publie
Health Education of the Department of Health Is arranging, moreover, for
lectures on health matters, to be given in the city's training school for
police officers.
police
TUBERCULOUS INFECTION.
R. A. F. writes: What course
would advise to prevent tuberculosis
in a child of consumptive parents?
Answer: The child should not sleep
In the same bed with Its parents and
should if possible have a bedroom by
i. i# i.l. . * „ ,
Itself; kissing must be avoided, cer
. . , .. ,, s . . ...
tainly on the lips; feed the child suit
ably and abundantly and keep It In
the open air and sunshine as mtmh
as possible, preferably nt the seashore
MILD EPILEPSY'.
r. vfl . » _.. , .
J. C. writes: My boy is now
, _ r , , .
years of age. W hon 5 years old he
. . ... ,, „„ v,., .
vwts taken with rolling his eves and
. - , , . ,
throwing his head back. While the
,, , . . „ , . , ,.
apell lasts, about a minute, ho doesn t
. i.. .V. . *
hoar or know anything that Is going
on about him; and when he comes out
of this spell he seems bewildered. His
physical condition is perfect and he
is very bright in school. He had the
mumps a while ago and then those
spells stopped. When he got better
of this disease they came back.
Answer: Here is a mild form of
T/t(* eolvmn t* drvotnl to diteatr prevention; to physical and mental
hypiene; to domestic, industrial and public sanitation; to the promotion m
health; efficiency and lnnrj life. Th" latest developments in medical seien es
teilt be presented. Questions of general interest M ill hr answered here, space,
permitting—all others by mail if stamjied return envelope is enclosed. Requests
for personal diagnosis or treatment cannot, however, be considered 1» any way.
DEPOSIT
Your .Money Now
I
D -V
tr.
i
to
A;
e!
!v
I
or
Somebody Else
Will Deposit It
for You.

«
95
it.
Overland National Bank
O r Courteous Service Will Please You.
—--—-—-.
lots, 3, 4 and 6, Saxton'9 Hirst subdi
vision.
Juntos W. Harroll ot
I i
George
I Parkin, lot 9. part lot 10, block 5, old
j towns!te.
Emrnitt Pfost as sheriff, to Kathrvr»
E. DeSouehet, $758.82:
block 8, Grandview park,
lots 5 and 6,
Baggage delivery.
and
isley Tra
1
Auto delivery fur
Phone
sfer & Storage Co.
long
trips.
motors have been invented by a
j lishman to enable nn *nviat
I mate roughly hia speed and distance
! traveled.
tf
Revol U tion i n d i cat < > ra
for aeroplane
Eng
to esti
1
Out glass sale. Saturday; 25 per cent
I discount. Con W. Hesse, Jewoler, 1002
Main St.— Adv. tf
—-——
He Uses the Safe and
Sure Thing at Home
. A. Bflrd. Conejo, Calif., writ#«
follows :—"I have sold Foley's Honey
and Tar Compound arid also other line«
of cough medicines for a number of
years, but never uso anything but
Foley's Honey and Tar Compound for
mv family or myself, as I find It pro
duces the best results, always cur*a
severe colds and sore chest and does
not contain opiates or other harmful
drugs."
Unthinking and careless people neg
lect their cough« and oolds, not resJis
j lug how they weaken the »ystera and
lower the vital resistance to such grav#
2v S /n M p£.umom™ nChlU *' pl * urU,y
For promptly averting serioua ra
BU ^*L^ ro J? a co ^ u f? holey's Honey
and Tar Compound. It spread« a heal
j„p. soothing inIPuence over raw in
flamed surfaces, eases tightness and
soreness of chest, help« croup, whoop
. , cou - h# .tufty wheezy breathing,
bronchial and 1® grippe cough».
★** Every uaer U a friend.
V
as
SOLD EVERYWHERE.
epilepsy — celled by doctor« pet « mal.
You will find that the digreetlon h na a
*eod deal to do with tho«« «pell#,
a ' °, n * , he . wa *
the **ad. .uch Injurie, are Ilk.
,0 brl "« ™ rnlld eelzuree. Never let
f h °J 8- constipât e* A teaspoon
nil of bromides at nl*ht should help.
.. . . .. ? .. . . .
wet this solution of the druggist;
_ A . rr .
7 hrpe dram9 , of »'™nttum bromide In
,wo ounreB of Peppermint water,
j MOT Til BREATHING.
Answer to A. F.: Adenoids, en
larged tonsils, tonsilitis and naaal oh
14^ # _....
Htruction are the causes of mouth
. ... »... , r>«„
breathing. And the results are: Pigeon
.
breast, headaches, snoring, earache
, ' „ ..
and other car affections, mental den
_ .
i cieney, frequent atta n m coryza
, 4 .
'™'™ , CBtarrh >
^ r " wt , v convulsions St \It, . dance
and other nervous affections.
i
^
I

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