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Evening capital news. (Boise, Idaho) 1901-1927, December 21, 1916, Image 4

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EVENING : CAPITAL : NEWS

AN INDEPENDENT NEWSPAPER
MEMBER OF THE ASSOCIATED PRESS.
Published Every Afternoon and Sunday Morning at Boise. Idaho, a City o t
30,000 People, by
THE CAPITAL NEWS PUBLISHING COMPANY. LIMITED.
Entered at the Post Office at Boise. Idaho, as Second-class Mall Matter.
Society Editor, 1269
Phon.
-Business Office, 234; Editoilal Rooms, 234;
BOISE, IDAHO, THURSDAY, DECEMBER 21. 1916.
LEGITIMACY OF MINING.
() LONG as we*havc money we will have counterfeit
ers. So long as we have penmanship we will have
forgery. So long as we have business there will be
some fraud. So long as we have jails there will be prison
el's. And—
So long as we have mining there will be a few who will
attempt to bunko the public through fake operations.
But why should mining be discredited in anybody's
mind because some confidence man takes advantage of it 1 ?
We do not think it is discredited, for the public under
stands that mining is a business that only lends itself to
rascality as other business lends itself to it.
Perhaps mining lias been italicized as a profitable field
for sharpers because of the gold brick gag. Wo might as
well damn every mother of every married daughter be
cause of the stale mother-in-law joke. Another fact that
lias tended to attract special attention to mining swindles,
as few as they have been, is that the victim of a mining
stock fake will yell like a Comanche, whereas if lie had
been plucked by some siren or bunkoed in a horse race or
victimized in a poker game or made financially short by
cashing a phoney check, lie goes to the extreme of silence.
Mining is as legitimate as any other business, and the
records show that, investment considered, it lias given as
good returns as any other legitimate business.
Idaho has billions of wealth hidden beneath its surface.
This fact has been specially emphasized on the mind of the
investing public during the past year and accounts for the
revival in mining operations. The progress of that de
velopment will not be retarded because some unknown
man has been arrested for fraud in connection with a fic
tilions mining company in this state, the details of which
are widely advertised, probably in exaggerated form.
COMMON JUSTICE, THAT'S ALL.
k-, j— 1 11 Hl? F is no famine in 1his country and no lack of the
necessities of life. The fields have never produced
J more abundantly. There is no scarcity of food, but
there is a scarcity of money with which to buy it. Per-
haps a fairer way of putting it is that the supply of money
is apparently curtailed because of its decreased buying
power. It's a case of the cost of living being higher pro-
portionately than the earning capacity of the average per-
son. No law can succeed the law of supply and demand,
and the less law we have affecting our households the bet-
ter off we will be; but something can be done to preserve a
parallel between prosperity and prices, to keep the pro-
ducer and the consumer in closer touch and, in those east-
ern centers where food is cornered by storage concerns,
V> draw a line at fair profits—making them liberal at that.
All this can he done by application of tho fundamentals
hound up in one word—"justice."
A WISE SUGGESTION.
<=j-pHL county commissioners of Idaho declared them
*
selves on a vital point when they went on record in
J favor of public improvements in times of stress.
There is scarcely a time when some public improvements
■ire not needed. When times arc good it is not wise to go
beyond the usual limitations, but when there is a gen
eral scarcity of work and the masses are up against it, the
authorities in charge of such work can easily justify un
usual effort along the improvement line. Not only will
employment be provided for the citizens who need it, not
only will business be stimulated at a time when it keenly
requires it, but the work can be performed cheaper than
when more prosperous conditions prevail.
The
BY
MRS. EVA
LEONARD
HIGHFLYERS
I I
IN WHICH MARJORY EMBARAS8E8
"Tea. I will go If you think you will
not be made to blush on account of
my clothe*," aald Misa Volmar when
the subject of the opera party was
broached at dinner.
"Do go." urged Mrs. Gerard;
want someone to pair off with, and
we can shine in the reflected rays of
Marjory's splendor."
"Is Marge to wear her new sky
piece?" laughed Tom. "I told her 1
would feel honored to walk down the
street with a flfty-dollar hat." Miss
Volmar glanced despairingly at Tom's
mother. The good lady gave no sign
that she had heard her son's remark.
So it was arranged that the aunt
was to go to her rooms and make her
self presentable as possible, and the
taxi containing the other members of
the party was to call for her on the
way to the theater.
Mrs. Gerard thought Marjory great
ly overdressed in her party gown and
heavy silk opera cloak. She chose a
conspicuous place In front of the box
and settled herself to be observed.
The diamonds glittered on her snowy
shoulders and the good lady blushed
as she saw a number of glasses level
ed in their direction.
"Such vulgar display," she thought
bitterly. "Poor Tom!"
At the end of the first net several
of the young men who had been so
attentive at the party found their way
to the box and Marjory held quite a
little court. Tom slipped into a chair
by his mother and glowerpd fiercely on
the visitors. Miss Volin: r sat in the
stiadow of the drapery and nervously
clasped her hands in her lap. She
fell the anger nnd erltiei
Gerards and trembled for her darling.
Why would tile girl expose herself to
such criticism? Marjory was utterly
...
•r tim
Uncle Walt Has for You
This Evening [
I
:
NOTHING TO SPARE.
The hungry children cry for bread,
nd J would gladly see them fed; my i
have !
oui 1
bosom bleeds for little ones wh<
no doughnuts, pies or buns, and I
help them out, I
ween, but need my
-
coin for gasoline.
In yonder hut a
human drove
gathered round an
empty stove; the
father long lias had
disease—an infiu- I
enza in his knees—
the mother's wash
e d for folks in
until
i y
i
her
broken 1
Grim fam
town
health is
down.
ine in that shack 1
abides, and all the
wretched inmates
rides. I'd gladly help them in their
plight, and bring them food and
warmth and light, and make their
empty kettle boil, but need my coin for
gas and oil. As I go Jaunting near and
far. in my upholstered touring car, I
see around me signs of w'ant—and
they disturb my little jaunt. I'd like
to aid the ones who starve, and give
them ducks and hens to carve. With
loaded arms I'd like to go whereve •
there is want or woe. wherever there
is grief or care, and spread some
warmth and sunshine there! I'd like j
to do it, but, alas, I need my coin for
oil and gas.
(Copyright by George Matthew Adams.)
Walt frUitx
-

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her hand In that of her »on. They
h«<1 always been such good compan
lone, and she knew how humiliated
the boy was to have her see this ex
hibttlon of bis wife's vanity. Tom
pulled himself together and made an
attempt to hide his feelings and Join
in the pay conversation when the cur
tain went down, hut it wna a areal re
lief to all but Marjory when the last
curtain call waa over and they were
In the taxi.
TOM AND LOSES HER DIAMONDS
oblivious to nil this. With shining
eyes and flushed face she laughed and
chatted with the gay group till the cur
tain rose and the lights went out.
Tom's mother reached over and slid
Marjory soon felt the
constraint in the atmosphere and sank!
into silence in a corner. "What is the
matter with everybody?" she thought,
"It was such a lovely opera; such a
perfect evening. Someone must al
ways spoil everv good time I have,"
she fretted. "People are so selfish."
Mts» Volmar looked tired and anxious
under the glare of the electric light
when she said good-night at her door.
Ma.rjor;- called good-night to her moth,
er-in-law and ran up he stairs to her
room a . soon as t y reached the
house.
"What can I do. Mother?" he said in
a low voice. "Marjory is innocent of
any wrong. She is vain and has al
ways longed t
that is all. She has read a lot of rot
in the silly hooks she gets at the libra•
ry and she imagines she ran have a
coterie of admiring youths round her
and no harm will he done, but I ran-j
not allow It, either for her sako or my
<> wn "
vo,?H- uw you " annot> my '.'' ar hoy
■■Tom. telephone to the garage
once. 1 have lost my diamonds!" cried
Marjory, pule and trembling, bursting
into the room.




«hinr socially, i know
'
(To be continued.)
•••••••••••••••
DAILY LESSON IN HISTORY.
I •
: •
One Hundred Years Ago Today.
1861- Rev. VVm. L. Morgan, for
more than 30 years rector of St.
Thomas' church, New'
Oity, born at Hartford. Conn.,
died May 10, 1SH8.
Seventy-Five Years Ago Today.
1841 A conference was ar
ranged between the Afghan
chiefs and Sir William Me
Naughton, commander of the
British force besieged In Cabul.
Fifty Years Ago Today.
1866— The Sioux Indians mas


York
i •
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sacred and scalped three offi
cers and 90 private at Fort Phil
ip Kearney, near Rig Horn,
Wyo.
Twenty-five Year» Ago Today.
1891—One hundred and fifty
persons were drowned at Cor
dova. Argentine, in a flood
suiting from the bursting of a
canal.
One Year Ago Todiy in the War.
Fiench captured important po
o n Hart m a n n s - W e i I e r -

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; tendants.
church provides
I ear trunipeis for the use of deaf at
kopf in tlif* Vosges; Asquith's
call for 1,000,000 more men op-
posed in house of commons;
German reichstng voted war
credit of $2.500,000,000; Russians
occupied Kinn after
fighting; Italian force attack-
ing Monte Michele annihilated,
according to Vienna.
severe
A Del mar (N. Y.
PEPS
0 •
• •
Psycho-analysis is at it ;
again. Can't something be
done with these pesky !
germs'?
Wheat moves up and down
violently On the Stock IliaV- 1
. , 1
AiOt. 1 lOllty OI UlUitl 111 tll6
IVRSOILS for it.
k * p _ I
i i u i • t
i-ClHnO DOV 11101*1*10(1 OHO
month gOOS to political job
,. P .. . , ' u "
U10 next. liriSK altUI'-at ÎOIIS.
I
I
France is pllt Under StlÛCt 1
1 . , . ...
prohibition. A ISO Still Oil
the slaughter wagon.
|
Tt's ORSiOF to stclV ill tho
i • , m ( • n
lOW TildH ill 1 IH*
trenches. Hie fabula doeet
-;ih a t peace deferred makethj
atlfhe hearthstone sick.
_
itt~~ _ j n
Women who tell girls not
to marry until they can
iround up perfect men will
not he popular in high school
circles.
Lot us have peace; also
j potatoes.
Man caught with narcot
ics caught the dickens from
the judge. His name was
Lippincott and the judge's
Cotrell. Catching, eh?
Motor mind" a new one.
Said to be lower than sub
a
fonseious mind. Must bo the
get-out-aiul-get-under kind.
I
TO BE TAKEN BE
FORE OR AFTER
She had been silting in the furni
ture shop for nearly two hours in
specting the stock of linoleums.
Roll after roll the perspiring clerk
brought out, but still she seemed dis
satisfied.
l-Yom her lress he Judged
IWÏÏTfS
T
11
WE\
n
her to be a person of wealth and
; thought it likely "he would have a
i B When at lasThe had shown her the
; last roll he paused In despair.
•Tin sorry, madam," lie said, apolo
goth-ally, "but if you could wait
j could get some more pieces from the
! factory. Perhaps you would cal', again.'
.5?
4
%
I
Ù
J
$ 1 , 000 , 000.00
TO LOAN
ON GOOD SECURITY
The Pacific National Bank
CAPITAL AND SURPLUS
ooo.oo
ariS
The prospective customer gathered
her belongings together and rose from
the chair.
"Yes. do," she said with a gracious
sinile, "and ask them to senil you one
or two with very small designs, suit-j
iable for ;uUing In the bottom of a
ennary cage."
It is claimed that President Wilson
imites at a story
Pcr
laughed for five
he heard last elect ion night.
Is nothing short of a curio, all things
considered. Howbeit, here is the
story :
sonally we believe that if the president
even smiled on that alarmin.; night he
. . ., , _ ,
Mainl y About Peo P le -
Senator Ham Lewis, he of the pink
hirsute adornment and Chesterfield
lanners, asked :"If you had Bert Wil
liams, Charl'.e Chaplin and Billy Sun
day together, what would you have?"
The answer was, "A chocolate nut
sundae."
A physician leaving the sick bed of
a wife, whose husband accompanied
him, exclaimed doubtfully; "I do not
like her looks." "1 have not liked her
looks for a long time," was the quick
rejoinder of the husband.
-
-
.'
'
Eva Booth, Salvation Army leader,
will enter upon her forty-fifth yea?
on Christmas day.
Rt. Rev. John 8. Foley, Catholic
bishop of Detroit, will celebrate this
month the sixtieth anniversary of his
ordination to the priesthood,
took place in Rome, Dec. 20, 1856.
Peter Goelet Gerry', the young Dem
'rat who is to succeed Henry Lippitt
s United States senator from Rhode
sland, is a great-grandson of Elbridge
toioh
Health is Wealth
hyJohrv. B. Huber. A.M..M.D.
I
!
A defective phy9ioaî éducation i§ one of the primary causes of unhoppinffas
in marnage. A girl cannot be a uaefvl or a happy wife, ehe cannot make her
husband or children happy , unices the be a healthy woman, —Mbs F P South*
WOATBL
Pleurisy With Effusion
HIS I* what people call the water in the cheat; doctors ti.ll this
substance the blood plasma, and then they speak of sero-nbrinons
pleurisy (fibrin plus serum). And when the patient recovers (by
the absorption of the fluid, or Its withdrawal In the way 1 will laltr
mention) "granulations" will form, there will be permanent thickeulng
of the pleural membranes and oftentimes adhesions of the opposing mem
branes—which are likely to continue to be painful.
In pleurisy with effusion, besides the symptoms we mentioned yester
day as going with dry pleurisy, the fever bepomes pretty high (up to 102
py the clinical thermometer), apt to be lower In the morning and higher In
a , th e evening. This fever may drop down to normal at the end of a week or
i t8n , or « gev ® ral Th ® <> aln coat,Btt ®* *° »>ejevere.
ond " may b ® fe,t mo »t In *he armpit, or tn the breast, or In the abdomen,
or the back. There Is either no cough, or It Is without splttla, or with
1 : just a slight expectoration. And the pulse becomes rapid, from 120 to
j even 140 the minute. The lungs on the afTected side now become co.iv
i pressed by reason of the constantly Increasing fluid, which sometimes
comes up as high as .he third or the second rib—even higher. Naturally,
thee, there Is constantly Increasing and most distressing shortness of
breath. If the pleurisy Is left-sided the heart may be pushed toward the
right. In thin people It Is the ribs which stick out. but where there Is
much fluid In the chest, the spaces between the ribs will stick out and
side will become larger. If the pleurisy Is right-sided the
liver may be pushed downward As anybody can realise, these ars serious
conditions.
And yet a still worse state may come on—that Is. pleurisy wltk the
production of pus. empyema, which we will take up In our next article.
m
r \TAHRn.
■V S. writes: Have catarrh In my
heni and throat, have always had a
terrible taste in my mouth, which
grows worse ail the time and seems
to come directly from tbs throat. The
taste is
s had as If something were
mortified. Several years ago little
vellow hard patchoe would come Into
my mouth from my throat. My ton
sils sre hardly noticeable so that they
nnot be nffected. Am troubled with
core mo In face, and nervous tndlges
! Mon at times. My car drums seem
I 'o feel as if 1 had taken cold: Is that
hcallh
!»art of the disease?
Answer: Your general 111
will certainly not improve until your
catarrh has been cured. The offen
sive character
called oezena.
« tissue in and about your nose
is diseased; in such cases there is an
odor as of rotten eggs. You must
imperatively have all this remedied.
The tonsils may be small and yet be
the focus of rheumatism and othi»r
germs. You will always have Indiges
tion and in time worse, so long as you
keen on swallowing the nasal dis
of the discharge!
It Is very possible that
is
keen on swallowing the nasal dis
1 en ta
Th t» column I» devoted to prevention : to physical and
hyyicne; to domestic, industrial and public sanitation ; to the promotion
health: efficiency and tony tife.
will be presented.
permitting—all others by mail if stamped return envelope is enclosed. Requests
•or personal diaonosls nr treatment lannot. however, be considered in any icny.
The latest developments in medical science
Questions of general interest will be answered here, space
DEFOSIT
Your Money Now
SOJ
is
Sr.
9
g
or
■Ç
fcj
Somebody Else
Will Deposit It
for You.
*
H
S
w
cr
2?
)lAj
Overland National Bank
O r Courteous Service Will Please You.
Gerry, who was elected vice president
| with Madison in 1812.
As general manager of the London
j and South-Western Railway, Sir lhr
j bert Walker has directed the move
ment of 15,000 troop trains and soc
i oral thousand Red Gross trains
rying the wounded, since the beginning
1 'ci r
of the war.
| r ied Miss
The Duke of Manchester, who mar*
lelena Zimmerman of Cin
! climat 1, was committed for trial by a
recently on a
•harge of obtaining credit without dis
| ,. loHjn|< . thal ll0 wa8 an undischarged
' i a0 , l( j 0 n magistrate
bankrupt.
Count Etienne Tisza, premier of
Hungary and generally considered the
dominant personality in the dual em
pire at the present time, Is a man of
very simple tastes and habits,
though he possessed vast estates and
a fortune of many millions.
Lieutenant Pollner, a young and
well known Danish military aviator,
is planning to make a record by cross
ing the Atlantic. He figures that the
distance from the Fsroe Islands to
Newfoundland can he covered In about
30 hours, and the w hole trip to New
York in 48 hours.
Commander Sir Edward Nicholl, who
is prominently connected with the
British naval defense, was a small-
salaried clerk less than 20 years ago.
By chance he acquired a »mall interest
1 in a shipping concern, and within 15
j years ho became a multi-millionaire
I and owner of one of the largest fleets
In the British mercantile marine.
1
1

• plenty is the foster child
I • peace.—Ovid,
j •
; ••••••••••••••••
• LINES WORTH REMEMBERING •
It is peace that brings plenty; •
of •

.?
Tea: th« ear* ara alway*
charges.
affected In nasal and throat catarrh.
j Almost all cases of deafness corns
s a ^0Ut that way.
WAX IN THE EAR.
Answer to R. A. B.: Cerumen f "wax
; In the ear") may become lodged tn
'he externa! car; and this may be the
! cause of deafness, ringing tn the ear,
giddiness, oven of cough. Syringing
with water as warm as can possibly
! be borne will In moet cases remove
| this wax. During this process a basin
. is held undor the ear. One may add
to the water sodium bicarbonate and
glycerin (a tablespoonfnl of each to
one pint.)
1
THE SKIN.
Answer to A. M.:
The akin hna *t
least four functions: To protect tbs
* underlying structures, it is a special
organ, for touch; It helps
lied sen;
to regulate the bodily temperature; It
excretes a lot of bodily waste as per
splratlon.

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