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Evening capital news. (Boise, Idaho) 1901-1927, December 27, 1916, Image 1

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EVENING
NEWS
For the
Develop ment
of Idaho
WEATHER
Probably mow tenight
and Thursday.
\ oi xxxvn
BOISE, IDAHO, WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 27, 1916.
No. 166
TEUTONS PUSH SWEDEN URGES
FORWARD Wm CONSIDERATION
NEW ENERGY IN OF PROPOSALS
THE NEAR EAST TO BRING PEACE
Field Marshal von Macken
sen's Forces Have Ad
vanced to Great Grain and
Oil Storehouses on the
Lower Danube.
PROGRESS MADE BY
BULGARIAN TROOPS
Attack Made on Bridgehead
at Matchin, Opposite!
Braila, With a View of
Clearing Dobrudja of All
Russian and Rumanian
Forces.
(Associated Press War Summary)
While peace discussions
are proceeding, active mili
tary operations, except in
such remote fields as those
of Egypt and Tigris, are be
ing vigorously prosecuted
only on the Rumanian front.
In this war area latest re
ports show Field Marshal
von Mackenzen making new
headway in his advance to
ward Braila, tlie great Ru
manian grain and oil store
house on the lower Danube.
The taking of Filipechti placed Mar
little
shu I von Mackenzen's forces a
ore than 30 miles from this objective.
ATTACKING BRIDGEHEAD.
On tlie other side of the Danube, in
tho meantime, the Teutonic Dobrudja
army, apparently comprising chiefly
Bulgarian troops. Is hammering its way
at the bridgehead of Matchin, almost
opposite Braila. Tlie Clearing of the
remaining Russians from Dobrudja
thus seems a possibility not only by
direct attack, but through the advance
in Allachia which, if it succeeded ~in
reaching Braila, would be able to take
the Matchin position under artillery
fire on the flank and rear from across
tin
the Danube.
QUIET ON WESTERN FRONT.
On the Franco-Belgian front artil
lery has been active In some sectors
and aviators have been busy, but the
Infantry Is being held In the trenches.
GOVERNMENT PAPER
MILL RECOMMENDED
Washington, Dec. 27—The erection
of a government pulp and paper mill
lo assure the government's paper sup
ply at reasonable prices was recom
mended to the joint congressional com
mittee on printing today by the com
mittee which annually draws speci
'ications for government paper.
OFFICIAL FIGURES
ON POPULAR VOTE AT
NOVEMBER ELECTION
New York, Dec. 27.—Complete offi
rial returns on the presidential elec
tion show that Mr. Wilson received
9,116,296 votes and Mr. Hughes 8,547,
474, a plurality of 568,822 for Mr. Wil
In 1912 Wilson, Democrat, re
Taft, Republican, 3,
Roosevelt, Progressive, 4,124,
eon.
t-nlved 6,297,099;
846,299;
959
The vote for Mr. Benson, Socialist
750,000,
randidate for president,
with right missing Matos estimated,
«gainst 901,873 for Debs, Socialist, in
1912; for Mr. lianly, Prohibitionist
candidate, the vote was 225,101, against
207,928 for Chafin, Prohibitionist, in
as
1912.
The total popular vote for the four
candidates was 18.638,871, as against
15,045,322 In 1912. This is an increase
of 3,593,649, accounted for by the in
creased population and the woman
vote In the new suffrage states.
ADDRESS FROM THRONE AT
CONVENING OF THE DIET
Tokio, Dec. 27.—The diet was opened
yesterday by the emperor, who In his
address from the throne said Japan's
relations with treaty powers
growing closer,
alliance with Great Britain and the
convention with France were becoming
stronger, and called attention also to
the new convention with Russia, which
he termed a matter for congratula
tion.
The emperor explained that he had
ordered the ministers to draft bills nec
essary for the development of the
country, "keeping in mind the world
iituation," and asked the diet to eo
•perate in passing these measures.
The house was then adjourned to Jan.
were
He declared that the
IL
Follows Example of United
States and Switzerland in
Addressing a Note to the
Belligerent Powers of
Europe.
COPIES SENT TO THE
NEUTRAL COUNTRIES
Information of the Action
Taken by the Swedish
Government Received Of
ficially at Washington—
Supports Position of Pres
ident Wilson.
Washington, Dec. 27.—Official in
formation reached here today that
Sweden has addressed a peace note to
the belligerents and sent copies to
neutrals, urging consideration of terms
for peace.
Secretary Lansing said in response
to questions that such a note had'not
reached the state department, Rnd he
hud no knowledge of its having been
dispatched.
NOTE ALREADY DELIVERED.
Advices received here said the note
had already been delivered in some
belligerent capitals and that it much
resembled the Swiss note, which was
an expression of an endorsement of
President Wilson's note.
There were no indications to show
what Spain intends doing.
SUPPORTS PRESIDENT.
Berne, Dec. 27.—The Tageblatt an
nonunces that Swedish diplomatic
representatives have handed to both
belligerents . nd neutrals a note in
suport of those of President Wilson
and the Swiss government.
MURDEROUS PLOT TO
FORCE GREECE INTO
THE WAR DISCLOSED
Washington, Dec. 27.—Copies of the
letter from former Premier Venizelos
to General Korakas, head of tl • Greek
revolutionary movement in A , '«-iv.,
railing for extreme efforts to
Greece into the war on the side of the
allies even to the "destriuetion at the
proper hour of all designated persons,
no matter who they may be," were de
livered to the state department today
by Greek Charge Vouroa for Its in
formation. The letter was said to have
been seized in the general's house and
was dated Nov. 24.
hr! I
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COLD WAVE IN MONTANA.
Helena, Mont., Dee. 27.—Great Falls
reported officially a temperature of
37 degrees below zero today. The cold
wave still has the state in its grasp.
Young Woman Will Direct a Twenty Million
Estate Left by Owner of the Waldorf Astoria;
But Big Brother Will Look Out for the Hotel
New York, Dec. 27.—Mrs. Alfred
Graham Miles, daughter of the late
George C. Boldt, will direct the fortune
of over $20,000,000, while her brother
will manage the great hotel business
left by his father.
Tlie fortune is said to be the great
est to be directed by a woman since
ihe death of Hetty Green. At a meet
\g of the Waldorf-Astoria company,
Mr. Boldt, who had been vice president
under his father, succeeded to the
presidency. Mrs. Miles was made vice
president.
HIGH CLASS PROPERTY.
The property which is controlled by
son and daughter embraces In addi
tion to the hotels. Investments and real
estate, considerable of which is on
Fifth avenue. Mr. Boldt had besides
the extensive estate he occupied in the
summer on Florence Island in the SSc
Lawrence, eight other houses In the
Thousand Island section which he rent
ed. And this Is but Incomplete detail
of the multifarious holdings whose des
tiny depends for guidance largely on
a woman.
OUT OF THE HOTEL.
Apparently Mrs. Miles will take on
herself the large share of the opera
tions o.' the combined affairs, and
while she will be in full eharge of the
Boldt estate which is divorced from
the hotel end of the propefty and
which takes In the real estate aryl oth
er Investments, she will play an Im
portant part In the running of the ho
tels.
Mrs. Miles, In her leisure time,
which will not be plentiful in the
hereafter, Is not only a crack tennis
player, but drives her own motor
boat "13." Mrs. Miles also has
driven "P. D. Q. IV," one of the fast
est racing boats in the country.
SURVEY HADE
FOR EXTENSION
OF RAILROAD
TO BURNS, ORE
Arrangements Completed
for Building of the Line
From "The Gap" to In
terior, Opening Great Sec
tion of Country.
TIMBER TONNAGE IN
PROSPECT FOR LINE
Correspondence Between
Forest Supervisors Shows
Possibilities for Lumber
Industry in Central Ore
gon if Road Is Built From
Burns Up Silvies River.
The survey for the proposed railroad
from what is known as "the Gap" to
Burns, Ore., tlie construction of which
the Boise Commercial club indorsed,
has been completed. Plans for raising
the necessary funds to make construc
tion possible have been arranged. In
formation received in Boise from
Burns is to the effect that the railroad
is to be built. This road, it is said,
will be of great benefit to the Jobbers
and merchants of Boise, in that it will
open a vast territory to Idaho and Boise
handled goods and increase the trade
revenues of wholesale merchants.
Regarding the timber tonnage that
may be handled by the road, corre
spondence that passed between Super
visor Grandjean of the Boise forest and
Supervisor C. J. Bingham of the Mal
heur national forest throws some light.
It follows:
LETTER OF INQUIRY.
Malheur National Forest, John Day,
Oregon. Dear Mr. Bingham: As you
are probably aware,
Is on |0oot to Interest capital in
the construction of a railway from
Burns, Ore., to Boise, Ida. Tlie Com
mercial club of Boise is taking a lead
ing part and is working on a prospect
us giving the tonnage which would be
tributary to this road and they desire
to know the amount of timber which
could be handled by the road in tho
Burns locality. If you have any data
giving the amount of stumpage on your
forest which could be handled by the
proposed railroad. I would appreciate it
very much if you would furnish me
with this Information. Also if you have
any other information in regard to the
amount of timber outside of your for
est. I would be very glad to obtain that
Information. I wish to have especially
the estimated timber on the Silvies riv
er watershed.
The prospectus looks very favorable
at the present time for the enlisting of
capital for the building of this road.
The preliminary survey has been made
but I have no plats showing this sur
vey but I believe that the route is to
leave Burns and enter Idaho at a point
movement
»Continued on Vage Eight !
Crack Tennis Player,
Fast Motor Driver,
To Handle Fortune
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MRS. ALFRED GRAHAM MILES.
LOCATIONS OF THE
FARM LOAN BANKS
ARE ANNOUNCED
Twelfth District to Be Com
posed of Washington, Ore
gon, Idaho and Montana,
With Bank at Spokane.
Washington, Deo. >7.— Omaha,
Neb.; Berkeley, Cal.; Spokane,
Wash.; Springfield, Mass.; Baltl.
more, Columbia, S. C.; Louisville,
Ky.; New Orleans, St. Louis, St.
Paul, Minn.; Wichita. Kan. and
Houston, Tea., have been chosen
as locations for the 12 federal
farm loan banks.
The farm loan board announced
that district No. 12 will embrace
Washington, Oregon, Montana and
Idaho.
The banka will be established as
soon as practicable. Under the law
each will have a capital of 175,000.
Applications for loans have been
pouring in in great volume.
TO ISSUE BONOS.
Almost the first work of the
banks after approving and issu
ing the loans will be the issu
ance of farm loan bonds, a new
form of security in this coun
try. The bonds will be Issued at
a rate of 1 per cent less than
the interest rate charged farm
ers on their loans.
One of the chief tasks con
fronting the board is to find ex
perienced employes for the new
banks. Over 6000 applications
for positions have been received.
AMERICAN CAMP IN
MEXICO SERIOUSLY
DAMAGED BY STORM
\
Washington, Dec. 27.—Heavy dam
age to tlie equipment of Major Gen
eral Pershing's dimmand in Mexico is
reported in dispatches to the war de
partment telling of the storm which
swept his lines Christmas day. The
masts of the wireless station at Co
lonia Dublan were blown down and
field hospital No. 3 was demolished.
The commissary, store house and
many other structures were badly
damaged. At least 75 per cent of the
tentage at Colonia Dublan was de
stroyed. Telegraphic communication
was Interrupted along the line.
CONSIDER PROBLEMS
GROWING OUT OF WAR
Columbus, O., Dee. 27.—Men and
women from all parts of the United
States who take an active part In the
eohsideratlon of economic and sociolo
gical questions, gathered here today for
the annual meeting of societies organ
ized for the discussion of such s8b
Jects. These organizations are the
American Economlo association, the
American Soolologlcal society, the
American Statistical association and
the American Association for Labor
legislation. Both the economic and
sociological sessions will be devoted
.largely to the consideration of prob
lems arising from the European war
and its after-effects upon this coun
try. _
T
TOLL OF TEN DEATHS
TAKEN BY STORM IN
CENTRAL ARKANSAS
Little Rock, Ark., Dec. 27.
Ths winter tornado which yes
terday swept through central
Arkansas gathered for its toll
10 known deaths and property
damage not estimated. Reports
have been received of other
deaths, but they have not been
verified. The tornado's path
path was four miles wide. Def
inite reports are expected when
communication is restored.
CONFERENCE OF THE
DOMINIONS CALLED
London, Dec. 27.—The secretary of
state for the colonies has sent a tele
gram to the dominions explaining the
purposes of the forthcoming imperial
conference announced by Premier
Lloyd-George. The telegram explains
that what the government contemplates
Is not an ordinary Imperial conference,
but a special war conference of the
empire.
The prime minister of each of the
dominions Is "Invltod to attend a ser
ies of special meetings of ths war cab
inet In order to consider urgent ques
tions affecting the prosecution of the
war, possible conditions on which, in
agreement with our allies, we could
assent to Its termination and problems
which would then immediately arise.",
Tlie premiers are urged to attend
at an early date, not later than the
end of February,
Gave Up Pretty Wife and Mill ions
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For Nimble-Footed Affinity; Act
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of Famous Yale Quarterback Bared
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Mr. and Mrs. John L. De Sanllen (left) and Mias Joan Sawyer.
Fox Trotter and Artist
Model Breaks Up Home
of Chilean Heiress—All
Over Now but Possession
of the Child.
New York, Dee. 27.—"A certain Miss
Sawyer, whose first name Is Joan and
who is well known as a dancer," was
the cause of all the trouble between
the former Senorlta Bianca Errazuriz,
Chilean heiress, and her husband, John
Longer De Saulles, a famous Yale
quarterback, according to the report
of Referee Phoenix Ingraham, filed
in the supreme court in a divorce suit
brought by Mrs. De Saulles.
According to the testimony taken
before the referee in two hearings, at
the very time that Miss Sawyer was
at the height of her popularity as a
dancer and as a model for artists who
were picturing the grace of the fox
trot and the hesitation, she also was
the magnet which was diverting Mr.
De Saulles from attention to his own
wife.
IN THEIR MERRY MOTOR CAR.
The testimony showed thkt on many
occasions Miss Sawyer and Mr. De
Saulles had been seen motoring to
gether in one of the high powered au
tomobiles that had won for him the
envy of the amateur speed devotees.
The referee recommends that the
divorce be granted to Mrs. De Saulles.
De Saulles was a member of one of
the oldest Knickerbocker families. He
was graduated from Yale in 1901, hav
ing been one of the cleverest quarter
backs who ever captatned a 'varsity
eleven.
In tlie employ of the South Ameri
can Concessions company he went to
Chile armed, among other things with
letters of introduction to the most ex
elusive circles. There near Valparaiso,
he met and won the beautiful Senorlta
Bianca Errazurlz, then only 16 years
old and regarded as the wealthiest
heireas in Chile. They were married
in Paris. Dec. 15. 1911, following a
trip to that city by the young girl and|
her mother.
HIS POLITICAL OAREER.
Mr. De Saulles is now engaged In
(Continued on Pago Eight.)
OREGON PEDAGOGUES
MEET AT PORTLAND
afternoon and continuing through Fri
day the numerous departments of the
association will hold their meetings.
-
Portland, Ore,, Dec. 27.—From every
direction in Oregon, on every train and
on interurban cars throng# of teach
ers arrived in Portland today to at
tend the annual convention of the
Oregon Teachers' association. For the
first time the eastern and western
divisions of the association have Joined
in one convention and as a result all
previous attendance records have been
broken. Today was devoted to the
deliberations of the administrative
council. Tomorrow morning will be de
voted to a general assembly of all
the teachers.
Beginning Thursday
SON OF BANKER PAYS
FORTUNE TOCLEAR UP
DEBTS OF HIS FATHER
New York. Dec. 27.—A thick-set.
somewhat stolid looking man about 40
years old entered the law offices of
Zabriskle. Murray, Sage & Kerr at 4»
Wall Street. Several men were seated
about a table in the office of Albert
Kerr. The serious faced visitor shook
hands with them and handed to each
a check, receiving an acknowledgement
in return, and after a few wordi shook
hands again and walked briskly out.
PAID DAD'S DEBTS.
The man who entered was Warner
M. Van Norden, and he paid In full
tho legacy of debts, amounting to
about $200,000, bequeathed to him by
Ills father, the late Warner Van Nor
den, founder of the Van Norden Trust
company, which merged with the Ill
fated Carnegie Trust company. Many
(Continued on Page Eight.)
HOW MUCH LOVE BILL?
New York, Dec. 27.—Miss Honora
May O'Brien, tho Skibberen beauty,
has j, 0 t begun her expected breach of
promise action against John B. Mann
j n g, th^3-year-old millionaire banker,
who jilted her by telephone Just before
the time set for their marriage. Her
failure to do so gave rise to the im
pression I hat her aged Romeo had
made a satisfactory settlement with
her out of court,
INDICATIONS THAT MANNING,
AGED MULTI-MILLIONAIRE HAS
APPLIED TO WOUNDS OF HIS
YOUNG SECRETARY THE BALM
OF BOODLE.
A statement credited to the young
woman to the effect that she had no
intention of suing him and that she
was anxious to forget tho whole af
fair strengthened the belief that finan
cial compromise had been effected be
tween the O'Briens and the Mannings.
Miss O'Brien's attorney would not
admit that a settlement had been made.
He insisted that no action has been
started and that he Is still discussing
the situation with hts client. He would
give no reason for the delay In begin
ning the action, another circumstance
which pointed toward the settlement
theory.
BIRTHDAY GREETINGS FOR
THE PRESIDENT ARRIVING
Washington, Dec. 27.—Congratula
tory messages are arriving at the
White House from all parts of the
United States and from foreign coun
tries to remind President Wilson that
tomorrow he will enter upon his six
tieth year. The president will spend
his birthday anniversary quietly with
his family, and no special observance
of the day is planned.
Agent From Berlin Arrives
at The Hague to Make
Preliminary Arrange
ments for Proposed Con
ference of Belligerents.
QUARTERS FOR THE
GERMAN DELEGATES
Instructions Sent to Ameri
can Managers of Steam
ship Companies to Pre
pare for the Early Re
sumption of Trans-Atlan
tic Service by German
Liners.
London, Dec. 27.—An Ex
change Telegraph com
pany's The Hague dispatch
says a German agent has ar
rived at The Hague to make
preliminary arrangements
for the German delegates to
the peace conference sug
gested in the German'reply,
to President Wilson's note.
The dispatch follows: "In
view of the preparatory
meeting of delegates to the
peace conference suggested
in the German reply to Pres
ident Wilson, German
agents have arrived at The
Hague and are making in
quiries for hotel accommo
dations for the German dele
gates.
GERMAN REPLY NOT RECEIVER

Answer of ths Entente Powere Fore
casted ae Courteoue but Firm
Refueal.
Washington, Dee. 27.—Germany's re.
Ply to President Wilson's peace note
has not yet been received hi official
form. If the reply Is received by Fri
day it will be considered In the cab.
lnot meeting. Some officials pointed
out today that the United States
could do nothing further and could
not decide on a course until after the
entente allies had also replied to the
note.
Tho entente allies' reply haa been
forecasted by diplomats here as a cour
teous recognition of the president's
course and ideals, but probably a firm
refusal to enter Into conference with
out having the terms advanced first
DOOR STILL OPEN.
Officials are Inclined to hold to the
view that the door to negotiations
must necessarily remain open until
the allies themselves close it.
The ivtew was persisted in in Teu
tonia quarters that Germany's reply
would be followed by a highly oonfl
(Continued on Pag# Fly#.)
Ohio Congressman
Wars on Electors
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"Such an amendment, If passed, would
further democratize the government,"
Robert Cromer .
Washington, Dec. 27.— Congressman
Robert Grosser of Ohio is the author of
the resolution introduced in the lower
house to amend the constitution of the
United States to provide for direct
election of president and vice president.
says Grosser.

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