OCR Interpretation


Evening capital news. (Boise, Idaho) 1901-1927, December 27, 1916, Image 4

Image and text provided by Idaho State Historical Society

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn88056024/1916-12-27/ed-1/seq-4/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for 4

EVENING : CAPITAL : NEWS
AN INDEPENDENT NEWSPAPER
MEMBER OF THE ASSOCIATED PRESS.
Pablished Every Afternoon and Sunday Morning at Boise, Idaho, a City of
80,000 People, by
THE CAPITAL NEWS PUBLISHING COMPANY, LIMITED.
> I
Entered at the Post Office at Boise. Idaho, a* Second -claaa Mall Matter.
Phones—Business Office 234.
Society Editor, 1262.
Editorial Rooms, 252.
BOISE, IDAHO, WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 27, 1916.
LET US HAVE PEACE.
1T OFTEN requires more moral courage to compromise
than to go on battling. To fight is often the easiest
-I way out. To propose a cessation of hostilities at a time
when strength is not exhausted is neither easy nor pleas
ant. It invites a charge of cowardice, whereas to go on
may be the more cowardly course.
At a time when Germany was strategically as strong
as at any period during the long war, when none of her
territory was occupied by a foreign foe, when that nation
was still in the role of aggressor on the soil of her enemies,
and immediately following a victory of more or less sig
nificance, the German government laid down the bars for
a peace parley. That was followed by pacific suggestions
to all the belligerents on the part of the neutral powers,
initiated by President Wilson.
Now Germany goes a step farther and proposes a con
ference of delegates of all the belligerents to discuss peace.
4» 4* 4*
A variety of motives have been ascribed to Germany.
One is that a purpose is denoted to place the entente allies
in an embarrassing position in the eyes of the neutral
world by propositions that could not be accepted by the
enemy but that would prove impressive to noncombatant
nations. Another is that the desideratum is to exert a
moral influence at home at a time when the war spirit is
flagging and to arouse the German people to further sac
rifices by adroitly suggesting the necessity for continued
war activity to repel a possible invasion by foes who are
deaf to all peace suggestions.
All these analyses, however, do not interpose an effect
ive barrier to the fact that Germany has made
move that will he considered by neutrals on whatever j
merits subsequent developments may show it to possess
and that so far the other side has not accorded it a wel
come. On the contrary, without proposing any concilia
tory counter steps, the entente allies in effect flatly re
jected the first German tender on the ground, as we
gather, that it did not run to the moral side of the conflict.
A minister, officiating at Westminster, echoed that official
view from the pulpit. It may occur to that part of the |
world outside the war zone, and to some of it inside the!
boundary of carnage, that such reasoning constitutes an
obdurate splitting of hairs. Obviously the moral side is
now more associated with peace, leaving to the future set
tlement of the problems of diplomatic prophets. In any
event, this seems to be true, that any moral issues involved
ran be more speedily and more satisfactorily settled in
the forum of peace than amid the clash of war. And in
passing, does it not appear to be remarkable that a servant
of the Master should voice such sentiments especially at a
time when the world should lie in tune with the gospel of
peace on earth?"
j
cl p(îcl< G
!
!
I
1
!
..
4* 4* 4*
If there was any logical reason for turning the cold
shoulder to Germany's first tender, there seems to be
occasion for it now if the allies really want peace,
ferenee of the belligerent powers, aided by neutral
sei if desired, w T ould, first of all, result in an armistice, and
there is little doubt it would he followed by abandonment
of the war under terms that would dispose of all issues,
both material and moral, more permanently than it can be
done by the arbitrament of the sword held on either side
by an apparently unconquerable agency.
The world is sick of war. It is nauseated with the
spectacle of horror upon horror, of nations laid waste, of
slaughter indescribable, of back-breaking burdens being
piled upon posterity. It will not be tolerant of those who
either utilize the white robe to screen ulterior motives or
those who discard it with criminal indifference.
no
A eon
coun
The
BY
MRS. EVA
LEONARD
HIGHFLYERS
MARJORY HEARS BAD NEWS AND SCENTS FOUL PLAY.
"Marjory, I have the worst news
{or you," said Tom. coming into the
boudoir where his wife lay curled up
on the couch with a novel. "You
must be bravo and try to help me all
you can, for-■"
"What is It?" asked the girl in
great excitement, sitting up and
dropping the book on the floor.
"We ore not going to get any
money," said Tom, blurting out the
j dreadful truth that lie might have it
over with.
"Why, it can't be! They traced the
'relationship without any flaws direct
ly to the man who left the property
and there were no heirs there in Eng
land." Marjory had sprung up and
stood with eyes wide with fear and
looking at her husband.
"They found an heir in the direct
line." answered her husband quietly.
"I don't believe it. It Is just a
scheme to cheat us out of our rights,"
she burst forth In a fierce voice. "Why
do you submit to such treatment?"
'The lawyer writes that he has
sifted the evidence and is convinced
that there is no flaw in it. It-"
"Why didn't they know about this
heir in the first place? They said
there was no one to claim it," she cried
wildly.
I "Listen, dear. It seems there was a
I secret marriage that no one knew
about. The son died as they thought
unmarried and now it is proven that
he had been married and had a son.
Therefore, the property belongs to
him." Tom sat down on the couch
and tried to draw her down beside
him, but sho was too excited to sit
down.
"I do not believe a word of it. It is
a trumped up case, anybody can nee
that."
"The lawyer says he has gone over
the proofs and is convinced that there
was a legal marriage." Tom felt that
he was heating against a stone wall;
he could make no impression on his
wife.
"He has been paid a sum of money
to decide that they are legal without
a doubt."
"Even if that is so," answered Tom,
"we have no money to bid higher for
a different verdict."
"Do you mean you are going to
tamely submit to this injustice; that
you are going to sit down and be
cheated out of everything?" blazed
the girl.
"What else can I do?" he asked
wearily. Marjory began to cry, fling
ing herself on the couch In the aban
donment of grief.
"There, dear you're all upset." Ho
patted her head in a half-hearted
way.
"So clever of you to see it. Most
people would not have noticed it,"
snapped the desperate girl.
"Fee here, Marge, you act os if I
had personally defrauded you. I
guess it will fall as heavily on me
JIS anyone with debts piled sky high.
Saying sharp things is not going to
make a bad situation better." Tom's
tone was dreary in the extreme.
"Oh, it has got to be gasolined
gloves and madeover dresses and the
wolf at the door all the time," she
sobbed, wiping her eyes with the wet
ball of a handkrehief In her hot hand.
"Now you see why I was so dis
turbed when the papers published our
expectations. If things had been kept
quiet, as I wanted them to be, wo would
be living quietly in the apartment and
no one would be the wiser. Of
course you were not to blame that
the notice got in the paper." Marjory
was thankful that Tom did not know
she had given the reporter the infor
mation. "But you insisted on buying
everything in sight after you saw you
TINY FLASHLIGHTS SAVE 11 AS VESSEL SINKS IN MID-OCEAN
■m
R
Ü:
edSp •:$ -j
H.
■ -y,
V
r v
m
• -r
:-:$i
f
0 .
w
.<
>:
•V
iff
•••
g
00
r
■<
pF
■0
3
J&..
-
if, ?
'. m
iff*
5
I
it
&
*
> A,
:
É
l:,
L '■> j
g
* "4*j
.
m
■W
.
• j
:
up
■vu
0
ii|
'C
The Pio IX linking and nine members of crew who were eared.
The Spanish steamer Pio IX was wrecked in mid-ocean and so rough was the sea that life-boats could nof
bo launched. In response to a wireless call the Spanish liner Buenos Aires came to the rescue. It was night
and the crew of the Pio IX were floating about tne sea on the wreckage. Two of the wrecked sailors had tvip
pocket flashlight!. These were used to such good effect that rescuing parties were able to locate and pick up
eleven of the men.
could get the credit."
"I guess I was not the only one who
bought on credit," was the angry re
tort.
"There, I did not mean to reproach
Blame timber is easy to find,
but we cannot repair our broken for
tunes with that."
you.
Tom rose and
ailked dejectedly up and down the
room.
(To be continued.)
Uncle ^Walt Has for You j
This Evening [
THEY SAY
They say that Smithman spends his
life In dodging bills he ought to
They say that Biffkin
wife, and feeds his children bran and
h »y- They say that
Jinx, the dry goods
prince, burned down
Ills store, with fell
intent. They say
that Jasper Julius
Quince held up an
orphan for a cent.
Thus Rumor, with
its evil tongue, goes
drifting through the
busy mart, and
baseless, vicious
tales are sprung,
which wreck your
frame and break
your heart. The
busy scandal-mon
ger cries, "Of course the yarn may not
be true, but still they Hay tliut Reu
ben Wise steals chickens every night
or two." Then Reuben, in his native
town, becomes a shunned and lonely
man; "They Say" has ruined his re
nown, and made him outcast from his
elan. The scandal-monger drifts along,
and makes his old accustomed noise;
"They say Jane Juice is going wrong
—she's much too friendly with the
hoys." Then Jane from social scenes
is missed, in every glance she finds
a freeze; "They Say" has barred her
from bridge whist, and banned her
from the Purple Teas,
scattered woe and stn, and
hearts, along his way; but
second violin, I often think, beside,
''They Say."
(Copyright by George Matthew Adams.)
pay.
beats his
B
v > :
Ma.P£ )N
'
Old Booze has
broken
he plays
• LINES WORTH remembering «
Labor Is the foundation of «
• the wealth of every country. « !
—JAMBS BUCHANAN. e ;
e
e o
e
»
e
Electric smelting at Welsh tin mines
causes a loss of metal of about 1 per
cent as compared with 9 or 10 per cent
by older methods.
j
j
\
STIFF, SORE MUSCLES RELIEVED ;
Cramped muscles or soreness fol- j
ciiie of grippe are !
lowing a cold
eased and relieved by on application j
of Slo.-.n's Liniment. Does not stain
the skii or clog the pores like mussy
ointments or plasters and penetrates
quickly without rubbing. Umber up
your muscles after exercise, drive out
the pains and aches of rheumatism,
neuralgia, lumbago, strains, sprains
and bruises with Bloan's Liniment. Get
a bottle today. At all Druggists, 23c.
—Adv.
An English inventor's electrical tool
for removing boiler scale delivers 800
hammering and tearing strikes a min
ute.
In 20 generations every person has
had 131,076 direct ancestors.
PEPS
• •
• •
Brand Whitlock is being
groomed for president in
or pa
1020. As tire Brand
ciiist?
First call for
Year resolutions.
King of England refers to
my army," etc. Wouldn't!
do in this country. He'd
have to say "our army" to
let the queen in.
— -O- ■
President Wilson in his
peace offerings may have
proceeded on the theory that
a stitch in time saves
"nein."
Man fought with waiter
over beefsteak. Fined $5,
but got the steak. May have
been ahead at that.
—O—
Secretary Lansing
shift his explanation gears
so fast he stripped 'em?
new New
* i
Did
—o—
Have you observed the
back to the oil movement?"
Note increase in auto sales.
U
TO BE TAKEN BE
FORE OR AFTER
Advancing prices make women's
stockings shorter.—Headline. And un
less the skirt styles are reformed we
won't have to read about it.
P
0-^w^ may be all {Kexr^4W.
Tipe! Jfcrl -Ihei-eV all SblTS oP
Germs-" Fays' VStmö Hopley Maine?
And. Must cal Genres' ts Surely,
-Jo Me. •a.Çap&cÜy -lor Cnxrax-St
Ih/tTuiQ-> P»uiî!"
T
a
P
u
inn
THIS DAY IN HISTORY.
Two hundred years ago today, n
Connecticut hen laid an egg on Ice and
gave birth to an td"a that is making
The original egg.
properly
It was sold with others
millionaires today.
unfortunately, has
treasured.
ut heel
some months ago.
FACT.
An earnest friend, indeed, the man
may be
Who tells you all the woes that he
endures;
And yet by far a finer friend Is he
Who lends a sympathetic ear
yours!
to
Lots of people sneer at building 1
castles in the air who are busy build
ing dungeons in the air.
Baggage delivery. Auto delivery for
country and long trips. Phone 73.
Peasley Transfer & Storage Co.
tf
$ 1 , 000 , 000.00
TO LOAN
ON GOOD SECURITY
The Pacific National Bank
CAPITAL AND SURPLUS
MSB,000.00
ia
am;
• •••••••••••••a
DAILY LESSON IN HISTORY. •
On« Hundred Years Ago Today. «
1816—Rt. Rev. Michael Dome- •
nec. Catholic bishop of Pittsburg: «
and later of Allegheny, born in e
Terragonn, Spain. Died there •
Jan. 5, 1873 e
Seventy-6 V« Years Ago Today. •
1841—Coionel Albert D. Shaw, e
New York congressman and e
one-time commander In chief of «
the G. A. R., born in Jefferson e
county. New York. Died in e
Washington, D. C., Feb. lu. 1901. e
Fifty Year. Ago Today. •
1866—Juarez, leader of the •
Mexicans in their war against •
Emperor Maximillian, entered •
the city of Durango amidst •
great rejoicing of the people.
Twenty- Five Years Ago Today. •
1891—Traffic throughout Eng- •
land was suspended by one of •
the densest fogs ever known •
in that country.
One Year Ago Today in the War. •
Lloyd-George threatened to •
resign unless England establish
ed compulsory military service;
intense battle with heavy cun
Belgium, near Rheims
«

«
a
«
non
and in the Vosges; Bulgar •
army withdrew four miles from •
Greek border; Indian army re- •
ported to have left France for •
another field of operations, •
presumably Egypt or Mesopota- •
mia.
«
eeeaeseeaaeeea«
Dr. King's New Discovery. The sooth
ing pine balsams heal the Irritated
membranes, and the antiseptic and lax
atlve qualities kill the germs and break
up your cold. Don't let a cold linger.
STOP THAT COUGH.
A hacking cough weakens the whole
system, drains your energy and gets
worse if neglected; your throat is raw,
your chest aches! and you feel sore all
over. Relieve that cold at once with
Get Dr. King's New Discovery today
at your Druggist. 60c.—Adv.
The Quinine That Does Not Affect
Head.
Because of Its tonic and laxative ef
fect, Laxative Bromo Quinine can be
taken by anyone without causing nerv
ousness nor ringing in the head. There
is only one "Bromo Quinine.'
GROVE'S signature is on box. 26c.
B. W.
3
>Tal
Lv* ï.
Kitty Lou's Drink
Kitty Lott, the pretty little gray
house cat, looked at her clean whits
drinking cup with disdain.
"I'm bo tired of drinking out of you
all the time," she said, as she pushed
the cup with her paw. "Other kit
tens don't have to drink out of a
freshly-washed white cup—they can
drink out of anything they find.
And I wish I could, too."
Now anybody would hare supposed
that a dainty little gray kitten such
as Kitty Lou was would have much
preferred to drink out of a nice,
clean cup. In fact she looked like a
kitten who would touch water from
nothing else. That simply shows
how deceiving looks are! Kitty Lou,
with everything heart could wish for.
aspired for a drink out of a puddle!
But, dearie me! With the careful
watching she received she had no
chance to run and hunt for dirty pud
dies—or clean ones either for that
matter!
But one morning Kitty Lon's mis
tress went to visit her grandmother
and that left Kitty Lou free for ths
day, lor all the grown folks of the
house were too busy cleaning house
to pay any attention to a mere kit
ten. So Kitty Lou, with a delight
ful sense of adventure, wandered out
into the garden to Bee If something
wouldn't happen to her.
And It did.
Mr. Garden Toad waa ont taking
his morning hop and he 'kplumped
right in front of Kitty Lou as aha
stepped Into the garden path.
"Gvod morning! Good morning!
Good morning, Miss Cat," said he, la
his most mannerly style
"Good morning," exclaimed Kitty
Lou breathlessly (for she hsd no
idea what sort of a creators this
might be). "Only. If yon please, my
name is not MIbs Cat."
"SoT" said Mr. Garden Toad. "And
what may It be, may it be. It be?*'
"May you have everything you
want In the world, Kitty Lou, Kitty
"Kitty Lou, if you please," replied
the little kitten.
Copyright —Clara Ingram Juäson
-w
DEPOSIT . a
Your Money Now >1
§
Somebody Else Lf
Will Deposit It TO
for You. '
Overland National Bank
Si
S
or
©
i
:
O r Courteous Servie# WHI Flösse You.
OREGON SHORT MNE
GIVES PREFERENCE
TO THE GUARDSMEN
T . _
r< !5 0n ®' 10r * Line Railway
„ ny ° ffers to employ members of
* , Sac ° nd Ida h° regiment who can be
„1 n lts Bervlce in such capacities
„V.? 5 are bast "oited to fill. Joel L.
... ' Suerai agent for that company,
. cad Quarters at Boise, waa so
, . e aat n *6ht in the following
'''f '" from » V. Platt, vice
1 and * eneral
ln ®
prest
manager of the Short
I.°8 Angeles, Dec. 26, 191«.
J. L. Priest. Boise:
Now that our Idaho boys hays
turned and had
rs
.... opportunity to
spend their Christmas at home, I de
sire to offer through
to such of them
you employment
as we oan place In our
service and In such capacities as th»y
are best suited to fill, assuming that
many of them sacrificed their positions
I am prompted to do this
. .. at this time
feeling they responded to the call cf
; duty In service of their country, which
8tam P s them as possessing the spirit of
loyalt > - which we prize so highly in our
service, and further that they have
been subjected to the proper kind of
discipline and by their intelligence ap
preciate the advantage of good disci
pline. I am sending copy of this to Mr.
Knickerbocker and Mr. Hinckley
Pocatello In order that you
•t
may con
fer with them direct on any applica
tions you may receive.
H. V. PLATT.
t
NOTED OLD COWBOY DEAD.
James Willoughby, familiarly known
"Kid," one of the famous cowboys
of the early days In Wyoming, died
recently at Los Angeles, Cal. The old
cowboy expressed a wish Just before
on the range
j where he spent his youth. The old tim
Prs of Cheyenne are ready to give him
I the burial on which his heart was set.
j Willoughby left Cheyenne with a
Wild West show In 1885.
as
! his death to be burled
Though ha
i traveled the world, his heart was
ways In Wyoming. In recent years he
worked for moving picture companies.
He was as popular with the motion pic
ture people as he was on the range.
Willoughby worked on the range here
as early as 1878 and 1877. He was re
cognized as the champion rider of the
early days.—Cheyenne State Leader.
al
New song by Mrs. Tufcey and Mrs.
D31
Hoover—on sale.—Adv.
trying gallantly to nuke up for fclg
first mistake.
"Thank yon," answered Kitty Lon.
who by this time had lost her first
fear of the toad and had decided ha
must ba a very nice creators. -Then,

M
I
I
li
I
I
I

I
I
I
I
B
\
*,
'
. . . . „ . .. „
l,uob * frolic >n th% alley modi
When her mistress came home aha
found neat, tidy little Kitty Lon ao
dirty and muddy she hardly knaw
her—but so contented and happy
looking she hadn't the heart to scold.
Ul|
M
J\
W'
« *
• V
% •
4
T
I
"Good morning. Kin Oaf," NX Wt,
4» Mi most mannerly style
tf you want me to have everytMag I
with for, perhaps you will tall ma
where to find a drink."
"In the alley, in the alley. In the
alley behind the garbage pell," said
Mr. Garden Toad promptly.
"I thank you, kind sir,'* replied
Kitty Lou and, without waiting for
further pleasant conversation, ska
darted back to the alley.
And eure enough, there was
water, In a delightfully dirty tta
can. Some water dropped in there by
the rain of two days before—just aa
Kitty Lon had hoped she would Audi
Such a drink as Kitty Lon did have!

xml | txt