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Evening capital news. (Boise, Idaho) 1901-1927, September 28, 1917, Image 1

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn88056024/1917-09-28/ed-1/seq-1/

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R EWflR DSnACED OVER RE ADS OF SLACKERS
«« • ••••••••••»••
American Radicals Demand Immediate Move to Bring War to End
Leader in News
and Advertising
EVENING CAPITA
lL ne
ws
LEASED !
WIRE
Vol. XXXIX
BOISE, IDAHO, FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 28, 1917.
No. 73
PEACE BUREAU ESTABLISHED BY U.S.
DWINDLING
AS THE WAR
DRAWS ON
Germany Now Has 6,800.000
Men in Service, Including
Unincorporated Classes of
1919 and 1920. i
Less Than Half of the Four- j
teen Million Men Who '
Have Figured in Military
Lists of Empire During j
War Now Remain.
GERMANY'S PRESENT MAN POW
ER. I
Soldiers at the front or in can- |
tonments, 5,500,000.
Soldiers at depots, constituting
the reserve 600,000.
fiasses of 1919 and 1920, still
unincorporated. 700,000.
Total 6.800,000.
GERMANY'S LOST MAN POWER.
Losses in the army through
casualties. 4,000.000.
Wounded under treatment but
not yet capable of service, 300,000.
German reservists in foreign
countries (50.000 in the United
States alone) 200,000.
Hermans physically incapable of
army service, 2.100,000.
Employed in Indispensable in
dustries 500,000.
Total 7,100,000.
By HENRY WOOD.
CUnited Press Staff Correspondent.)
With French Annies In the Field,
Kept. 28.—Germanyetoday has 6 . 800.000
men as the "human material" with
which to enforce her demand for "a.
place in the sun."
This is the "man power'' that re
mains out of a total of 1 4.000,000 men
who have figured on the German mill
tar 7 lists and passed through the
hands of Germany's military srbtters.
Of the 6,800,000, approximately
5.500.000 are actually at the front and
600.000 more are in reserve. The re
maining 700,000 constitute one of the
greatest tragedies of the war. They are
the boy soldiers of the classes of 1919
and 1920. They constitute the only re
sources of "human material" on which
Germany has to draw. They must fill
tip losses in the German army which
no manner allied offensives in progress
normally total from 70.000 to 80,000
monthly.
To date, however, the German gener
al staff has not succeeded In Imposing
on the German people its right to
seize these youths before they are 18.
Therefore this last drop of potential
German manhood cannot pass into the
army except in piecemeal lots, as the
bogs attain the age of 18.
INFORMATION ACCURATE.
The figures cited herewith aie based
upon the highest and most accurate
sources of Information. From this
sam" source it Is possible for the Unit
ed Press today to detail this history of
Germany's mobilization efforts.
Before the war. the German army
contained 51 divisions of 870,009 men.
Mobilization at the declaration of war
of all who had previous military train
ing brought the total to 4.500,000.
But these were insufficient. The
Ersatz reserve. §00.004) strong, was
mobilized of men whose physical con
dition was a trifle under normal army
standard. Thn the class of 1914 was
railed out—450.000 men who became 20
years old in that year.
CALL TO THE LANDSTRUM.
In 1915. call for the first ban of the
Landstrum yielded 1,100.000 men; the
1915 class another 450.000; a special
call In September, for the remainder of
Ihe Landstrum, 130,000 and an advance
call for the 1916 class, 450,000. Still
more men were wanted; therefore Ger
many combed out 800,000 more by
stringent examination of those pre
ciously exempted.
In 191«. the 1917 class was called out
early—450,000 boys. 18 and 19 years
old. Another combing process added
300.000 more and finally, in November,
the 1918 class was called out—another
450.000.
In 1917 the demand for human ma
terial was still more pressing. An
other squeezing process found 150.00«
(Continued from Ptigc Two.)
Terrific Losses by
Germans in Recent
Battles in Flanders
London. Sept. 28.—"No slaugh
ter of the Germans since the first
battle of Ypres has been com
parable to the terrific losses in
flicted on the enemy in the last
two battles around Zonnebeke,
General F. B. Maurice, director
of operations, asserted to the
United Press today.
"Since the end of July there
has been practically one continu
ous battle for possession of Zon
nebeke ridge, which is the key
to the whole system of Flanders
ridges. The Germans are fight
ing their hardest.
"In our last two fights we
gained all objectives with small
losses. The enemy counter at
tacked dozens of times, but were
annihilated.
"The Germans employed 75
per cent more divisions than we
did."
E
GROWS MORE SERIOUS;
ENGLAND CALLS ON U.S.
London. Sept. 28.—The grave
warning that the submarine situa
tion is "extremely serious" was
authorized this afternoon in a
statement to the United Press by
the ministry of shipping.
"Britain calls on the United
States to build at least six million
tons yearly." the ministry urged.
"Otherwise all war efforts may be
futile.
Sinkings since Feb. 1 equal all
losses for the preceding period of
the war—which is four and a half
million tons.
Frankly admitting that England
has not yet achieved a shipping
construction program which will
equalize her losses through the
submarine warfare. 1 *>rd Robert
»'ecil, minister of blockade told the
United Press this afternoon that
"America aiding." it will be pos
sible to beat the U-boats."
"Supplies of munitions and food
are maintained with the great
est difficulty and at the barest
minimum of safety,** Lord Cecil
asserted.
"At the present rate, the tier
mans may destroy three hundred
mors ships than are built by
spring."
"The question America fares Is
whether she will be able to build
enough ships to transport her
troops without sacrificing the
shipment of needed supplies. I
believe she can—if her effort
equals that of the allies.**
PRESIDENT OF BANK
SHOT AND KILLED BY
OKLAHOMA LAWYER
Oklahoma City, Okla.. Sept. 28.—Or
ban C. Petterson, widely known crimi
nal lawyer, shot and killed Sam Will
iams. president of the Purcell Bank
and Trust company. Purcell, Okla., to
day. The shooting occurred before a
large crowd of state fair visitors on
one of the busy downtown street cor
ners. and was the result of a feud of
several years standing.
Wade Williams, son of the dead man
was charged some time ago with the
killing of Patterson's father and also
of Intimate relations with Patterson's
sister. Patterson's sister ended her
life for the charge. Patterson emptied
his revolver, five shots striking Will
iams who died instantly. Patterson
surrendered to the police.
HAIG'S REPORT
London, Sept. 28.—German counter
attack« continued with bitter drapera -
lion laat night. Field Marshal Haig
reported today. All were unaticceasful
in a atorni of artillery, rifle and ma
chine gun Are directed at them by
British defenders of the positions won
In the latest Ypres drive.
"At Zonnebeke yesterday evening
another hostile counter attack was
broken up by our artillery, rifle and
machine gun Are," Haig aald. "South
of Tower hamlets and south of Poly
gon wood, isolated strong points
where the enemy was holding close to
our new positions, were cleared up.
"Southwest of Cherlsy we carried
out a successful raid at night. Sev
eral Germans were killed or captured
without loss to us.
"South 4( Lens the enemy artillery
was considerably active at night."
COL HOUSE
AMERCA'S
PEACE PLAN
Bureau Established at
Washington With the Per
sonal Adviser of the Pres
ident in Charge. i
i
Way Being Paved for Pre
sentation of Proposals by
United States When Rep
resentatives of Warring
j Nations Meet.
! Washington, Sept. 28. -Colonel E. M. '
J house, "silent partner" of President!
Wilson, has been named to build the]
basis of America's contentions before
the world peace conference "some
where, sometime in the future."
Formal announcement was made by
the state department today.
Upon tlie shoulders of his quiet
Texas friend, the president has placed
once more a groat responsibility,
gatherihg historical, commercial and
geographical facts for this country's
use at the ponce table.
It has been long accepted that House
would personally represent the presi
dent at this conference. His new ap
pointment-arranged when the presi
dent recently visited him in New Eng
land—clinches this belief.
FOR A DEFINITE PLAN.
It is the purpose c*f both to draft for
the peace councils of the world n de
finite plan, whereby the world may be
made safe against further aggression.
It is not the intrntlon of this country
to interest herself in territorial ad
ditions or subtractions in Europe -ex
cept insofar as those changes are ne
cessary to preserve future tranquility.
The wishes of peoples in small states,
buffeted about from nation to nation
during wars of the last century, must
be determined. The commercial re
quirements and geographical needs of
all must be studied before President
Wilson draws his plan for future world
peace, to be presented at the round
table.
SPOKESMAN FOR PRESIDENT.
House has always worked with the
president on grave International prob
lems. Before America entered the war
he toured the belligerent countries as
spokesman for the president in an ef
fort to keep America*« position clear.
Colonel House will collect historical,
commercial and geographical data
such as England and France have
been gathering for the past three years.
This information is designed solely for
use at the peace conference when that
comes, but state department officials
were careful to. indicate that the house
appointment by no means indicates
any peace negotiations are in prospect
now.
LIKENED TO LABOR STRIKE.
They gave ns an Illustration of
House's work the situation surround
ing a railway strike. When it comes to
a settlement, it was pointed out, the
confère©« Are primed with facts on
wag©«, working conditions, income and
expenses. Similarly at the peace con
ference, those participating will want
to know all the facts attaching to ©v
i ery subject which may arise. The d©
! pertinent declared officially that this
government, is concerned with Euro
pean territorial readjustments only to
the extent of seeing that they shall
b© such that the world hereafter shall
be "safe for democracy.**
Colonel House is not empowered now
to go abroad or to sound out either the
allies or the Teutons on the subject of
peaè©. it was stated. The department
said his work will be similar to that of
a group of college professors and oth
ers in England and France*who have
been collecting information for the al
lies ever since the war started.
SPOKANE DEALERS
CUT COAL PRICES
I A dispatch from Spokane esys:
Anticipating federal kctlon on the Io
| cal prke of coal, Spokane dealer, held
! an Informal meeting and ordered an
j cut of from 50 to 75 cents a ton on
I local retail deliveries. The new prices
will prevail until action is taken by
I the Spokane branch of the. coal ad
I ministration bureau now forming.
WRY UNABLE TO
REACH VERDICT IN
THE KELLY CASE
Eleven of the Jurors Voted
for Acquittal and One for
Conviction on Insanity
Grounds.
Red Oak. la.. Sept. 28. The jury
trying Lyn George J. Kells, charged
with the Vlllisca axe murders was dis
charged at 1:30 this afternoon because
it could not agree. Judge Boles order
ed the dismissal after the jury had
asked repeatedly to be discharged. The
Jury stood 11 for «acquittal and one
for conviction rn insanity grounds.
After the discharge of the jury
Kelly was taken to the jail at Logah.
la., for safe keeping. As he was being
taken through the court room and
past the jurors he renia i ked that he
should have been acquitted "because
jf his health."
PLEAS OF NOT GUILTY
BY I. W. W. MEMBERS
IN WALLACE COURT
(Capital News Special Service.)
Wallace. Ida.. Sept. 28.—Pleas of not
guilty were entered in district court
were entered in district court
last evening by five I. W. W.
members arrested upon c o m
platnt of the prosecuting attorney. One
member of the organization J. J. Mc
Murphy, is charged with the crime of
organizing a society to advocate the
doctrine of criminal syndicalism and
others. Elex Nelson, Swan Swanson. E.
Dawson and Mike Carter with being
members of such a society.
James A. Wallace, an attorney from
Missoula, has been engaged to defend
defendants. Their trials will he set
a ntsog &b# hi sc on tflfc O iAiRial dtwlfcet.
The defendant's attorney announced he
would file a demurrer to the complaint
and a motion to quash and these mo
tions will have to be disposed of be
fore the case goes to trial. McMur
phy, according to the complaint, was
arrested at Burke In July while making
a speech advocating membership in
the I. W. \V.. which is cited as an or
ganization to tench and advocate
crime, sabotage, violence and unlawful
methods of terrorism as a means of
accomplishing Industrial reform.
At the time of the 1. W. W. agita
tion in the north, officials of Shoshone
county nipped the movement in the
bud and placed under arrest the men
most, active in endeavoring to get
members for the organization.
YOUTHFUL WIFE OF
SUKHOMLINOFF NOW
REPENTS HER FOLLY
Petrograd. Sept. .28.—Madame Suk
homlinoff. the butterfly wife of the
aged forrnçr minister of war on whose
youthful whims and frivolities some
of his friends blame his treachery to
Russia, pleaded with the government
today to send her to prison with her
husband. The formal court trial ex
onerated her from treason charges, hut
found General Sukhomlinoff guilty,
sentencing him to hard labor for life.
Many of Sukhomlinoffs rormor as
sociates in the regime testified that
the minister's devotion to his wife
and her extravagant follies plunged
him head over heels into debt. It was
need for money, they held, that caused
him to succumb to German intrigue.
Sukhomlinoff's appeal was before the
court of cessation today. It may be
some weeks before decision will be
rendered. Meantime his frivolous wife
has been transformed by revelations
of her husband's payment of the price
of her luxury into a devoted woman,
determined to snare his punishment.
General Sukhomlinoff is 63 years old.
His wife is in the. twenties.
DIFFICULT TO DRAW
LINE ON FREEDOM OF
PRESS SAYS WILSON
New York, Sept. 28.— President Wil
son explained his views on pres» re
strictions In a letter to Max Eastman,
editor of The Masses, made public to
day. Eastman wrote a protest to Wil
son when his paper was barred from
the mails.
"I think that a time of war must be
regarded as exceptional," the president
wrote. And "that It Is legitimate to
regard things which would in ordinary
circumstances be innocent, as very
dangerous to tile public welfare, but
the line is manifestly exceedingly hard
to draw and I cannot say I have nny
conAdence that 1 know how to draw It."
"»MOKES" FOR THE NURSES.
New York. Sept. 28.—"Smokes for
the Red Cross nurses." Is the latest
war slogan. The army and navy field
comforts committee, at It's executive
board meeting Tuesday, will take up
the proposition of sending cigarettes to
the girls behind the trenches.
NO INQUIRY
INTO TRUTH
BY HEFLIN
House Rules Committee De
cides Against Investiga
tion Into Use of German
Funds in Congress.
Charges Against Integrity
of Certain Members With
drawn—Similar Inquiry
Under Way by Depart
ment of Justice.
Washington. Sept. '28.—Representa
tive Heflin. Alabama, has withdrawn
his charges against the integrity of
certain congressmen. Chairman Pou.
of the house rules committee, so de
clared on the floor today, .announcing
the decision of his committee against
"slush fund" or Heflin investigations.
Th» Alabamans' statemqftts, he ex
plained, were made in the heat of de
bate and since have been disavowed
before the rules committee.
"This proposed Investigation,' said
Pou, "would pull the very props from
under a similar investigtion which the
department of Justice is now conduct
ing. When that is finished, the $50,
000 slush fund will not be a drop in
the bucket."
IMMUNITY SOUGHT.
Representative Campbell, Republi
can leader of the committee added
that certain persons already had
sought to testify before a. house com
mittee in return for immunity in the
department of justice investigation.
Representative Cooper, Wisconsin,
showed that Heflin had 'made his orig
inal speech in *he midst of the debate
on potassium fertilizer.
"If there is .any man 1 detest." said
Cooper, "it is the man who slanders
another and then seeks to prevent an
investigation of the truth of his state
ments."
Heflin arose as if to reply, hut was
restrained by friends.
REFLECTION ON INTEGRITY.
Representative Britten who was
mentioned yesterday hv Heflin as dis
loyal. demanded to know if the com
mittee had decided that a "reflection
on a member's disloyalty is not a re
flection on his integrity."
Pou repeated the committee did not
want to interfere with an investigation
into Germun propaganda which will
"send some one to the penitentiary.'
1
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I
LAST MINUTE NEWS
HAYWOOD AND OTHER I. W. W. ARRESTED.
Chicago Sept. 28.--William Haywood, international secretary of the T. W.
W and about 35 other men believed to be members and officials of that nt
gunlzat Ion, were brought into the federal building under arrest shortly after
4 o'clock this afternoon.
FUSION MANAGERS CONCEDE DEFEAT OF MITCHEL.
New York, Sept. 28.—Grand j-Jiy Investigation of the primary election in
New York was made cel lain today, as a recount of ballots gave William S.
Bennett su;h a lead over John Purroy Mltchel ns the Republican candidate for
mayor that fusion managers unofficially conceded Mitchel had been defeated.
STORM SWEEPS ENTIRE MISSISSIPPI COAST.
• New Orleans, La.. Sept. 28.—The entire Mississippi con-st from tVavelnnd
to Scanton, was being swept by a hurricane at 2;30 o'clock this afternoon, ac
cording to telephone advices reaching here. The wind varied from 40 to 90
miles an hour. Eleven Ashing boats with crews of 45 were unaccounted for
up to mid-afternoon and grave fears were felt Tor their safety.
PERSONAL ENCOUNTER ON FLOOR OF HOUSE.
Washington, Kept. 28.—Bitterness over the Heflin Insinuations of disloyalty
In tne houso reached a climax this afternoon when Representatives Heflin and
Norton, North Dakota, engaged in a personal encounter. Norton asked per
mission to discuss the house rules committee decision not to press an investi
gation of Heflin's charges when the Alabaman objected. Immediately Norton
strode over to the tatter's seat, seized him by the shoulders and shook him.
Other members of the house and the sergeant-at-arms rushed to the scene
and the two struggling members were separated. Heflin retired to the Demo
cratic smoking room. Norton hastily left the flodr.
BUTTE SLACKERS CANNOT ESCAPE.
Butte. Sept. 28.—No' one of Butte's slackers will escape punishment.
Every deserter, every one of the city's drafted men who have mysteriously
dropped from slgAt will be placed under arrest. This today was tile announced
stand of the Butte exemption board. Of the second quota alone, over a score
have not yet appeared, although the quota left for Camp Lewis, Tacomn, Sun
Ida) night. A number of arrests have already been made.
PEACE QUESTION
UPPERMOST IN THE
MIND OF AUSTRIA
Liberals Introduce Resolu
tion Demanding Appoint
ment of Committee to Dis
cuss Way to- End War.
Zurich, Sept. 28.—Austrian liberals
are determined to force the peace
question to a practical and decisive
plane, according to dispatches receiv
ed here today.
In a resolution introduced in the
Vienna reichrat. the Liberals demand
the appointment of a committee to dis
cuss quickest possible way of bringing
the world, war to an end.
The resolution offered on the eve
of German Chancellor Michaelis' ap
pearance before the main committee
of the reichstag to discuss aspects of
Germany's war aims, is considered sig
nificant as a hint to Germany, that
Austria-Hungary is growing impatient
of the German government's discus
sion of the question, as well as en
couragement to the reichstag block
which put through the "no conquests''
peace resolution at the last session.
The Vienne Arbiter Zeitung, organ
of Victor Adler, leader of the Social
ists in the Austrian parliament, edi
torially said. "The nation has had
enough of suffering and vacillating
peace notes dictated by hatred and
German Imperialism."
HAND OF THE I. W. W.
SEEN IN STRIKE ON
CHICAGO BELT LINE
Chicago. Sept. 28.—Committee rep
resenting the strikers and employes
to meet here today In an effort to set
tle the differences which resulted in
the walkout of 850 switchmen employ
ed by the Elgin, Joliet, and Eastern
railroad in Gary, South Chicago and
Joliet, early yesterday.
The big steel mills In the cities af
fected. which are working on govern
ment orders, face complete shut down
unless the strike Is called off within
a day or two. The tin and sheet iron
works of the American Sheet and Iron
Plate company, in Gary closed down
last night through Inability to obtain
coke for it's furnaces. Several fur
naces in South Chicago also were
banked.
The strike called in direct opposi
tion to instructions from union lead
ers. ostensibly was for a wage increase
approximating 50 per cent.
At a meeting in Joliet, last night at
which trainmen refused to join the
strikers, it was intimated, however,
that the trouble had been fomented by
members of the I. W. W.
Officials of the Brotherhood of Rail
way Trainmen, of which many of the
strikers are members, have ordered
the men to return to work under pen
alty of suspension from the union.
POLICE AND*FIRE
COMMISSIONER OF
FORT WORTH SHOT
Fort Worth. Tex., Sept. 28.—C. Ed
ward Parsley, police and fire commis
sioner. was shot and killed at his desk
in the city hall late this afternoon by
.1. K. Yates, former city detective.
Yates barricaded himself in an inner
office but the door was forced by Po
lice Chief Montgomery and other of
ficers who riddled Yates with bullets.
BE PAID LOR
ARREST OF
DESERTERS
Adjutant General's Depart
ment Officially Notified
$50 Paid for Delivery ol
Slackers.
Stringent Regulation Ap
plies to All Persons Who
Failed to Report When
Called for New Army:—All
to Be Rounded Up.
The registered men who failed to re
port for physical examination to theli
respective county boards and after be
ing so notified failed to report to Ad
jutant Oeneral C. 8. Moody of this
state, ore certified to the adjutant
general of the war department as de
serters and for every one of them whe
is delivered to the authorities at th<
nearest array camp, the government
will pay a reward of $50.
Official notification to this effe.'t
was received by the state adjutant
general's department from Provost
Marshal Crowder. All authorities as
well as Individuals are asked to Join
In the man hunt and bring Into reach
of the law those men who are classed
as slackers sad deserters, having been
regularly drawn for military service
and deliberately failed to respond
when called.
In the state of Idaho there are sev
eral hundred of three men. The Capi
tal News has published several lists a*
certified by the adjutant general. A
number o fthose listed have Joined the
army, navy or Idaho regiment, bu*
have failed to claim an exemption
thereby. The result Is that the adju
tant general has received no oCfkdal
notification of their enlistment They
sre the exception, however. Bsnreral
hundred other registered men have
helther Joined the army or navy nor
hav they reported when called under
the draft.
REWARD NOTICE.
The adjutant general's department
today Issued the following notioe re
garding the war for deserter* to all
county exemption boards: ,
The following telegram from the pro
vost marshal general onder date .if
Sept. 27, 1917, is quoted for your Infor
mation and it is requested that you
give it as wide a publicity as possible:
"A reward of $50 ts payable for the
delivery at the nearest army camp or
post of a deserter. This reward is
in full satisfaction of all expenses In
curred in said dejivery. A person who
fails to report to his lobal board for
military service at the time specified
in his honor to report is a deserter.
A person who falls to report for mili
tary service to the. adjutant general of
the state by the date specified in the
order of the adjutant general to said
persons is a deserter. It is highly de ■
strahle from every standpoint that an
effort now be made to round up all
persons who are delinquent in repr-t
ing for military service It is thought
that If the fact of reward Is given ths
widest publicity we shall have a great
force of police officers and even of In
dividuals interested in bringing suck
delinquents under military control. If
after such persons are brought to a
military authority It appears to ths
military authority that their delin
quency is not wilful, they will be for
warded to mobilization camp and their
local board will be given credit. If it
appears that the delinquency was wil
ful they will be prosecuted before
courtmartlaj as deserters. In elthei
case the reward is payable.
"CHARLES S. MOODT.
"Adjutant General of Idaho."
A
IR
AI
11
II
Forecast for Boise and vicinity:
FAIR TONIGHT AND SATURDAY.
For Idaho: Tonight and Saturday
fair.
Highest temperature yesterday, 73.
lowest temperature this morning, II,
mean temperuture yesterday, 61.

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