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Evening capital news. (Boise, Idaho) 1901-1927, October 23, 1917, Image 1

Image and text provided by Idaho State Historical Society

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn88056024/1917-10-23/ed-1/seq-1/

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FRENCH TROOPS HIT TERRIFIC BLOW
* • * * * • • • • • « » » « * «
Idaho Fruit Growers Demand Car Service from Oregon Short T.ine
Leader in News
and Advertising
■ ■ -- • - -.=1
EVE]
Ml]
MG<
CAPITAL ]
NEWS
LEASED
WIRE
Vol. XXXIX
BOISE, IDAHO, TUESDAY, OCTOBER 23, 1917.
....... * ..... "——■ ——
No. 96
PLO
r to i
<ILI
LTHI
PRESIDEN1
DISCLO
SED
APPLE MEN
COMPLAIN
ON THE BOX
CAR PLANS
Unit 1 LrlliU
Railroad Demand Puts the
Extra Cost Up to Grow
ers, Which They Declare
Unfair.
Refrigerator Cars in This
Territory Operated Under
Monopoly Arrangement
Hope for Public Utilities
Action.
HELP FROM CITY IN
PICKING APPLE CROP
President Joy of the Boise Com
mercial club said today the club
would go to the limit in aiding
»rowers to harvest the big apple
crop of Boise valley.
IF IT SHALL. BE NECES
SARY." he said, "THE CI.UB
WILL ASK BUSINESS AND
PROFESSIONAL. MEN TO LET
BUSINESS MATTERS GO FOR A
FEW DAYS AND GET OUT INTO
THE ORCHARDS"
Formal action will be taken at
the directors' meeting tomorrow.
Professor Rose, superintendent
of the Boise schools, said s num
ber of school children were now
picking apples and more were
available. "The schools will do
their share," he said.
# There are 3000 cars, estimated, of
apples in the south Idaho district from
Twin Falls to Weiser, most of which j
cannot be shipped for lack of cars.
The Union Pacific, having raised its
embargo on the shipment of fruit in
box cars, makes it possible for the)
crop to bo moved In that manner, plus
what refrigerator cars may be ob- ,
talned, but the'Oregon Short Line re- j
fuees to accept such shipments unless ■
each car shall be supplied with a heat-|
er and ench shipment accompanied by 1
an attendant. I
UP TO ,. THE gr OWER. I
THIS MUST BE DONE AT THE
EXPENSE OF THE FRUIT GROW- j
ER. SAYS THE RAILROAD COM-i
PANY. THE OREGON SHORT LINE
REFUSES TO DO MORE THAN TO I
SUPPLY THE TRANSPORTATION
FOR THE ATTENDANT. AND ONLY
ONE WAY IF THE SHIPMENT IS
CONFINED TO ONE CAR.
IT IS ESTIMATED BY THE EARL
FRUIT COMPANY THAT THIS EX
TRA EXPENSE WILL AMOUNT TO
$75 A CAR.
FEW REFRIGERATORS.
The Pacific Fruit Express has a mon
opoly of the refrigerator ears used on
the Hariiroan system, and its Inca par
lty to supply enough cars to handle the
Idaho apple crop Is declared to be
manifest.
The P. F. E. has about 12,009 refrig
erator cars for Its field—Idhao, Oregon, 8
Washington and Utah. One authority
stated today that he did not believe,
aside from the prune crop shipments,
the P. F. E. had supplied more than
800 cars for the Idaho field
Having a monopoly of the business
here, the P. F. ft. Is preautned to an
tlclpate the needs of the territory and
meet them. That Is the opinion of
fruit growers. I
Because of the existence of that mon
opoly it Is declared to be Impossible
for the Oregon Short Line to Interest!
other refrigerator lines in emergency
cases such asJetlves
_ H , FROM COMMISSION. I
J he J«r.r ar * ho r fl11 thnt
commission w \\\,
the public utilities
take some action to compel the Ore
gon Short Line to fit up cars for fruit
shipments and provide service. In any
event to make such arrangements that
ell the extra expense will not fall on
the growers.
DIVIDEND IN BONDS.
New York, OcL 23.—An extra 1 per
c*nt dividend payable in liberty bonds
FrenchMakeHuge^^l
Dent in Lines of
Germans on Aisne
One of the Most Important Successes of the, Allied Offen
sive Scored by General Petain's Forces—Troops Ad
vance Two Miles Over a Front of Two-thirds of a Mile
and Capture Allemant, Vaudesson and Malmaison
Fort From the Enemy.
fans. «jet. 23.—French troops achieved one of the most Important victories
In rerent months today when they swept forward for nearly two miles over a
front of two-thirds of a mile capturing Allemant, Vaudesson and Malmaison
fort. i
Premier Palnleve announced the drive "as a most Important success." |
Three thousand German prisoners were taken in the drive, he stated, with
twenty cannon. FYench forces now have reached the brick yard at Chavignon, !
overlooking the I.aon plains. j
WAR OFFICE REPORT.
"After several da 3 's bombardment j
we attacked powerful enemy lines be- i
tween Alipmant and Malmaison," the [
war office announced, "and progressed!
satisfactorily on a wide front."
Numberous prisoners have been!
taken the war office said.
"Northwest of Rhelms artillery firing
was active," the statement declared,!
referring to the fighting elsewhere.!
"On the right bank of the Meuse, j
around Hill 344 artillerylng was vio
lent toward th* latter part of the j
night."
The new French assault is the first
drive on the Chemin des Dames sector
that has been made by General Petaln
in more than a month. Allemant is
dicht miles northeast of Soissons and
about, three miles southwest of Aniz.V
le Chateau where the battle line makes
a »harp curve northward around Coney
and up to l>a Fere. Malmaison is sit
uated about two and
the west of Allemant. Both towns are
on the highway to I^aon.
HOSPITALS TO CARE
FOR WOUNDED FROM
THE BATTLE FRONT
......
half miles to '
j
Chicago. Oct. 23.—Reclamation hos- ;
pitals. to be established throughout
country to care for the deeper
wounded from European battlefi
will be permanent institutions.
These "man factories" which not'
only will repair men physically, but will
teach them new industries and oec.u- 1
pations to enable them to make their
j way in the world, will care for those
injured in industrial accidents after j
the war and educate the physically un
fit* '
This was revealed to the United Press
this afternoon by Major E. G. Bracket.
, head of the reclamation work In (he
j surgeon-general's department of the!
■ army. j
Major Bracket said that sites have!
1 already been selected for these hos-|
I pitals In New York. Boston and Wash-(four
lngton and that contracts for their
construction will he awarded imme-}
j diately. Later, similar hospitals will
be established in Chicago and other
parts of the country, he said. |
I *-—
week *
North sea fight would bo held as »non as survivors of the British destroyers
Mary Rose and Strongbow were able to attend. He promised a fuller state
LAST MINUTE NEWS
COURTMARTIAL INQUIRY INTO NORTH SEA BATTLE.
London. Oct. 23.—Sir Krlo Geddes, first lord of the admiralty, announced
In the house of commons today that a courtmartial Inquiry into the recent
ment of the naval action, in which the British lost the two destroyers, next
TOLL OF LAST AIR RAID OVER ENGLAND.
1-ondon, Oct. 28.—Last Friday's Zeppelin raid over southeast and east Brit
'* h counties, including the London area, cost the lives of 34 persons and in
8 ur «<* 68 in a11 . according to a formal statement late today.
POTATOE8 FREEZING FOR LACK OF FREIGHT CARS.
St. Paul, Minn., Oct. 23.-—Coldest weather of the season struck the north
west today with temperatures as low as eight above. Snow fell In many sec
tions all night. Duluth reported 16 degrees today and Moorhead, Minn., eight
degrees. Potatoes and vegetables are freezing In large quantities because of
l° ck °f freight curs. Thousands of bushels of spuds are stacked at country
"kipping points without adequate protection from cpld. Coal dealers are hav
ln * difficulty In filling orders for coal.
i
BRITISH SEAPLANES KEEP UP THEIR RAIDS,
Ixindon. Oct. 23.—British seaplanes kept up their aerial offensive during
the 1«** fc w days, the admiralty announced today. On Sunday they bombed
the Melle railway sidings ..ear Ghent and at night dropped bombs on ob
around the 8t. Dennis western aerodrome. On Monday afternoon
raid was attempted on Zeebrugge mole but owing to the thick clouds the mole
w r TT* th : 1 p ! an ' !S ,hm "» attention to two small ves-!
alondslde it, which were hit by bombs. Other bombs burst close to the
1
German seaplane base and the mole. All British planes returned safely.
MERCANTILE CRUI8ER AND DE8TROYER 8UNK.
London, Oct. 23. Sinking of the mercantile cruiser Orama by a torpedo
on Friday without casualties and of the sinking of a destroyer by a collision,
were announced by the admiralty today.
' _ "J U ? P , H T,* UE# , NEW YORK WOBLD FOR LIBEL.
Tork ' ° ct - -*•— ch »Tles F. Murphy of Tammany Hall, sued the New
Tork Evening World for alleged libel tnrfnv rpv» .
j
i
[
j
j
ASSASSINATION OF
PRESIDENTWILSON
PLANNED IN SOUTH
PR£S/D£NTlV/tSON ;
Eight Men Under Arrest for
Conspiracy to Take Life
of Nation's Chief on
Thanksgiving Day.
MEMPHIS, TENN., OCT. 28.—
EIGHT MEN ARE UNDER ARREST
HERE ON A CHARGE OF CONSPIR
ING TO KILL PRESIDENT WILSON
ON THANKSGIVING DA V.
THE PLOT, WHICH IS SAID TO
HAVE BEEN WORKED OUT IN A
SMALI, TOWN NEAR HERE. WAS
' UNEARTHED BY SECRET SERVICE j
AGENTS. FEDERAL OFFICIALS
REFUSE TO GIVE THE NAMES OF j
THE MEN INVOLVED.
METHOD NOT ANNOUNCED. |
DETECTÏVE8 SAY THAT THREE
OF THE MEN PLANNED TO GO TO j
WASHINGTON AND GAIN AN AU
j DIENTE, THROUGH POLITICAL IN
; FLUENCE,
RESTED NEAR NASHVILLE AND
ONE WAS ARRESTED IN
1 COUNTY. THE OTHERS
ARRESTED HERE.
FOUR OF TIIE MEN HAVE BEEN
j ROUND OVER TO AWAIT THE AC
l-TION OF THE GRAND JURY.
' ---------------
WORK RESUMED IN
PORTLAND YARDS
Portland, Ore.. Oct. 23._Portland
j shipyards, employing approximately
70 OO men, resumed work today after
a complete tie-up, due to a strike, for
weeks.
Work was resumed under a tempo
rary agreement drafted by the federal
shipyard labor adjustment board and
formally adopted by the »unions yes
| terdav.
*-—
SCOTT j
W ËR,E J
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j
Counter Attacks by the Ger
mans the First That Have
Been Made in the Last
Two British Drives.
; "t®rs" n E^
of Wedge Is Widened by
Local Attacks by the Brit
ish Forces.
London, Oct. 23.—German troopa
made a successful counter blow
against one. new British post in the
southern portion of Houthoulst wood,
forcing the British to fall back a short
distance, Field Marshal Haig reported
today.
The German assault came parly last
night, the British commander in chief
reported.
This counter blow is the first which
j lhe enem >' ha » made in the last two
Br «tl» h drives.
j COMBINED OFFENSIVE.
Another combined general offensive
| bluw b >' British and FYench troopa be
!' 0, ' d wl ' at u8 '' tl to be the ' r I ,rea **e
j
>ond what us<
forecast in descriptive dis
patches from the British front today,
yesterday's "local attacks" by the
allies were held to be the first of two
r.erted
I
j
I
]
j
1
j
The point of tho British wedge now
j rests near Passchendaele on the ridge.
J Yesterday'H "local attacks" were de
signed to widen the angle of this point
to the north. Next, London expects
Haig to achieve the same widening by
local attacks on the south. Then will
come the general assault.
THE DRIVE SLOWED UP.
'Plie first German counter attack
which was successful enough to slow
up the British advance, was reported
from across 'he Ypres-Staden rail
way. In Haig » two previous drives
the Germans either did not risk a
counter blow or else delivered it with
such feeble strength that it failed com
pletely to reach British positions.
With the British Armies in France,
Oct. 23.—The British retirement south
of Houthulst forest at 8 o'clock last
night before the German counter at
tack In no wise lessened the value of
yesterday's advance.
Examination of prisoners today re
vealed the fact that Crown Prince
Ruppiecht had ordered his picked men
to hold the blockhouse, redoubts, for
thu*terrû^ „ a " d , plllboxe * throughout
"1 a. ^ CO ' ,, • Hurther -
son * '; Ut . th ? "
positions were lost, specially trained
unit" should retake them Immediately
—r< gardless of sacrifice of men.
The British and French fought for
ward stubbornly, and held all tholr
gains save in the one Instance.
An unusually large number of Ger
man dead littered the muddy battle
field today or formed grim and ghast
ly mounds In Hie interior of the pill
boxes.
Considering the limited size of the
operations. Hie number of prisoners
ahd guns taken, is considered most Im
portant.
on the ration basis here" today'
a'meeting of the r.
and city officials 111 the federal fold
administration offices, resolution, were
SUGAR IN NEW YORK
ON A RATION BASIS
York. Oct. 28.—Sugar was placed
ere todHy. At a
meeting of the refiners, retail dealers
adopted limiting the amount of sugar
which can be purchased by dealers. A
price of 10 cents a pound was agreed
upon.
The retail dealer, after receiving his
share of,the limited supply which" will
be sold to him each week from now till
Jan. 1, will then divide It among his
customers. He Is prohibited from sell
ing any large quantities to any pur
chaser.
A committee to have charge of the
distribution wag appointed.
TO BUY LIBERTY BONDS FOR
THEIR 1917 CHRISTMAS GIFTS
MONEYWASTED FOR GIFTS OF SMALL VALUE
By WILLIAM GIBBS M'ADOO, Secretary of the Treasury.
There could be no more appropriate Christmas gift In 1917 than a United
States liberty bond.
Let every patriotic American this year determine'not to waste money on
Christmas gifts of no value, gifts that would merely Indulge appetite or vanity.
I Let every patriotic American substitute for such gifts the one present
j which would be of genuine value to the recipient and at the same time help
I to win this great war for freedom against despotism, namely, a bond of the
United States government.
] Every American who contemplates making a Christmas gift of Jewelry or
other expensive things should Immediately decide to give a liberty bond In
HtCüfi.
I... a west hearts, children would rather have a liberty bond than any
thing else thnt could be offered to them.
j Every liberty bond an American eitlzen buys will arm and equip our gal
1 ,anl soldiers ajid sailors, will help to moke them Invincible In the fight. The
j more Invincible we make them, the more quickly the war will be ended.
By the destruction of the kaiser's brutalized rule of the bayonet the more
quickly peace on earth, good will toward men will be restored.
Christmas day, 1917, should be a time of re-dedlcntion and re-consecration
to the cause of freedom and humanity throughout the world to the Ideals for
which Christ suffered crucifixion on the cross. We must be prepared to make
indefinite sacrifices to secure this glorious result.
The least we can do is to give up something of our pleasure, something of
our comfort, something of our convenience, something of our needs and to
employ all the savings we may thereby efTect to strengthen the hands of our
government and to support our gallunt men on the battlefields.
UNITES CHRISTMAS SPIRIT AND PATRIOTISM
By SAMUEL GOMPERS, President of the American Federation of Labor.
Liberty bond for Christmas presents Is a splendid idea. It combines the
spirit of Christmas and the spirit of American patriotism as nothing else could,
in my estimation there could be no more fitting gift between friends and
families this year.
It is not only a present from the giver to the recipient, but is also an ur
gently needed loan to the government and an earnest of one's faith and Interest
In the fighting success of every American hoy In this war. Nor do Its ad
vantages end ther«.
A liberty bond given this Christmas it many Christmas presents In one
for it. will multiply itself into other cash Christmas presents for many Christ
mases to come.
This plan will also keep many, many of our badly needed American dollars
from disappearing in the form of useless fripperies. It is as genuinely con
f*od a iupply °" r na,lonnl W,,a " h 8 " kitchen economy Is conservation of our
I cannot too strongly Indorse liberty bonds for Christmas presents
Buy at least one NOW. *
BULGARIA TRYING
TO SECURE PEACE
AND SAVE NATION
Balkan Country Sees Hand
writing on the Wall,
Hence the Soundings by
Her Minister.
Washington, Oct. 23.—Bulgaria is
frightened at the bandwriting she sees
on the wall and hence is conducting
a separate peace propaganda through
.her envoy here, according to Greek
Minister Rossob Georges today.
In an interview with the United
PreHB. he expressed the opinion that
Bulgaria is already making plans for
eventualities that will come with a
crushing German defeat. George*
openly charged that the Bulgarian en
voy in Washington, at the instigation
of his government, is trying to influ
ence peace opinion in the United States
though the Bulgnr claims to have no
communication with his government.
BLOW EXPECTED IN APRIL.
The Greek stated that the "answer"
to Bulgarian peace talk will come In
due time, while confidential advices
indicate that the allied armies around
Saloniki will probably be ready for a
blow' against the Austro-German -
Bulgnrian forces some time in April.
The allied conference in Paris will
settle the question of the date when
the advance against Bulgaria shall oc
cur. Meantime French officers are re
organizing the Greek army and are
paving the way for a smash which
shall cut the Berlin-Constantinople
railroad. Such a maneuver would cut
Turkey from Mitteleuropa— ^the kai
ser's not-to-be empire.
ALLIE8 DI8PLEA8ED.
The Greek minister said Bulgaria en
tered the war in sympathy with the
German idea of world conquest and
because of a heavy German loan.
Allied diplomats are frankly dis
pleased ot the Bulgaria peace propa
ganda and still wonder why the state
department permits him \o remain,
here. Government officials explain,
however, thnt he will be useful ns a
means of communication when peace
talk becomes a reality.
BRITISH TANK ON
PARADE IN NEW YORK
New York, Oct. 23.—A British tank
—one of the monsters that smashed
through the German lines on the west
ern front—Is in New' York today. The
fighting engine will parade the streets
to Central Park where it will be sta
tioned before the captured German
submarine now there and become a ral
lying place for liberty loan mass meet
ings.
RUSSIANS DRIVE BACK
GERMANS FROM THEIR
FIRST LINE TRENCHES
Petrograd, Oct. 23.—Suddenly
assuming the offensive. Russian
troops on the Riga front swept
forward over enemy front line
trenrhea In the sectors of Bkull,
Hlnzenbcrg Manor, Althaxar
Minor and Lemberg castle, all of
which places were orcupied, to
day s official statement asserted.
The enemy evacuated Hlnzenberg
after the engagement.
On the Werder sector, Russian
forces repelled an enemy attempt
to land forces near Motsekull
Manor, eight miles north of Wer
der.
YOUNG PHYSICIANS
WHO FAIL TO ENLIST
CALLED SLACKERS
Chicago. Oct. 23.—Young physicians,
who remain at home and make no ef- :
fort to enlist in the war will bo 1
branded as "slackers."
The state committee of the national!
council of defense medical section, de
vised a plan to this end today.
Congress will be petitioned to ree
ngnlze and create an insignia for the
senior officers' reserve corps. The
corps Is composed of physicians and!
medical men over 5S years old.
The state committees today took up|
moans for securing more physicians
for the medical reserve corps, and lo
require the 6000 doctors throughout the
United States who have made no move
to accept the commissions proffered
them to act.
MEXICAN GENERALS
ORDERED DEPORTED
Laredo, Tex., Oct. 23.—Eighteen ex- 1
generals of the Mexican army under
Huerta und Diaz, yrdered deported from
Mexico on grounds of being trouble
some citizens, arrived nt Neuvo Laredo
today. They are held on the Mexican!
side because United States Immigra- j
lion authorities will not allow them
to cross the border without permission!
from Washington.
Included among the ex-generals are
Iturblda. Garcia. Cuellar, Jesus Aguilar,
and Navarro. Some of them are quite
wealthy.
ARMY OFFICERS SUBSCRIBE.
Gettysburg, Pa.. Oct. 23—Twelve
thousand regular army officers and
men camped here today subscribed for
1425,000 worth of bonds in the second
liberty loan.
:
1
j
Suggestion by Secretary of
the Treasury Meets a
Hearty Response In All
Parts of the Country.
With Only Five Days Re
maining to Complete Sub
scriptions Nearly Three
Billion Dollars Must Be
Raised.
Washington, Oct. 2*.—'For the final
spurt in the five billion dollar cam
paign. the treasury department today
urged all patriotic Americana to buy
liberty bonds for Christmas presents.
And to buy them NOW for only fly»
days remain.
"Do your Christmas shopping early
by buying bonds," la the latest official
slogan.
In the few remaining days the coun
try must raise about 32,750,000,009 more
to make the second liberty loan a suc
cess.
HEARTILY INDOR8ED.
Secretary McAdoo, Samuel Gompers,
labor leader, and other high officials,
today heartily Indorsed the liberty
bond for Christmas presents move
ment.
They will never wear out, nor
change in style and no one ever will
grow tired of them," said Captain
Oscar Price, national, director of pub
licity In the loan campaign.
Members of the national society for
the prevention of useless giving are
enthusiastically supporting the new
movement.
80LVE8 SHOPPING PROBLEM.
"This bond giving plan also solves
all problems of Christmas shopping—
from wondering when on earth, where
you will finish—to where there la an
other piece of wrapping paper. Buy
ing a bond is as simple nowadays as
buying a newspaper," said Prie«,
"Finally you will not help your gov
ernment much by showering necklaces,
hobbyhorses and limoualnaa «g you*
friends."
Financial, experts explained today
that It Is perfectly feasible for a per
son to buy a bond os a gift If tt 1«
registered It should be made out In the
receiver's name The coupon bond tu 8 »
be delivered like so much aash.
LIBERTY BONDS AS
BONUSES THIS YEAR
Naw York, OcL 2k—New Tork fin
anciers swung In line today with the
liberty bond Christmas, suggested by
Secretary of the Treasury McAdoo
through tbs United Press today,
Bnipluyes of many large bonking *»»
brokerage houses on Wall etreet will
receive liberty bonds Instead of cash
bonuses for Christmas. The old cus
tom of giving gold coins will be din
carded for the new plan.
Henry Clews, head of on« «f fit«
oldest brokerage houses on the attest,
sold:
''Who could want a better Christman
gilt? I would not employ n man who
would object to such a bonus.
"The [ion Is an excellent one. Bonds
given now to children will ds se.ltng
above par before they appreciate the
value of the gift."
Guy Emerson, vice president of the
National Bank of Commerce, said:
"Do your Christmas shopping this
week. With the seriousness of the bus
iness of war facing us, the American
people must make some sacrifices. This
is one of the least they can make. To
give up some of the pleasures of a
Christinas and lend their money to the
government. ,
"Buy your boy a bond Instead of m
sled."
"Every citizen should give Uncle
Ssm a Christmas present this year,"
snld Benjamin Strong, governor of the
Second District Federal Reserve bank.
"Uncle Sam seldom asks for a share
In the giving at Christmas but he has
(Continued on page Two.)
life nun
©MrapicaiassB;.
? ?
■ ■ ii»n
Forecast for Boise and vlcinlt
FAIR TONIGHT AND WEDNESDA
For Idaho: Tonight and Wednesdi
fair.
Highest temperature yesterday, 1
lowest temperature this morning. ]
mean temperutvre yesterday, it

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