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Evening capital news. (Boise, Idaho) 1901-1927, January 17, 1919, Image 1

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WEATHER
SATURDAY.
EVENING CAPITAL NEWS
ALL THE NEWS
FIRST
VOL. XLI.
BOISE, IDAHO, FRIDAY, JAN. 17, 1919
No. 183.
BORAH INSISTS
PEACE PARLEY
BE KEPT OPEN
ELSE USELESS
Idaho Solon With Senator
Lewis Denounces Effort to
Keep Versailles Conclave
Activities From Public.
SAYS SENATE SHOULD
BACK WILSON DEMAND
Fears Abolition of War Impos
sible Unless Treaties Con
summated Via Old World
Means of Secret Diplomacy.
Washington. Jan. 17—The sen
ate today assured President Wil
son of its emphatic support in his
fight against secrecy in the peace
conference. Republicans and Dem
ocrats alike, spoke in unmea
sured condemnation of any at
tempt to "bottle up'' the peace
news, or keep the American peo
ple in ignorance of the steps taken
toward a lasting perce.
Senators Borah and Johnson,
California, Republicans, and Bow is
and Williams, Democrats, united
in declaring:
That secret diplomacy now will
defeat the end for which the war
was fought and the peace con
ference called—a lasting peace.
That no European or set of
Europeans must be allowed to
prevent President Wilson from
keeping his promise of lull pub
licity to the American people.
That former close associations
with the allies must not he per
mitted to close the mouth of the
American people and no delicate
considerations for the feelings of
allowed to shield
trying to impose
others
must
be ;
those
who ;
ire t
on th«
confe
rene<
That
th« (
»ffori
preside
tit on
the
points
is a
fore
mit y t
■xisting ah
his other pei
ice i
That
the (
lema
shows
that
at
of the on
to some of
un siatr . 1
as ever.
i'ii
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in addition, Johnson demanded that
p definite American i> >lh y b. formu
lated to brine : bout us i . d 1 1 «. is
pt - -iblo -• pa rat ion of \i u-r < m f • m
E h opi.an affail s.
Washington, Jan 17 Socrory in the
pence confM' Ui .- means .mother world
var. Senator Lewis. Illinois, Demo
cratic whip, today declared in the
senate. Lewis echoed criticism of the
reported "bottling lip of the peace
conference." voiced by Senator Borah,
Idaho, who declared with lewis, that
continuation of secret diplomacy
means that the dream of world peace
will not come true.
After reading dispatches from Paris
♦.riling of the appar* n; derision to
Close the conference to newspaper cor
respondents, Bore ii said he had been
Informed the subj*. t had been re
opened with sonn i• : • ; « *<'t of a modi
fication of the se. recy order.
SHOULD SUPPORT WILSON.
"For this reason," said Borah, "the
Renate should go on r* cord as support
ing emphatically the view of the Am
erican delegation on open sessions.
' There can be no doubt from Presi
dent Wilson's langue g* on January S
that the first «»I his 11 peace terms
meant np''i. se ssions ol tin- e* a«-«- eon
press. lie was careful to say that
peace treaties should not only
open but that they should be openly
arrived at.
Secret diplomat y has left a trail
(Continued on Page Two.)
French Press Says Wilson's
Plan for Full Representation
Biggest Triumph to Date.
By ROBERT J BENDER.
Paris, Jan. 17. On the eve of the
formal opening of the full peace con
gress, it maj be stated authoritatively
that today President Wilson Is folding!
more optimistic regarding the general:
situation than at any time since his
nrrival in Europe. When preliminary j
conferences were resumed today it was |
expected the delegates would take
prompt action on publicity demands'
P rmulated by the committee of news-j
paper correspondents. j
The president is known to he strong-|
1y appreciative of the support of both:
American and foreign correspondents
of his ideas of "open covenants of j
peace, openly arrived at," and he be- j
Sieves the desired publicity will bel
ac hieved.
That press delegations of all coun
tries will attend tomorrow's formal
opening, when President Poincare will
make a welcoming address an«l other
Raders will reply, already has been
practically settled.
Fear 500 Die
In Sinking of
French Liner
Palermo, Jan. là (Delayed)
Five hundred passengers were
missing today from the French
steamer Xhsproi, (Chaproi),
which struck a mine in Messina
strait and sank in four minutes.
'Flic steam* a vessel ot 4600
tons, had 67.0 , ssengers aboard.
The British o .liter Cageston
saved 150. The ; mainder are be
lieved to haw perished. The
Xhaproi sailed lr-an Marseilles.
Neither Chaproi or the Lägest on
are registered in Lloyds. It is
possible the names were garbled
in cable transmission.
Messina strait separates Sicily
from Italy. It D a narrow, deep
waterway with a strong tidal cur
rent which Is very dangerous to
shipping. The mythical monsters,
Scylla and Charydba, were situ
ated on this strait. Scylla, a
rock, was located < n the Ltalian
side and Charybda, a. whirl pool,
was on the Sicilian side.
RED CHIEFTAIN
SHOT DEAD IN
ESCAPE FROM
EBERT GUARDS
Liebknecht Stabbed Captor.
Then Fled Only to Be Killed;
Rosa Lux mburg Met Death
at Hands of Mob.
By FR ANK J. TA Y LOR.
Berlin. Jan. 16. Karl Liebknecht, the
most dramatic figure in Germany, was
shot dead while trying to escape from
a heavy escort of government troops,
it was learned today. At the same
time his chief lieutenant. Rosa Luxem
burg. was lynched by a mob.
The Spartacan leader, who fell just
short of overthrowing the n* w German
government by a country-wide revolu
tion, was trapped in his home and
taken prisoner with his wife and sons.
The latter were taken to a jail. Lieb«
Knecht himself was being escorted to
military headquarters. The automo
bile in which lie was riding broke
down. The party proceeded on foot.
Liebknecht suddenly drew a kino,
stabbed one of the guards and fled.
ANARCHIST FALLS DEAD.
The guards flung their lifles to their
shoulders and fired, Liebknecht « « il
dead, riddled with bullets.
While Liebknecht was being hunted
down, Rosa Luxemburg met d< tli at
tin- hands of a mob. The details of
her death could not be d* finitely
Darned as this was written, but it is
known she was beaten into insensibil
ity by a maddened crowd and then
thrown into the Landwehr «-anal. The
government issued an official state
ment today, announcing that the "mur
derers" of Liebknecht and Rosa Lux
emburg "will be severely punished.'*
If. is known that several prisons have
been arrested in this connection.
$12,000,000,000 ASKED
OF BC - HE BY FOCH FOR
BELGIUM RESTORATION
Other Damages of $4,000.000,000—Allies
Demand Possession of Railways
and Forests.
Amsterdam, Jan. 17.—Mathias
Lrxberger. chairman **f tie Ger
man armistice committee, has in
formed his government that Mar
shal Foch estimated the restora
tion of Belgium would cost Ger
many ? 1 2,000,000, 000 , and that oth
er damages would amount to $4,
OOÖ.idiO.oOO, it w; - Pained today.
The allies are also said to have
demanded possession of German
railways and forests as security.
Krzbergcr is reported to have de
clared it was impossible to accept
those "severe < conomic conditions"
on account ol the uns* tiled politi
cal situation.
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SEATTLE POLICE ROUT
I. W. W. DEMONSTRATORS
Sf-atllc
dr ù
lfu v i<• i nit
r , ( 0 j ^
} K) , ir < , n(
j Wr j f s
The I. w. w. had marched in the
direction of the polie, station from an
open air labor protest meetirg. whi t .
«.uganized labor loaders denounced the
police department for its action i i
breaking up last Sunday's meeting.
--- — -
Jan.
<f th* pi.lie«
last night i
Armed with
. emergency
streets in
station of
half an
minor in
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;
,
(
ALBERS MUST FACE TRIAL.
Portland, Ore., Jan. 17 -Henry Al
bers, millionaire miller, must stand
trial on a charge of violation of the
espionage act.
It was announced today that he will
appear in federal court next Wednes
day. Albers' attorneys argued a de
murrer yesterday afternoon.
CENSOR'S BAN
OVER PARLEYS
BECOMES THE
LEADING ISSUE
Other Problems Subordinated
to Reaching Amicable Solu
tion of Manner to Tell World
of Conclave's Actions.
WILSON HELPS SCRIBES
IN FIGHT FOR PUBLICITY
British Labor Leader Outlines'
Labor's Program: Says War
Between England and An
archy to Be Decided at Berne
Paris, Jan. 17.—Twenty-five
countries will be represented at
the formal opening of the peace
congress tomorrow, it was official
ly announced today.
In addition to the 21 states which
participated in the war, there will
be Peru, Ecuador, Uruguay and
Bolivia, which severad diplomatic
relations.
By FRED S. FERGUS ON.
Paris, Jan. 17- The question of rep
res. ntation for the people themselves,
through the newspaper correspon
dents, today took precedence over
every other problem before the peace
conferences.
Importance, of this matter was evi
denced by the fact that the league of
nations, the Russian situation and
other vital subjects had been subor
dinated to arriving at an amieâ*ble
solution of the manner in which the
proceedings at the peace table are to
be made public.
WILSON AIDS SCRIBES.
President Wilson is understood to
be h iding the fight for one of his
principle points- "open covenants of
peace, openly arrived at." He brought
up the question of publicity during
both yesterday's and Wednesday's
conferences.
There was every indication today
that a satisfactory agreement will
soon be reached between the eoires
pendents and the peace delegates. A
program containing the newspaper
men's demand- regarding publicity
will be submitted by a committee
comp. * d of three representatives
each of the A mermen, British, French
land Italian correspondents and tow
representatives qf the other sections
of the allied press.
BRITISH LABOR'S AIMS.
r. I.< iWKI.I, MKI.I.IOTT.
IL i is, Jan. 16 The \var between
lGn.it Britain and anarchy and ter
rorisrn w ill b* decided at the interna
tional labor and Socialist conference
at Berne, declared Arthur Henderson,
British labor leader, in an interview
with the United Press.
Henderson explained this was the
reason the government had tactfully
supported the proposal of British ba
lm that German and Russian dele
gates be admitted to the congress
The last hope in democracies is at
kc." he : aid. The ls-su3 is democ
y vs. terrorism. Between the two,
western world * in not long de
it:
CIV1LIZATION. CHAOS.
"Wo arc prepared to stand between
civilization and chaos. Now that the
govenments are beginning to realize
that fact, there is little liklihood of
them over reverting to the id. a that
we (labor men» are to be feared.
Henderson said the allied laborites
mid Soeililita have drawn up a pro
gram for their principles, the reforms
(Continued on Page Two.)
25,500 Seattle Shipyard Work
ers to Walk Out Tuesday ii
Demands Are Denied.
P* attic. Wash., Jan. 17.—The Metal
Trades council, representing 22 ship
yard unions, today served strike notice
n Seattle shipyard owners.
The strike, affecting 25,500 men, takes
(place at 10 o'clock Tuesday morning
and may in« hide the entire northwest
shipbuilding industry, according to
(union leaders.
The Metal Trades council ordered the
'walkout following a report by a special
committee last night of refusal of ship
yard heads to accede, .to demands for
wage increases to $8 a day for mechan
ics, $7 for specialists and Jfi for unskill
ed workers.
THE WEATHER
Forecast for Boise and vicinity—
RAIN TONIGHT AND SATURDAY.
For Idaho- Tonight and Saturday,
rain.
Highest temperature yesterday . .. .47 j
Lowest temperature this morning ..44!
Mean temperature yesterday ......45
Total precipitation for the 24 hours!
ending at 6 a. m. today, .11.
Direct Poland's Fight for Freedom
r'
Kb
Ignace Paderewski, Polish, president,
in center, with Major Joseph F. Kaslowski, at left, and Capt. J. Marten, at
Ignace Paderewski, famous the |
world over as a musician, is now
playing an important part in the
destiny of Poland. He recently j
47 AYES, ONE NAY TO
New Jersey Only Conceded to
Refuse Prohi Amendment;
Ridicule Wets' Technical
Fight on the Measure.
Madison, Wis., Jan. 17 - Tho
Wisconsin legislature today com
pleted Its ratification of the na
tional dry amendment when the
house voted. .*»8 to 39, in favor. The
senate ratified two days ago.
St. Paul, Minn., Jan. 17. The
Minnesota legislature today com
pleted ratification of the national
prohibition amendment -the forti
eth state to do so. The senate
passed the amendment yesterday.
The house concurred today, 92 to
,
-Thirty-eight
national pro
36.
Washington, Jan. Fi
states having ratified tl
hi bit ion amendment, (fry leaders
today were hopeful that the final vote
would stand 47 for and 1 against.
Two dry states are yet to vote and
eight wets. Seven « » f the latter, the
drys believe, will act. favorably. New
Jersey is the only state that the drys
concede.
To those who see patients dying
from lack of whisk« y ns a stimulant,
A Dinwiddle .the anti-saloon leader,
explained that the prohibition amend
ment just ratified does not Interfere
with manufacture and distribution of
liquor for legitimate scientific, phar
maceutical and sacramental purposes.
To congress goes the task of decid
ing just how sick America must be
under the amended constitution to
get such stimulation.
Prys here refuse to take seriously
the wets' technical fight on the amend
ment. They insist that the liquor in
terests haven't a leg to stand on. and
won't get very far in the courts after
the nation has expressed itself for pro- j
hibition. It was also pointed out that
the supreme court is not in the habit j
of passing on the constitutionality of i
a constitutional amendment.
Under the eighteenth amendment!
congress will l*«- a slid by the drys ;
t enact laws making prohibition ef- ;
feet ive along these line-*'
1 The appointment of a federal law j
(Continued from Page Two.)
MONTENEGRINS AND
SERBS CLASH; MANY
DIE ON BOTH SIDES
Battle Result of Alleged Attempt By
Serbs to Forcible Abolish Monte
negrin Sovereignty.
Paris, Jan. 17 Bloody fighting
with heavy losses on both sides
has resulted from an allege«! at
tempt by Serbians to forcibly
abolish Montenegrin sovereignty,
according to official dispatches
received here today by Monte
negrin representatives.
Twenty thousand Montenegrins
are said to have participated in an
uprising against the Serbs.
The report that King Nicholas
is opposed to inclusion of Monte
negro in the proposed Jugo-Slav
state is untrue, notwithstanding
Serbia's protestations to the con
trary. Montenegrins declared the
king demands that a constituent
assembly shall decide the sovere
ignty of the new state rather than
having it automatically come un
der Serbian dynasty. The upris
ing is cited as proof that the ma
jority o' the people stand by the
king.
right, aides.
became president of his native
land when it declared its inde
pendence. Poland is warring
against Germany, anything that
ARMISTICE EXTENDED
ONE MONTH; SEVERAL
MORE CLAUSES ADDED!
Germans Agree to Edicts Concerning
War Prisoners and Return of
Stolen Property.
Paris, Jan. 17.—The armistice,
with several important clauses add
ed. has been extended for a month,
it was officially announced today.
"Following the conference at
Treves between Marshal Foch and
the German delegates, the armistice
conventions were prolonged for a
month," the statement said.
"Clauses concerning agricultural
material, Russian war prisoners,
naval conditions and the. recupera
tion of material taken from the in
•aded districts were signed."
LIBOR STRIKE JULY 4
I
Also Provides for Delegation of
Five to Present the Mooney
Case in Washington; Other
Action Is Planned.
Chicago, Jan. 17—July fourth,
1919, was set today by the labor
Mooney congress here as the date
for a nation-wide strike of every
branch of organized labor as a
protest against the imprisonment
of Thomas J. Mooney.
Resolutions setting date for the
strike and providing for a com
mission of five labor delegates to
go to Washington to solicit federal
were passed overwhelmingly.
Resolutions introduced today in
cluded :
Recommendation of five-year gov
ernment control of railroads.
Reorganization of the American Fed
eration of Labor on an industrial basis
and to Oppose capitalism. j
Recalling of Samuel Oompers as ,
president of the federation, and pro
posing Mooney as a candidate for hi«:
position.
j
Recommendation to President Wilson
for the removal of Postmaster General
Burleson.
Fhieago, Jan. 17 —A. resolution pro
viding for a general strige July 4,
ami a delegation of five to go to
Washington t<* present the Mooney
esse to the ofiiee of the atorney gen
eral and to friends of labor in con
gres«, was offered by a committee at
the Mooney defense congress here to
ii? y.
The
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resolution
taken regarding
congress opened,
nounced purpose
to discuss means <
was the first action
Mooney since the
although the an
of thp meeting was
<f freeing him. Radi
cals. in control of the meeting up to
today, had consumed practically all
tlie time on other questions.
VOTE LATER TODAY.
Tie report of the resolutions com
mittee declared the move proposed
was the result of 25 motions referred
t.. the committee for recommendation.
A vote was to be taken later today.
Besides the strike and Washington
trip, other provisions were:
Request habeas corpus proceedings
to remove the case from California
jurisdiction.
Visit to American Federation of
Labor convention to ask co-operation.
Ways and means to assist the In
ternational Workers' De/cnse leag ae
of California.
Amendments to Fi'iforr.ia constitu
tion enabling further legal moves to
free Mooney.
Strike referendum vote not later
than June 1.
Broad publicity.
speaks of Germany and against
the Bolshevik!. Recent dispatches
stated that Paderews i already
has dodged Bolshevik! bullets.
Sentences From One to Ten
Years Given 43 I. W. W.s by
California Court; Woman
Accused Not Sentenced.
.Sacramento, Cal., Jan. 17.—Sentences
ranging from one year in the Sacra
mento county jail to 10 years in Leav
enworth penitentiary were imposed on
tie 4" "silent defendants." convicted 1.
I W, W. conspirators, by Federal Judge
Rudkin today.
Miss Theodora Pollok of Oakland,
the only woman defendant, and the
two men who with her offered defense,
wer« not sentenced today.
"The Heaviest sentences," said Judge
Rudkin, "will be given to those who
have destroyed property."
T«n year sentences were gi
the following: Mortimer Downing
I
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HammPr , p<?te
'Sprague, Elmer Andcrsor
bio, Robert Oonneiia. i
Frederick Esmond, Fhris Luber, Rhil
McLaughlin. John Grave, J. Mori.
Jnmes Quinlan, Edward Quigley,
(»eoi - O ( oniiell, Roy C onnors, Henry
Bernardi. Ilirani j
, Caesar Ha - J
rank Elliott.
Harry Gray, Herbert Stredwiek, John
Hotthalt, Gabo Brewer, Godfrey Ebel,
William Hood, Vincent Santelli, George
Voetter.
Th* prisoners sentenced to the coun
ty jail without exception voiced pro
test. Three declared they had tuber
culosis and asked for a change, while
another declared that he would rather
go to Leavenworth for two years than
be kept in the jail here one year.
New ^ ork, Jan. 1. Police today were
|searching for a maniac believed
j sponsible for murders of four people
, , vIthin thp , ast 10 days . following brutal
!assassination of 17-year-old Klizabeth !
piddle. The girl's bead was crushed j
before she wits dragged from a sidewalk !
j GOTHAM POLICE SEEK
MANIAC SLAYER OF 4:
YOUNG GIRL IS VICTIM
near her home and robbed,
j The latest crime bears strong resem
Mance to the murder of Mrs. Heltna
! Southland, who was slain recently while
j crossing a vacant lot. Two women In
j New Jersey were killed under similar
circumstances. Police indicated they
I believed they have to deal with a crim
jinai of "Jack the Ripper" type.
ARMY TRUCK PLUNGES IN
CREEK; ONE DEAD. 4 HURT
Winchester, Va.. Jan. 17 -One sol
dier was dead today, and four others >
were in Memorial hospital here. I
seriously injured in an accident at |
Fisher's mill yesterday when an army
truck crashed through the bridge
over Tumbling Run, and plunged 50
feet into the water. Private George
Shawhold of Minen gulls, was killed.
Among the injured was:
Samuel Platt, of San Francisco.
ZONE RULES ON COAL TO
BE SUSPENDED ON FEB. 1
Washington, Jan. 17.—Zone regula
tions on coke and all coal except Penn
sylvania anthracite will be suspended
February J. the fuel administration an
nounced toda>.
Likewise all price regulations. In
cluding agents* 'commissions ami
wholesale and retail margins on coke
and all coal except Pennsylvania an
thracite, will be suspended
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GERMAN REDS'
LEADER KILLED,
SAYS OFFICIAL
BERLIN REPORT
Karl Liebknecht Shot by Escort
in Effort to Escape; Rosa
Luxemburg Beaten by Mob
and Drowned.
SPARTACAN REBELLION
TAKES LEASE ON LIFE
Revised on Large Scale in
Boche Capital and Several
Provinces Following Death
of Radical Chieftains.
London, Jan. 17.— Karl Lieb
knecht and Rosa Luxemburg have
been killed, an official dispatch
from Berlin announced today.
The dispatch added that the per
sons who committed the murders
will be severely punished. Several
arrests have been made.
WOMAN MOB'S PREY.
Basle, Jan. 17. -The Frankfurter Zei
tung officially confirm? the death of
Karl Liebknecht and Rosa Luxemburg.
The former was shot by his escort
while frying to escape as he. was being
taken from his homo to military head
quarters. The woman was beaten into
insensibility by a mob and then
drowned in the Landwehr canal.
RED REVOLT DEVIVED.
Zurich, Jan. 17. The Spartacan rev
olution has been revived on a large
scale in Berlin and several of the prov
inces, following tb death of Karl
Liebknecht and Rosa Luxemburg, it
was reported in a dispatch received
here today.
The government is expected to take
violent measures in an effort t*> suit
press the new disorders.
Five new divisions of government
troops have arrived in Berlin. The
city gives the impression of being oc
cupied almost entirely by soldiery.
KARL STABBED GUARD.
I Amsterdam. Jan. 17, Karl Lieb
j knecht stabbed a guard and made a
break for liberty while being taken to
|j a ji f a Rr-rlin dispatch reported today.
The automobile in which the Sparfa
jean leader vas en route to jail broke
down. The escort proceeded on foot.
Liebknecht stabbed one of the gt: ' Is
vith a knife he had concealed and u.
Soldiers in the escort fired at him.
The dispatch does not state whether
Liebknecht was wounded.
RADICALS DISORGANIZED.
By FRANK J. TAYLOR.
Berlin, Jnn. 15.- Karl Liebknecht
was still at liberty today, following his
escape from a trap set by government
troops while he was visiting his fam
ily. His wife and sons were captured.
(Later dispatches from Berlin offi
cially reported that Liebknecht had
been murdered.)
The Spartacan* are becoming more
and more disorganized but are con
ducting; guerilla warfare. They are
keeping up spasmodic fighting from
windows, roots and hiding places in
the streets. There are occasional out
breaks in which rifles, machine guns
and hand grenades are employed, but
these are rare.
Many desperadoes and ex-convicts
have taken advantage of the Sparta
can revolt to conduct a campaign of
robbery and plundering. Many per
(Continued on Pag* 1 Two.)
PERSHING "PUT'
His Original Program to Keep
30 Yankee Divisions in
France Unaltered.
Washington. Jan. 17. General TVr
«lilng's original program of keeping 50
div isions in France as a basis of oper
at ions has never been altered to date,
(according to war department officials
today.
In so far as could bo ascertained
ft cm war department men, events in
Europe, are having no effect upon Chief
of Staff March's plan to get the other
soldiers home as rapidly transpor
tation can be provided.
Authorities here hope that the Amer
ican food relief plan and that the ad
justments worked out by the peace
conference will tend to stabilize Eu
I« pc. thereby relieving the situation of
the prospect of further military action.
Great Britain, apparently, is planning
to keep n considerable nucleus of an
army in France, lest, once discharged,
it should be difficult to mobilize a new
June, in event of Russian or other mil
itary action.

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