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Evening capital news. (Boise, Idaho) 1901-1927, January 18, 1919, Image 1

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WEATHER
SUNDAY.
EVENING CAPITAL NEWS
ALL THE NEWS
FIRST
VOL. XLI.
BOUSE, IDAHO, SATURDAY, JAN. 18, 15)19
No. 184.
U. S. ARMY OF
OCCUPATION TO
BE CUT DOWN
TO NECESSITY
Yanks to Be Brought Home as
Fast as Possible, March Says
—Pershing Instructed to In
form Gen. Foch.
TO USE GERMAN SHIPS
IN TRANSPORT SERVICE
820,219 Men Discharged in
Home Camps, 104,000 Re
turned From Overseas; 1,
177,000 Listed for Early
Dismissal.
Washington, Jan. — American
troops will be brought home from
Franc© just as fast as possible. Gen
eral l'ershing has been ordered to so
Inform General Foch.
The American forces will be re
duced to a point where only such
forces will be left overseas as are re
quired under American international
obligations.
Chief of Staff March made fliese
revelations today, declaring that the
heads of the various governments are
now working out details of what
forces shall be left behind. The re
turn movement is slated ,to lie fis
rapid as is compatible with tonn / •*
available.
TO USE BOCHE SHIPS.
March also announced that he had
en official report from Europe Indi
cating that the United Slates will get
for transport use a goodly portion <»f
the German ships, negotiations for
which are now under way.
The original tentative figure of 30
diivisions to Vie left in France will be
scaled down. No such number, said
March, will be kept in France.
The fore- now in the many of oc
cupation. coupled with the allied
armies of occupation, is fully capable
of preventing any renewal of hostili
ties by Germany. March held.
820,219 DISCHARGED.
March deciar* d that 7
6s.626 men and
51.59:1 officers have aett;
la 11 y be
e n dis
charged in this country
; that
104.000
had actually returned
from
abroad
and that 1,177,000 in the
United
States
are listed for demobilization.
Demobilization has n
•ached
a rate
of 30,000 men per day
in the
states,
and discharge of the remaining half
of the combatant divisions has been
ordered.
As previously pointed out by the
United Press, the actual slicing off of
divisions below 30 has not yet been
ordered. March could make no speci
fic figures indicating how extensive
the reduction will be though previous
statements of the war department
figures have shown that 27«>,000 to
800,000 men should he returned month
ly if a score of German ships can be
obtained for transport purposes.
SOME UNITS RETAINED.
This means that now all troops in
the states are slated for discharge ex
cept those of a. permanent character,
(Continued cm Pago Two.)
SEN. LEWIS PROPOSES
PERMANENT CHAIRMAN
NATIONAL COMMITTEE
Washington, Jan. 18 —Senator Lewis,
Illinois, will propose to the Demo
cratic national committee that It
abandon the periodical appointment of
a national chairman and name some
body to hold the job permanently as a
' business proposition."
Lewis advocated having the new
chairman chosen as a business exe
cutive. He would maintain an office
in Washington and would keep the
country informed of p.irty activities.
This plan has manifest advantages,
according to Lewis.
Democratic congressmen expect
Hornet Cummings, as Vance McCorm
ick's successor, to be national Demo
cratic chairman.
TEUTON GUARDS FIRED
ON YANK CAPTIVES
WITHOUT PROVOCATION
American Headquarters in Germany,
Jan. 16.—(By Courier to Nancy.) —
Americans who were prisoners in Ger
many will make affidavits exposing a
number of new German atTocities,
General Harries stated today. The
worst of these occurred when Germans,
without provocation, fired upon pris
oners playing football, killing and
wounding numbers of them. The last
of the American prisoners are now
on their way home, General Harries
said.
A commission has been appointed to
assist in repatriating Russian, Serbian
and Rumanian prisoners.
WILSON TO SEE RAZED ZONES.
Paris, Jan. 18.— Präsident 'Wilson will
Inspect the devastated regions of I
France during the peace conference, it |
was announced today. Ho w ill take ad
vantage of the first opportunity to go
between conference sittings to the bat
tlefields.
RUSSIAN REDS WILLING
TO CEASE PROPAGANDA
IF ALLIES OFFER PEACE
Bolshevik Envoy Asks President Wil
son For Truce, Copenhagen
Newspaper Says.
Copenhagen, Jan. 18—Boris
Litvonoff, former Bolshevik dele
gate to Great Britain, has sent a
note to President Wilson saying
the Bolshevik! want peace and are
willing to cease their world prop
aganda if the all s cease hostili
ties, the Social Demokraten de
clared today.
REDS FORCED TO RETREAT.
Stockholm, Jan. JS Bolshevik
forces are retreating in Ksthonia
on account of a counter revolu
tion which has broken out in Pet
ragrad, according to a dispatch
from Helsingfors, received here
today. It is believed that the Bol
shevik government may need
strong forces to suppress the up
rising and that this is the reason
for calling the Esthonian army
back.
Diplomatic advices received in
Washington brought the first
word of the revolt against Bolshe
vik rule in Petrograd. Street
fighting was reported.
FOCH DEMANDS
HOLD ON RHINE
AS PROTECTION
IN THE FUTURE
Calls on Allies to Establish New
'•Watch on Rhine:" Warns
Germany May Attempt a
Second World War.
Treves, Prussia, Jan. 16 i By Cour
ier to Nancy) Warning that. Germany
may attempt to force a second world
war within a feu years. Marshal Foch
told American newspaper correspon
dents that France must hold the en
tire west bank of the Rhine to protect
herself from further aggressions. He
called upon the allies to establish a
new "watch on the Rhine."
Foch began the interview', which
was granted at the conclusion of the
armistice conference, with a. state
ment of his warm appreciation of he
American armies, declaring - that "n *
body will ever forget what America
did."
PEACE ABSOLUTE.
"We must make peace a ate."
said Foch. "Our success must guard
us against further aggression
th
• right t
f protect
ike t
aft.
feet i
her
I a ire.
men -
»rm al
ible
efforts to
natural frontier, which will protect
civilization, is the Rhine. It is <»n the
klilm we must, halt tl < Germans. It
is by using tire Rhin -s that we must
make it impossible hi Germany to
repeat the coup of : 91 L The Rhino
is a common barrier f< * all the allies,
a guarantee of the p-ace of all na
tions.
ARMISTICE 700 SOON.
"France is ready to sa: g uard the
interests of mankind. Thus.* interests
are at stak* on the Rhino It is there
we must prepare to obviate painful
surprises of the future. Let us watch
together so that we will not lose the
fruits of the common victory. Let
us i t main united as we were in bat
tle."
Foch sail! tne armistice came too
soon as a great attack was prepared
to be launched four days after the
date on which hostilities ceased.
MICHIGAN'S RATIFICATION
OF DRY BILL RULED VOID
Lansing, Mich, Jan. 18.—Michigan's
ratification of the national prohibition
amendment is void and the legislature
must again vote on the proposition, ac
cording to Assistant Secretary of State
Polk.
In adopting the amendment the reso
lution referred to the measure as be
ing ''conclurent" with the federal
amendment. The word "joint" should
have been used instead, said Polk.
Michigan was the l.'.th to ratify.
on Page Two.)
IMPCMIT ISSUE BEFORE LEGISUTURE
1
Calls for Expenditure of $1,
850,000 Apportioned in Fed
eral, State and County
Money, Over Idaho.
The biggest good roads program in
the history of the state Is ready to be
launched before the present legisla
ture. It calls for a biennial expendi
ture during the years 1919-1920 of
federal, state and county funds of $1,
850,000. Of this amount $800,000 is fed
eral aid, divided into two classes,
$526,000 post road and $247,000 forest
road. The total county share is $2,
440,000 and state $1,51-1,000 added to
which is $336,000 for overhead ex
AUSTRALIA TO
DEMAND SPOT
IN SUN; DAWN
OF A NEW ERA
Has Own Program Mapped Out
at Peace Parley; to Insist on
Recognition as an Independ
ent Nation.
TO DEMAND INDEMNITY;
AGAINST SEAS' FREEDOM
Premier Says Australia's Fight
ing Record Surpasses That
of any Nation; 60,000 Men
Killed; 260,000 Wounded.
By JOSEPH DE G A N OT.
Pails. Jan. 18.—Australia, as a free
and independent nation, has its own
peace demands for consideration at the
conference, Premier Hughes declared
today, In an interview' with the United
Press.
Australia considers that it has won
its independence on the battlefield and
politically It stands now where the
United States stood at the end of the
Revolution. It is in this spirit that it
enters the peace conferences with its
own program.
Recognition of the British dominions
by the peace congress marks the dawn
of a new era, the premier believes. It
if: taken to mean that the world recog
nizes Australia, Uanada, South Africa,
New* Zealand and India ns autonomous
nations, tied only by sentiment to the
motherland.
CARDS FACE UPWARD.
; "Our fighting records surpass that
I of any oilier nation," he asserted.
; "Now we want self-determination."
Australia, Hughes made plain,
i throws its cards face upward on the
pence table. His country, he said,
being most democratic and a firm foe
of secret diplomacy, frankly arid open
ly makes public its aims and desires
in the great settlement.
Hughes announced Australia will de
mand :
Jndi mnities; the islands of New
Guinea; a league of nations with cer
tain restrictions; military support to
Poland. If that country is threatened;
a hearing on all questions concerning
Europe or tire far east.
Australia, he declared, will oppose:
freedom of the seas, if that means
taking Britain's supremacy from her.
Any restrictions on the right of mak
ing whatever economic arrangements
she phases.
Further intervention in Russia.
WAR-WON LIBERTY.
"Australia," said Hughes. 'Teels that
she stands politically' today pretty
much when the United States stood at
the end of the Re-volution. She has
won liberty on the fields of France,
and deserves recognition as an autono
mous nation.
"Australia lost nearly 60,000 killed
and -'0,000 wounded in the war. She
spent a billion and a half dollars. She
clothed her own troops in uniforms of
wool, grown in h* r own country. Her
fighting record surpasses that of any
other nation.
"Now' Australia wants self-determi
nation. This means she insists on a
If a 'white Australia.' We do
nt promiscuous immigration,
a white nation in a .sea of
We must have th»- New
islands. They are full of pos
sibilities fur naval bases and U-boat
nests if they pass into unfriendly
hands.
"We believe we ought to have an
indemnity. We helped beat Germany,
who wilfully forced the war, thereby
saddling us ,n country with only
r>,<"->0,000 inhabitants, with a war debt
which is a most frightful handicap to
a new people like ourselves. If Amer
ica had been so burdened in the first
days of her independence she would
have been unable to make headway.
Germany ought to pay indemnities to
the utmost of her ability, Australia
j
policy
not w
blacks.
Guinea
(Continued on Page Two.)
I
!
j
;
]
;
;
j
pense, reimbursing counties and main
tenance.
It is proposed to make a two mill
levy on the state's total valuation of
$460,000,000. The state money needed
therefore, will be raised by direct tax
ation.
This money is divided among the
various road projects making up the
federal, state and county system of
which there are 14. To the Boise
Arrowrock road a grand total of $119,
000 is apportioned, made up of $40,
000 state and $79,000 county.
The budget has been prepared by
State Highway Engineer H. U. Allen.
One conference had already been held
on it with tire roads, bridge and ferry
committee of the house and other
(Continued on Page Two.)
BOSTON UNEMPLOYED
STORM CITY'S HALL;
RELIEF IS DEMANDED
Former Army Chauffeurs Lead Dem
onstration— Mayor Promises to
Consider Grievartces.
Boston, Maas., Jan. IS. Hun
dreds ol' unemployed, including 1100
former chauffeurs of the army,
stormed the city hall Imre today in
a huge demonstration against un
employment.
Fearing violence, city officials
called reserve police forces, who
held the mob in check.
Hundreds fell In line and
marched, amid shouts and cheers,
to the city hall, where the pres
ence of Mayor Peters was de
manded.
When the throng i vhed the
city hall, nearly 100» had gathered.
It Is understood that 300 chauf
feurs, formerly employed as clv
ilions in the army service here,
organized the demonstration. These
men took the lending part in de
manding "justice and fair play."
Mayor Peters promised to give
their grievances attention.
REPORT HUN SOVIETS
PLOT BILL'S CAPTURE
QUAKES WITH FRIGHT
Secret Trial and Death a la Czar
Planned For Wilhelm, Castle
Guards Reinforced.
Amerongen, Holland, Jan. 18—•
Guards about Count Bentinck's
castle were reinforced today, when
it was reported that armed Ger
man Bolsheviks plotted to raid the
place, seize the former kaiser and
kaiserin und carry them off to
Germany for a secret trial and
death like the czar's.
An airplane has been observed
reconnoitoring over the castle.
This greatly upset Wilhelm Ho
henzollern and his wife. They de
manded further protection from
Iho Dutch. In addition to the
kidnapping plot, Wilhelm fears a
scheme to blow' up the castle.
Bochc Governor Declares Seiz
j ure by Victors Will Bring on
Another War; Voices Vigor
ous Protest to Plan.
By WEBB MILLER.
American Headquarters in Germany,
Jen. 17......(By Courier to Nancy.)—If
the Rhlm lands arc taken from Ger
many a. spirit of revenge will he en
gt nth rod a spirit that will bring on
another war Count von Groote, gov
ernor of the Rhenish provinces, de
clared today to the United Press.
(Marshal Foch, in an interview with
the newspaper correspondents, made
I public today, declared that France, in
! self-defense, must keep its hold on the
j Rhine.)
Von Groote made tlie emphatic as
; sertion that -the Germans would never
] forget any retention by France of the
; Rhineland territory. Ultimate redemp
Jtion of such territory by Germany
would be the object of their "hopes and
endeavors," he said.
GROSS VIOLATION.
"Germany as a whole would consider
such severance as a gross violation of
the fundamental conditions for an
equitable peace of nations, as pro
claimed by President Wilson," von
Groote declared.
"The territory on the left bank of
the Rhine belongs to Germany and is
thoroughly German." (This is the area
at present occupied by American and
allied troops.)
"We would never forget such a sev
erance and tin* reunion with Germany
would be the object of our most ardent
hopes and endeavors.
"These sentiments are most emphat
ically shared by the Rhinelanders
; themselves They would consider their
j separation from the rest of Germany
a great misfortune. I think the effects
of such a separation are clearly evi
dent. I do not doubt for a moment
that such a procedure would create a
permanent source of serious uneasi
ness and perturbation in the political
! situation.
DON'T WISH DIVISION.
! "It is my opinion that the Rhenish
provinces do not wish separation from
•Germany, but that the inhabitants may
I 1 consider that the peculiar interests of
the Khinclands an not sufficiently
guaranteed by the present relations
with the Prussian state and that their
interests would lie better protected if
the Rhineland and perhaps other parti;
of Germany were divided into separate
state within the German realm."
An effort to influence tlie peace con
ference decisions by whining or wheed
ling is evident In recent statements
from German leaders. Von Groote's
plea and war hint follows an utterance
from Bernstorff, wherein he insinuated
that it would be dishonest for the ,\1
lies to retain the German colonies.
U. S. CONSUL DIES.
Washington, Jan. 18.—Consul John R.
Silliman is dead at Guadollara, Mexico,
after two days' illness, the state de
partment was advised today.
!
!
i
j
I
DELEGATES OF
26 NATIONS AT
PEACE PARLEY,
OPENING TODAY
First Official Session Staged at
3:00 This Afternoon in the
Famous "Clock Hall" of the
Quai d'Orsay.
TREMENDOUS PROBLEMS
NOT CONSIDERED TODAY
All Nations Associated in War
Against Germany and Four
Who Broke Diplomatic Ties
Are Represented.
Paris, Jan. 18—The peace confer
ence convened for its first official
session at 3 o'clock today.
Delegates, representing 26 nations,
meet, in the famous "clock hall" of the
Qual d'Orsay. President Poincare
made the opening address. The peace
delegates sat. at a huge horseshoe
shaped table; their secretaries at
small tables near by. Tills being the
first session, it was open, and the
newspaper correspondents were per
mitted to be present. None of the tre
mendous issues of the peace settle
ment were to be taken up. The sit
ting was to be devoted to the formali
ties attendant to the convening of the
most important gathering nt which
President Wilson, leading the peace
delegation of the United States, in
tended to put through his league of
nations plan and other measures
which he believes will end wars and
make the world safe for civilization.
TREMENDOUS ISSUES.
Formation of a definite policy to
ward Russia, Involving possible recog
nition of the Russian soviet govern
ment; indemnities to be collected from
Germany; final disposition of the
Gorman fleet; future of the German
colonies; regulation of national boun
daries; the demand of Greece for
Constantinople; the disposition of the
Holy Land; Ireland's demand for
home rule under the principle, of self
determination; adjustment of national
boundaries along radical lines; free
dom of the seas, and reduction of
armament were among the important
questions confronting the peace mak
ers ns they assembled.
The delegates present represented
all the nations associated in the war
on Germany and in addition Peru,
Ecuador, Urguay and Bolivia, which
severed diplomatic relations with
Germany. The central powers were
not represented. Win n the peace
treaty has been drawn up, the dele
gates representing the German gov
ernment, and its former allies will be
asked in to sign.
When the conference starts regular
(Continued
Page Two.)
Trade Board Probers Declare
Meatmen Pocketed Trebled
Returns Over Peace Times;
Congressional Quiz Probable.
Washington, Jan. IS.-—"Open di
plomacy in the government here as
well as the peace conferences was
demanded by senators at tlie pack
ers' hearing here today.
Members of the senate agricul
tural committee and Francis J.
Honey, appearing as a witness, at
tacked Food Administrator Hoo
ver for holding secret conferences
with packers to fix meat prices.
Washington, Jan. 18. Sensational
disclosures «as to puckers' profits dur
ing the war will stir congress to action,
j sc note leaders believed today.
Federal trade commission experts,
I be: f«»ro the senate agricultural commit
j t. *•. testified war profits were throe
j times as great as peace time earnings.
Members of the senate committee
; bcli< ved the situation called for action.
Kenyon, Norris and Gronna «'ire espe
cially anxious that effective legislation
! he put through at this session. Con
f< n n> -s are being held daily over sug
gestions for control of the packing in
du s t r y a n d stock y a r d s.
WAR BOOSTS PROFITS.
Regulation by the food administra
j t ion did not amount to anything, so far
las regulating packers' profits is con
I corned," Stuart Chase, federal trade
[commission investigator, said at the
hearing.
"Armour's profits before the war
'averaged 6.5 per cent, but from 1915
! to 1917 they averaged 16-7 per cent,
! figured compiled by the federal trade
i commission indicated.
Swift's pre-war profits were around
8.6 per cent, while during the war they
j jumped to 24.5 per cent. Morris' peace
I profits of 7.2 per cent doubled after
J1914. J
LICHNOWSKY NAMED
AS BOCHE DELEGATE
TO PEACE CONCLAVE
former Envoy to Britain Exposed the
Kaiser's Guilt in Forcing
World War.
Munich, Jan. 16.—German dele
gates to th* peace conference will
be the foil »wing, newspapers here
stated today:
Prince Lichnowsky, former am
bassador to Great Britain.
Count von Hrockdorff- Ranzau,
foreign minister
Karl Kaut/.s! y, recently under
secretary for foreign affairs, and
head of the commission which in
vestigated and recommended pun
ishment for the kaiser as a war
maker.
Count Arco.
Lichnowsky's memoirs of tlio
kaiser's course showed that, he
forced the war. For this Lich
nowsky was disgraced during the
kaiser's regime.
WILSON FIGHT
FOR PUBLICITY
IS PARTIALLY
SUCCESSFUL
Secures Ruling Whereby Lim
ited Number of Press Corre
spondents Will Be Permitted
at the Full Sittings.
By ROBERT J. BENDER.
Paris, Jan. 18—-The first sitting of
the peace congress today found Presi
dent Wilson partially victorious in the
fight for recognition of his first prin
ciple—"open covenants, openly ar
|j rived at."
j Today's peace conference sitting was
planned as a formal affair with an
imposing turnout of troops, impres
sive ceremonies and a keynote speech
; by President Poincare.
President Wilson's vigorous fight
J for an open conference was backed by
the universal stand of t • American
' correspondents. He was finally .suc
cessful in securing a rule, whereby a
: limited number of newspaper men
j would be permitted at the full sit
j tings. The situation as it stood to
j day was similar to that in the United
j States senate where reporters are al
! lowed to hear all proceedings except
, committee meetings and executive
j sessions.
HERE ARE THE FACTS.
j Following are the facts:
Several days ago the president be
gan a quiet movement for recognition
j of his first principle. Discussions de
! veloped. Premier Lloyd George agreed
! with Wilson but French, Italian and
Japanese delegates refused to agree
I to have the press represented at any
j * «'inference. Finally, with the aid of
Lloyd George, the president succeeded
I in having the gag proposal laid over,
j i'ending suggestions from the corres
pondents. American newspaper men
' led the protest against secrecy with
representatives of the press of Britain.
Italy and smaller nations, uniting In
the demand for publicity—the French
j dissenting throughout.
! During the conversations, the pros!
i dent's only reservation was said to bo
I
! "- t,on * |,-M the r ' 1,01 *
: pre
m.-ai,
j ings
action, lest the
(dings should coi
thus creating
Hi ich might h.uv
m* out
misunderstand -
e serious re
d „UH.
GROWING PUBLICITY.
The president expects that as
f f •
tl «
conferences go on. delicate points will
be disposed of, and more and moil
meetings will be public until the final
sessions when he hopes they will all
be open. The American correspon
dents, however, are not yet satisfied.
They see a possibility of only a f«-\i
sessions being open and «are prepar
ing to invite newspaper men of all na
j tions to co-operate in pressing their)
j respective administrations fm morn
public sittings.
for freedom and government by the
people are to receive their Hist inter
national test in the peace conference
which opened today to make the world
safe for democracy.
America's battle for liberty and uni
versai p« ace was not ended when the!
military pow<
By J. W
) ork. Jan.
T. MASON,
la. American ideals!
of the United States
overthrew German militarism. It has
become necessary for American public
opinion to continue the struggle against
the old school of European diplomats!
who want no permanent peace that does
not make their own countries para
mount within imperialistic spheres of
influence.
The peace conference is to be a diplo- j
matlc battleground. The idealism which !
guides America in the quest for a just
peace has net been accepted by the
continent of Europe. National aspira
tions, not international fellowship,
vide the inspiration for the continental j
J delegates. j
WORLD FUTURE
HYOUR HANDS,
SAYS POINCARE
TO DELEGATES
French President Recommends
Formation of League of Na
tions in Opening Address at
First Peace Session.
LAUDS AMERICA'S PART
IN DOWNING KAISERISM
Declares Triumph by Allies Was
Total Victory; That Ger
many Willed to Rule by Iron
and Thereby Perished.
By WILLIAM PHILLIP SIMMS.
Baris, Jan. 18.—"You hold in youi
hands the future of the world," Presi
dent Poincare of France declared today
in liis address to the peace delegates at
the opening of the conference of Paris.
Poincare recommended the establish
ment of a league of nations. His closing
i words were:
I ''You hold in your hands the future of
I the world. I leave you, gentlemen, to
j your grave deliberations. I declare open
' the conference of Paris."
"PERISHED BY IRON."
! Welcoming the commissioners, Poin
jeare thanked the nations for choosing
Paris for the conference.
"Germany," he said, "willed to rule
by iron and she perished by iron."
Reviewing the reasons for each na
tion's entry into the war, he dwell« l
• specially upon the course pursued by
I the United States and tho events that
j led up to America's entry, lie thanked
President Wilson in the name of Franco
j and of all countries represented in the
j <-onTerence hall, lauded the America a
(people and praised the allied troops ami
the armies of the United Stal« s for fin
ishing their task.
A TOTAL VICTORY,
j The victory, Poincare declared, was
la total victory and the delegates ought
ito draw out of this total victory the
Itotal consequences. The associat'd
powers' unity for work, he said, ought
to continue to exist in a unity for peace.
A spirit of justice, he declared, should
•guide the conference in their delibera
tions.
Today's real peace conference busi
ness was:
First: Submission of memoran
dums by all the powers on the re
sponsibility of the authors of the
war.
Second: Memorandums on re
sponsibility for crimes committed
during the war.
Third: Legislation regarding in-'
ternational labor.
The society of nations will be th«
first business of the next meeting.
Premier Lloyd George entered the
(Continued on Pago Two.)
FACES ITS FIRST TEST
, Seven Amendments to North
Dr.kota Constitution Wait
Governor's Signature to Be
come Part of Law.
Besjde
Bismarck, X. D., Jan. 18—State
ownership faced Us first great test in
America today.
Seven amendments to the state con
stitution. providing state owned banks,
flour mills, elevators, mines and other
industries awaited only Governor
Frazier's signature to become a law.
state ownership, the
amendemnts include initiative, refer
endum, tax reforms and quick action
on constitutional amendments. Hail
insurance will also be provided.
Non-partisan league leaders, who
promulgated the amendment, said the
plan is to institute only the state
ownership this year.
The amendments are:
1 Initiative and referendum.
2, Limiting emergency measures
and making them effective on signa -
j py the governor,
3 --Direct action on constitutional
j amendments.
j 4-— -Fixing status of taxable property
I by legislature.
j 5—Hail insurance by land tax.
6—Limiting state bonded indebted
THE WEATHER
ness for industrial enterprises to $li,
000,000.
7—State ownership.
■ ■■ - -
Forecast for Boise and vicinity—
r.\IN TONIGHT AND SUNDAY,
For Idaho- Tonight and Sunday,
rain.
'Highest temperature yesterday......50
Pr^-jMoan temperature yesterday........48
Total pit cipitatkm for the 24 hours
ending at 6 a. in. today .If

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