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Evening capital news. (Boise, Idaho) 1901-1927, January 19, 1919, Image 1

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LEADS IN NEWS,
ADVERTISING
SUNDAY CAPITAL NEWS
ALL THE
NEWS FIRST
VOL. XLL
BOISE, IDAHO, SUNDAY, JAN. If), 1919
No. 1J35.
BORAH SCORES
HOOVER AS AID
OF PROFITEERS
AND MEATMEN
Both Republicans and Demo
crats Oppose Appropriation
of $100,000,000 for Aid of
Starving Europe.
DEMAND JUSTICE FOR
YANK SOLDIERS FIRST
Kenyon Says Many Discharged
Men in U. S. Out of Work:
Wounded Unpaid for Seven
or Eight Months.
L.
t he
M \RTIN'.
^Vaphinffton, .i aiu jjj i;ff,,if :
i'i tf.-'n ir^iif'rs to hm
f 1 nn ono nno fno<1 appropria t ir>n f « ,
Europe through the r-npatn v .-i -
♦hwarteri todm by dotn-mlpr«! nj*pn
•it ton Iront both I Jopublka ns
fJemocrata
Urging that rhsrltv begin :it nom«
F*na*ors Ttorah an.I Km,yon ;i. sa I1...J
appropriation an fn, .-, d charily by
♦h* American people. Roch denounced
Fond Administrator Uoovor, charging
timt the moat packers and other mon
opolists had "controlled and directed
♦he food administration."
f Senator Myers, strong pro-adminis
tration Democrat, declared the pro
posal savored of highway robbery of
»lie American treasury by Fnropean
Bolsheviki who, he said, are threaten
,lng in set the world afire unless Am
iericnn dollars arc shovelled out to
feed them.
INSUFFICIENT DATA.
Other senators opposed the mea
sure, chiefly on the ground that con
Kress has Insufficient Information
concerning tlie part tile allies will con
tribute to the food fund, the people
to whom the relief Is to be afforded
and the means of getting some of the
tnoney back.
Declaring that justice he done Am
erican Soldiers and sailors before
charity is given blindly in Kuropc,
Senator Kenyon said:
"There are over 200.000 men ont'
work in the United States, many
them soldiers. \\ c ran go to a lmr
rital in the capital's shadow and find
wounded soldiers who have not re
ceived a cut of pay for even or
• ig'bt in ont hp. In the povrrnmcnt for
insane yon will find American r»l
cher a suffering: from shell shook \vh>
in rooms with insane persons be
fans«' we didn't, have the monev, n
........ . . ,
xi lea^t didn : provide any other place
for them
OWN ILLS FIRST.
"Some of this money should go to
I>*y allotments to the mothers .and
wives of soldiers many of whom have
riot received their allotments for
months. Let's stop Bolshevism abroad
if we ran, but let us get at some of
the causes of unrest in our own coun
try."
Borah declared there may he good
reasons for spending the $100.00,000
but said congress 1 isn't the reasons.
"Yet we are the only persons re
sponsible to the taxpayer for the
spending of their money." }, P said.
Assailing Hoover. Borah said he
C"ul«l not vote t « > turn over a man
r*f Hoover's vb
t<> be spent ;i
vpoint
he sec
fit.
Treasury Plans Raising Huge
Sum in 1919; Two Popular
Loans Arc Probable.
sir.ftO".!
I>y ih
1.000 «Juri
I 'repa rations
■ treasury to
ig this year.
Bit when the
This became kn«>\vi
federal reserve boa ni ann<ain< « d tu i
the treasury plan of raising $2 iji loans
t«' $1 obtained in taxes will rearm 5 n
effective during payment of war coals.
' >ffi« ia 1 opinion tonight was that
tin g*>v«*rnnient would seek i*> obtain
the great sum through tu<> popular
loans. One, the \ ict«>ry i.ihertt Joan
i* 1 *' «ho to «-onu wilhin two months.
lh< federal reserve ann.>unc« , in«:nt
p <«l then* <«»nl(l be no reason to an
ticipât«' a reduction in expend;! nias
6u*m.
F«>ntinuati«*n c*f large spending op
erations is implied througluMit. ta«*
board's stat» m» nt. T«nt.ative Beasur*.
eslimat«'s, tlie statement sai l, are fnr
expenses of $18,000.000,000. The reve
Ji'u* bill, now pending in congress, ;j*
fir signed to yichl about $«;,O<io,00U,(»0G
nn.j jt.s provisions are aj>parentlv sat>
f « lory to treasury officials.
THE WEATHER
For«cast for Boise and »vicinity
SHOWERS SUNDAY.
Forecast for southwestern Idah.
Sunday, showers.
YESTERDAY'S WEATHER
Highest temperature, 56.
I*owest temperature, 4L
Mean temperature, 4 X.
vastsum
T hav»
|
!
j
j
!
;

;
j
'
«
j
j
j t
J
j
I
here.
President
George
Premier
ofjdeserves the prec
oficause iva are me
j md because she h
j the most tragical
but also because ,,
jeton t and beautiful
! berri (he «vntor • » f
1
HUNS' PEACE PROGRAM
1READY; MOSTLY BASED
ON WILSON'S 14 POINTS
Demands Relei.se of Boche Prisoners
and Return of Colonies: O. K.
World League.
Ba:-k*. Jan. 1 R. Germa n> 's peace
program i.s pi ad.' for submission to
the eonferem • a dispatch from
Berlin annoni • d today.
Foreign Minister Brockdorff
Rantzau and Philip Scheidcmann
have been naimal chiefs of the (1er
man delegation, (ho advices said,
with instruct ion ; to stand on the
following points:
Opposition to 11 demands in ex
cess of President Wilson s program,
opposition to continuation of any
economic war on Germany. Dis
armament, provided other states
disarm.
Release ami return home of Ger
man prisoners at. the beginning of
the negotiations. There is no fur
ther justification for detaining
them, it is argued.
Return of German colonies with
in the limits of Wilson's program.
The German delegates will admit
the right of the colonies' inhabit
ants to self-determination.
Full support to the creation of
President Wilson's league of na
tions on the theory that formation
of such a league will malo it pos
sible mote easily to obtain a dur
Wilson and Lloyd
Eulogise French
in Nomination for
Chairmanship of Conclave.
Paris. Jan. IS.-
Clemenceau for i
of the conference
Wilson said:
"Mr. Chairman:
f*h usure to prop.$
man ol the confère
the president
"1 would do this ;
tom. I would do t
the French republic
it as something moi
to do it as a tribute
Xominating P
H gi
cat
t he
s pcrmaiu-nt cltair
■e Mr. Olemonceau,
council.
s a matter « *f ous
ts as a, tribute to
But 1 wish to do
than that. I wisp
.«> the man
I
1
1
!
1

j

ting in her
s undergone
uffc ring of
nn
eapital, has often
■«inferences of this
I sort und on which t H« fortunes «if large
j parts of tli«' world turned. It is a very
delightful thought that the history <>f
the world, which has so often center«
, ,
jhor<\ will now b«> crowned i.v the
chicvements of this confer«
cause there is a sense m whi
is the supreme conference of i
lory of mankind.
WORLD'S FATE INVOLVED
.
not only he- |
apilal
• in« ,,fi
war
,-,f j
i. ,j
the. I
I i
ij,P:
Pis
:
te represent«
presented in
The fortiin«
"More nations
than were 'ever
conference befor
peoples are involved. A gt» at, a a r is
ended, which s< « mod about t « > bring
a universal cataclysm. The «lang r
is passed. V victory has been won for
mankind and it is delightful that \v<
should be rible to record the great re
sults in this place.
"But it is the more <l«*lightful to lu»n
or Fran« e becau.se wo can honor )i<t ;
i: tin- ]** i son of so distinguished a -or
■ant. VVe have all felt in our partna
bat ion in the struggles of this u ar tin*
jf nc steadfastness which chitracierixed :
he leadership of the. French in the!
hinds «»f Mi. Clemenceau.
"\V* have learned to admire him and ;
those of us who have been associated •
•'dh him hove acquired . genuine af- *
foctinn for him. Moreover, those of
us who have been in these recent «lays
hi constant consultation with him.
knoyv h«»vv warily his purpose vas set
i * • ' \ * r « 1 tin g « * a 1 of achievement, to
jwhwb all faces are turne«!.
PERSONAL PLEASURE.
'H«- feels as we f«el. and I have no
doubt everybody In this room feels that
've art* trusted in do a great thing,
do it in the hi 'F t spirit of frien«'
jship and a«comm<»datlon and t• > «lo it
;< s promptly a possible in order that
jthe hearts «.f men Lave fear lifted flora
them and that they may return t«> tlu»s®
purpo.'-i ,.f lifn, which will bring th n
h .ppijo • nd «îontentment and pres
peril y. K i «.wing lux hrotherh«*o*l of
'heart ir tb.ese gieit matters it affords
im«* a personal pb asurc to propose tli it
Mr. Clemeneeau shall b«* the porma
lient chairman «»f this conference."
Mr. Lloy«i G <•«) rge in seconding Çle
inenceau's nomination said:
'J count it n«>1 merely a pleasure but
ja gi • a t privilege that T .shmihl lie ox
p«*«*tr«i ou hehalf «»f the British empire,
j«b*l«*gates to support the motion of •
Br« si«l« nt \\ i!s«~>n. I «i«* s«> for the rea- |
:;«»n which he has : -» eloquently given
expression, as a tribute to such n man.
Clemenceau was a compelling and con
'spi* , u«>us figure in «he politics of Ids
uat hr la ml, a ml hi. fame has extended
far beymui th«* bounds of France. Were
it not for that undoubted fart, Mr.
Pr« si.lent. 1 should have treated as a |
legem! the common report of your ^
y ears. :
"GRAND YOUNG MAN."
"I have attended many conferences J
'with Mr. Clemenceau and in them alii
t he most vigorous, the most enduring j
ami the most youthful figure there has I
" —------I
(Continued on Page Two.) I
«
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j
POINCARE SAYS
NATION LEAGUE
NECESSARY TO
FUTURE PEACE
In Brilliant Address at Opening
of Paris Conference, French
President Declares Allies
Would Lay Down Rules.
TRUTH, BATHED IN BLOOD, j
PROVES GERMANY GUILTY
Arrogant Desire to Rule by the 1 ,
Sword Brings the Hun to
Utter Misery Through Own
Weapon, Poincare Says.
Paris. Jan.
delegates that
are. in then e*
j today opened
; wit ll it S pe< cl
j t I biialinient «
, - «feg uanl hut
I fet ing.
j Poincare dr
IS. Warning
siinies of the
IVcsid' at Pm
•nferen« «* of
hi« h lie urge
tguc uf li iti*
from furthei
rific«
dared the
def
1
would lay down th« rules for the j. ; .g
ffs aim, lie said, would be to pre\<
uiir.s and gain respect for'!he right« «;
Peace the conference is to establish.
Falling attention to the fact that i
I « ■ ni pire* was born 48 years a
President Polin are said it h
nd«'«l ils
mk i 111 <
jli\ ion. P«
• ill it nnslu
POINCARE'S SPEECH.
I President Poincare. upt-niug tin r..:i
fen lie. . spoke as follows:
1 "Gentlemen: France gre< ts aie
1 Blanks you lor having unanimous'»
! chosen as the scat of your l.-Jjurs th
1 city which for over four years the « in
Huy lias made the principal militai \ nb
■ jeetivc and which the valor of the alii
j armies has victoriously defend«*«
■ against unceasingly renewed often
■'Allow in«; that sc« - : 311 your decision,
the homage of all the nations that you
represent toward a. country which still j
| ,nol, ' lhau any others, has endured the '
*»ufferings of war; of which entire prov - 1
inces ' transformed into vast battle
Yields, have be« n systematically wasted !*
by the invader and she has paid hu- ;
inanity's tribute to death. !
.... . , j
'■»•aiiee has minie these enormous t
saci'ificcs without having incurr««l the'
slight'st responsibility for the frightful'
j ca tastr«.«phe which lias ovcrwlirlrned the |
universe, and at the moment when this .
I cycl« of horror is ending, all the p«.nvr*rs *
i wliU '* delega tes are assembled her**
may acquit themselves of any share in
the criin«; which has resulted in so un- '
pivci'doiitcd a disaist.-r. What giv«*s y.u
authority to establish a peace <>f jus
(Continued on Page Two.)
Cruisers South Dakota and
Montana and the Transport
President Grant Carry Men;
Three Men Die on Voyage.
York,
Ja
8000
halt
ferro field here' was to leav
plane early tomorrow morning for
San Diego, Cal., preparatory to an
attempt t « » lower the coast to coast
flying record.
Starting from San Diego Monday
morning, the major's schedule calls
a brief stop ut Fort Wurth Tues
day morning. II»* expects to r«*a«h
Jacksonville. Fla . by Tuesday night.
. —Nearl
troops arrived bore Unlay on the cruis
ers South Dakota. Montana and the
transport President Grant. All showed
« \ idence of tempestuous weatln r pre
' tiling on their trip a« ross.
There were 150 influenza cases on
the President Grant. Three men .li«*«l
on the voyage. Their bodies will be
sent to tli» ir homes.
The units nb«»ard the President .
Grant were the headquarters detach
ment of the 8th field artillery brigade; '
the 3d field artillery. 81st and S3r.i j
li«*l«l artillery. 13th trench mortar bat
Pry and company H of the 347th in
fantr * v ;
On tho South Dakota were the 56th
coast artillery corps and the 4 74th
coast artillery corps. All on the South |
Dakota, were in action in France, and 1
both groups had been cited for bravery
under fire. On the Montana, which
Uft Brest an hour after tho South
Dakota, and dock ed at Hoboken ex- j
aetly an hour pfter that cruiser, were j
*neh and 24th trench mortar |
They had not been in action
the
ARMY FLYER TO TACKLE
C0AST-T0-C0AST MARK
Fort Worth, Texas, Jan. »8 Major
M<'Fauley, commander of Talia
air
j
POLK AND LEWIS MENTIONED AS POSSIBLE
SUCCESSORS TO GREGORY IN U. S. CABINET
Frank I,. Polk, counselor in the
state department, and J. Hamil
ton Lewis*, senator from Illinois,
are mentioned as possible sm «as
ms to Thomas Watt Gregory,
who recently resigned liis cabinet
post
Greg«
S.
att«
genei
resignation wa
American Troops to Be Taken
From France as Fast as Pos
sible ; Cut Force Far Below
3 0 Division Mark.
is«- him that Amei
taken out of Frail«
e. 'The only limit.
*e the limit of avai
'«»in' national oh
iu. h of
un abro
What ov
id.
th«
A rneri
.1* I.
nui i
Am.
ihing
mniati
they will cut the
o far below the :h
which General Per
the basic figure for the j
overseas group. Tlmse fac ts develop- j
ed today from Chief of Staff March's)
press ^conférence, though, aft« i \\ a ? «1 |
•f th«* session j
reference t «» In
j forro
' ni:,rl< *
1 lo,ltativo1
!* 1
;
! 1 . "
j omitted Hie
t , , , . .
HAD PLANNED ON 30
| S«'crefar\ Baker some tune a
. uoun«*«^ ■«! officially that I*ersliu
* « I » 1 «^ « ! he won!«! ns«* 30 di' i. ,; i
t hash* for«-e abroad uutn tan
iS if atlvisablf* t<» rc<lur
' äMn,l * ,r 1 Ybe actual ia dti« ti«ui
:U) h; - s M " ? v, ? ,H , n attempt.nl i
lfu ' OVf>,;;iS Bna-e been sii*e«l
Mr
eh ilia
i
:
• * • Vf* i lient * » t troop*
propose." he satt
I. "to rod urn
en to the lowest
figure rou
with our intom
iMtional ubli
ami to Iviui: the
mon from
to the* limit of a'
i'ailablo ship
In that conm.-tio
h, I will say
Brit sh
»port ton
. *
M
] ,
fin.»,
French and Dutch shipping
«'ceding very satisfactorily
have .secured a number of
all these nations ami have
g.io.l chance to get a large
of tin German ships which are bein,
tu ned over to the allied powers.
DEMOBILIZATION HERE.
"Our international obligations." ac
cording l" the state department ait
thoriti**s, "are merely the obligation
of seeing this through, having one
got into the war.'
March has ordered the last half <>
the combatant divisions in th« Fnitei
States demobilize«!, making a total <>
1.177.000 slated for discharge. In th
Fnited States 786,028 men and
!
!
593 office
Prom abre
returned.
ha Vf
104,000
1 ,
dismissed.
have been
intemls t«> k*
«»f permanent
MARY'S WELL AGAIN.
AngeL-s, Jan. IS- Mary I'i
ho has been suffering from
flu«»nxi«. was virtually recovered
night, it was announced from
home here.
t
t
I
1
hi
\ ictoria, B. C.. Jan. 1 S'. —-Madaino
Katherine Bresh«jv»ky, "the grand
mother of the* Russia,i revolution,"
arrive«l in Victoria on her Way to
B.jston and other cities of th< east
ern states, where friends are await
ing her.
While in this country. Mrs. Bres
kovsky will appeal for funds to es
tablish handicraft schools for Rus
sia's war orphans, « >f whom she
says there are four millions. Mme.
Breshkovsky, now well past 80
years of age. is attended by two
men secretaries.
The Little Grandmother stated 'n
her best Knglish about Russia.
"Russia will come ah«i will have
a voice in the world's peace con
ference and will yield 1 «» none. In i
light to a br ight futur«*.
copied by President Wilson by
cable. Gregory had held the po
sition four years. He gave the
small salary as his reason for r« -
signing. Polk is acting secretary
of state during Secretary Hous
ing's absence. Lewis recently was
defeated for re-election by Abnlill
McCormick.
DISARM SPARTACANS
IN BERLIN: ANTI-REDS
ATTACKS CONTINUING
! »Fa j ui,i nieul
in progrès?
according to
received here
, représenta -
f the Russian Bolsheviki.
'■is sent to Germany to aid
volt is besieged in a castle
lunsrliwoig. The stronghold
oughout « 'mi me u\,
rices from Zurich
light Carl Badek
1 'nrtii'ie.l
I tul
it ill.a
pla«*«l lo defend it. «lispatche?
ported.
Anti-Bolslievik mais <o M
in Berlin. .\»uie than 30u Ute
I *« > 1 ; • 1 1 e v i k i ha\t been am*
The army of mumi ployed is
liver ".10,000 in Berlin alone ai
ni-r « a sing, greatly worrying
,
i
I
I
I
j
j
i
I
i
»
iovt minent.
Blotted tin*
The governnn nt ha
un« mployed eigh
FLOOD WATERS PERIL
WESTERN WASHINGTON
west«
Wash., Jan.
Washington
with a flood tonight i
4S hours heavy rain.
1S- Portions of
are threatened
s the result of
Snow melting
in the Faxende mountains is adding
to the volume «if streams and railroad
crews 'Wer«-* sont out tonight to pro
tect bridges.
u. s. hospital'transport
TOWED INTO DEEPWATER
pit Ml
a h os
fort..**
• n.sport Northen
The h«i
• might
She
wounded and soldier
if el y removed within
since then, constant cf- j
i ina*l«' to pull the ship !
j
a ter.

______ :
'
Passillg' of Spartacan Leaders
I
j

with its i
md Rosa ;
« general ;
from tin- '
DEATH EASES CUISIS
Marks Exit of Cause ; Berlin
Feels Much Believed.
Jan.
•The
Spartacan
leaders. K..
Luxt-mburg
.feeling her
«lied
no vcim *,it
Liebknecht
according t«» tli
today. Belief
vv day >
tension of the la.**
t icea 1 » 1 e every where when news of i
their deaths was circulated.
The government has practically «le- J
ride«! not to make public the results j
of the r«xsea.rches «»f Karl Kautzsky in
tin* foreign office archives which re- j
.suited in Ka ut/.sky's recommendation
that the former kais'.r t»e brought, to
t rial.
According to the foreign office, it
was the independent Socialists who de
manded the publication and their exit
from the government removes the de
mand. The foreign office says the
papers are not sensational, the inter
esting features being supplied by the
kaiser'» notations, it was his habit to
istudy documents and with a pencil
scribble his views on the margins.
\\'* Russians rejoice with tho
; allies and congratulate them, but
j we am forgotten by them. We are
j l«_*it alone and hear no voice that
, call» us to share in the world's vic
!<>' \. ) « t is it possible to put aside
in this solemn hour r a country of
i i , « » " » m >. « » « mi iniia him nts now blazing
I with revolutionary flame?
'id not the duty <>f the nations
win» haw found a condition of true
! «!« •moorncy to hurry' to aid a p« «»pie
w in» stand in indecision? A deino
• rati«-, progressive Russia is a
j blessing, not alone for the Slavonic
! peoples hut a hearth of riches and
justice for all nationalities ami
tribes. Strong and normal Russia.
iS -'gainst all th<* iniquities of the
• lark powers, no matter vvhepco
j t hey coin**"
transport, carrying
3000 troops, docks
after rough voyage
ut in 120
s, some
Many of Men Sick and Wounded;
Some Had Hurts Reo^sned By
Tumbling Ship.
Newport News, Va.. Jan IS
Bringing nearly gnoo oftioors anil
nun. many of them sick and
wounded, the transport Huron ar
rived today from France, after one
of the roughest voyages on rec
ord.
Sim was buffeted
mile gale for two
tinies careening as much as »I
degrees.
Sonn» of the sick and wounded
wore thrown from their hunks
and their wound» reop«med. The
Huron was 14 days making the
trip.
The officers and crew of the
transport Tenu dores ret urned on
the Huron. The Tenadores went
on tin* rocks off the coast of
France some time ago.
Ten Red Cross nurses declared
they were as busy on the return
trip as they ever were in the hos
pitals of France.
The Huron had on board 4 29
sick and wounded: Companies f.
F and K, fifth engineers, a medi
cal unit of the same oryanizn -
tion. tho second heavy ordnance
mobile repair shop, eight casual
«'■«»mpanies and field hospital, 301
of the 310th .sanitary train.
PRETTY PRETTIES BARRED
ON SOLDIERS' UNIFORMS
, San Francisco. Jan. *18. Younger <»f
i fivers of the western «li\ isi«>n were
I "brought to their senses" today by Ma
jjor General John F. Morrison, com
jrnainling, who issued an order against
I "pretty pretties'' on uniforms.
I The order was, in effect, a brusk
command to "cut it out."
j Sam Browne belts were described ns
j unauthorized for American wear. The
i officer wearing them shows ignorance
land dr-obedience. according to Morri
I son. Attempts to imitate the Knglish
i uniform w ere forbidden. Parents who
adorn their children with uniforms
» were c insured.
Each Power Asked to Outline
Views Regarding Possible In
ternational Legislation in Be
half of Workers.
j , .
! ^
By FREI) S. FMRGFS«»N.
Pan-, Jan. 18 . The peace conferen« e
jay took up the question of labor
ndiBons as part of its work. It is
& first peace congress in. history to
fishier that problem.
IT.,it the interests of labor are «5ccu-)
j P.ving
• session.
big place in the thoughts of
was evident at the opening!
Labor was given exceptional!
prefrivncr, evrry power being o.-kert tn;
submit mnnorniiJum ntitlining Its
views regarding possible International
legislation In behalf of the working men
and working women.
t'liilcj labor and maximum hours for
: women "-ill possibly be taken sip. he
' sa id, together with the question of max-;
Imum hours fur ne n. Sanitary work -
•ink conditions may also l..e considered.
I Regulation of labor conditions j 3
bln iv to i»e included in tlie peace eon
j fereneo's legislation.
Asked bow such legislation would be
[made effective, this delegate said:
"The league of nations idea is to
turn over all decisions for the league
enfol cr ."
_ 4 f ^ _
ARMY HEADS AND TAFT
PLAN NATIONALIZATION
OF YANK BOXING BOUTS
dent Taft.
Wood ami
k, Jan,
Major
F'rovosf
ml Leonard

( rowder wet
interested in
boxing unde:
provid« state
iep«»rte«l
a project 1
new laws
Contests f<
Marshal General
today to be
ships ami later
ment to decide
ships.
a nath
nations'
OHIO TOWN ISOLATED
nationalize ,
which will
champion
il tourna - ;
champion- j
I
I
BY SWOLLEN WATERS
____
Marshfield, < ire., Jan. 1' \ fier ex
perieneiiiK several da\s ,,f demoralized (
railroad, telcfjraph, telephone and boat
services. Marshfield is on the Net-Re o£
bfinfr completely isolated toniRht.
Heavy rains oontinulng for daja, have
caused freshets in all the rivers and
streams of this region. All Ooos Bay
towns face isolation. So far there
has been no serious damage to prop
er! y.
LUMBERMEN'S CONVENTION.
U'apltsl News Special Service >
Spokane. Wash., .Tan. Is. Plans for
the sixteenth annual conference, of tho
Western Retail Lumbermen's associa
tion, to be held at Boise, Idaho, arc
virtually completed, according to A. I.
Porter of Spokane, secretary treasurer,
Mr. Porter will deliver an address. A
Prediction.' white 1. ti. dullness of
Lewiston »ill speak on "Our Business
a Few Years Hence."
PLACING GUILT
OF WAR START
FIRST TASK OF
PARIS PARLEYS
Initial Session Opens With
President of France Poin
care's Speech of Welcome;
Clemenceau Chairman.
LEAGUE OF NATIONS TO BE
DISCUSSED NEXT MEETING
Two Hundred Newspaper Cor
respondents Present, Led by
American Scribes; Wilson
Seated in Post of Honor.
By WILLIAM PHTUJP SIMMS.
Baris, Jan. 1« The confèrent« of
Paria began today.
Fixing the guilt for starting the r. ir
• » nd for the. crime» committed during
the war waji the first task taken up
b.' the delegates.
The league of nations will be
brought before the next. ««"««ten Pre?
ident Poincare, in hin speech of wel
come, urged the conference to ««tab
lish the league. The peace congress,
he declared, holds in its hands the
future of the world.
During the translation of Poincare's
speech President Wilson leaned for
ward, listening. At the conclusion
Poincare first shook hands with Wil
son. Then lie shook hands with all
ihe others, passing around the hall.
WILSON MAKES MOTION.
I At 3:50 o'cloi k this afternoon Clem
enceau took his place in the chair as
! presiding officer, amid a fanfare of
I bugles outside the building.
! Wilson then proposed Clemenceau as
! permanent chairman.
"1 «I«) this," he said, "as a tribute t<>
it he man, inasmuch as lie deserves sm*h
•n honor. In a sense this is the su
preme council of the history n" nueir
ikind. Victory has been won for man
jkind. it is delightful to honor France
through a distinguished man as Clem •
'enceau. I have acquired a real affe« -
j tion for him and believe that he feels
;as we do that we are trusted to do a
great thing as promptly as possible."
GEORGE SECONDS.
I Lloyd George, seconding the motion
to make Flemenoeau chairman, lauded
(him as the "most vigorous and useful
figure of past conferences."
!
\v<
will not waste time under the
direction of Flcmenceaii," be said
Clemenceau was the allies* courap*
and inspiration in the dark days, T,b**yd
George declared.
"I consider it a rmile** to second
] ni ° 1 ,on -
^onnmo also lauded Clemenceau.
} '° ,lr vfro presidents, representing
,h * îr,cat «W ««*1*' , ted .»nd »
l 0ni ™ttee on crndPntla.1» was sppointd
PRESS SCRIBES PRESENT,
1 Newspaper men were admitted *n
j ,,us «'''«••'on- b V American eorre .
spomlents, thej axe. readv to make a
"ffh< «or more representation than *1
1 ' AVPd b >' «he amended rule, which pro
; ' "h's fern certain number nt full eon
I lerenees and for secret «Ittlng» when
. deemed expedient.
i f rench Foreign Minister Richon
• drove to Prince Murat's palace and
picked up President Wilson there
shortly before the opening of the eon
gross. They drove to the "Quai
d'Orsay" together.
Poincare entered the hall shortly
j afterward. There was a crowd outside
I the buildings, but the automobiles
j bearing delegates Uash(Hi directly into
■ the courtyard, being distinguished by
the flags fluttering from their hoo.ls
Therefore there was no opportunity
for a big demonstration.
THREE SIDED TABLE.
In the center of the conference hall
was a large table with three sides ffhr
ntral was occupied by Poincare,
, with Wilson and the American deleg.<
tinn on his right, while Lloyd George
and the British delegation sat on his
; left. Nine delegate« from the British
j dominions had places still farther to
th» left. At the right of the American
I delegation sat Clemenceau and lYench
I representatives, and with them Mar
shal Fooh. not as a member of tin*
J'lTnch group, but us representative ot
the inter-allied command.
Still further along: the table were
the delegates from Rumania. Slam and
( fruffuay In the order named. Du the
other side were the representatives m
j aran> Bolivia, China, lOeuador Oukte
ma | a , Honduras. Nicaragua Peru Pei
Serbia. Czecho-Slov ika and llke
V ise Prince Kmlr Ynyssal, representing
bis father, the Arabian kind of the
lied jaz.
WILSON IN BIG CHAIR.
All the delegates were seated in or
dinary chairs except \\ ilson and Poin
rare, who occupied big chairs of state.
Before the congress opened. Poinenre
shook bands with all the representa
tives. Andre Tardieu, of the French
group, was the first to enter the hall.
Henrj W hite was the first American
delegate to enter. Koch followed.
They began arriving rapidly. There
were only a few minutes of general
■■envoi- a tion and handshaking. Wilson
(Continued on Page Two.)

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