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Evening capital news. (Boise, Idaho) 1901-1927, January 22, 1919, Image 2

Image and text provided by Idaho State Historical Society

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn88056024/1919-01-22/ed-1/seq-2/

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TUE LUS
State Council of Defense 13 In
formed That He Asks Con
gress for Hundred Million
Dollars.
TWO DAYS' COST OF WAR
Nothing Stands in Way of Pro
ceeding With Plans Except
Appropriation All of Which
Will Be Returned.
Tlie appropriation of a sum equal
to but two clays' cost of the groat war
will r< claim and make productive
thousands of farm homos in this coun
try in many slates, including Idaho,
f « » 1 * returning soldiers. That is the
plan of Franklin K. Lane, secretary of
the interior, tlie state council of this
state has been informed. The plans to
put this amount of money to work
bringing about t lie reclamation are
made. Nothin« - stands in the way ex
cept the pending appropriation, all of
which will be returned to the govern
ment when the reclaimed lands pay
out.
STATEMENT RECEIVED.
The following statement was sub
mitted to the state council by the
Washington author!iic.s:
"Secretary Lane is before congress
after $1 00,non,000 for land develop
ment for returning - soldiers. President
approved in bis message to congress,
Roosevelt approved before death in a
big magazine article. LsmC wants to
create farms by reclaiming arid lands
in west, draining swamps in south and
clearing cut-over lands in north. Every
state affected. Present bill equals
only two days' cost of war. It. really
should be increased. On Australian
basis for same work a proportional
cost to America would be four billions.
"Canada offers soldiers a possible
total of Ü20 acres land and $3000 cash.
Lane wants to employ soldiers on the
reclamation work at full wages, have
them build the homes, slock the farms
and sell them to them on 40-year basis
at 4 per cent, cost to be finally re
turned to government. The south has
4 0,000,000 acres alone, the entire coun
try 250,000,000 acres to be developed.
Roads also needed. Development of
farms will develop manufacturing to
supply implements and buildings. No
time to wait for already surplus labor
idle in many states. If action now
land can get much work done during
present year when needed. Delay will
postpone w^rk into 1920.
"Lane appeared before a caucus of
the house and made remarkable speech
quoting from some of the 1000 letters
the soldiers have written him. Women
also writing. With the $100,000 pre
viously furnished for survey the work
has been carried on and nothing
stands in the way of going ahead but
the government's loan, not gift, of the
necessary mon- . This should not in
terfere with present farm product
market for in : as*- in city popula
tion increasing present heavy demands
on present, farm product a Even be
f' »e war we had to import F - f from
Argentine. Present money asked will
only provide some 25,000 farms. Sec
retary requests widr st possible pub
licity and that this also be laid before
your state, county and community
co u noils.'*
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RolifIIom
NORTHWEST CASUALTIES
' IDAHO.
Killed in action—Private Jakob A.
Nibak, Kellogg.
Died of wounds—Private Ray E.
blicrrer, Payette.
Returned, to duty, previously reported
missing—Private Marion C. Hampton.
•Franklin.
WASHINGTON.
Died from wounds - Private Thomas
Hughes, Beattie.
Died of dis«., t Private Wilford P.
Chausser, Pacific.
Missing Corporal Stephen A. En
right, llillyard.
Wounded severely—-Sergeant Stephen
E. Hoc, Stan wood.
OREGON.
Died of disease Sergeant Newman
G. Dennis, Dallas; Private Allen <7.
White, Kirrky.
The following casualties arc report« 1
by the commanding general of the
American expeditionary forces;
Killed in action ............ ... f,y
Died from wounds............... 4 5
Died of accident and other causes.. «>
Missing in action ................. 20
Died in aeroplane accident..... ... J
Died of disease.................. 97
Wounded severely .........
Total
.ut
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BIG SLIM, MOVIE STAR. DIES.
Loa Angeles, Cal., Jan. ÏL'.- James
M. Fitzgerald, Known in the movies as
"Big Slim," til" tallest comedian on
the seroen, is demi here today, an
Influenza victim. Fitzgerald was H feet
6 Inches tall.
»ROUP
8r«*modte croup in
usually relieved with
one application of—
NEW PRICES 30c, 60c, 61.20
FRANCE PAYS GENERAL PERSHING HIGHEST HONOR
-- .........
mm
£^y
-- - -
General Pershing being awarded the Grand Cross of the Legion of Honor by President Poincare of France.
General Pershing has been hon
ored many times by the French re
public for his services in the war.
CURB ü. S. EXPORTS
Decrease for 1918 of Only
$83,000,000 From Record
1917 Year; Imports Show
Gain of $79,000,000 Over
Last Year.
Washington, Jan. 22- In spite of
drastic export regulations, due to the
war, the total exports for the United
States in 1918 showed a decrease of
only $83,000.000 as compared with 1917.
Total export for the year was $6,150.
000,000, the department of commerce
announced today.
Imports for the year were $3,031,
000,000, a gain of $79,000,000 over the
previous year.
Exports for December, the first full
month after the signing of the arm
istice, ggregated $5Gi;,000,000. This
figure is $14,000,00 higher than that of
November. As compand with De
cember. 19JR, were $34,000,000 less.
Imports for December were $211,
600,009. The November imports I
reai bed the high figure of $251,000,000. ]
For December, 1917, the imports were
$228,000,000. I
Imports as well as exports of gold j
continued to decrease during the cal- ;
ondar year of 1 928, when tBe gold im-j
ports were $62,000,000 end the gold ex- !
ports $41,000,000. imports of gold In
1917 were $••■" 2 , 000 ,*iOu, and gold im
ports were $372,000,000.
Imports of silver increased from
$53,000,000 in 1917, t«> $71,000,000 in
1918. Silver exports in , used from
$84,000.000 m 1917, to $2 5 3,000,000 for
1918, the report shows.
December exports of silver set a
record for three years, r ecording to
the announcement. The "tuai exports
of silver totalled $48,000,' " 0 .
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Mllfl/IQETB ABRtTOTQ MAnC
l\J UiVi jL.n MnnCO I O LIMUlL
•---------- ,
Tlmt. the city of Boise is w< il
CITY WELL BEHAVED
ACCORDING TO SMALL
haved and constantly under control of
the police and detcctiv« department as
regards wrong-doing, is evidenced by
the ! :icl that in 22 days this month
thor* have been but nine arrests; live
of whom wer«- for speeding two for
robbery, one for bootlegging and one
for being drunk.
By these figures
seen that there wei
i « sts made for or in
nature, as speedinj
do not constitute v
in the « yes of the lax
"Tills has been th
so tar that I have eve rseen since my j
connection with the force," said "Cap.'')
SheIIworth this morning, which speaks!
well for the quality of Boise's citizens
ami also f».r the efficiency of the police
and detective departments.
it will be readily
really b it two ar
<*f an important
; and drunkenness
cry heinous crimes
OPPOSES PR0HI PROVISO
IN WORLD LEAGUE PACT
"of nations program
"1 do not believe It would ho
best inti rests of the prohibition
to take this m tlon," he said.
Indianapolis, Tn«b, Jan. 22. - J. Frank
Manly, candidate for president on the
Prohibition ticket in 1916, today do
w'.T'i 1 , 'r, n; V". ' n ;; 1, " l , in * a
won«! prohibition proviso in the league I
.. P . .. ... .
! " matter of prohibition should |
be left up t.*> tin* various countries in
the league of nations.''
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cl« neat month *
. t
> the j
•aus« ;
OCEAN RATES'REDUCTION I
TO AID U. S. EXPORTERS
Washington, j, tn .
porters will soon b«
sueeoasfull y with f..
ers as a result ,,r a t
policy in
American ex
ile to compete
a wamifactur
shippin g hoard
an rales, Sec
retary Hod field de« land today.
field's announcement followed receipt
of a ruble from «'halrmun Hurley of
the «hipping hoard to the ef feel that a
further reduction in
peeled.
may
The most recent honor paid him
was the greatest that France can
bestow. In the name of Franco

MS PLACE TONIGHT
Directors of Local Association
and Friends Will Gather at
Festive Board, Make Merry
and Listen to Reports and
Speech.
The annual banquet bf the directors
and friends of the local Young Men's
Christian association, in charge of
Richard E. Randall, general secretary,
will be held promptly at 6:15 p. ni., in
the rooms of the association on Tenth
street, tonight, with many men of
state-wide prominence in attendance.
The banquet will be featured by an
utter absence of long and tiresome
speeches, Rev. Willsle Martin, who
will deliver one of his customary en
joyable talks on "When the Boys
Come Home," being the only speaker
scheduled. The balance of the even
ing';; entertainment will he taken up
by reports by General Secretary Ran
dall, Judge Dietrich, president of the
association, and reports covering the
work done the past year.
Governor D. W. Davis will be a
guest of honor, as will also Slate Y.
M. C. A. Secretary Van Akin of Mon
tana, who will talk very briefly on the
needs r,f the organization and what it
has accomplished
The tables will be arranged in the
form of the familiar "Y" triangle, and
140 guests have signified their inten
tion of being present. The top of tho
triangle the flat part—will be com
posed of a table seating the 16 boys
who participated in the Christmas
membership drive; the winners lac
ing the speakers, the losers facing
'away from the rostrum. "Col.'' Pnwell,
commanding the "Cleansweepers' who
won the contest, will tell how he won,
ami "Cnl." Swan, who had charge of j
the losers, will tell how he lost. New j
officers for tho coining year will be'to
eb « ted during the banquet.
Following the banquet, the guests 1
W;!I 1,0 entertained at th»» opening of j
the Commercial Basketball league by
witnessing two fast games between
be-{equally matched teams.
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PLAN BILL TO TURNBACK
Or'delivery V*5* bales a Tear 'for
I tj irr0 V e*us
A London firm is th« buyer. The
Oregon hop man has been Indepe ndent
of the American brewer ever since the
.nrmlatica was signed, when English
| dl manilB befa
J
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WIRES TO PRIVATE HANDS
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24 and 25 are the telephone numbers
of The Capital News. tf ,
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HOPS HIT RECORD PRICE. j
Portland. Ore., Jan. 22.-Not W ith
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Washington, Jan. 22.—A resolution ]
'for immediate repeal of government,
wire control may be brought into the
l ouse In tin* next few days.
Encouraged by their success In '
! burying in committee the bill to take j
lover the wireless systems, oponenta
jof [government ownership today were
* oon * ,df ' rIng n measure to return the
t wires and cables to private hands at
once.
standing the fact that prohibition is
scheduled for the United States, the
highest price ever paid for hops is on
record lure today.
Nine thousand bales of Oregon hops.
p.,I< 1 yesterday for »,100.000. nt the ratel
J5 rents a pound. The contract 1
j
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hi me st rong.
I
Only One Kind
of
Post
Toastie;
— says(
Best Corn Flakes Mac*
President Poincare bestowed upon
the general the Grand Cross of
the Lotion of Honor.
GAVE HIS LIFE FOR
CAUSE OF HUMANITY
John McLean.
U. 3. LABOR TEACHES
Union Leaders Seek to Discour
By J. W
New York, J..
jinfluene
j discouru
j measure by European labor lead'
impress upon Europe's working men
Itliat the way to earn more money is to
1 produce more goods.
j This is a startling .doctrine for Eu
,rope, where leisure is highly prized
jml speed in production is strictly lim
lited by trades unions. "Pep" is a new
J xvord to Europeans, which America is
now trying to introduce to them.
* Europe's agitators have long been
running to the national legislatures for
j increases in the standard of living.
Help from the state has been their es
sential condition of economic improve
ment Europeans are now learning
I that in the United States the working
! men have not formed powerful political
; parties and instead of maintaining
j class representation in congress, they
j improve their economic status by di
et negotiations with their employers.
PLAN SOCIALIST PARLEY.
The Huropt an labor lenders who
j want the tsate to act for them in at-
tabling greater economic comfon me
, planning to hold a, congress in Switz-
jerland under Socialistic auspices. The
j Americans have declined to attend this
«"tventiun. The Swiss meeting, (hero
! lore, cannot have a wide International
j influence.and will not ( xert much pres
sure on the deliberations of the peace
I congress.
Samuel Gompers wants to hold a
ASON.
American labor,-he
are at work attempting to
political agitation as a class
uid
ru n
as
age Political Agitation
Class Measure; Aliens Intro
duced to Doctrine of "Pop."
]
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rlval ln,£-rnatlonal labor convention In
Paris. The essential purpose of his as
sembly would be to impress American
Urals of high productivity at high!
wages upon Europeumd to persuade the
peace congress to recommend action to
this end.
PADEREWSKI ASKS RECOGNI
TION.
Warsaw, Jan. ::: -Ignace Fade:
euski, president of the new Polish r*
public, having completed formation «
the cabinet, has sent a note to
allies requesting recognition of
provisional government of Poland
one of the allies.
RUSSIAN WRITER DEAD.
Los Angeles. Cal.. Jan. 22. -Unptnlri
Peter Demons, Russie n writer, who is
said to have contributed much to the
overthrow of the Romanoffs through
hls work in allied countries, is dead
here today.
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He had been in
years, having fled
the czar's wrath.
this country 40
Russia to escape
Transport Cretic Docks at New
York With 1911 Aboard;
Manchuria in Port, Laden
With 4557 Ove rseas Troops.
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Npw York, Jan. : The transport J
Cretic from Brest arrived here today I
with 1911 men, and the Manchuria
from St. N a zaire with 4557 men. The
Cretic brought the 55th regiment coast .
artillery complete, 4 1 officers and 1557 I
men, and also casuals, sick and i
wounded.
The Manchuria's list includes the
87th division headquarters company,
detachments of the 312th sanitary !
train, 39th division, 301st trench nmr- I
tqr battery, seventh heavy martor old-!
nance repair shop from Camp Merritt, j
466th engineers' pontoon train, 97th !
aero squadron, 154th aero squadron
from Fort Slocum, 2d casual ordnance
battalion, parts from Camp Upton,
Camp Dix and Camp Merritt, casual :
companies 126, 127 and 128, and sick
and wound'd.
FOR EARLY CONVOY.
Washington, Jan. 22. Vsslgnment to
early convoy was announced by the
war department today with respect to
the following organizations:
Ninetieth and 104th aero squadrons.
Thirtieth company transport corps.
First and second casual company,
transportation corps, and the follow
ing replacement and salvage compa
nies of the 332d battalion: 376, 377,
378. 379, 3S0 and 3X1.
Three hundred and fourth battalion
with the 307th. 318th. 335d, 326th, 337th
replacement and salvage companies.
Casual companies A. B and C, Octo
ber automat i< replacement draft;
303rd eent'-r oank company unit) ce
ment mill companies 2. 4 and 6: quar
termaster casual company 3, 17th and
18th balloon companies, 109th field
signal battalions, 464th pontoon train,
407th telegraph battalion, 58th regi
ment coast artillery, less third bat
talion and base hospital 24.
(Continued from Page One.)
•«.re considering the possibility of
finding homes elsewhere.
"Italy's population actually in
creased ns a result, of the war. Nor**,
mal emmigration was dammed up
while hundreds of thousands of men
returned home to Tight.
LONG FOR HOMELANDS.
"The movement of peoples is not
sqh Jy westward, however. Hundfreds
of thousands of Europeans, for one
j reason or another, returned from Am
erica to their homes each year. The
I war stopped this ebb. particularly for
'citizens of neutral countries. Multiply
this annual emmigration by four and
you hav* a vast army waiting im
j patiently in America, for an oppor
tunity to go hack to their homelands.
! Many of those are dissatisfied with
their position in American society,
' where they are regarded as menials.
! They expect to return home and buy
farms and become important and re
spected citizens, tust.on<" S of this at
titude arc not isolated, but g* aeral.
"There is also a widespread re
sentment among the immigrants from
neutral countries over what they con
sider America's rough shod treatment
of them in war time. Tns provides
im.ntiv« for man- i* return
heme. There is no doubt tl.tt many
European nations are
is'.ation for restriction «
j tion, hoping to keep tin
home. On the other hand, America
and other lands of promise doubtless
will have* up barriers, especially since
they desire to protect the interests of
their returning soldiers.
"The peace congress should take up
the problems presented by libs situa
tion and work ont comprehensive
plans from tho standpoint of tho
world's interest:-."
SILTS FI FOR
We Eat Too Much Moat Which
Clogs Kidneys, Then the
Back Hurts.
nsidering leg
"I einmigra
pie at
Most folks !
like tho bon
clogged and ne
ly, else wo h
misery In the
>rget that the kidneys.
Is, g« t sluggish and
d a flushing occasional
ve backache and dull
kidney region, se voie
torpid
» and
(headaches, rheumatic twinges,
jhver, acid sl " m '" s " ' l '* 4 ssn '
j aW sorts ' r bladder disorders.
You «Imply must keep youi- kldne
active and
, t ah,
thoilithiu
thejkidm
take
clean, thus avoiding serious compliea
, tions.
a well-known local druggist «ays he
i, and the moment, yu
pain in the kidne
ut four ounces of .lad
good drug store here,
■niul in a glass of water
t lor ;i lew days and
ill thi n act film. This
Its is made from the acid of|
I lemon juice, combined with
i is harmless to flush clogged
gion,
I Sa It from an
take u tablespi
before break G
your kidney
I famous
grapes
• ant
• vs and stimulate them to normal
activity. U al o neutralizes the acids
in the urine ho it. no long« r irritates,
thus cmling bladder disorders.
Jad .Salts is harmless; imxpcnsiv
makes a delightful effervescent hthia-i
water drink which everybody Htould
ami then to "keep their kidneys
soils lots of Jad Salts to folks who be
lieve in overcoming kidney trouble
while it is only trouble.—Adv.
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VIVIAN
MARTIN
-IN
-A Happy,
-Snappy
-Story
JANE GOES
A-WOOING
A COMEDY
A SCENIC
MAJESTIC
TODAY
TOMORROW
A Western Photo-Drama of California in
the Days of Road Agents and Vigilantes
THE MIDNIGHT
■— STAGE ■■■
WITH FRANK KEENAN
AMERICA'S GREATEST CHARACTER ACTOR
Mr. Krennn, plays In this photo-drama a dual roi» —
two distinct and separate characters, is far apart as
the poles, one man square and honest and upright—
the other an arch-thief and rond ngent. Their path«
cross In this golden rimmed melting pot of the west.
WE ARE ABLE TO GET THIS SPLENDID PICTURE
FOR ONE DAY ONLY
SCENIC
COMEDY
STRAND—TODAY" ONLY
Many Kinds of Rheumatism
One Sure Mode of Treatment
Authorities Say Don't Use Liniments.
Treat It Through the Blood.
You Can't Rub It Out!
Whether your trouble Is Sciatica,
Lumbago or the dreaded Articular
Rheumatism, the answer is tin* same.;
Voit must treat it through the blood.
That is the only way to rid the system
ef uric acid, purify the blood and re-!
vtalize the- nerves. If the blood is
freed from impurities. If the Wood Is
must g". This in short is the extra
knowledge gained by the research la
boratories of the K. S. S. Co., in At
Manta. There tests have been made for
'ars. They know what. Rheuma
SPECIAL MEETM6 T0KI8HT
BOISE CHAPTER HO. 3, R. A. M.
at 7:30 o'clock. Work M. E. M, Degree.
SPECIAL MEETING THURSDAY EVENING
at 6:30 o'clock. Work R. A. Degree.
Refreshments will be served.
ARCH CUNNINGHAM, H. P.
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Despite Four Years of World
.
Strife, Prosperity Rules in I
American Banking' Affairs.
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Washington, Jan. 22 — American
hanks have come through the four and
n,,e half years of International stress
, ' i!h ÎOHS Ut their depositors of less
than dollars in each $1,000,000 in
p * n hank failures. An this fig
ure, by the way of comparison, was
only one ninth of the average loss
during the 33 year period preceding
1 h*' outbreak of the world war, nc
cordin'; - to the annual report of the
ompt roller of the currency made
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VU {'\\\ Hii ' ♦
Although the hanks nf the United '
Suit . have hern subject to strains,!
dangers, burdens and trials to an un- j
usual degree, the report shows they !
have prospered. The banking power
Tho Capital Newt telephone numbers
are 24 and 25. tf
tism la. They know that R. S. R., the
remarkable lbood tonic, which they
originated, will relieve you of Rheu
matism. Take S. S. S. today. The
complete recovery of thousand« of
sufferers by the use of S. S. S. is posi
tive proof that you can be relieved. S.
H. S. is a blood tonic—a purifier that
restores the blood, revitalizes it.
cleanses it, makes tt pure as It was
before It became poisoned with impitr
mes. S. S. S. gives it strength to
drive out these impurities- the uric
acid and organic poison and with it
Die Rheumatism, r iet S. S. S. nt your
druggist's. If you need special advice,
write Medical Adviser. 44« Swift I.a
bora tory, Atlanta, Ha.-—Adv.
"f the nation now totals more than
for! y billion dollars, a gain of over
*5,000,000,000 in the year that America
actually hail a part in tile war. Htinoe
'.lane 1011 , or through the period
\\«icu tile whole of Europe was em
l,1 ' oll( ' <i . th « banking: power of this na
i[on has .lumped an average of four
billion dollars a year, the report
'«hows,
Superfluous Hair
Ik^Uiraefe
nrMIr.rt«, th. orttfl.I niHu*
liquid, aprrntpu ou an ontlrrly dlf
twml principle from any other
method. It roh* hair of It* vital
ity by attacking It under the akin.
Only icenniae DeMIracle has a
mone?-buck Ruarantee la each
partake, q, toilet enuntera In tide,
"t nud «2 alaea, or hy mall from
ua In plain wrapper on receipt of
price.
FREE *>«H>k With testimonials of
li i K h r a t amhoritiea n.
pin Ins what raunen hair on fate,
neck and arma, why It Increases
and how DrMIrnrle devitalises It.
mailed In plain sealed envelope on
request. DeMiraele, Park Are. and
120th St— New York. **«•■»*

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