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Evening capital news. (Boise, Idaho) 1901-1927, January 25, 1919, Image 1

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WEATHER
EVENING CAPITAL NEWS
ALL THE NEWS
FIRST
VOL. XLII.
BOISE. IDA HO, SATURDAY, .IAN. 25, 1919
No. 11
915,553 YANKS
IN U. S. CAMPS
DISMISSED UP
TO JANUARY 24
Orders for Discharges Total
1.300,900 Men; America Far
Ahead of Britain in Demobil
ization, March Says.
ALLIED FORCES ON WEST
FRONT NOV. 1, 5.927,100
U. S. Had 1,950,100 Ration.
Strength; Staff Chief De
clares Allied Troops in Rus
sia Hold the Upper Hand.
■\Y.is1im s ton,
tii'ii t-f sol dir* h
uv» to January
r «.mens.
Jan. 25— Domobi l i/ta
in the I'nited States
24 totalled 85S.1S7 ond
Chief of Staff March
announced today. Orders for tbs
charges total 1,300,900 men. America
dismissed at a faster rate than (Treat
Britain, for up to January 19, Kng>,
lend had dismissed 011,950 men and*
12.579 officers.
March announced for the first
time the official figures of the al
lied strength on the front as of j
November 1, The ration strength— j
that it the total force to be fed— i
on the west front was: France,
2.259.000; United States, 1,950,100;
Britain (including Portugese) 1,
718.000.
The department's first advices as to
the recent fighting in tin- Archangel
r- . '.n showed that tin* Bolshevik at
tm k on three sides of the allied force,
jm hiding two American companies,
h-i 1 compelled evacuation of I'. tpe
tionRM and retreat west of Kania. The
American losses were ten killed, D
wounded and 11
near I 'stpegi nda.
March declared
h.» never. 1- large
the situation.
et the problems imulv
sin«
die allie«
enough t<
•t ion
th
ma
Mai
end I
INSIGNIA.
the national army
soldiers ran re
insignia upon re
fry, but that offi
■gular outfits will
• n ni
1 but the
now
the shipping
eh that assign
- for American
faetorily. Gen
g to March, has
or desire of rc
er ! 1
i
!
j
I
j
U!
Al»
n
Former
y&se
* Says
*Ltfst .»rove Its Case
Reds' Doctrine Wins,
Iritish Statesman;
Verdict at Peace Conclave.
Paris, Jan. 2 5
mst settle tie*
ti«i|
tod r
th«
ouf.
«leckt
Tli
im use disguising the fact
tlia i \ a I i o 11 a ! I an is . . :. 1 1 in , to* ,d.
"ll Nationalism is unable to prove
lis fitst.* thin Bolshevism win . Bol
shevism proposes ela.-s distinctions
«gainst national distinctions. Co-oper
ation among tin nations can solve the
problems which provide tin* whole
basis foi Bolshevism."
The statt . -man d* ohm d that, one of
tin 1 bi.;;;
van!
steps l
Spi nd of Itolshevisit! v
national labor législatif
laus providing tinitnin
lioars of employment.
Sueh legislation, he pointed out, will
fiiso react in favor of better Industrial
end commercial conditions.
king the j
>uhi bt* ii;t « i
l, particularly j
wages and
CONGRESS JAMMED ON
INHERITANCE TAX ISSUE
Washington, Jan. 25 —Congress is
«gain in a jam on taxes.
The $6,000,000,000 bill is being held
in conference by a wrangle between
the house and senate over inheritance
taxes. From all quarters demands are
coining that congress get down to
action on the measure. The treasury
department is trying in vain to speed
up final passage.
The house wants inheritance taxes
collected before legatees have been
paid their share. The senate wants to
collect, from legatees separately upon
their shares.
j
i
AID TO OWN CITIZENS
DEMANDED NOW THAT
ALIENS TO BE HELPED
Kenyon Insists on Immediate Consid
eration of $100,000,000 Bill to Aid
the Unemployed.
By L. C. MARTIN.
Washington, Jan. 25. - Having
dispensed aid to Kurope's starving
millions, congress, next week, is to
he called on for quick action on
the pressing domestic problem of
unemployment.
Senator K mi yon and others, 1o
■fvhom appeals for emergency legis
lation are coming from mayors,
governors, chnmbi*rs of commerce
and plain citizens out of work,
will demand immediate considera
tion of the bill creating an emer
gency public works boards with
money to employ thousands.
"We have voted $l(»<i,00o t 000 to
Kurope's hungry," said Kenyon to
day. "Do wo refuse to appropriate
at least an equal sum to keep
thousand.*- of Americans from go
ing hungry:"
Kenyon's bill provides $190,000,
099 as an emergency land to start
public works.
"< '! the money wo spend for
food for Kurope, much will never
be returned to the public treasury
and wo don't grudge it." he con
tinued. "Rut every dollar used
now to put an American to work
means dividend: to America. Pub
lic works provide permanent public
improvement."
Concerning Colonies; Would
$ j
r
effective international j
momlx r «if the Uhitish
t told the United Press !
Peace Envoy Outlines Program
Keep Captured German Pos
sessions Merely on Trust.
Paris, j
prepared
toward est
nations, a
instrument
i h ic« dele?
make i
ishm.cn t «
ritain
f thc
. Hi
colonie
•ts on
sp • 'll •
y named t
Mesor
I in i.i
dy to meet the tes
Our proposal lik* 1,
over colonies we wo
entirely on trust," he
be strictly accountabl*
nations
trust« e:
It
hip
as '
I
la* BriL it : re
i. j
. will, be t.» bike
a from Germany ;
said. "We would;
to the league of i
in tu rally follows that our
vould continu« <>nl\ so ,
<*re able to render a satis
factor;* accounting.
REGARDING FAR EAST.
"The same is true regarding
Mesopotamian countries and the
1
w ; M u ,: s subject to inL ! nation.li /a -
<i* n. The Suez canal already is ad- j
minist r <1 by an international private j
«•« rpoiata.n, but that h ardly meets the .
present demands. Tie baling ora vails |
liât U in us l come under th* hue in 's ;
administration." i
Ask* d if he thought this should also
I'ply to the 1'anania canal, h • Replied j
was up !.. America. j
OTHER WATERWAYS. j
•'Line of the principles of the 1*.-ague
the principles of the 1*.-ague
in national
non -in ter f
but naturally this side of the
s the ease of the Panama
I nah *vous to that of the Sue/,
•I* Unv . i can only discuss
t things v, i.* are prepared to con
"Other waterways that are likely to
t om* before the league are the Danube,
Rh«>ne, Vistula, S< h* ldt, Struma, « 'on
go, Amazon, and all others s* rving
n
thn
one country. The railways
probably will be Berlin to Bagdad, the
Cap** to Cairo, and the Siberian, and
'.ifious short* ! roads serving the Bal
kan countries."
CHARGE PLOT TO AID
U. S. FOES OF WILSON
•b*n. 25. -The Populäre, Jean i
' - pup* r, eh.*r«**s that a speak- *
the Franeo-&iav society urged
'"I 1 " 1 ? "f »'i'll ImW propagandists '
the
b Amorim to "join bands with tlie
Imperialist plutoc< rats of the senate."
In opposition to Wilson's peace pro
gram.
Fra mo-Amerlean circles today re
fund to take tlti' matter seriously,
pointing to It as a "typical Instance
of tin* attitude In sunn* qu;i
d States
in tli©
in E
I
RULES YANKS CAN STAY
IN ARMY IF THEY DESIRE
Washington, Jan. 25—Soldiers, who
w'oukl he Jobless if turned out of the
army, can remain in the service tem
porarily upon their own request, ac
cording to war orders just issued.
Thi« does not. bind them to remain
any considerable time.
URGE CHANGE IN GAME LAW.
Twin Falls, Ida., Jan. 25—Through
Deputy Game Warden Joe Fitzsim
mons, the Twin Falls Rod and Gun
club presented today, at a meeting of
g«9m«' wardens and sportsmen con
vened In Hois«* by Governor Davis, its
resolutions recommending the division
of tlie state into districts of one coun
ty each, to be governed by a game
commission of three members serving
without compensation and with power
*° make and enforce provisions for the
protection of game in the district.
KMG NICHOLAS
CLAMS SERBS
PLAN TO GRAB
HIS MONARCHY
Aged Ruler of Montenegro Tells
Many Troubles to U. P.
Scribe; Looks to Wilson to
Save His Throne.
WILLING TO ABDICATE. HE
SAYS, TO HELP SUBJECTS
Declares Serbian Army Occu
pied Montenegro When Arm
istice Signed, Then Attempt-'
ed Annex Country by Force.
Rv WILLIAM PHILLIP SIMMS'.
Paris, Jan. 25. -King Nicholas, the
aged ruler of Montenegro, believes bis
little nation should enjoy the same
right of self determination as larger
countries. He expressed confidence
today that the peace congress will en
force the application of this principle.
Tn an interview with the United
Press, Nicholas declared that Serbia is
attempting forcibly to annex Monte
negro. rather than join with her in
formation of a new Jugo-Slav state.
This alleged attitude of Serbia is be
lieved to have constituted one of the
elements which resulted in the warn
ing issued yesterday by the supreme
war council, that claims to territory
seized by arms will receive no reéogni
tion from the peace congress.
ON DOUBTFUL GROUND.
Nicholas, who is living in the Hotel
Rue de Rivoli, is watching the work
af the peace conference closely, to
letermine whether he is to be a king
without a kingdom or the ruler of an
independent nation. II«* declared he is
an I iitbusiastie supporter of President
M dson's policies, and that be is will
in " to abide by the Wilsonian test as
«Applied to Montent
means the loss of his crown.
"The Serbian arm; oe npied Monte
negro immediately following the sign
ii'g of the armistice, after the Monté
negrins had driven the Austrians out
tho country," said King Nicholas,
"The Serbian government then hastily
;lt tempted to annex our land by force,
The Serbian agent (Prince Alexander)
not hesitate to assume the Monte
-negrln «-r* wn which I wort, and still
ir legal!*
i ft c
reign of nearly CO
I
j
J
j
i
I
I
J
j
confei
PEOPLE RESISTED.
ishod to go before the peace
ce with the 'union of Serbia
and Montenegro' as an established
fact, explaining to the delegates that
this was the will of the Montenegrin
people. The Montenegrins rose in
arms to defend their rights. They,
like the other Jugo-Slavs, wished to
become part of a confederation rnod
jelled on thc United States, whore many
«'f our soldiers lived for many years,
They wish to see President Wilson's
pence proposal applied to Jugo-Slavia
j--that is. that the people should decide
their own fat**.
und«
Kerl
Mon
and
"T am absolutely in accord with my
people, but Serbia insists that any
move by tin* lo. Slav people should
receive sanction of the prince regent
of Serbia. Profiting by the extreme
misery of my people, who have lived
under war conditions since 1912, the
■inns have attempted to win the j
tenegrlns by distribution of silver!
f'*od, these going only to those
who did not oppose Serbian activity. j
"But this game was unsuccessful.
Bloody fighting has taken place be
(Continued on Page Two.)
i --------
*
Economy Pleas Threaten Defeat
' t , „ , _
large Naval Program;
for large Naval
Voters Oppose Tax Increase.
Jan. 25 Pleas to con
ernmeiUal economy are
< administrations large
Washing!
gross for j
threatening
naval pi'ogi
I S* v« raj big fleet advocates on the
jhou.se naval committee are wavering
j because of letters from constituents
who oppose extensive naval construc
tion on the sole ground that it would
increase the already large federal
taxes.
This situation has prevented the
committee vote on the new three-year
building program, scheduled for last
Thursday, and delayed final action for
a week to see if naval constructors
«'an not make another out in their
plans without materially Injuring the
big navy plans.
Administration supporters in com
mittee have enough votes to put the
Daniels' recommendations for a new
three-year program through but do
not want to bring a bill that can not
g« t support In the house.
ONLY A ONE-DAY VISIT.
Paris, Jan. 25. -President Wilson will
make a one-day visit to the devastated
regions Sunday, it was asserted today,
it is believed he will go to the Rheims
'district. i
FRENCH PAPER SAYS
LENINITES AGREE TO
CONFER WITH ALLIES
The Humanité Publishes Unconfirmed
Report to That Effect; Reds Ask
More Details.
Paris. ,T:in, 25—The Humanité
published an unconfirmed report
today saying- the Russian soviet
government has agreed to (he
principles of the point meeting
proposed by the associated pow
ers.
The report said the Bolshevik!
believed the Princes' Islands to be
too far from their seat of govern
ment. but were ready to make
this concession. The soviet gov
ernment. it was said, had asked
further confirmation of the pro
posal which was sent out by wire
less.
The Humanité, a Socialist daily,
was the first newspaper to publish
Foreign Minister Bichons rec* nt
reply to the original British pro
posal for partial recognition of the
sov'.t ts in which Pichon refused to
consider such a proposition.
j
)
j
LANCE
I
------. ;
Two Crucial Battles Between!
-, ...
Kepublican
Royalist and
Forces Scheduled Today for
Ccntrol of Lisbon and Oporto
j tugal
Dispatches from lipo, Spain, today
indicated that government troops
about to attack Oporto in great
A military airplane is said to
dropped leaflets over the city, warn
ing foreigners t « » leave to avoid being
London, Jan. 25—The fate of For
expected to bo decided in two
important battles, which may already
be under way today.
The fighting will probably center
about Oporto, where the Monarchists
bave established the seat of govern
ment, and Lisbon, where the Republi
can government still holds out.
slaughtered. Another dispatch said a
government destroyer bombarded the
city lust night. Prev ious advices in
dicated a concentration of Republican
forces in the vicinity of Oporto.
IN ROYALISTS' HANDS,
Lisbon, apparently, is partially in
the hands of the
defection of a portion of the garrison
The Monarchist leader at Cruelas
wirelessed the Royalist commander in
Oporto that the cavalry units, part of
the infantry, several butteries of ar
tillery and many civilians In Lisbon
had joined the Royalist revolution
aries. other reports said the garrisons
of the city forts were remaining loyal
to the republic.
The Monarchists appeared to be
gaining strength in northern provinces,
but the issue will be decided in pos
session of Lisbon and Oporto.
SEVEN WARRANTS SERVED
ON KANSAS CITY STRIKERS
Iva
ity, Kansas, Jan. 25- Seven
of 21 wan aids, issued as a result of
federal investigation of the recent
dynamiting and stoning during the
street car strike here, had been served
today.
The arrests followed complaints by
the Kansas City .Street Railway com
pany that it is being subjected to what
is termed in labor circles as "scien
tific: sabotage" destruction of prop
erty without Injury to persons.
' (l \'
a*a
Royalists through
PLAN RATIONS FOR IDLE
SHIPBUILDING STRIKERS
Seattle, "Wash., Jan. 25 -—Seattle
shipyard strikers need have no worry
over tlie food problem should the
yards continue to lie Idle, according to
Fred Nelson, vice president of the
metal trades council. He an non mad
plans for a co-operative market where
all strikers with families may obtain
groceries on credit.
Go-operative market plans follow
the announcement by the Retail
Grocers Association that ship yard
workers would be t * fused credit as
long as they continued out of em
ployment. 1
FRISCO PHONE OPERATORS
THREATEN TO QUIT JOBS
San FranciHio, Jan. 25 San Fran
cisco telephone operators will take a
strike vote next Tuesday night. Miss
K. Schultz, business agent for the
union, announced today. The proposed
strike, plans involve thc whole coast
territory.
Failure o fthe company to accept
an nnnual agreement providing In
crease of wages is given as thc rea
son for the proposed strike.
THE WEATHER
Forecast for Boise and vicinity:
FAIR TONIGHT AND SUNDAY.
For Idaho; Tonight and Sunday,
fair.
Highest temperature yesterday, 41.
Lowest temperature this morning, 28.
Mean temperatuie yesterday, 36.
SEES FRENCH
IMPERALiSTS'
PLOT TO BEAT
WILSON PLAN
Movement Hatched to Combat
the Program of President
Through U. S. Senate's Re
fusal to Ratify Peace Pact.
MAY ATTEMPT TO OUST
CLEMENCEAU MINISTRY
Followers of Napoleonic Ambi
tions, Fearing Loss of Rus
sian Investments, Seek More
Imperialistic Regime.
By J. AY. T. MASON.
New York, Jan. 25.—French imper-
ialists {ire beginning to plan for the
I failure of the peace conference as a
; means of enforcing their own * views
'upon Kurope and America.
Tll °. v have no confidence in their
ability to bring about a permanent
deadlock among the peace delegates,
Mlt th,y !UU c, '" sl,Uring thc >'°* slbil -
|ity of combatting President Wilson in
tin* I lilted States, for the purpose of
persuading the American senate to re
lus** to ratify the peace treaty.
The futility of making headway by
mean - of foreign propaganda in Amer
ica against President Wilson has not
prevented these followers of the Na
poleonic ambition from making a pub
lic proclamation of their desires.
NOTABLES INVOLVED.
There are indications that the idea
is not confined to Frenchmen of un
j f " name " an<1 no !nfluencc * ° ne
*s of the movement Is An
j ,:, r Flu rudame, well known in the
j I'di^-'d States as the alleged discoverer
of Germany's mittol-Kuropa ambitions.
Promi« r Clemenceau, who showed
strung imperialistic sentiments early
in the exchanges of opinion among the
leading peace delegates, has greatly
modified his initial attitude. The
American viewpoint about world dem
ocracy has exercised a moderating in
fluence upon him. But there arc oth< r
French political leaders who have not
the responsibility of defending their
« xtremist views .against the democratic
idealization of America's peace dele
gnt< s. These Frenchmen have not been
converted ns Premier Clemenceau ap
parently has.
FEAR FOR INVESTMENTS.
The possibility exists that they will
attempt to overthrow the Clemenceau
ministry, and establish a government
with more? openly avowed imperialistic
tendem ies. Especially this plan may
bo atti mpted if the Prince's Island
conference among the Russian factions
is without result. The French middle
classes are greatly worried about their
billion dollars invested in Russia,
which ti:e Rolsheviki have repudiated.
If Lie Prince's Island conference gives
assurances that this sum will be re
paid. France will continue to support
M. Clemenceau. If not, Clemenceau
r j
may be overthrown and increasing
French support may be expected by j
Cheradame and his group. ■
-♦♦♦■ j
BOOHS. PACIFISTS;!
Jane Addams Admits She's
Labeled Rightly, but Denies
All Disloyalty Tinge; Is Firm
ly Opposed to All War.
Washington, Jan. 2f. Before the
(lernian propaganda probers today
»as a list of persons with alleged
pacifist tendencies, according to the
military intelligence service.
This list, submitted by Archibald
Stevenson, included Jane Addams.
David Starr Jordan, Morris llillquit.
Fugen«. \. Debs, Srott Nearing.
Frederiek 11, * \v, -, Amos Finchot. Os
wald Villarda and Fouls i*. Buchner.
JANE ADMITS IT.
Chicago, Jan. 25 I am a Pacifist,**
declared Jane Addams today, listed us
a Pacifist with other ''intellectuals" by
Archibald Stevenson of the military
intelligence committee.
"1 am a member of many pacifist
organizations- national and interna
tional and head several of them." as
serted Miss Addams, "but I have been
loyal to my country.
"I did not see the Stevenson list and
f do not know how I got on it. but I
can not change my convictions. I
have been against wars for many
years. * believe there may be found
other methods of adjusting relations
between nations, and I believe it will
l,e speedily found at the Parts con
ference."
32 RATIFICATIONS REPORTED.
Washington. Jan. 25—Wyoming and j
I
Idaho notified the state department j
today of the ratification of the ha
TO TAKE NATION-WIDE
CENSUS OF JOBS OPE1J
TO RETURNING TROOPS
Council of National Defense Strives to
Solve Unemployment Problem,
Increasingly Serious.
New York, Jan. 25.—A nation
wide census of all jobs available
for returning soldiers will be taken
by the United States council of na
tional defense, It was learned here
today.
The council, in a statement, said
that the entire nation-wide machin
ery of the organization Is being put
behind the United States employ
ment service in an effort to meet
the unemployment problems. The
situation is regarded as serious, as
a surplus of common labor exists
In 15 states, and the area of this
unemployment Is reported to be in
creasing, the statement said.
More than 1800 bureaus for re
turning soldiers have already been
created by the council and the em
ployment service, and in these bu
reaus positions open to returning
soldiers and sailors are being list
ed. Governor Clarkson, director of
the council, has telegraphed all
state councils to furnish nt once
data to show the needs of tlie em
ployers.
I
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_ . ^ _ ;
French Steamer Rochambeau,
17 Days Enroute, Docks at
Gotham; Troops of 337th
Field Artillery Brought Home
New York, Jan. 2 5 -The French
liner Rochambeau, several days over
clue, arrived here today with Ameri
can troops aboard. The troops were
part of the 337th field artillery, in
cluding seven officers and 728 men
and part of the 339th field artillery,
including 19 officers and 557 mon.
They were trained at Camp Dodge,
Iowa, and in Kansas and Minnesota.
All expressed regret that they ar
rived In France too late for the fight
ing.
Among officers in the two groups
were: Lieutenant Fred Phillips, Des
Moines; Captain O. L. Nay, « >rd, Neb.;
Captain It. H. FUlius, Denver; Lieu
tenant M. A. fehaw, Lincoln. Neb.;
Lieutenant Willie Whitaker, Daven
port, Iowa; Lieutenant Vern Ceilings,
Bismarck, N. D.. and C. M. Higley,
Cedar Rapids, Iowa.
NO THOUSAN DS BLINDED.
Medical officers who organized the
entire field medical corps of the Am
erican expeditionary forces also re
turned on the liner. Among them was
Colonel Greenwood of Boston, an eye
specialist. He declared untrue the re
port that thousands of American boys
had been blinded during the war, as
serting that official records show' not
more than 110 thus wounded.
One of the best known Salvation
Army workers in France was also on
hoard. She was Captain A. M. Hell- I
brook, Denver, attached to the first j
division. She was wounded by a shell
at Cheppy when the Germans shelled
the base in an attempt t>> demolish a
hospital.
Lyon, of Columbus, Ohio, rnr-
respondent of the Newspaper Enter-
prise association, brought back a
description of high prices and scant
food in Berlin. He said he was one of
the first Americans who had been in
Berlin to reach the United States.
The Rochambeau was 17 days on the
trip over, having put into Halifax for
fuel and water.
NAT GOODWIN'S "FIFTH"
MARRIES ARMY OFFICER
;
t
New York, Jan. 25—Marjarie Moor- j
land, who was the fifth w ife of Nat !
Goodwin, is now' the bride of Lieu- j
tenant Ray Gilson, it became known i
today. They were married last Mon- I
day. This is Mrs. Gilson's third mar
ring«'. She divorced Charles N.
Doughty of Baltimore in 1913, mar
rie«! Goodwin and divorced him more
than a year ago.
Lieutenant Gilson was wounded at
Chateau Thierry, while fighling with
the 125th infantry.
Lieutenant and Mrs Gilson will
leave soon for a honeymoon trip to
Palm Beach.
BERNST0RFF DENIES AID
GIVEN VILLA'S BANDITRY
Berlin, Jan. 24 -(Delayed) -Cotint
von Hernstnrff denied today the charge
published In American newspapers
that he had financed Francisco Villa's
banditry in northern Mexico.
"I never in my life had anything to
do, directly or indirectly, with Villa,"
he declared.
"It is one **f the many fake stories
invented about me to create an anti
German sentiment."
RECEIVES LETTER FROM
KIN, 3 YEARS OVERDUE
Twin Falls, Ida.. Jan. 25—Mrs. F. E.
Chamberlain of this city, has received
from her nephew, n German In Bel
gium. an acknowledgement delayed
f«-*r three y.ars by war conditions, of
financial assistance giv<*> him in 1915
he and his wit'*», a Belgium
woman, had been taken prisoner and
their property confiscated by Belgian
forces.
after
woma
INDORSEMENT
GIVEN LEAGUE
OF NATIONSM
PEACE PARLEY
Special Committee Appointed to
Work Out Details of Project;
Wilson Declares League Is
Vital to Preserve Peace.
AMERICA'S FOR LEAGUE
NOT BECAUSE OF FEAR
President Says U. S. Has
Fought in Vain if the Peace
Settlement Only One of Euro
pean Sentiments.
By FRED 5b FERGUSON.
Baris, Jan. 25.—The league of na
tions received formal Indorsement by
the general peace congress this after
noon, when a special committee was
appointed to work out Its details.
Another committee will fix upon .
"the amount of reparation the enemy .
countries ought to pay; what they are
fapabIe of [Jaying; and the meth0(1>
r ' rm and time within which payment
should be made."
President Wilson, In opening* the
discussion, said the league seemed nec
essary In reaching th« conclusion of
peace and preserving the peace of the
world.
NOT RESULT OF FEAR.
He declared ''America's nrdor for the
league is not the result «>f fear, but
that she will feel she has fought in
vain if the peace is only one of Euro«
pi an sentiments."
The congress also appointed com
mittees to determine the degree of re
sponsibility for the war and its con
duct, "attaching to particular members
of the enemy forces, however high they
are placed," and to Investigate inter
national labor and world transporta
tion problems.
"The league of nations seems neces
sary to me, both in reaching the con
clusion ol' peace and in preserving the
Peace of the world," declared the pres
ident.
"Some questions which are not sus
ceptible to competent judgment at
present possibly will need adjustment
in the future.
"We are not representatives of gov
ernments, but of peoples. it Is not
sufficient to satisfy our governments.
We. nupst satisfy mankind.
AMERICA FEARS NOT.
"There is no need to tell you how
the burden has fallen on men, women
and children; how the burden has fall
en on the heart of humanity. We are
called upon to prevent this burden
falling upon them again. Settlements
may be temporary, but the actions of
governments are permanent. The
powers of destruction have not so
much multiplied as they have gained
facilities. It Is esesentlal that science,
as well as armed men, should be kept
in harness by civilization.
"It Is less likely that America will
be attacked by an enemy than some
other nation. The ardor of the United
States for the league of nations, there
fore, is not the result of fear. America
will feel it has fought in vain If the
peace is only one of European senti
ment. She wants a lasting peace for
humanity. America did not come Into
the war merely ns an intervention In
European politics."
!
j
i
I
MIS PARLEY SM
Lansing and Latin-American
Envoys Favor Convention at
Early Date ; Indicated Con
gress to Be Held in Chile.
A\ u)shlnKton, Jan. 2 .". Convocation at
an early ilate of tIn fifth l'an-Amt'rl
van I'niiKriMM lias hern recommended
b\ Secretory of Stat.« J-Htisiny; and the
ambassadors and ministers here of all
tho I-ntin American republics, compris
ing the governing board of tho Pan
American union.
The probable status of tho Pan
American scheme In regard to the
league of nations and the proposed nll
Ainertcan ratification of the Monroe
doctrine are expected to he the princi
pal issues.
Other leading problems likely to
come up include:
Movement to eliminate European
sovereignty from any part of North
and Central America and the West In
dies.
Minor territorial disputes.
Increased Pan-American participa
tion In world commerce.
Industrial and economic effect of
peace conference arrangements on
1-atlu America.

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