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Evening capital news. (Boise, Idaho) 1901-1927, January 25, 1919, Image 2

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WORLD LABOR
ASKS HEARING
OF PROBLEMS
AND PROGRAM
Leaders of International Unions
and Socialism Expect to
Make Important Contribu
tions to Peace Settlement.
FOUR VITAL PLANKS IN
ORGANIZATION'S PLANS
British Chief Henderson Admits
Difficulties in the Scheduled
Congress at Berne; Under
Fire From Both Sides.
By FRANK J. TAYDOR.
Berne, Jati. 24—(Delayed)—Leaders
•f international labor and Socialism,
the Influence of which has been offi
cially recognized by the Versailles con
gress, expect to make an important
contribution to the peace settlement.
Arthur Henderson, British labor lead
er, told the United Press todny that
they hope to obtain endorsement by
the peace delegates of the following
program;
First—Establishment of the
league of nations with authority
to prevent war3 and enforce its
decisions; ail nations to be mem
bers, including Germany as soon
as she complies with conditions
of armistice and pays for the
damage she has done.
Second—Acceptance of an Inter
national labor charter securing a
world standard of social and eco
nomic conditions.
Third—Universal abolition of
compulsory military service, gen
eral disarmament and prohibition
of the manufacture of war ma
terial except by international con
trol.
Fourth — Non-intervention in
Russian affairs, but the exercise
of moral force to bring the differ
ent elements of Russian Social
ism together and afford them
representation at the peace table.
EXPECTS RATIFICATION.
Henderson expressed confidence that
this program would be ratified by the
International labor and Socialist con
gress which is to be held here. The
congress was scheduled to meet Jan
uary 27, but may be delayed by tho
inability of some of the delegates to
arrive by that time. Henderson ad
mitted the congress is having its dif
ficulties.
"We are under fire from both sides,"
he said. "The Bolshevik! condemn us
as being 'yellow international poli
ticians.' On the other hand, Samuel
Gompers refused to participate, claim
ing Socialism has no connection with
labor and trade unionism. Both ex
trem os, therefore, look askance upon
us and we regard it as a sign that we
are somewhere near right.
DATE INDEFINITE.
*'I do not know when the first ses
sion will be held, as tho delegates are
having some difficulty with their pass
ports. Fo far, the United States has
granted no passports to the American
delegates. The Swiss did not wel
come us but they are becoming more
friendly.
"We expect representatives of 17
nations, including Russia and tho cen
tral powers, to participate In drafting
resolutions which will be submitted to
the peace conference. We have re
ceived the most cordial intimations
that our decisions will be received
with interest by tho peace delegates.
The congress hero is expected to last
about three weeks.
NO TRACE OF LOST SEAMEN.
Hoquiam, Wash., Jan. 25.—A. beach
patrol reported today that the bodies
of the six members of the crew of tho
auxiliary schooner Janet Carruthers,
washed away in the storm that swept
the vessel on the beach Wednesday
night, have not been seen, it is be
lieved the ship can be floated at con
siderable expense.
Was Restle&s at Night.
Sufferers from kidney trouble ex
perience backache, rheumatic pains,
aches in Joints and muscles and other
torturous afflictions. E. W. Kitt, R.
F. D. 2, Box 0. Fhorters, Ala., writes;
"I used Foley Kidney Pills as I was so
restless over night with pains in my
back and side. They did me good and
I truthfully say Foley Kidney Pills Is
the medicine for kidney trouble.''—
Adv. T.Th.S.
Jan. 26, 11:15 a. m.
"The Cup of Sacrifice the
Church Must Drink."
7:30 P. M.
"Bolshevism and Madam
Breshkovsky of Russia and
the Power of God."
First Congrega
tional Church
CHAS. J. CHRISTIANSON,
Minister.
HASTY ENACTMENT
OF FAMINE BILL IS
PLANNED BY HOUSE
Washington, Jan. 2.7.—House con
ferees on tho $100,000,000 famine fund
bill will be appointed Monday. An
effort will be made to hasten final
enactment of tho measure already
greatly delayed by the senate fight.
When the measure passed late yes
terday, it was only after nearly every
senator had expressed opposition to it,
or had explained that he voted for it
only because convinced it was neces
sary to enable Pros! tient Wilson to
succeed in his peace mission.
Tho bill will have to he sent to
President Wilson for his signature, but
congressional leaders understand that
news of its passage was to be the
signal for setting In motion tHe ma
chinery for getting food to the needy
of Europe. Senate conferees named
arc: Martin of Virginia, Overman of
North Carolina and Warren of Wyom
ing.
OF
NORTHWEST CASUALTIES
IDAHO.
Missing In notion, previously reported
wounded -Private Lyle 13. Garamond,
Troy.
Returned to duty—Private Henry A.
Clegg, Dubois.
WASHINGTON.
Died of wounds—Private John A.
Halverson. Meridian.
Wounded severely—Sergeant Louis
Schaufler, Eldon.
OREGON.
Died of wounds—Private Faul B. Pie
trok, Slayton.
Erroneously reported killed—Lieut.
P.obert McMurray, Albany.
Wounded severely ................ 104
Died of wounds.................... 3fi
Missing................. El
Total.......................... 201
JUDGE LANDIS RULING
TODAY TO DECIDE THE
FUTURE OF V. BERGER
Chicago, Jnn. 27.- -Fats of Victor
Berger and four other convicted So
cialists was 1 o bp decided here today
by Federal Judge Landis at the hear
ing of i motion for a new trial.
Sworn denials of Irregularities were
made yesterday by II nu mbers of the
trial Jury, following charges made by
Thomas C. Nixon, twelfth Juror, who
said a deputy Unit' \ States marshal
had made remarks derogatory to the
defendants In the presence of the Jury.
SPECIAL COMMITTEES
Supreme War Council to Handle ;
Only Biggest Problems and
Render Final Decisions; Na
tion League Board Important
By FRED B. FERGUSON'.
Paris, Jan. 25.—Details of tha peace
settlement will bo worked out by spe
cial committees leaving tho supreme
war council free to handle only the
biggest problems and render final de
cisions, (according to present plans.
Ratification of this scheme was ex
pect'd at today's meeting of the gen
eral peace congress.
As various problems develop, com
mittees will be appointed to handle all
details. The most Important of these
bodies will be the committee on the
league of nations. Premier Orlando
will represent Italy; Loid Cecil. Great
Britain; Senator Bourgeois, Franco,
and President Wilson probably will act
personally for tha United States.
The committee next in Importance
wjll ho that on reparation and indem
nities. Other committees will be
picked to handle such questions as in
ternational! zui ion of transportation fa
cilities.
FUTURE PROBLEMS LEAD.
Some paper dealing with responsi
bility and punishment for tho authors
of the war were expected to be sub
mitted today, though those who are
anxious to speed up the negotiations
aro more concerned with problems of |
the future than with immediate post
mortems. If any speeches were to bo
made regarding the league of nations
today it was believed they would be
made, by the representatives of small
nations. Premier Lloyd George had
been expected to talk on the British
plan, but this was later cancelled.
Following today's session, it was be
lieved that all powers will transfer
practically their whole foreign offices
! to I'aris, for work on the various com
I mittees. These will be men exper
ienced in Internationa] affairs.
Worth $50.00 a Bottle,
, Wm. Barnes, San Antonio, Texas,
; writes: "Foley's Honey and Tar is the
best cough remedy In the world. It
has been worth $30.00 a bottle to me.
T had the 'flu* followed by pneumonia.
I which left rne weak, with a persistent
I cough. 1 needed rest and sleep, which
, 1 was unable to got. Some one ad
i vised Foley's Honey and Tar. I began
taking It that very night. Before bed
'time 1 noticed relief, and ttiat night
I had a sound sleep and perfect night's
rest, the first since tho beginning of
the flu. I havo completely recovered
and do not cough at all. It cost me
only $1.20 to cure that obstinate cough
with Foley's Honey and Tar. Let all
who read this letter try Foley's."—
Adv. T.Th.S.
Let us mount your head and tan
your hid", make up your furs or rugs.
R. W. Limbcrt. Taxidermist and Fur
rier, Boise Adv.-tf
S3.5D STEAK LIABLE
Heney's Revelations of Pack
ers' Gift to Illinois Solon
Deals Harshly With Chances
for House Leadership.
12-YEAR-OLD HORSE, ALSO
Senator Chamberlain, of Ore
gon, Looms Up as Presiden
tial Possibility, Though Mc
Adoo Conceded to Lead .
(T'a pita! News Special Serviced
Washington, Jan. 25.—Events of tho
last few days have dealt harshly with
the speakership boom of James R.
Mann. The revelations made by
Francis J. Heney regarding the rela
tions between Mann and the packers
probably in ordinary times would not
have been taken seriously.
In fact, it is not the custom any
longer in "Washington to take any
thing Mr. Heney does very seriously
for tile reason that as soon as he
gains any prominence in connection
with any movement, laudable or other
wise, he runs away and becomes a
candidate for something, thus at
tempting to capitalize personally any
publicity thus gained.
After the packers' Investigation,
which was not an Investigation in the
fullest sense of the word, he went
back to California and ^sought the
Democratic nomination for governor.
A Republican on the Democratic
ticket took tlie nomination away from
him.
MANN «IN BAD."
But coming back to Mann, this was
a had time for charges of any kind
to be brought against him because he
is already under fire on account of his
war record. There has been but lit
tle made of the Heney revelations
publicly but the talk around the capi
tol cloak room and In hotel lobbies and
clubs is that Mr. Mann should not
have accepted a horse from Swift and
company. The fact that the horse
was 12 years old and only worth, ac
cording to the most liberal apprisal,
about $150, tt is argued, is beside the
point, because the mere acceptance of
a gift, if known would cast suspicion
on any friendly attitude that ho might
exhibit toward tho packers.
Louis Swift's inquiry when told that
a $7.70 steak had been sent to Mr.
Mann showed a fear on his part that
Swift and company was likely to be
come too deeply involved in the g'ft
business with Mr. Mann. When told
that a $2.50 steak had been sent to
Mr. Mann because the latter had
said '1 have not had a good steak In
years.'' Swift, it was testified, in very
sober tones inquired, ''How many
steaks is Mann going to want" indi
cating that he was unwilling to have
Swift and company carry any large
fixed charge for gift steaks even to a
member of congress.
"DARK HORSE" LOOMS.
The effect of the disclosures was to
put Swift and company in a some
what better light than Mr. Mann is
placed.
Tho result of the horse and steak
testimony has been that Mann's op
position has grown stronger and
braver. The strength of Frederick H.
Mill'dt, of Massachusetts, the only
candidate opposing Mann in the open,
is more noticeable, at least, if not
gaining, but a great wedge has been
driven by Nicholas LongwortU and Dr.
S. D. Fess, both of Ohio, making it
look more and more like a "dark
horse" will win the race, much to the
satisfaction of a large part of the
house membership from western
states.
CHAMBERLAIN POPULAR.
Senator Chamberlain does not cease
to hear from his presidential boom,
and there is no sign of provincialism
about the developments. His support
ers are distributed throughout the
country east as well as west, north as
wel! as south. The Oregon senator
receives much commendation for hie
fearlessness In exposing bad condi
tions tn the army, regardless of the
fact that such a course would put him
"In Dutch" with ids own party lead
ers His strength grows as the boys
come borne from France and from
some r >f the army camps here within
the United States and tell family and
friends that Senator Chamberlain told
the truth in his two speeches before
the senate, one last January and the
other early In this month, assailing
the mismanagement of the war de
nouncing the treatment received by
the American boys lu camps and
trenches.
Opposed to the Chamberlain boom
is only one other in the Democratic
party, and this is the boom of William
Gibs McAdoo, former secretary of the
treasury. The difference between
Chamberlain ond McAdoo is that the
Oregon senator Is only the center of
a boom with which he has had noth
ing to do except Insofar as the char
acter of his service has made him
popular, while McAdoo is out of the
boom stage and baa progressed to the
candidate stage. Mr. McAdoo Is a
candidate this very minute, although
he will not admit it until he has been
separated from his father-in-law's ad
ministration a little longer. His can
didacy is everywhere in the east an
accepted fact, and some opposition Is
already arising from the general an
tagonism to what his opponents
choose to term tho establishment of a
dynasty. McAdoo's friends are de
fending his candidacy so soon on ths
grounds that he has nothing to do
with It. They say that the railroad
workmen are demanding his nomina
tion and that his selection is the only
ise one that can be made, declaring
him to be the only Democrat with any
chance of being elected next year.
IE
IN RELIEF FINI DRIVE
Thirteen Counties Raise Quota
in American Relief Fund
Campaign—Expect to Close
February 1.
j state Director Robert M. McCracken
: expec ts the drive for funds for the!
I relief of Armenians and Syrians to .
finish up in Idaho by tho first of ;
! ebrunry with the state well across)
j with its quota of $75,000. A uniform;
campaign has been Impossible, but all;
counties are responding; to the call for |
lunds tor relief in tHe near east and
Mr. McCracken expresses confidence
that every county will make its full !
quota.
Boar Lake, Franklin, Bingham, Bon- j
novlile, Madison, Fremont, Lemhi, !
Custer, Minidoka, Latah, Bonner, El- ;
more and Gem counties have already ;
raised the amounts allotted to them. !
In the counties not yet across the
workers are steadily going toward the
goal and at least three, Blaine, Lincoln
and Payette, Will have finished the
drive by Saturday.
County Chairman Sam E. Blaine has
Ada county well organized, and nearly
all sector captains are engaged in rais- ]
Ing their quotas this week. State Di- ;
rector McCracken and Mr. Blaine vis-|
ited Meridian yesterday and finished 1
effecting the organization In that dis- :
trlct. Arrangements were made for a
mass union meeting of all the churches
of Meridian to be held Sunday, at •
which time it Is believed the entire!
sum that town is to raise will lie au- |
counted for.
"Idaho has been a bit slow in get - j
ling started on this drive," State Dt- I
rector McCracken said, "but there has
been no more delay in this state than
in many others. The whole country
has been handicapped by tho influenza
epidemic. Wo will raise our full
$■5,000, I am sure, by the f>rst of Feb
ruary. There has been some misun
derstanding owing to the prevalence
of the Idea flint; the $100,000,000 ap
propriation asked from congress for
European relief Is a duplication of the
fund the American committee Is rais- i
ing by contribution for ro'ief in the
near east. These are entirely separate
matters. The solvation of the starving
Armenians depends solely upon con
tributions from the American people.
The help that reaches them must he
from the outside, it. cannot lie direct
ed through tiie Turkish government,
for the simple reason that Turkey her
self is trying to destroy the Armenian
and Syrian population in that country.
''The $75,000 Idaho is asked to raise
means the preservation of 1270 Ar
menian lives for a year - that is $60
each. If these people can be returned
to their homes and kept alive for 12
months, they will be able then to pro-j
vide for their own future needs. If we !
do not respond and provide the moans!
to carry them over this time of star-;
ration—well, they will die, and that is j
ail there Is to it—tho Armenian race
will be Wiped out and the fanatical !
Turk will succeed in the tiling he has
been striving to accomplish for hun
dreds of years. That is nothing less ]
than the utter destruction of the ;
Christian population of Turkey."
REPORTS AMERICAN FIRM
BUYS GERMAN SHIPYARDS
Berlin. Jan. 25—The North German!
Gazette reports an American concern
has bought the Schichau ship-building
yards, one of the most important in
Germany, for 160,000,000 marks < $ 10,
000 , 000 .)
The Schichau works built the fa
mous sea raider Finden. Among the
important ships surrendered to tho as
sociated powers under the terms of the
armistice, were the Bayern and the
Koenig Albert, turned out by the
►Schichau works.
FLU IN FRISCO DECREASES.
Ban Francisco, Jan. 25.—Influenza
cases reported yesterday totalled 85,
showing a steady decrease in the epi
demic here. Deaths reported numbered
20. Thirty-three arrests were made
for violation of the masking ordinance.
Despite the evident benefit of the
masks, the anti-mask league, wearing
masks, will meet tonight.
THE MAGNIFICENT
THE INCOMPARABLE
TOYS
FATE
HER MOST SPLENDID
PICTURE
PATHE WEEKLY
STRING
LAST TIMES TODAV
!
EAT LESS MEAT
Take a glass of Salts to Flush
Kidneys if bladder bothers
you.
Eating meat regularly eventually
produces kidney troubla in some form
or other, says a well-known authority,
because the uric acid in meat excites
tbo kidneys, they become overworked;
get sluggish; clog up and cause all
sorts of distress, particularly back
ache and misery in tho kidney region;
rheumatic twinges, severe headaches,
acid stomach, constipation, torpid liver,
sleeplessness, bladder and urinary irri
tation.
The moment your bark hurts or kid
neys aren't acting right, or if bladder
bothers you, get about lour ounces of
Jad Salts from any good pharmacy;
take a tablespoonful in a glass of wa
ter beforo breakfast for a few days
and your kidneys will then act fine.
Tills famous salts is made from the
acid of grapes and lemon juice, com
bined with iitliiu, anil has ben used
for generations to flush clogged kid
neys an i stimulate them to normal ac
tivity; also to neutralize the acids In
the urine -o it no longer irritates, thus
■ tiding bladder disorders.
Jad Suits cannot Injure anyone;
makes a delightful effervescent lithla
water drink which millions of men and
women take now and then to keep the
kidneys and urinary organs clean, thus
avoiding serious kidney disease,—Adv.
of
a
ft/lALONE AND TILLMAN
STAGE VICIOUS BATTLE
Min
Dli«t
Minn., Jan. 2".—After a
Unifie 10 round fight last night be
tween Jack Malone of St. Paul and
Johnny Tillman of Minneapolis, each
lightweight claimed victory. Malone's
aggressive tn* fight ing won him a ma
jority of unofficial decisions.
MEEHAN EASY FOR FULTON.
Fnn Francisco, Jan. 25.—Fred Fulton
easily defeated Willis Meehan in a four
round bout here last night. The only
time Meehan showed to advantage was
ir. the third round, which Jie won by
a shade. It is the second meeting of
the men, with the same result.
a
Chronic Constipation.
It is by no means an easy matter to
cure this disease, but it can be done
in most instances by taking Chamber
Iain's Tablets and complying with tho
plain printed directions that accom
pany each package. All dealers.—Adv.
T Th
CHIROPODY AND ELKCTItOLYS
IS'. Room 312, Overland. Dr. D. K. Arm
strong. Adv. $f,
iilllllllülllülllilliilllllllllllllillllilllii
I THEBfiS IS LIFTED |
I LET S GO I
1 THIRD GRAND |
1 OPENING i
= THIS SEASON =
SIXTH AND IDAHO.
I JANUARY 25 |
1 NEW MUSIC 1
1 DUFFY'S 1
1 ORCHESTRA |
H NEW AND GOOD =E
== This orchestra was or- |=j
== ganized especially for ==
rsj The Glide, but is open —
== for other engagements. EE
Ü DANCES Ü
— Tuesdays ==
rrE Saturdays S5
liliilllililllllillillllilillllllllilllllllllll
I ROUP
Spasmodic croup is
usually relieved with
one application of—
it l r" Yiödvdi io»
&
H KS VAI'ORl
NEW PRICES ...30c, 60c, $1.20
No««
Talking Maohlnaa
Eaey Terms
Buy them now;
■tart tho payments
In January.
Columbia«, Sonora«
end Cheneye
WILLIAM KRULL
MUSIC HOUSE
EAGLE NOTICE.
To members of Boise aerie No. 115:
Another good time expected on social
night, January 27. Good music, good
cats and good dancing. Get an invita
tion for a friend at 817 Main street or
Raw's bakery, corner Eighth and Han
nock, or at secretary's office.
V. K. OLDHON, W. r.
{A. W. Glims, Secretary. Adv.— J.25
(Continued from page on«.)
tiveea the Montenegrins and ths Ser
bians, and is still going on.
"In order to stop tilts war, my office
lias sent a message to the Montene
grins begging them not to spill fur
ther blood. I ant confident of tlioir
fate, now that the allies have again
given me a guarantee that tho rights
of our people will be respected.
"1 am persuaded that the allies want
fair play, not only for the Jugo-Slavs
of Austria and Hungary, but for .Mon
tenegro and Serbin, too. 1 am perfect
ly confident your grout president will
not fall us now, for Montenegro offers
a present example of the principle of
self-determination."
CONSTANT CAMPAIGN ON
AGAINST BROKEN GLASS
One hundred and eighty-six pounds
of broken glass were removed from the
streets of Dos Angeles in one week by
a two-man crew assigned to a truck
owned by the Automobile Club of
Southern California. The machine,
conspicuously placarded, was sent out
largely for tho purpose of calling pub
lic attention to a condition that men
aces motorists the world over. it
traveled 815 miles in collecting Its by
no means small cargo. Although this*
activity was merely a temporary one, |
the club makes a practice of removing
glass-, day or night, from the city j
streets in response to reports made by j
telephone.
GATHER AMPUTATION CASES.
Washington, Jan. 25.—Orders were
issued today by the war department to
concentrate amputation cases in gen
eral hospitals in Colonia, N. J.; Fort
McPherson, Ga.; Boston. Fort Des
Moines, Iowa; Fort Snclling, Minn.;
Washington, D. C., and San Francisco.
PHONE 73 for baggage wagons.
Prompt service. Peasley Transfer
Storage Co.—Adv.
Plano moving mad«- cosy. Call 71.
Peasley Transfer A Storage Co.—Adv
PATTY
IN HIS LATEST HAPPY
LAUGHING HIT
i&lsSl
GOOD NIGHT
NURSE
u \m
igülK
Wallace Reid
— IN —
"THE DUB"
Adventure—Thrills
The Picture Different
LAST TIMES TODAY
MAJESTIC
BOISE VALLEY SHORTHORN
BREEDERS' ASSOCIATION
FIRST ANNUAL SALE WILL BE HELD AT
CALDWELL, IDAHO
FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 7,1919
FIFTY HEAD—25 Females and 25 Hulls. Females
range from weaners to matured cows. 1 5 bolls of breed
ing ago; 10 young Bulls. The mnjorily of these cattle
are native bred and sired by Scotch Hulls. <
The Boys* and Girls* CalfjjRub
Financed by the Caldwell Commercial BftpK, Knabling
the purchasers to buv the calf in one vear's'inviG, - .
AT THIS SALE. * \
BREEDERS CONSIGNING
Iddings * Florence, Meridian.
Tho». W. Torr, Wilder.
C. K. Grim, Star.
David Riggins, Meridian.
E. M, Robertson, Nampa.
Robert McGuire, Caldwell,
II. W. Dorman, Caldwell.
L. M. Beal, Kuna.
C. M. Bassett, Greenlenf.
P. A. Sorenson, Meridian.
MILLER A DICKENS, Auctioneers.
WM. FLORENCE, Sales Mgr., Meridian, Ida.
For information, address CHAS. HOWARD, Seely.
Treas., Caldwell. Idaho.
Remember WILSON BROS.' HOC SALE, on Thursday
Feb. 6. of 50 Registered Poland China bred sows. * '
Remember the Idaho National Rabbit and Pet Livestock
Show, Feb. 4, 5 and 6.
ALL OF ABOVE AT CALDWELL, IDAHO.
V. D. Hanna it Hon, X'oti::.
Wilson Bros., Greenlenf.
Frank Wing, Caldwell.
F. K. Caldwell, Caldwell.
Bird Bowman, Caldwell.
Frank Howard, Caldwell.
John Smeed, Caldwell,
Charles Wells, Caldwell.
R. Williams, Greenleaf.
AMERICAN CAFE
709 MAIN STREET
American and Chinese Pishes. Noodle Chop
Suey specialty. Merchant Lunch and Short Or
ders, Come to the American Cafe, where all the
good Americans go.
Open 11 A. M. to 1 P. M.
ITHERSJPIS
When the Children Cough, Rut
Musterole on Throats
and Chests
No telling how eoon the symptom» maj
develop into croup, or worse. And then'i
when you're glad you hava a jar of Mu»
trrole at hand to give prompt, sure re.
lief. It does not blister.
As first aid and a certain remedy
Musterole is excellent. Thousands ol
mothers know it. You should keep :
jar in the house, ready for instant use.
It is the remedy for adults, too. Re
lieves sore throat, bronchitis, tonsilitis
roup, stiff neck, asthma, neuralgia, head
ache, congestion, pleurisy, rheumatism
lumbago, pain» and aches of back 01
joints, sprains, sore muscles, chilblains
frosted feet and colds of the chest (il
often prevents pneumonia).
30c and 60c jars; hospital size $2.50.
REMOVE PHOTOGRAPHIC BAN.
Purls, Jan. 25.—All photographie re.
strictions within the American army
zone have been removed, it was offi
cially announced today by William
Moore, In charge of the pictorial sec
tion staff.
IT'S NEWS TO BAKER.
Washington, Jnn. 25.—Secretary ol
Will linker has heard nothing ol the
alleged plan for General Pershing to
return to tile I'niied States with Pres
ident Wilson.
SAVE YOUR OLD SHOES.
Have them soled In time. Xo matter
where you live we will deliver you
them parcel post, C, O. D. Best leath
er-best workmanship. Capital Cily
Shoe Shop, export shoe repairers end
manufacturers, 923 Idaho St., Boise,
Ida. Peter Giavanoff, Pron.—Adv.
The Caoit.nl News tolephons number»
ira 24 and 25. tf

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