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Evening capital news. (Boise, Idaho) 1901-1927, February 03, 1919, Image 1

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WEATHER
EVENING CAPITAL NEWS
ALL THE NEWS
FIRST
VOL. XLII.
BOIS I*:, IDAHO, MONDAY, FEBHl'A KY 3, 1010.
No. 20
HINES FAVORS
3-YEAR POLICY
CONTROL, ELSE
R. R.S' RETURN
Director General of Railroads
Tells Senate Committee 21
Month Limit on Government
Operators Is Intolerable.
OPPOSES OWNERSHIP. BUT
WANTS FIVE YEARS' TEST
Urges Private Operation by ai
Few Companies Under Profit
Guarantee and Strict Gov
ernmental Regulation.
By RA VMOXn CLAPPKK.
Washington, I '« b. 3. (Invcrnment
rcilrn.nl control must bo extendi <1 for
fit Dost three years or be shelved at
once.
That is the ultimatum laid clown to
day by Walker D. Hines, director gen
eral «>f railroads. He propos- d i
three-year extension périrai as a com
promise bee,a use of hitter opposition
In congress to the recent five-year rec
ommendation of William G. MeAdoo.
In any event. Hines declared, when
he faced the senate interstate com
merce committee today, 1 Ho present.
21 -month limit on govrnnient opera
tion is intolerable. II- had in mind the
resolution intr-.du. « -1 by Senator
Cummins to prevent r-'arn of the
railroads to privat« control before that
limit c x;.ii < .
AGAINST U. S. OWNERSHIP.
Mine s « ame out. frankly against gov
ernment ownership, hut earnestly ap
pealed f«>r adoption of a five-year test
period. He favors private operation
by a few companies under a. profils
guarantee and stri- t government rég
ula tion.
"T think a three-vear extension
Would a«-complisli a ■ •. i- et de al to rr
luov. dip i« ; i- • whi« !i are in'e r-s'.f
In 1h< 2 1 -mon? !-••' pi..a 1 Hines fold the
senate -a.mmittce. '*E\«-i* thro- years
would segregate and spread out and in
part dissipate the un fs v< « ; 1 *1 • and th*
psvehologa al factors w inch under the
21-months' plan promis«-- t<> converge
S«. as to do tin- maximum damage to
th* public
"Also th
th!
extension would
opporl unity
instead of im
tlie presidential
n -lia tel y preceding
cl- -dion.
FIVE YEARS BETTER.
"Hut," he added. * f believe the five
y. r « vliMision w-edd 1>< much better
b« , ; e it would give a«hled stability."
Hines, realizing that this plan faces
widespread oppnsii i o ! ! among both
parties in congress rguod from every
possible angle for ;i- adoption.
"I'nless a rcasonnh!« extension shall
he granted it will he contrary to the
public interest to hold the railroads
for the full 21 months,' Hines d. lared.
"We had better terminate the con
trol and go back promptly t > tin- old
system or \vc should * xn rd the con
trol long enough to admit • •■»* . n ade
quate opportunity to adopt a ladi- al
pnd new s y stom w hieb w id r- a 11 y
bring about a perm..ran? so'-ath-n."
T T nofficial reports at the ? dir-, d . <]
ministration are that unless --nuress
Votes an extension, a pn >« lamation
will he issued in March turning the
toads hack about .Tune d'h
SCOUTS CHAOS PERILS.
Fears of railroad «-X« eu t i v< *= and
others that prompt return will result
lr. chaos and financial 1« wn
ceouted by Hines,
"We can only a: -nme n chaotic con
dition by assuming the interst do com
merce commission would omit to per
form its fiincd ions," lie explained.
Attacking the commission' pro
posal for Increased powers. Him s said
present laws give ample power tn pre
serve existing rate.. .,nd for adjusting
them to lircl immediate necessities
fïhould government operation he aban
doned. Pre-war intrastate rates could
be set aside in favor of the higher
ones, Hines believed.
"I would advise tin president that
any relinquisbm« nt made ought to be
oil reasonable n die and in a due and
orderly manner," Hines said.
NO NEED FOR ALARM.
"T believe that unless companies
themselves create a needless state of
nlarm. a reasonable and orderly tran
sit ion back to private management
could be made in the next few months
without additional legislation as well
as it could under any legislation that
|r likely to be obtained.
'T congess T ran see no reason what
ever why this control should continue
pimply for the purpose of protecting
the railroads from an alleged chaotic
condition."
Hines announced his stand on the
question of government ownership.
''I do not personally believe in gov
ernment ownership," he explained.
"T behexe there can be a form of
radically reconstructed private owner
ship with such close government su
pervision. including government rep
resentations on hoards of directors as
v ill give the publie and labor all the
benefits of government ownership and
•t the same time avoid the political
(Continued on Page Two.)
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PETROGRAD REPORTED
SCENE OF REBELLION ;
LENINE SOON TO QUIT
Unconfirmed Dispatch Says Capital
Bombarded by Kronstadt Troops—
Premier Ready to Surrender.
Lory loi
IV b.
An
u neon
firmed dispatch from Petrograd
today reported that soldiers had
revolted there and that there was
considerable machine gun fighting
going on in the streets. Troops
from Kronstadt were said t«> bo
bombarding rétros rad. Humors
were current in the latter city
that Premier la nine is preparing
to surrender to the entente.
The Stockholm correspondent of
the London Telegraph reported
that BolAhovik troops arc with
drawing in the Pallie provinces,
particularly in Ksthonis.
The Bolshevik official commu
nique received by wireless from
l 'et rograd t oda y soys :
"In the Archangel region we oc
cupied fortified positions near
Ta
ipturing three machine
go quantity of pros I -
considerable military
New Republic Control Contest
ed by South Germans Against
Junkers; Plan Now to Form
Federalized Government.
By I'llANK ,T. TA V LOU.
Weimar, Germany, Feb. 2.—-The
struggle between the l'nisians and
south Germans for control of the new
German republic, increased in score*
and intensity as preparation continued
for convening the national assembly
here today.
This factional fight had developed
a, new plan for breaking up the geo
graphical divisions of til- old empire
and forming all Germany into a com
pletely federalized republic, as opp«»s< «1
to the original plan nt organizing new
state.-', into a small lonsely e.instructed
confederation.
At present, the Prussian population
controls the country. This condition
would be augmented, rather than de
preciate«!, by splitting up Prussia into
several states, because of the increased
voting power it would give them..
SOCIALISTS IN FAVOR.
The Socialists are back of the new
scheme for a wholly centralized gov
ernment. They are naturally opposed
by the Pan-Germans, junkers and *■ » 11 -
servnt ives, who are essentially pro
ia n.
It. is not clear yet, whether the move- !
ment will gain sufficient support frmn i
the south Germans, who arc p i «*ud that
tho\ are ''different" from the I'ra -
si;;ns, and wish to retain their Individ- ;
uality as well as government.
The Bavarians regard the choice of'
Weimar as meeting pice joi the na
tional assembly as a victory oxer Un
Prussians, indicating a possibility of!
rebuilding the capital here. But Bor- I
lin holds the view that W« im. r v.,«s
selected only because it is qub-t :. 1
safe from Bolshevist demonstrations.
Beilin even expects the ass«-m;« t.•
adjourn to that city within a lortncjit.
JAPAN BUILDING TWO
GIGANTIC BATTLESHIPS
Tokio. Feb. :*«. Details of Japan's
greater navy program were learned to- :
day. U ip. lud« > tin sister battit suie
Nagato, to b< launched in July, and
Mutso for October.
Each bat 1 1« ship will be of 40,ôo<* ton. 1
with 16-inch guns.
Work on 1 v*. <» other great ships will,
be started soon, it is reported.
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8 U. S. SOLDIERS KILLED,
30 HURT IN TRAIN CRASH
Paris. 1-Vb. 3. Light Anu-riran sol
diers wer« killed ami 30 injured wln-n
a troop train collided with two German
locomotives while <n rout«* from Chau
mont to Brest.. The men were to have
taken a transport at Brest for the
United States.
Monarchists and Republicans
Declare Portugal's Control
Seized; Royalist Com
mander Killed.
Madrid, Fei». 3. Both Monarchists
and Republicans « laiim-d victories in
dispatches received here from various
Portuguese 'oim-c-s today.
An official ; 1 at'-ment issue«! by the
Republican government in Lisbon said
j the Monarchists tied aft«-r a nino-lmur
fight near Agu«za, in which they sus
tained great losses, including their
. comman«i« r-. Th«* statement also de
nied Royalists claims of the capture
I of Avciro. ami Chaues.
| A Monarchist wireless statement, said
Royalist troops were advancing south
j ward and that a monarchy hail 1-ben
j proclaimed throughout the country.
SOCHEPLUNDER
PLOTS AGAINST
SOVEREIGNTY OF
BELGIUM BARED
Complete Documents of Ger
man General Staff Relating
to Invasion and Proposed An
nexation of Country Seized.
CLEVER COUP ENABLED
CAPTURE OF THE PLANS
Division of Nation In Two Prov
inces and Destruction of Bel
gian Machinery Scheme Re
vealed in Mass of Papers.
Pari e IVh. 3. The Belgian govern
ment has in its possession what are
believed b* be the comph te documenta
nf the German general staff relating to
Belgium, including the «h tails for Ger
many's annexation of the country and
instructions for carrying off and de*
st roving machinery.
'The stmy of the capture of the doc
uments-—one of Ute most unique of the
war together with what their exami
nation has revealed so far reached the
Fnited Press today from authoritative
Belgian sources.
Ti
FILLED FREIGHT CAR.
l»ai"•!'.* filled an entire freight!
car. In the rush of evacuation after
■the armistice was signed this particu
lar ear was driven on a sidetrack by
a mistake. As soon as its absence
was discovered, the general staff nat
orally ordered a. quick and complete
search for it. They chose t « > direct the
search through a lowly civilian offi
vial,, the head of the barley depart*
ment.
His most exciting work heretofore
had been t « » get the last grain of bar
il ey from the Belgian fields. The per
sistence and anxiety displayed in this
(search led Belgian officials to assign a
s«'cn*t service operative to trail him.
When th« car was finally located on
an isolated siding, the Belgians an est -
cd tli. German and seized the car.
Examination of the papers is not
completed, but it is declared they show
the annexation plans provided for
.putting Belgium into two provinces
in an effort- to line up the .Flemish
and the Walloons against each other.
SIGNED BY HOLLWEG.
Th«* plan*---, which «wen went into ad
ministrativ«? details, were signed by
form« I Chancellor von Bethmann
Hollweg. at a time when he was assur
ing the world that Germany had no
intention of annexing Belgium.
According to the documents, Ger
many ordered systematic destruction
<>f Belgian machinery last spring. At
first, instructions were issued to carry
off the machinery. Later, as trans
porta tion became taxed, orders were
issued t.t smash all machinery that
could not be moved easily.
The Belgians are in a quandary as
to where to begin reconstruction
work. They want to re-open their
mills and factories, but lack of ma
chinery and their railways and canals
I«- ■•« 1 :dly damaged as to affect
transportation.
General Strike Vote at Tacoma
Shows Many Are Opposed
to General Walkout.
um«;
■oma, Feb. 5 \n incomplete tle
bost is r-xpr-oled In result from
amoral strike vote among Libor
s. returnable t « > the central labor
until at a special meeting tomorrow.
A considerable number of unions
|have voted flatly against the g< neral
'walkout; others art* voting "nmral
support" without strike actions, while
'other» are sidestepping by failing to
jvote one way or the other.
I How extensive the tie-up will bo. if
I \' is call« «1 this we«*k, will depend
j largely on the vote of the outside « l«*e
itricians, who will cast their ballots to
! night. If they should'go out it would
»neun that lights would go out, street
Jeers stop running and that local in
! «lustre s would be paralyzed as olec
itric power is almost exclusively used
ONCE MAYORALTY ENTRY
HAILED TO MORAL COURT
j Chicago, Fob. 3. Bussell P. Butler,
one time candidate for mayor of ( hi
« ag«». now a court reporter, today was
to face Judge Dolan in tin» morals
* court to fa« o action by Ids wii -, Mrs
1 Alice Butb r. who caused his arrest in
another woman's apartment Saturday.
AGREE ON OIL LANDS BILL.
J Washington, Feb. 3. Confère**-» on
the oil lands leasing hill agreed today.
Agreement provides that persons hohi
ing claims in government oil reserves
, may lease the lands from the govern
nient on payment of one-eighth roya* *
ty, but that no new well can be drilled
jin naval «»d reserves.
219 BOCHES ARRESTED
BY OCCUPATION ARMY;
206 ADJUDGED GUILTY
Soccer Games Between Yanks and
Heines Investigated; Fraterniza
tion With Enemy Forbidden.
\rm ri< an Headquarters in Ger
many, Feb. 3.- Two hundred and
nineteen Germans have been ar
rested and tried by American
courtmartiul during the two
months of American occupation,
according to figures made public
toda t. There were 206 convictions.
Imprisonments ranged from on»* to
!>o days and fines from one mark
(25c) to 500 marks ($125).
Offenses included violation of
liquor regulations, wearing Ger
man military uniforms and holding
unauthorized meetings. There
was one arrest for failure to sa
lute an American officer.
Army officials are investigating
a soccer game which was played
at Khrcnbritstcin between a team
composed < »f men from a New
York and Kentucky pioneer regi
ment and one made of German
soldiers, many of whom wore parts
of their uniforms. The players
were good matured throughout, the
Germans submitting willingly to
Hie decisions of the American um
pire. The game was not scheduled
and probably was started on the
spur of the moment, but appar
ently it violated both the regula
tions against fraternizing and that
of wearing German uniforms.
Loyal Troops March Against
Dusseldorf Where Rebels En
trenched; Bremen Reported
to Be Great Bolshevik Camp.
Berlin, Feb. 2. The new Spartacan
outbreak is gaining strength in vari
ous parts of the country, it was re
vealed in dispatches received here to
day. The government has decided up
on severe, repressiv«» measures
hard fighting is looked for.
'Government troops were reported to
be marching against Spartacan forces
which are entrenched around Dussel
dorf. The government has obtained
consent, from the entente t « > take this
action since Dusseldorf is in the neu
tral zone.
1 At Eisenach, workmen and soldiers
hehl a Spartacan uprising yesterday.
They seized the telegraphs and de
cided to oppose the government. Th y
are reported to have declared they will
use force to Influence the national as
sembly meeting at Weimar.
OUST UNDESIRABLES.
! The government is sending picked
troops to prevent disorders in Weimar.
Anyone hoarding a train for Weimar
must have a special permit and all
undesirables arc being weeded out in
that city.
; Bremen was reported to be proctlcal
jly a great Spartacan camp.
• It is cut off from all telegraph ami
Telephone communication with the
outside world. Spartacan leaders have
i threatened to mobilize their entire
strength and fight to a finish unless
Military Governor Nusk«- recalls the
! troops he has sent to reston* order. In
j the meantime, the government is at
i tempting to pc
'evacuate pea«
nd
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undo the Spartaeans to |
fully to save historic I
j public buildings from destruction, as
Noske has announced he will bombard
Hamburg and WJlhelmsh
Spartacan uprisings were reported
said to be quiet again.
TRANS-AMERICA FLYERS
START ON RETURN FLIGHT
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n. where
are j
Washington, I
squadron which
j San I lieg«» 1 n X«
j orn route plante
I again today. The
i ma V info
b. The ai
recently flew
I t«
five
st;
plane
from
a the sobth
rt westward
will use tl"*
niatinn obtained <«n tin- orig
inal flight, and they hope t<» i««hn
considerably i lu- hours actual flyin
time set in that journey.
POLICE NEAR SOLUTION
OF CHINESE MURDERS
Washington. Feb. 3. -Police beln v* «
today they were close to the soiutioi
of the mysterious murder of Dr. Won;
and two associates of the Chinese edu
eatlonal mission.
Dr. Wong had the disposition
Boxer indemnity funds used in oduru
ing Chinese youths in this count!*
It is believed the murderer or mu
deters planned t«> get at this nionev.
MAKES DEATH DOUBLY SURE.
Chicago, Fob. 3 Walter Gerard, 3X.
was a suicide hi re today. He mail«*
sure of death by swallow ing poison and
turning on the gas. .
of
TilL WEATHER
Forecast for Boise and vicinity
FAIR TONIGHT AND TUESDAY
NOT MUCH ('HANGE IX TEMPERA
TURIL
For Idaho: Tonight and Tuesday. '
Highest temperature yesterday
Lowest temperature this morning
I eMan temperature yesterday. 30.
30.
THOUSANDS OF
TEXTILE PLANT
WORKERS QUIT
WORK IN EAST
More Than 35,000 Out in Pat
terson. N. J., Silk Mills, Ac
cording to Unofficial Esti
mates; Demands Refused.
NEW YORK FACTORIES
CORDONED BY PICKETS
Only Half Operatives in Lawr- S
ence, Mass., Plants Out, and'
Those Mostly Aliens: No En
tire Working Force Reports. 1
Lawrence. Mass., Feb. 3.—Shots
were fired when striking textile
workers clashed with police near
the Everett mill this afternoon.
There were no casualties. Police
said strikers did the shooting. They
were unable, however, to identify
those who had the weapons. The
crowd, estimated at 10,000, was
Hisoersed by police reserves. The
trouble started when Special Po
liceman Cornelius Sheehan tried to
arrest a striker who refused to
"move on" when ordered to do so.
Sheehan seized the mam Other of
ficers ran to his assistance as he
was surrounded by strikers. A riot
call was sent in.
i ik, Feb.
Striking garnie yi
a cordon of pick
in downtown Manhattan a
With criosi of ''scab" non
it to y re. serve ord*u\
OVER 35,000 OUT.
Patterson, X. J., Feb. 3. More thaï
,000 silk mill workers went on strik
here today, according to unofficial es
ti »nates, following refusal of th«' ein
ploy «us to meet demands !««r a 17 hou
week. It is believed thousands of oth
ers will follow the example of thos
already out, as the mill owners mu;
close the plants rather than grant th
The strikers* original request
a H hou.- week, but they tie«
arbitrate with the employers
agreement was reached mi the 17 hour
weekly lias is.
as tor
led to
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AMERICANS ON JOB.
Dawrence. Mass., Feb. 3. Not more
an half of the 30,000 textile opera
. - Tare went on strik»* today t<* cu
roe their demands for 54 hours'
ages for a 48 hour week.
The majority of those on strike are
Hundreds of pickets surrounded the
mills when they opened for operation
today. Operatives, most of whom wove
native Americans, reported for work at
nearly all plants. In some factories
half the operatives were on hand, while
in others not enough reported to start
work. In no instance did the entire'do
force report.
In some quarters it \va
that not more than bet we
10,000 of the 30,000 operati
strike.
s estimated
*n 5000 and
es went on
SAYS 30,000 TO QUIT.
Paterson, Feb. 3. That approxi
mat el y 30,000 strikers would be out of
the silk plants in this city before night
was the prediction t«>»lay of Bouts
Magnet, chairman of the workers' com- j
mitte*-. Magnet declared that the silk I
industry here would he completely par- j
alyzed.
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Presented By Berger Counsel as
Reasons Why New Trial
Should Be Granted.
Chicago, Feb. 3. A letter from Gov
ernor K. B. Philipp, giving Wisconsin
a clean bill of health for draft delin
quincy, was introduced as evidence by
Attorney Henry Cochems, attorney l'or
Victor Berger, here today, when the
hearing «»f a motion for a new trial
was opened in Judge Landis' court.
Berger and four co-defendant Social
Ist 1« itlers. ware convicted last month,
.... .haws. Th,- la,Ur wn.
Intend. .1 to show BsrKw and his sssu-l
(•ti.tos had not hampered war prépara
tions.
«'.resenting arguments for a new
trial. Seymour Stedmun, general conn
so 1 for defense, said the motion was
based on 1Ï points. The points includ
following:
e Landis overruled motion
' venue.
e«i in«
Jud
quash.
Veniict was contrary
ca sc.
Verdict not supported by evidence.
I mom potent evidence admitted.
'ourt erred in refusing change of
to law* in the |
it erred in refusing to admit a
verdict of not guilty.
Court gave improper charges to jury.
Court refused to set aside verdict.
CONSPIRACY REVEALED
TO REVIVE SENTIMENT
FAVORING EX-EMPEROR
Petitions Circulated Assuring Wilhelm
People Still Maintain Confidence
in Their Former Ruler.
By WEBB MILLER.
American Headquarters in Ger
many, Feb. 2. (Delayed).--A plot
to line up sentiment in Germany
behind the former kaiser has been
unearthed by the American mili
tary secret Service it was as
sert rd today.
A number of supporters of the
old regime were discovered circu
lating petitions, assuring Wilhelm
that his people still maintain con
fidence in him. Many signatures
had been obtained in various parts
of the region occupied by the third
army. The American authorities
are investigating to determine who
is back of tbe movement, which
apparently is widespread and prob
ably originated in Berlin.
American military officials have
ascertained that the present
strength of the German army shows
that the organization and staff of
all pre-war regiments is being
maintained, except those of Alsace
and Lorraine, although some of
these regiments have been re
duced to a thousand men.
Draft System Wizard to Retain
Post Despite Friction With
Baker and March; Appoint
ment Book at Early Date.
By CARL D. GROAT.
"Washington, Feb. 3.—Major General
Enoch Crowder will be reappointed
army judge advocate general.
Intimations that he was to be
shelved were dissipated today when
it was learned on reliable authority
that President "Wilson will again name
him for the post.
Crowder's friends were doubtful as
to liis reappointment until today.
j Some of them claimed that he would
! automatically go out of the service if
jnot renominated before Feb. 15. They
•feared that what amounted to bad
I blood between Crowder and Chief of
Staff March would operate to side
track him.
They declared privately that many
j obstacles had been put in the way of
nan who made the draft machine
idmitted success. They claimed,
I too, that a reprimand from the chief
of staff still lay against Crowder's rec
lord. Whether or not this is true, the
war department has refused 1 o allow
his record to be made public. Secre
jtary of War Baker and Chief of Staff
March have consistently declined to
discuss the report, while Crowder's
friends hace accused Baker privately
of failing to act to clean the record
after promising to do so.
However, President Wilson does not
intend to let army politics or funds
stand in the way, it was stated today.
He will rename Crowder as chief legal
authority of the war department and
soon.
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OFFERS EYES TO SOLDIER
SON BLINDED IN THE WAR
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X.
eb. 3—Mrs. Margaret
Waugh wants her eyes transferred to
! the sockets of her sun, Janu s Waugh,
i who entered the army when he was 17
land fought until lie was blinded last
September.
In making the formal offer of this
sacrifice, Mrs. Waugh told the Red
Cross .she had heard of a rabbits eye
balls being successfully transferred to
another animal's head and said she be
jlieve«l it could be clone with human
eyes.
OPEN PARLEYS WITH ALLIES.
\ lacllvostok. lYb. 2. An official
communique issued at Omsk on Jan
uary 13 states that the government
the»- has opened pourparlers with the
allies regarding the proposed 1'rinkipos
conference.
M«anwhHo the struggle with the
Bolshevik! continues, the communique
states.
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AM Al . r- n » n ". ,,
AN ALLEGED B0BTA ' L - '
, '«' h - :i l ' rod Anderson dis
Mo ved his l»ok. r face In court here to
SWEDISH RAILROADERS STRIKE.
OnpenhuKen Kob. 3. -Transit condi
tions throughout southern 8wed. n
wore paralyzed today as the result of
n strike of trainmen on it* tailweys.
The food situation in some of the in
terlor towns was said to lie desperate,
owitur to dependence on a day-to-day
supply.
day pair of biack eyes and three
missing: teeth l- J. Browning called
Anderson's remark concerning an al
!«*ed "bobtail.''
BERGER FATE KNOWN TODAY.
Chicago. Feb. 3. -Fate of Victor Ber
ger and four co-defendant Socialist
| leaders, convicted last month on sedi
tion charges, was to be in Federal
Judge Tandis* hands today, when he
was to hear a motion for a new* trial.
SUFFRAGE BILL UP MONDAY.
Washington. I'eh. 3—Senator Jones,
X. M., today announced he will call up
thf* woman suffrage resolution in the
sertate next Monday.
WILSON ON THE
HOME STRETCH
IN COMPLETING
NATION LEAGUE
President Enjoys Sunday of
Rest Prior to Drive for Con
summation of Program Be
fore the Week Ends.
TO CONFER WITH SPECIAL
LEAGUE COMMITTEE TODAY
Balkan Situation Up for Dis
cussion Today With Paricu
lar Reference to Greek Po
litical and Land Claims.
By FRED S. FERGUS ON.
Paris, Feb. 3.—President Wilson to
day began his drive for consumma
tion of the league of nations program
before the end of the week.
Refreshed by a day of complete rest,
the president following his address on
the subject of the league before the
chamber of deputies this afternoon,
was to confer with the special com
mittee which is working on details of
the league's outline. In this meeting,
to be held nt the hotel Grillon, work
was to be taken up on the definite
constitution of the league upon which
several tentative agreements have al
ready been reached.
Paul Deschanel, president of th*j
chamber, was selected to greet Presi
dent "Wilson in the presence cf Presi
dent Poincare, Premier Clemenceau
end other celebrities. The situation
was similar to that of an address be •
fore a joint session of the American
c««ngress, as members of ths French
senate sat with the deputies.
IN CLOSE HARMONY.
Tim president is working in the
closest unanimity with Lord Cecil and
General Smuts on the draft for the
constitution which provides for a per
manent organization, to meet regularly
and to have machinery for arbitration
and economic) punishments. Complete*
agreement on the frame work is gen
erally anticipated before Premier Lloyd
George leaves for London at the end
of the week.
President Wilson mot with tin
peace bureau this morning. Tin Bal
kan situation was discussed with par
ticular reference to Greece's political
and territorial claims. Premier Ytni
zelos was the principal speaker.
TO EASE CENSOR BAN.
The president has under considera
tion plans for reporting progress of
the peace conference regularly to con
gress in the future. Reports from the
Fnited States indicate there Is need of
explaining the details of various prob
lems being worked out, as a misun
derstanding is obvious. The tone of
congressional debates is liable to re
sult in misapprehension by the other
delegates here.
When Wilson arrives In the United
States, three weeks hence—he Is ex
pected to sail Fob. 14 -he expects suf
ficient progress to have been made for
a comprehensive report to congress.
Colonel House is recovering rapidly
and is expected to ta ko full part in
the peace work this week.
ELIGIBLE FOR DISCHARGE.
W ashington, Feb. 3.—General Per
shing has been authorized to send
home for immediate discharge men
who present proof of Illness or other
distress in their families.
The request can be made by the sol
dier. by a member or friend of the
family, in a letter or cable.
V«/1L LI A M S NAMED COMMANDER.
Washington, Feb. 3.—Rear Admiral
S. Williams today was assigned t>. the
command of division l o. 1 of the Pa
cific fleet. Captain F. B. Bassett was
named commanding officer of the
Great Hakes naval training station and
commandant of the Ninth, Tenth and
Eleventh naval districts.
Fleet of Transports Bearing«'^
Yankee Overseas Fighter#
Due to Dock this Week
New York, Feb. 3—Bringing nearly
3000 American soldiers home from the
war the steamship Agummenon docked
here this afternoon. Ehe was the first
of a fleet of transports which is ex
pected to land 20,000 veteran United
Slates troops in New York and Ho
boken before the end of the week.
The 51st coast artillery corps, regu
lar army, came on the Agammenon. On
it were 1650 men and officers.
Others aboard were 82 casual officers,
including 63 aviators and 659 sick and
wounded, of whom 130 were bedridden.
The transport Saniarind.i also steamed
into port today bringing New York and
Georgia troops and 13 unattached cas
ual officers.
Among the casual officers were Lieu
tenants L. K. French, Seattle, Wash.,
and L. J. Houghton, Salt Lake.

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