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Evening capital news. (Boise, Idaho) 1901-1927, February 20, 1919, Image 1

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ALL THE NEWS
FIRST
EVENING CAPITAL NEWS
WEATHER
FRIDAY.
Probably rain or anew
tonight and Thuraday.
VOL. XLH.
BOISE. IDAHO, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 20, 1919
No. 37
STORM AT SEA
THREATENS 10
DELAYWASON'S
ARRIVAL HOME
Plan to Reach Boston Monday
May Be Disrupted by Harsh
Elements; Driving Rain Ac
companies Strong Wind.
BOSTON ALL READY TO
GIVE PROPER HOMAGE
29 Patrol Boats in Addition to
Warships to Convoy George
Washington to Dock; Mayor
to Meet President.
Boston, Feb. 20.—The transport
George Washington is expected to
arrive in Boston Monday, accord
ing to a wireless message today to
Admiral Spencer Wood of the first
naval district. The information
came from one of the vessels con
voying the president's ship.
On Board tlie l'. S. S. George Wash
ington, Feb. 20.—While planning '•>
reach Boston Monday, President Wil
son may be delayed until Tut sday by
a gale which sprang up this after
noon. 'i\k* strong wind was accom
panied by a driving rain. The presi
dent devoted most of tfie day to work
ing. lie appeared on deck with Mrs.
Wilson for a short time and joined
the soldiers and crew in "abandon j
ship" drill. lie has not
whether lie will address a joint s.-s
s.on of congress on the league of na
tions. but it is believed that lie will
do so.
BOSTON PLANS READY.
decided ;
Boston, Feb. 20.- Plans for the ro
ception of President Wilson were prac
tically completed today, subject to |
change if Joseph P. Tumult v, tho pr«' - I
ldent's secretary, believes any modii'f- .
cations are necessary. !
Mayor Andrew .1. Peters has made all
arràngemc.ts for the reception Mon
day, although the presidential ship may ;
arrive Sunday, in which case it is un- |
dergtood : h will lie at anchor in tho
lower harbor until Monday morning, j
It is known that President Wilson do
sires to avoid a demonstration on Sun- j
day
The George Washington will he met
by practically all the naval vessels sta
tioned here and by at least three ships
carrying the mayor's committee of wel
enrra . Admiral Spencer Wood, of the
first naval district, has made arrange
ments for : i\ destroyers to go out to
sea and convoy the big liner to port.
SPLENDID ISOLATION.
When the George Washington steams
up tho harbor to her berth at Com
monwealth pier, she will be surrounde i
by a fleet of 2!» patrol boats, which
will keep any other vessels away from
the presiden V. ship. Mayor P* ters,
Major General Edwards and Admiral
Wood, will come alongside tho liner
when she oi
iters
quara:
ntlne.
It is now
planri
ed tin
it the p
resident
will go to t
he C
tpley
hotel, M
ditch is
within a sh
ort d
istanc
e of Me
'chinics
hall, when
he v
till m
ake his
speech
Monday eve
ning.
So great is
the de
maud for a
drnisH
lion u
$ the h;
al! that
the mayor's
committee
is Issuing tick
ets only on
appll
cation
by mai
il.
THEN DISCHARGE YANKS
New York, Feb. 20.—The transport
George Washington, on which Presl
dent Wilson is returning to the United
States, will bring tho troops aboard to
Hoboken for debarkation after leaving
the president at Boston, it was as
serted today.
The transport will go into Boston
harbor and anchor so that the president
may be put ashore on a government
tug from Charleston navy yard.
TO TELL 35TH DIVISION'S
PART IN ARGONNE BATTLE
Washington, Feb. 21).—The story of
the 35th division in the Argonne fight
ing was expected to be told the house
rules committee today by Major Gen
eral Peter E. Traub, its commander.
General Traub was placed in com
mand of th" division following the re
moval of General McClure and General
Martin, national guard officers, shortly
before the Argonne battle began.
CHOOSE MICHIGAN TOWN
FOR FORD-TRIBUNE SUIT
Detroit, Mich., Feb. 20.—Mount
Clemens was today designated ns the
place where the Chicago Tribune
Henry Ford million dollar libel suit is
to be held. Mount Clemens Is 20 miles
from Detroit.
FOREMEN STRIKE; 20,000
HOG ISLANDERS JOBLESS
Philadelphia, Feb. 20.—Approxi
mately 20,000 men were thrown out of
work at Hog Island shipyard today
when 400 foremen struck for an In
crease in wages from $64 to $70 a
weak. •
TIFT FUVS LEAGUE OPPONENTS
Declares Solons Who Oppose Project Are Reactionary to Last
Degree; 10,000 'Frisco Hearers Applaud
Former President.
San Francisco, Feb. 20—Ton
thousand men and women looked
at the league of nations from the
Taft angle today and those who
favored the league had the bene
fit of a thoroughgoing lecture
from an international lawyer to
reinforce them.
William Howard Taft spoke to
that many persons last night and
praised the league constitution as
a preventative of wars.
The party will leave tonight for
Salt Lake. Taft explained his co
operation with President Wilson
for the league as follows:
ATTACK ON LEAGUE;
President, Not Senate, to Do
cide American People for or
Against Project; No Defense
Program Planned at Present.
By I,. C. MARTIN.
Washington. Feb. 20.—President Wil
m and not the senate will spealt the
ords that will decide the American
people fur or against tho league of na
in tlie opinion of senate admin
istration leaders. 1
They refused to worry today over
attacks on tho draft of tho league con
stitution. They are in no hurry to re
ply t
rush into the arena against other crit
ics, who plan to hammer at the league
daily from now on.
Yesterday's senate demonstration,
when packed galleries applauded Poin
dexter's assaults on the league, meant,
nothing in the absence of defense of
tin league by the man, more than any
one (Iso, responsible for it, administra -
t ion senators said
i n his absence, hostile criticism will
center the public mind upon the league,
create Interest in the provisions of its
constitution and thus give President
[Wilson an audience eager to hear what
j ie has to saw
"President Wilson will make tho chief
speech to the great American jury,"
said Senator Lewis, Democratic whip,
"The people know they can rely on his
being honest with them. If, after hear
ing him, they decide tho league plan
is evil they doubtless will express that
view to congress without hesitation,
and in no uncertain terms."
Senator Poindexter, nor will they
JURY FREES NEARING
AFTER LONG SESSION;
SOCIETY FOUND GUILTYi
i.ew York, Feb. 20.—After be
ing out 30 hours the jury in the
case of Professor Scott Nearing,
accused of violating the espionage
act, returned a verdict of not
guilty. The American Socialist
society, jointly indicted with Near
ing and accused of printing and
circulating Nearing's pamphlet
called "The Great Madness," was
found guilty under two counts.
WILSON RADIOS MESSAGE
TO INJURED CLEMENCEAU
Aboard the U. S. S. George
Washington at Sea, Feb. 20—
President Wilson sent the follow
ing message of condolence to bo
conveyed to Premier Clemenceau:
"Secretary Lansing and the Am
erican mission in Paris:
"Please convey to Monsieur
Clemenceau my heartfelt sym
pathy and my jcy at his escape.
I sincerely hope that the report
he was only slightly injured is al
together true. I was deeply shock
ed by the news of the attack.
U. S. Allotcd German Ships at
Hamburg for Troop
Transport.
Washington, Feb. 20.—Eight largo
German liners, now at Hamburg, in
cluding the Imperator, have been as
signed to the United States, under al
location of Teutonic tonnage, the war
department announced today.
An inspection board is now at Bre
men and the allocation of other liner*
is imminent.
An ultimate capacity for troop move
ment of 50,000 to 60.000 a month is es
timated from this source.
Troop shipments for February will
reach 160,000 and for March 200,000 to
225,000. In April 225,000 seems assured
and 250,000 a possibility. •
From then on an increase Is in Bight
up to 300,000 a month, assured summer
capacity
"President Wilson is a Demo
crat—I am a Republican. He is
going to remain a Democrat und I
am going to remain a Republican,
but our differences in regard to
national matters end at the shores
of the Atlantic and Pacific
oceans."
Regarding the men in congress,
who are opposing the league, he
said :
"I can only say they are reac
tionary to the last degree—they
are going back 100 years."
Taft again predicted that the
senate would ratify the "covenant
of Paris."
I;
I FOE
U. P. Investigator Finds
ports of Unsanitation
Re
Many Deaths Overdrawn,
Not so Bad, Men Declare.
By LOWELL MEIXETT.
(Copyright 1919: By United Press)
Bre st, Feb. 20.—Brest may not be the
best militfiry base in tho world, but ?s
[far from tho worst, in tho opinion of
t h e inhabitants of the camp themselves,
officers and men permanently station
ed here.
An investigation, conducted under
such circumstances as the situation
will permit, failed to substantiate the
charges that Brest is a "pest hole" or
that the men are victims of misman
agement* R Is true that, in common
with much of western France, there is
a super-abundance of mud, but this# is
duo to climatic and geological condi
tions. This could not be avoided, as
Brest was selected ns a base because
of strategic and geographical reasons.
Reports of shocking food and sanitary
conditions are unfounded, according to
1211 DEATHS ALL TOLD.
Rumors are understood to have been
circulated in tho United States that
3000 American soldiers died in Brest
during September and October of the
last year. The facts are, according to
figures given tho correspondent, that
from November, 1917, when Camp Pon
tanezzen—where soldiers are congre
gated to await transportation home—
was established, up to the first of the
present month there were 1211 deaths
from all causes. This includes the
victims of the pneumonia and influen
za epidemic during October and Sep
tember, most of whom are said to have
become infected either enroute here or
before they left the United States. It
also includes 510 who died aboard ship
while coming over. These figures were
authorized by General Eli Helmick, the
commander; General Smedley Butler,
commandant at Camp Pontanezzen,
and Colonel Guy Edie, base surgeon.
These officers claim that the sick and
death rate in Brest, which handles
moro American troops than any other
port, is tlie lowest of any camp in
France.
BEST CAMP IN FRANCE.
A private from California admitted
that Camp Pontanezzen is loss attrac
tive than Camp Lewis, that it proba
bly is less comfortable and that cer
tainly tlie streets are infinitely mud
dier, but declared that it is the "best
camp in France."
He was asked why.
"Because," he replied, "they feed you
right, here."
"What do you mean by 'right'?"
"Well, there's lots of it, it's good
and you don't have to wait for it. Why,
they had hot chocolate and things for
us when we got off the train and a hot
dinner ready when we got to camp, al
though it was in the middle of tho
night. Don't let 'em kid you. This is a
white man's camp."
Afterwards, the correspondent talked
with many other men in the runks and
and I
(Continued on Page Two.)
MEXICANS AND INDIANS
STAGE VICIOUS COMBAT
Nogales, Arlz., Feb. 20—Two san
guinary battles between Mexican sol
diers and Yaqul Indians have occur
red near Nogales In the last 48 hours.
The last encounter occurred within
nine miles of Nogales, Sonora. Twenty
Mexicans were killed. The Yaqul
casualties are unknown.
The first engagement took place
near Eoqull Sonora, 20 miles east of
Nogales. Its results are unknown.
Apprehension Is felt for the safety
of 60 American business men who left
today for Mazatlan and other west
coast points on a trade promotion ex
cursion.
WILSON'S FIRST SPEECH.
Washington, Feb. 20.—President Wtl
son's address at Boston probably will
be an appeal for public Indorsement
of the league of nations constitution.
It was stated at the white house. He
is determined to confine practically the
whole address to the subject of the
league.
I
IRENES CHARGE
35TH DIVISION
MISHANDLED IN
ARGONNE FIGHT
General Traub, Commander,
Tells House Rules Committee
Conditions Unavoidable or
Else Flatly Denies Charges.
SAYS BOCHE HAD FRENCH
"GOAT," BUT NOT YANKS'
Americans Took German Posi
tions in Three Hours What
Poilus Had Been Up Against
for Three Years.
Washington, Feb. 20—Charges that
the 35th division was mishandled and
not properly cared for in the battle of
the Argonne are not "well founded."
Major General Peter Traub, the di
vlslon ' s commander, told the house
rules committee today.
"Questioned caterigorically concern
ing the charges of Governor Allen of
Kansas, TratiD cither made a flat de
nial or said the condition was un
avoidable, under the exigencies ot bat
tle.
"Everything possible was dona for
the wounded," Tr$ ub said.
"But there weren't enough stretch
ers In tlie A. E. F. to take caro of
7000 at one point."
Traub denied flatly that the Ger
mans dominated the air.
SHORTAGE OF HORSES.
There was a shortage of horses, he
said, but he denied the shortage was
as great as 55 per cent.
Turning to artillery, Traub said
about a half dozen shells from the al
lied artillery had fallen inside the
American lines.
The division was never otuside its
army anil torps artillery, he said.
Generals Martin, a national guard
officer, and McClure, a regular army
officer, bad been removed on his
recommendation. Traub said.
"THEY FOUGHT, TOO."
Supplies of winter underclothing
had not caught up with the division
at the time of the Argonne fighting,
Traub explained. Engineer troops had
been pressed into the fighting to re
lieve an infantry division, Traub ad
mitted, "and you can bet your sweet
life they fought, too."
"The Boche had tlie Frenchmen's
goat. He would not go up there and
try that Job.
"We took in three hours what the
French had been up against three
years." _
Figures Show Sick Rate at U.
S. Camps Lower Than A. E.
F. Average; Yankee Gener
als Deny Ill-Health Reports.
Washington, Feb. 20.—The hospital
admission rate at Brest for November,
December and January ran lower than
the sick rate for the whole A. E. F.
according to reports from General
Pershing today. Total deaths were
1311 between Nov. 12, 1017, and Feb.
7, 1919, among the transient and per
manent garrisons at Brest. This Is
General Pershing's answer to charges
of bad conditions there.
The hospital admission rate per
1000 for Brest and vicinity ran:
November, 2.11; December, 1.3; Jan
uary, 1.63, and February to date, 1.45.
IN THE A. E. F.
In the A. E. F., exclusive of men
wounded In action, the sick rate was:
November. 2.2; December, 2.14, and
January, 2.04, while tho average dally
death rate per 100,000 In Brest and vi
cinity ran, November, 5.15; December,
2.08; January, 3.15; February to date,
3.63.
"More than 985,000 men entered
France via Brest and 165,000 left
Brest," Pershing cabled.
"Total deaths among all these tran
sients and among the permanent gar
risons from Nov. 12, 1917, to Feb. 7,
1919, were 1311. Deaths on Incoming
boat's or by the time patients reach
hospitals nt Brest, 2191 ; of these, 1817
burials occurred. In September, Oc
tober and November, 1918, Influenza
and pneumonia cases were arriving on
transports from the United States and
were In no way due to any health con
ditions existing at Brest.
"Health conditions at Brest and gen
eral conditions of camp and method of
handling troops through there have re
ceived high praise from all who have
Inspected since the first formative
day.
"General Pershing, General Harbord,
the chief surgeon and the Inspector
general have all personally Inspected
this place during the past month."
VICTORBERGER
REFUSED NEW
TRIAI; PRISON
CELL HIS FATE
Judge Landis Also Denies Stay
of Sentence to Congress
man-Elect and Four Other
Socialist Leaders.
CONVICTED MEN STAGE
IMPASSIONED APPEALS
Berger Declares Only in Japan
Could Such Verdict Be Pos
sible; Says Socialists Beat
Hun, Not the Allies.
Chicago, Feb. 20.—Socialist Con
gressman-elect Victor L. Berger,
Wisconsin, convicted of conspir
ing to violate the Spionage act,
was sentenced today by Federal
Judge Landis to serve 20 years in
Leavenworth prison, Fort Leaven
worth.
Four other Socialists convicted
with Betger also were sentenced
to serve 20 years.
Chicago, Feb. 20.—Motions for a new ■
trial and for stay of sentence were |
denied by Federal Judge Kandis hero
today in the case of Victor Berger,
Socialist congressman-elect, and four
other Socialist leaders. Each of tho
defendants asked to make a statement
before sentences were pronounced.
The five defendants who were found
guilty of conspiring to violate the es
pionage act are: Victor L. Berger,
congressman-elect from Wisconsin; J.
Louis Engdahl, editor of Socialist pub
lications; William F. Kruse, executive
secretary of the Young People's Social
ist league; Irwin St. John Tucker, So
cialist orator and writer, and Adolph
Germer, national Socialist secretary.
The five were Indicted a year ago
but were not brought to trial until the
close of 1918. The trial lasted six
weeks.
BERGER SPEAKS FIRST.
Berger, first to speak, said a ver
dict such as that against the five de
fendants would be imopssible in any
other country except Japan.
"We all admit that we are Social
ists," said Berger. "Our position was
simply that of the International Social
ist movement.
"Socialists know capitalism can
not last forever, any more than the
feudal system endured.
"We are no more guilty* of con
spiracy than the judge himself."
Berger discussed Socialism at
(Continued on Page Two.)
7
TILL MIDDLE OF MAY
Withdrawal of Allied Troops
From Archangel Region Must
Wait Ice Break—Able to Re
pulse Entire Red Army.
Washington, Feb. 20.—The middle
of May is the earliest date when tho
troops can be removed from the
Arohaqgel region, it was stated au
thoritatively today.
Dispatch of British and American
engineers to repair the railroad line
in the Murmansk region is a precau
tionary measure to supplement move
ment out through the White sea. The
ice breuks up In Archungel about the
middle of May and the railway cannot
bo repaired before that time.
There Is no definite time set so far
for the departure.
NO FEAR OF RED8.
Washington ,Feb. 20.—The allied
command is "capable of taking care
of Itself against tho whole Bolshevik
army," in northern Russia, Colonel
George E. Stewart, American com
mander tqjlay cabled the war depart
ment.
"The alarmist reports of conditions
of troops In northern Russia ns pub
lished In press reports the end of De
cember, are not warranted by facts,"
he said. "Troops have been well taken
care of in every way and my officers
resent these highly exaggerated re
ports, fearing that a slur Is cast bn
the regiment's wonderful record.
Health of command is excellent, sick
and wounded are well taken care of."
111b WEATHER
Forecast for Boise and vicinity;
SNOW TONIGHT AND FRIDAY.
For Idaho; Tonight and Friday, fair
In north, snow In nouth portion.
Highest temperature yesterday, 3$.
Lowest temperature this morning, 29.
Mean temperature yesterday 80.
RIOTOUS GALES DELAY
TRANSPORTS, BEARING
20,000 OVERSEA MEN
Kansas, With Idaho Troopa Aboard,
Picks Up Radio Near Bermuda;
Many Days Overdue
New York, Feb. 20.—Sever»
storms sweeping the Atlantic have
delayed arrival here of 18 trans
ports carrying nearly 20,0(10 men.
Wireless reports last night und
today stated that all the ships v.ern
weathering the gales but that many
would be several days overdue.
Some have been forced to run for
Bermuda for coal and repairs, the
messages said.
The steamer Henderson, due to
day with 1200 wounded, is heading
for Bermuda, according to a radio
picked up by the battleship Kansas
and relayed to tho naval station
here.
The President Grant wirelessed
last night that she had heard dis
tress signals from the small steam
er Polar Paar, which carries three
casual officers, and was going to
her aid.
A message from the Woonsocket,
which left Bordeaux January 27
and was due here ten days ago,
said she had lost p propeller Made
but was proceeding to port under
her own steam. Twenty-one sol
diers are aboard.
Readjustment Conferees Op
pose Federal Ownership ; En
dorse League of Nations;
Many Other Resolutions.
Omaha, Neb. Feb. 20-The Trans
Mlssisslppi Readjustment congress to
day went on record as opposed to gov
ernment ownership and operation of
tho railroads, it declared that the
roads should be returned to private
ownership as soon as possible, sub
ject to government regulation and
supervision to prevent abuses of the,
past.
The convention endorsed the league
of nations and believes It to be the
duty of public men of tho United
States to co-operate in securing and
adoption of the constitution adopted
in Paris.
OTHER RESOLUTIONS.
Other resolutions were;
Employment of returned soldiers by
federal, state and municipal govern
ments; Industrial progress, stopped by
the war, should continue; good roads;
conference and mutual discussions for
settlement of labor questions; belief
that emergency fleet should be turned
over to private operation; declare that
federalization of business In effect
during the war Bhould now cease; that
the government should keep Us con
tract with the farmers for $2.26 wheat;
recommended legislation to develop
water power In the west; rigid en
forcement of blue sky laws; urged fair
treatment of public utilities corpora
tions; recommend that a budget sys
tem be inaugurated by the federal gov
ernment; recommend extension of the
Americanization campaign to Include
all parts of the country.
HOUSTON SPEAKS.
To dairy ulong the work inaugu
rated by this congress, a permanent
organization is to be {firmed later in
tho day.
Secretary of Agriculture Houston, In
addressing delegates attacked control
of packers of the big livestock markets
and declared he favored federal inter
vention to bring about restoration of
confidence of livestock growers in the
market*.
"Livestock growers are suspicious of
packer control of livestock marketing
centers and do not believe there Is an
adequately free market," Houston said.
"I don't think a few men should say
what conditions should be at the big
marketing centers. 1 think federal in
tervention the only thing that will re
store confidence of the growers In the
murkets."
AVERAGES 167 MILES PER
GOTHAM TO WASHINGTON
Washington. Feb. 20.—New York to
Washington—85 minutes—average 167
miles an hour. That's the record claim
ed today by Lieutenant F. H. Harmon,
who made the flight In a scout plane.
NO YANKEES *T0 BE
DEMOBILIZED HERE;
REPORT A MISTAKE
The Capital News is in raeaipt
of a wir» from Congressman Ad
dison T. Smith in Washington,
advising that no man ar* to ba
sent to Boisa barraoks for da
mobilization, contrary to a report
aant out by the war department
recently. Th» wir» follow«:
"News item given out by war
department on the 12th that
casual oompany 265, oomposad of
two officer* and 64 man, would b*
aant to Boiae barraoka for dis
charge Is erroneous. Col. Kimball
of the ataff advises ma that a mi«
taka was mads in giving this
statement out for publioation. It
Is not eontamplated to send any
troopa to Bais» barraoka for dis
oharga."
CLEMENCEAU IS
RESTING EASILY;
LOCATE BULLET
NEARTHESPINE
No Serious After Effects Have
Developed and an Operation
for Shot's Removal May Be
Avoided.
SLEUTHS HUNT FOR PLOT
AGAINST ALLIES' LEADERS
Assailant Known to Have At
tended a Recent Meeting
Where Participants Shouted
"Death to Clemenceau."
Paris, Feb. 20.— Th» assassin'»
bullet penetrated one of Premier
Clemenceau'» lunge, eauting a
slight hemorrhage yesterday after
noon, it waa officially announoed
today. His condition, however, was
»aid to be satisfactory.
The statement »aid:
"There waaa a slight hemoptysis
(hemorrhage) of the lung» at 1
o'clock yesterday afternoon, owing
to the bullet's penetration of the
lung."
Clemenceau had a good appetite this
morning and conversed cheerfully with
Foreign Minister Plchon and others.
Among his visitors was King Nicholas
of Montenegro.
The policemen who were wounded In
grappling with the assassin and the
premier's chauffeur and secretary, have
been awarded military medals.
HEARD PLOT PLANNED.
A French consul who returned from
Russia some time ago, overheard in the
Russian library In Paris, a month ago,
a Russian agitator discussing the pos
sibility of disguising Russian soldiers
in French uniforms as part of a pljt
against Clemenceau. The police watch
ed the library thereafter, but were un
able to obtain any further evidence of
the conspiracy. It had been ascertain
ed that Emile Cottln, the assassin, has
been closely connected with Russian
prisoners who were recently repatri
ated.
Paris, Feb. 20.—French authorities,
with the cooperation of Intelligence of
ficers of the associated powers, were
conducting a sweeping investigation to
day in connection with the attack on
Premier Clemenceau yesterday which
resulted In the aged statesman receiv
ing a slight wound from a revolver
bullet. The officials were working on
the theory that the attack may have
been only part of a plot against the
principal allied leaders, although noth
ing had been unearthed so far as Is
known to support this surmise.
RESTING EASILY.
No official statement had been Is
sued early today on Clemenceau's con
dition but it tvns understood that he
was resting easily and that no serious
after uffects had developed. The bul
let had been lc/cated In the right
shoulder near the spine and It waa re
ported that an operation for Its re
moval might not be necessary.
Emil Cottln, the nssassin, Is known
to have attended a recent meeting of
anarchists at which the participants
shouted "death to Clemenceau." Cottin
was arrested In company with several
anarchists at the time but later was
released.
Cottln was mobilized for two months
at the start of the war and then was
exempted because of heart trouble. He
went to work in an airplane factory
but was discharged for Inefficiency
and laziness after throe months.
Thereafter, he was employed in a
furniture factory. No papers were
found upon Cottln save a minority
Socialist newspaper, the Journal du
Peuple. His police record shows that
he has served three sentences for In
citing soldiers to disobedience.
Numerous Riots Staged, Eighi
Deaths Reported in Spart
acau Outbreak at Hanon.
Berlin, Feb. 20—The general strike
la spreading rapidly in various paris
of the country and a number of riots
have occurred, according to reports re.
celved here.
Eight persons wero killed and scores
Injured during a Spartaean outbreak
In Hanon. Other demonstrations oc
curred In Elbeifeld, Gelsenkirchen and
Hamborn. At Brunswick, a hundred
unemployed men forcibly entered tha
parliament, demolished all the furni
ture and buried the president under
the wreckage.
ISSUE ULTIMATUM.
Washington, Feb. 20— Tho soldiers'
and workmen's council of Mnntoh has
Issued an ultimatum to the Bavarian
governmen-, according to dispatches
received here today, demanding that
It resign or agree to the folowlnf.
Dismissal of a number of conserva
tive officials.
Dissolution of the Bavarian armv
under control of the soldltys' oounctl,
which would sleet all officers.

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