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Evening capital news. (Boise, Idaho) 1901-1927, February 22, 1919, Image 2

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn88056024/1919-02-22/ed-1/seq-2/

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CAMP AT BREST
WtLLTAKECARE
90,000 YANKS
atcompledon
Permanent Garrison of 17,000
Now With 45,000 Transients
Though Facilities Overtaxed
to Care for That Number.
TEN AMUSEMENT HALLS,
CONSTANT ENTERTAINING
Health of Inmates Carefully
Supervised by Best of Army
Doctors; Hospital Declared
Finest Equipped of A. E. F.
By LOWELL, MELLETT.
(Copyrlghf 1919, by United Press.)
! Brest, Feb. 22—Camp Pontanesen,
j whore most of the homeward Ameri
can troops are stationed while await
ing transportation, Is a big institu
tion.
The camp today contains a per
manent garrison of 17,000, which will
he reduced when the camp is com
pleted, rendering carpenters and en
gineers unnecessary. The transients
number 15,000, wliigh is the maximum
that can be handled—in fact, strains
the facilities.
When completed, the. camp will ac
comodate 00,000 comfortably.
The completed institution will be di
vided into 16 areas, each having its
own kitchen, entertainment hall, re
creation grounds and Y. M. C. A. hut.
There are. now ten amusement halls,
varying from big tents to substantial
buildings large enough to be .lised for
dances.
CONTRAST ENTERTAINMENT.
There Is an entertainment of some
kind in at least one hall every night,
some times more than one. Minstrel
■hows by clever colored troops are
the most popular. Last night the cor
respondent saw one of these. Some of
the dancers ought to be on the pro
fessional stage and there was Jazz
music that would have done credit to
Broadway's celebrated restaurants.
Aside from amusementB, the sol
dier's time is occupied in construction
work, particularly forming mud roads
Into macadamized streets. This work
Is nearly finished and the motor
trucks find good going in most of the
places around the camp.
The billeting officers also utilize as
much of the transient labor ns pos
sible In Improving the billeting areas
under their charge, for there is con
tinual billeting competition, whereby
the winners get a week's leave once a
month, the same as the wlnnerB In the
kitchen contests.
The health of the permanent garri
son and the transients is carefully
aupervised. The camp hospital con
tains 2340 beds though a third are un
occupied. It is capable of expansion
tf necessary.
BEST IN THE A. E. F.
"It Is the best equipped hospital In
the A. E. F„" according to Major
George H. Burke, who Is in charge of
It, and who might be expected to pro
test If he were inadequately supplied
with essentials. On the other hand,
he maintains It has everything that
can be expected In a camp hospital.
The hospital consists of a big stone
barracks building which contains the
operatink rooms and dozens of frame
ward buildings. The stalf includes
104 Red Cross nurses. It was differ
ent in the days of pneumonia and In
fluenza epidemic when there were only
37 nurses.
"The war cleaned out the Ameri
can supply of nurses. We got all we,
could. In addition we combed out the
men In camp, finding many for tem
porary duty."
The major spoke glowingly of the
way the nurses worked during the epi
demic, saying, "they never thought of
■leeping and son)e times worked 24
to 36 hours straight."
Blanche Jones, head nurse, whom
Major Burke described as "the great
est woman In the A. E. F." has been
recommended for congressional recog
nition.
(Continued from Page One.)
war minister, Roaahaupter, who have
also been Bhot, were among Eisner's
chief supporters In his effort to make
Germany realize the supreme respon
sibility of the militarists for the fa
therland's defeat. It Is, therefore,
practically certain that they, too, were
marked by the army for destruction.
NEW TERROR REIGN..
Thus, the militarists of Germany ap
parently are Intent upon* propagating
a new kind of terror. Instead of as
sassination being the exclusive argu
ment of anarchists, seeking to over
throw government, it is now shared
with them by German militarists,
who are determined that respect for
the army shall continue to be enforced
upon the German people. The situa
tlon thus» revealed by the crimes In
Munich is one of profound gravity.
The adoption ' of assassination as s
new form of strategy by the German
army means that elements of serious
danger to civilization still exist across
the Rhine,
German militarism is attetmptlng at
■U costs to keep alive the traditions
of discipline end loyalty even in de
mobilisation to Itself. If the German
people are not now shown that this
spirit doesn't pay, they doubtless will
try to make it pay some time in the
tutors.
NATURE PAYS UNCONSCIOUS TRIBUTE TO
MEMORY OP THE FATHER QF OUR COUNTRY
>■ "
!**<*?:
• '
•m
A striking resemblance to the features of George Washington, Amer
ica's first president, is seen in the face of this rock locatedra San Ber
nando »alley, California. It may wall be called nature's tribute to 'the
Father of Our Country." ,
REED ATTACKS
(Continued from Page Qne.)
pute, shall have Its commerce ravish
ed from the high seas.
"This Is freedom of the seas with
.vengea nee."
Reed warned American labor that
"their supremacy and superior condi
tion ran not bo maintained If they
consent to any International body
composed of the representatives of
kingly government interfering with
their conditions."
DECLARE LIEBKNECHT
INSANE WHEN KILLED;
IN PRISON TOO LONG
Berlin, Feb. 22.— Karl Liebknecht
was Insane as' the result of his long
imprisonment, when he was murdered,
according to a finding reported to
have been made by the special com
mission Investigating his death. It
was alleged that he had been so ad
judged by his family physician and
two others.
Reports that Liebknecht and Rosa
Luxemburg were killed while tryng
to escape are untrue, the commission
Is alleged to have held. The two Spar
tacan leaders were said to have been
brutally clubbed to death, after which
their bodies were taken away and
filled with bullets.
CHARGES SENATE PROBES
REFUSES TO HEAR TRUTHS
Washington, Feb. 22.—Charges that
the senate investigating committee ts
unwilling to learn the truth about Rus
sia was made by Miss Louise Bryant,
who returned from that country sev
eral months ago. 1 •
Miss Bryant, declared subpoenas were
canceled when the commutes realiied
the testimony of witnesses would be
favorable to the soviet government.
Chairman Overman denied unfair
ness had been shown and said the
committee was willing to hear all sides.
WOULD OUST SOCIALISTS
WHO BACKED UP BERGER
Madison, Wis„ Feb. 22.—The Wis
consin State Journal has printed a
story to the effect that a Wisconsin
assemblyman has started a movement
to unseat every Socialist In the legis
lature ,on a charge that they have
openly ridculed Judge Landis' sentenc
ing of Victor Berger and that they are
morally guilty of charges on which
Berger was convicted.
'FRISCO GAMBLERS BET
; AMERICA TO STAY WET
San Francisco, Feb,. 22.—Gamblers
believe the country will not go dry.
Betting ln San Franclsoo today was
four to one that the nation stays wet.
In one pool room, where many bets
are taken, It was said tew are willing
to take the dry aide of the bet.
8AY8 IT 18 THE BEST IN THE
WORLD.
There is one remedy that those who
know depend upon for relief from
coughs that "hang on" after the grip.
Foley's Honey and Tar clears the
passages, soothes raw, inflamed mem
branes and banishes irritation and
ticUng in the throat. A. M. McDaniel,
Box 51, Llndalde, W. Va., write«: "I
am glad to tell you that Foley's
Honey and Tar Is the best medicine
In this world. I have had a severe
cough and before I used half a bottle
I was better." Whitehead's Drug atora
—Adv. t th e.
OLYMPIC TO DOCK MONDAY.
New York, Feb. 32—A wireless mes
sage to the International Mercantile
marine from the steamer Olympic,
which left Brest February 7, said that
the liner would make port Monday or
Tuesday. . ,
The Olympic carries C648 passen
gers, 584t of whom are members qf the
A E. F., the message stated.
Two Transports, Delayed by
Heavy Storms at Sea, Reach
New York Port.
New York, Feb. 22.—Transports
which have been delayed, by heavy
Atlantic storms were coming safely
Into port today.
The Orlzba, which sailed February
12 from Bordeaux, brought 2931 men,
Including headquarters supply com
panies, ordnance medical detachments
and batteries A. B. C, D, B and 'F of
the 334th field artillery: headquarters
of the 162nd field artillery and a num
ber of casual companies.
The Henderson, which left Bordeaux
February 2, had 1212 men, mostly
wounded and casuals. She put Into
the Bermudas on the voyage.
When the Manchuria from St. Na
znire, with 4447 men, was Inspected at
quarantine she was found to have 104
cases of Influenza, 24 of pneumonia, 3
of mumps and 1 of measles. Four In
fluenza victims died on the way over.
The Manchuria carried the 70th and
1st coast artillery regiments and 867
sick and wounded, as well as several
caaual companies. Quarantine offi
cers did not delay her, as the army
Is prepared to care for the sick men.
IT
Youth of 16 Is Apprehended,
Charged With Theft of Some
Six or Eight Automobiles.
Harvey Graves, alias Harvey Rey
nolds, age 16, was placed under arrest
Friday by the city detective depart
ment on a charge of having unlawfully
apropriated for his own use, some
eight automobiles which have dlstp
peared for short periods during this
month. On account of his age, he was
turned over to the probate court.
The theft of the car of Victor Jack
son, found In an alley bteween Front
and Grove streets and 8th and 9th
streets, was admitted by Graves, end
the detective department has evi
dence of some six other care which
he took at different times. A descrip
tion given by a boy at 702 Hays street
of a youth who drove up Wednesday
evening and left a car, number 19,889
owned by J. M. Brown, standing by
the curb, fits Graves perfectly also.
Charges against the boy were pre
ferred by Victor Jackson, who has
been without his car for several days,
hut owing to the probate docket be
ing crowded Friday, the case will come
up Monday. At the probate court, the
boy Is registered as Harvey Reynolds.
thousands^Tfünèral
OF CANADIAN STATESMAN
Ottawa, Ont., Feb. 22.—Thousands of
mourners attended the funeral here to
day of Sir Wilfrid Leuler, former pre
mier of Canada.
Many viewed the body of Sir Wil
frid lying In state in the parliament
garbed In the uniform and regalia of
a grand knight commander of Bt.
Michael and St George.
FUNERAL SUPPLIES.
McBratney A Co. carry In stock the
very beet of funeral furnishing! end
■ell them at reasonable prices. Only
undertakers In Boise who own an auto
hearse, therefore Independent. Price
of hearse In city. »7.— Adv. tf
Tour euto licensee are peat due. Ceil
at Assessor's office at once. W. A.
Kincaid. —Adv. tf.
Chrenie Constipation.
Only mild and gentle laxatives should
be used. Strong cathartics ere too
harsh end drastic. Chamberlain's Tab
lets are excellent, easy to take, agree
able In effect.—Ad ' T.Th.8.
Public
Health Committee Rec
ommends Passage — North
and South Hospitals—Hailey
Mentioned as Site.
The public health committee has
unanimously recommended for pass
age house bill No. 117 which provides
for the building of two tuberculosis
hospitals in Idaho, one In the northern
section and one in the southern sec
tion of the state.
The bill provides fbr the creation of
a state tuberculosis commission to be
corrvponrd of five members, four of
which shall be appointed by the gov
ernor for terms of one, two, three and
four years respectively, and thereafter
one member shall be appointed each
year for a term of four years. Two
members of the commission must be
from the northern district and two
from the southern and one of the
members must be a physician, one an
educator and one a business man and
the fourth Is to be chosen without re
gard to his vocation. The members of
the commission arc to serve without
pay, but are to receive their neces
sary and actual expenses.
Section four of the hill provides for
an ad valorem tax of one-fourth- of
one mill on each dollar of taxable
property In the state during 1919 and
one-eighth of a mill during 1920 for
the purpose of providing a fund for
the construction, equipment and sup
port, and the proceeds of the tax are
to be placed in a special fund to be
known as the district tuberculosis hos
pital fund.
The commission is to meet for or
ganization on the second Monday in
April and , as soon thereafter as In
vestigations can be made will select
sites for the two hospitals, which the
bill required must be high and dry
and generally favorable to the West
ment of tuberculosis.
The city of Hailey has already been
mentioned ns a site for the southern
Idaho hospital and will likely present
its claims If the ,blll passes. Senator
Armstrong of Blaine county, when the
possibility of such a hospital for his
city was mentioned, gave the Informa
tion that Halley was almost the same
altitude as Colorado Springs, where
tubercular patients are so successfully
treated and that it had abundant and
wonderful hot springs while the rarl
fled mountain air would be Ideal for
the treatment of the disease as had
been demonstrated by cures perfected
there.
The bill Is one which is being
championed by the Idaho Red Cross
a branch of which Is bending Its
energies to stamp out tuberculosis In
the state and Investigations conduct
ed by It, its members declare show
the necessity for such hospitals.
(Continued from Page One.)
and traffic ceased and civilians begad
an. exodus from the city.
Meanwhile, friends of the slain
Eisner shot and killed Deputy Autel, a
Centrist, whose violent attacks against
the premier through the newspapers
were believed by them to have influ
enced the feeling against Eisner.
Fighting in Budapest, which began
Thursday .evening, Is said to have been
led by Bolshevik!.- Newspapers, post
offices and principal stations were oc
cupied. Government troops later drove
the rioters from the stations. A state
of siege was proclaimed. One report
said the trades unions were planning
a general strike for today as a demon
stration against the Bolshevik).
Copenhagen, Feb. 22.—Civil war
broke out In Munich at 2 o'clock yes
terday, it was reported In dispatches
received here today.
At that hour, the church hells were
rung and 10,000 workmen marched from
the suburbs into the city. Shortly af
terward violent fighting broke out. The
mobs plundered shops and residences.
Hundreds of civilians fled from the
city. Others were prevented after tho
Spartacans seized the railway stations.
According to the latest reports, work
men dictatorships have been proclaim
ed end Spartacans In armed automo
biles were rushing through the streets.
Many anarchiste were said to have
joined them.
War Minister Rosahaupter, wounded
during shooting in the diet chamber,
was reported to have been arrested
later by the Spartacans.
(A Zurich dispatch via Parle said
Rosahaupter had died from hie
pounds.)
Berne, Feb. 22.—With Premier Eis
ner, Interior Minister Auer and Deputy,
Osel of Bavaria, dead from assassins'
bullets, the victime' friends have be
gun to take revenge Into their own
hands, according to dispatches received
from Munich today.
Deputy Autel, author of a violent
prase campaign against Eisner, is said
to have been killed. Hie body was rid
dled with revolver bullets flred by a
number of unidentified men. Several
other attacke were reported to have
been made on enemies of the present
government.
Eisner wae shot yesterday while
walking Into the street with his secre
tary. Count Arco-Vallay, his assail
ant, who formerly was an officer in
the Prussian guard, wae wounded by a
guard.
Unconfirmed reporta aay he has died
from hia wound*. As Elaner'a assas
sination was announced in the Bava
rlan Lan tag. a vollay wae fired from
the visitor* gallery. Auer wae in
stantly killed and Oeel received wounds
from which he died later. Two other
offlolals. unnamed in the dispatch, are
•aid to have been wounded.
mes mm
Senatq Considers Measure so
Providing—»«ting Commit,
tee Enlarged to Bring For
ward Important Bills.
With Senator Robertson wielding
the gavel, the Renats spent two and
one-half hours Friday afternoon In a
committee of the whole considering
the general calendar with the result
that senate bill No. 94 and house bill
Nos. 9 and 48 were recommended for
passage and senate bill No. 122 ano
house bill No. 114 were reported out
of the committee without recommen
dation.
The first bill under consideration,
senate bill No. 94, came from the com
mittee on education and was destined
to pave the way for the creation of
county high schools. The bill was
amended to tho extent that it wat
left optional with counties as to
-'hether or not they wish to create
■ucfe district, the decision being
reached by a ivote of the various
school districts.
House bill No. 9, by Bonnell, was
discussed. The bill provides for the
extermination of ground squirrels,
pocket gophers and other injuriou»
rodents and provides pay on th*
bounty plan for those who make it a
business to destroy them, while
ranchers troubled with the pests are
furnished poison for their extermina
tion at a below-cost price.
House bill No. 48 takes the probate
court business out of the fee System
under which it lias been operating
since the territorial daÿs and places
It under 'straight charge system the
same as Is used in the district court.
The measure was Introduced by the
Judiciary committee.
Although ThrallklU made a fight
for a favorable recommendation for
senate bill No. 122 by the committee
on banks and banking, he was blocked
by Senator Whitcomb, who moved
that the bill be reported out without
recommendation, which carried. The
bill provided for creating a rating bu
reau for fire insurance companies in
Idaho and that no company could in
sure below schedule of rates fixed by
the rating bureau, and that the com
panies pay fees for its maintenance.
House bill No. 114, by Storey,
Spencer and Miller, regulating the
practice of chiropractlo and the li
censing of chiropractors was sent
from the committee without recom
mendatlon.
Senator Sims of Valley county,
sought to have Joint memorial No. 12
reconsidered and while he secured a
vote for reconsideration, which lost by
a big majority.
TKe sifting committee was enlarged
to seven members upon recommenda
tion of Senator Whitcomb and the
chair named Senators Whitcomb, Heg
sted, Seaver, Porter, Robertson, St.
Clair and Lee as Its members.
Adjournment was taken until Mon
day at 10 o'clock.
PRESERVE BOOZE CACHE
FOR SAKE OF POSTERITY
Charleston, W. Va., Feb. 22.—In or
der thut future generations may bo
able to say, "We have open It," Sena
tor A. E. Scheer of Kanawha county
favors placing in the department of
archives and history a quart bottle of
rye, a quart of bourbon and a quart
bottle of Scotch—"that the same be
guarded carefully and preserved to
posterity ns evidences of the things
that were." The resolution to this
effect was passed by the senate and
concurred In by the house of dele
gates.
REP. BORLAND, MISS0ÜRI,
DIES ON WAR ZONE TOUR
Washington, Feb., 22.— Représenta
tlve W. P. Borland, Kansas City, Mo,
Is dead of pneumonia, abroad, accord
ing to war department Information to
day. A cablegram said that the Demo
cratic congressman who had been tour
ing the west front, died In base hop
pltal 301 last Thursday.
Borland, born In Leavenworth, Han.,
has lived mostly "In Kansas City, Mo.
He had been in congress about ten
years and It was he who started the
fight for Investigating the packers.
TO EASE RULING AGAINST
SUNDAY-OVERTIME WORK
Washington, Feb. 22.—Relaxation of
the rule against overtime and Sunday
work In navy yards has been agreed
upon In a conference between Secre
tary Baker and Secretary Daniels and
Chairman Hurley of the shipping
board. This decision wae reached as
the result of the need for hurrying
transformation of cargo ships into
troop transports.
TRIBUNE-FORD LIBEL SUIT
SLATED IN APRIL OR MAY
Mount Clemens, ifrioh, Feb, 13.—
Circuit Court Judge Jamea G. Tuoker,
who will hear the Chicago Tribune
Henry Ford million dollar libel eult
here, eaid the case would be opened tn
April or May. He bellevea the firet
week In May will be eelected.
CANADA HONOR« GEN. PAU.
Winnipeg, Men., Feb. 22—Thousands
of persona today greeted General Pau
and hie staff following their arrival
frflm Vancouver. The party la return
ing to Frenoe via New York after a
trip to Australia.
109 head of government höre» «-y i
mules ranging, in weight from 1300 to
1500 to be sold at auction at Nampa
Friday and Saturday, February 11 and
32: also some fine saddle horses; aale
starting at 1 p. m. aha— Adv. Fll
"Seem* Things At Night"
TO MOTHERS! Guard your kiddies against
torpid lim, eour stomach, constipated bowels
which generate poison*. These "inside" poison*
circulate to the brain, producing bad dreamt, then
8 feverish head. ■ Unices yon "work" out these
poieoni you will have a real aick youngster shortly.
Ca*caret* are a candy cathartic, ideal for children.
Cost only 10 cent* a box. Read below!
I 0«*** ' j
c\
Children love C»carets betau» they tute like candy. When your
child hu a white tongue, feverish breath, foul stomach, give Cucafirta
anytime to "work" the nasty bile, souring food and bowel poison from the
dogged-up pise». Yon needn't coax even croes, tick children to take
these harmless candy "Cascarets." They never gripe —never injure.
Caicarets never disappoint tho worried mother. Eaeh 10 cent box contai»
directions and dose for children aged one yew old and upwards.
FRANCIS X.
BUSHMAN
AND
BEVERLY BAYNE
IN
"WITH N EATNESS AND DI SPATCH''
CHARLIE
CHAPLIN
• N
_ "THE LANDLADY'S PET" _
ISIS—TODAY ONLY—SOME SHOW
Declares Measure Will Do In
calculable Injury to Public;
Warns of Exhaustion of
Known Oil Deposits in U. 8.
•»
Washington, Feb. 22.—Provision* of
the oil land leaeng bill were emphati
cally condemned In a letter from Gif
ford Plnchot, read to the aenate today.
Pinchot, writing Senator Gronna of
North Dakota, said the bll) ■'will do
Incalculable injury to the public."
He pointed out ep*ciflc defects. The
provision for selling land at nominal
value, Instead of real value, will de
prive the public of proper compensa
tion, Pinchot aald.
Trespasser* on the naval oil re
serves are confirmed in their trespass,
Pinchot charged, and are given tho
preference in leasing naval oil lands.
"The known oil deposits In the Unit
ed States will not last more than 28
years at the present rate of coniump
ton," Pinchot wrote. "To Insure an
adequate oil supply for future naval
defense, the oil should be kept in the
ground In naval reserves."
Your auto licenses are past due. Ceil
at Assessor's office at once. W. A.
Kincaid. —Adv. tf.
DOROTHY
DALTON
The Star of
"Flame of the Yukon"
A8 A CABARET SINGER IN A
PHOTO DRAMA OP
NEW YORK LIFE
"QUI0KSANDS"
18 PRONOUNCED A SUPERIOR
PHOTOPLAY ATTRACTION BY
ALL WHO ATTENDED YES
TERDAY
strand
LAST TIMES TODAY
ENACTMENT OF DRY LAW
ENFORCEMENT IS HELD UP
Washington, Feb. 22.—Opposition to
laws for enforcement of the nation
wide "war prohibition" probably will
prevent their enactment at thle ses
sion.
Unless some enforcement aot Is
passed before July 1, when prohibition
Is effective, t^e country will have a
dry law, but no means for enforcing
It, congresalonal leaders eaid today.
vG
V J
COME
EARLY
TODAY
LAST TIMES
\

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