OCR Interpretation


Evening capital news. (Boise, Idaho) 1901-1927, February 24, 1919, Image 1

Image and text provided by Idaho State Historical Society

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn88056024/1919-02-24/ed-1/seq-1/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for

ALL TBS NEWS
FIRST
EVENING CAPITAL NEWS
WEATHER
TUESDAY
Fair tonight and Tuaa
day; coldor.
vol. xm.
BOISE, IDAHO, MONDAY. FEBRUARY 24, 1919
Ho. 41
America Hope of the EWorld, President Declares
BREST CAMPS
SETTINGS FOR
TRIUMPH AND
TRAGEDY ALSO
Records Were Smashed Daily
for Cargo and Troop Dis
charge; Hundreds Die From
Disease at French Port.
976,146 TROOPS PASSED
THROUGH FRENCH GATE
Unforgetable Hours When Men
Died by the Hundreds From
Influenza; Wonder Spirit
Shown by U. S. Soldiers.
' By LOWELL. MELLETT.
(Copyright 1919, by United Pre«s.)
Brest, Feb. 24—While every effort is
feeing strained here to get the boys
home as fast as possible, it Is not a
. race. The reason is that Brest, hav
ing outdistanced all other ports in the
! great "race for Berlin," has no serious
competitors In the "race for home."
È The "race for Berlin" was between
rest, Bordeaux, St. Nazalre, Havre,
arseillaise, Boulogne and Calais. It
igan in November, 1917, and was de
signed to show which port organiza
tion was the most efficient. Brest
accomplished eight weeks theoretical
■work in forwarding troops and ma
terial in six weeks and two days.
!. RECORDS SMASHED.
f When the armistice was signed 976,
146 troops had passed through this
port. The first boat arriving in Nov
| ember 1917, required 17 days to dls
1 Charge its cargo. On May 24, 1918,
16 boats arrived with 42,162 troops and
•11 were discharged within 24 hours.
'On July 15, 32,000 troops were dis
charged in 12 hours. The Leviathan
on its first trip to Liverpool—the
world's greatest harbor—spent 42 days
there before Its return to America. On
Its second trip to Liverpool it spent
JO days. She arrived in Brest on May
Î with 8842 troops discharged them,
recoaled and departed in 81 hours. The
next day a British official arrived In
Brest to see If It were possible for the
Americans to better Liverpool's rec
ord. He found the ship gone. Admiral
Clms receiving a message relating t<.
the performance, thought there was a
mistake and asked for verification.
SIMS RUINS HAT.
The confirmatory message was re
ceived while he was in the office of a
British admiral. He kicked his -hat
to the ceiling and shouted. On its
next trip the Leviathan discharged
10,388 troops in 29 hours and re-coal
ed In 49 V4s hours.
This is the pleasanter side of
Brest's activities during the trying
months when there was just one mo
tive actuating the American army and
the American people—to get the men
to the front. These records were
achieved with totally inadequate fa
cilities, insufficient lighters, tugs,
trucks, cars and lumber, and with
roads in deplorable shape.
In August, the city of Brest suffered
•n Influenza epidemic. There were
many deaths among the French Inhab
itants, but the army's precautions pre
vented the disease from spreading to
the troops working on the docks and
fct Camp Pontanezan.
UNFORGETABLE NIGHT.
The same was true, when transports
began arriving from America bringing
victims of influenza and pneumonia.
The first of these ships were the Van
Bteuben and the Louisville, which
reached here September 4. 1918, with
• hundred dead and hundreds of sick
•board. One unforgetable night was
Î hat of October 12, when the Levia
han arrived with hundreds ill and
many dead. Brigadier General Butler,
former colonel of the Thirteenth Ma
rines, had just been given command.
That night he sent a thousand Ma
rine* down to the docks. They carried
100 sick men in their arms four miles
to Camp Pontanezan through rain and
Baud because there were not enough
ptretcherg. The general himself walked
With the Marines, carrying the packs
of three sick men. Today, he related
low he met two Marines in the dark,
È eard a sob, turned on his flashlight
ad found both weeping as they car
ried a limp body. He asked what the
trouble was. One replied.
"One man died on us."
3TORM RAZES TENT8.
î A terrible storm blew down many
Itents the night of January 6, this year,
«nhouslng 1800 men. General Butler
ordered all kitchens fired up and din
ner served. Bonfires were started and
bands played. A disagreeable inci
dent was thus turned dnto a lively
midnight picnic, while accommoda
tions were being restored.
The spirit displayed In these various
Situations described is responsible for
«fee present efficient organization,
Which led Chairman Bchwab a f*w
days age to write a personal note of
•ommendatlon on conditions in the
eamp. Likewise, it has led dozens of
feen to volunteer to remain for per
manent garrison duty, though they
mare scheduled to sail for home.
;
POLICE GRAB ARMED
MAH WHO ATTEMPTED
TO REACH PRESIDENT
Boston, Feb. 24—Andrew J.
Rogersky, 33, of Worchester, Mass.
wee arrested in the Copely Plaza
hotel shortly after 2 o'olock today
when he attempted to reach Presi
dent Wilson's suite. Police and se
scret service men found a 32 cali
ber revolver and a black jack on
Rogersky. H* was taken to police
headquarters charged with carry
ing weapons.
TOTAL 72,951 DEATHS
IN A. E. F. 'TIL FEB. 16;
48,768 DIED IN BATTLE
Washington, Feb. 24.—Death* in
the A. E. F. up to February 16, to
talled 72,951, of which 20,829 wore
from disease, 48,768 from battle and
3354 from other oauaee, the war de
partment announoad today. Up to
February 14 in th* United State*
there were $34,493 deaths, of which
32,737 were from disease and 1756
from ether cause*.
STAB AT PRESIDENT,
SEN. LEWIS INSISTS
J. Ham Charges Borah, Reed,
Etc., Attack Project to Ease
Personal Spite ; Denies Mon
roe Doctrine Threatened.
By L. C. MARTIN
■Washington, Feb. 24.—Opposition to
the league of nations "is a personal and
political attack on President Wilson,
made by men who have nothing to of
fer in place of the plan they assail,"
Senator Lewis, Democratic whip, dt -
dared today in a speech to the senate
opening the defense of the league plan.
In reply to the specific objections
raised against the league plan, Lewis
said:
"It is asserted by the opposition that
it violates the principle of the. Monroe
doctrine, which guarantees the coun
tries of South and Central America
from aggression by European countries.
It was to prevent this very assumption,
that section ten of the charter p edged
all of the governments in the league to
resist aggression on any state or gov
ernment.
BASED ON HAGUE
"The words of this section ten are
taken from the spirit of the resolution
passed by The Hague peace conference
in 1907, resolving to preserve the Mon
roe doctrine in any treaty of or alliance
of world nations for world peace."
Lewis said that the fear Europe will
outvote America Is groundless, since
with the II American répudies lined
up together the nations of this con
tinent could out-vote Europe 1 nine to
five on any American policy.
Instead of Great Britain and her
colonies working against he i'j.lted
States, Lewis said the colonies at least
would vote with this country on Japan
naturalization or kindred subjects and
; England, he asserted, would not oppose
jher colonial children.
REFUTES ATTACKS
; "The document on Its face refutes
'every attack," said I^wls.
I "Now, I protest against our oppo
I nents assuming to create the political
! issue by crying 'nationalism' against
the object of the league. I oppose their
design in trying to convince the Amer
ican people that the spirit of democracy
was against nationalism of America for
internationalism of the world."
CLEMENCEAU BELIEVED
TO BE OUT OF DANGER;
MAY WORK TOMORROW
! Official Bulletin Says Premier Con
tinues to Improve, Though H«v
j in Restless Night.
Paria, Feb. 24.—Premier Clemen
ceau, ahot by an assassin Wednes
day, was believed to be out of dan
ger today.
The offioial bulletin issued today
said:
"Premier Clemenceau it continu
ing to improve. He spent a reet
leaa night, however, owing to hie
enforced inactivity yesterday. Hia
temperature it 36.6 oantrigrads
(97.88 Fahrenheit).''
It was expected he might be able
to carry out hie avowed intention
of resuming hia official duties to
morrow.
A bang of boys appeared on th#
Street, yesterday afternoon carry
ing a rod flag and shouting "down
with Clemenceau." Gendarmas
scattered them and asizad the flag.
Spectators wars mildly amused.
"The premier slept in hit bed last
night and probably will présida at
th# peso* conference session
Thursday," the Echo d* Paris, said
today.
(Clemenc.au had s been alaaping
In an arm ohair.)
GOVERNMENT
PREPARESTO
SUNDER REDS'
MUNICH HOLD
War Minister Rosshaupter to
Attack Soviet Radicals, Who
Are Being Strongly Rein
forced, Berlin Dispatch Says.
CIVIL WAR OF SOVIETS
THREATENS IN BAVARIA
Rival Elements at Outs Over
Administrative Power; Spar
tacan Disorders iri Boches'
Industrial Districts.
Paris, Fab. 24—A soviet repub
lic has baan proclaimed in Nurtm
burg, th* second city of Bavaria,
according to a dispatch recoived
by L'Information today.
Berne, Feb. 24—Bolshevik dis
orders have broken out at Gratz,
capital of Styria, (a former prov
ince of Austria-Hungary) where
severe fighting was going on ac
cording to latest advices received
today. Students with Bolshevist
tendencies were reported to be
employing machine gun* against
government forces, who had bean
reinforced by workman. Heavy
casualtiea ware aaid to have re
sulted.
TO ATTACK REBELS.
Paris, February 24—War Minister
Rosshaupter is preparing to attack the
revolutionists in Munich, who are be
ing strongly reinforced, according to
a Berlin dispatch to L'Information to
day received by way of Zurich. The
dispatch also said Interior Minister
Auer, who was shot Friday, and
Count Arco-Valley, who shot Eisner,
are still alive.
Latest previous advices reported
that the Spartacans had completely
overthrown the Bavarian government
and Bet up a Soviet republic in Mu
nich. Rioting and pillaging was said
to be going on Friday and Saturday.
Rosshaupter, one of the six ministers
shot during Friday's session of the
diet, was variously reported to have
died from his wounds and to have
ben captured by the Spartacans.
It was also reported that Auer and
Arco-Valley had died from their
wounds. The latter, a monarchist and
former captain in the Prussian guards,
was wounded by a guard after he had
shot Eisner.
DENIES DISORDERS.
Copenhagen, Feb. 24—Disorders, fol
lowing the assassination of Premier
Eisner and other ministers, Is denied
(Continued on Page Two.)
FOIL ILLEGED PIOT
TB SUY PRESIDENT
New York Police Nab 14 Span
ish Anarchists, Who,
Declare, Planned to
Bomb at Wilson.
They
Hurl
New York, Feb. 24.—In the arrest of
14 Spaniards, police today assert they
I have frustrated a plot to assassinate
'President Wilson, at Boston. The men
I were taken in an up-town club yester
day. The place had been under secret
! service surveillance for some time. The
prisoners were to be arraigned before
United States Commissioner Hitch
cock today, charged with publishing
and distributing seditious literature.
Secret service operators today said
evidence had been secured which will
be used to prove some of the prisoners
had planned to kill the president by
throwing a bomb In Boston. Neither
bombs nor explosives were found at
the place raided.
The prisoners did not carry firearms.
According to the police who cooperated
In the arrests, the only evidence found
was issues of a Spanish weekly issued
here, membership cards for the I. W.
:W., a small machine that they did not
j understand and a picture of Karl Lieb
knecht.
Among the Spaniards were Joseph
Grau, editor of the Spanish newspaper
El Corsario; Pedro Martin, business
manager of the paper, and Florlen
Veita, a chemist.
Of the men arrested, Elario Cres
tlssa arrived in Manhattan yesterday
from Philadelphia in company with
Florlen Madlni. According to the po
lice, two men were to have left for
Boston last night to carry out the plot
to asaassinate the president
WILSON SURE
AMERICA AND
SENATE WILL
SUPPORT HIM
Convinced by European Travels
That World Looks to U. S.
as One Great Power With
out Selfish Interests.
NO TOUR OF THE COUNTRY
TILL LAST PART OF YEAR
Work Now Largely Informative
as Covenant Only in Prelim
inary Form; Ratification
When Paris Approves.
By ROBERT J. BENDER.
Boston, Mass., Feb. 24.—(By Courier
From the U. S. S. George Washington,
Anchored in President Road.)—Presi
dent Wilson, returning to American
Bhores today, la confident that con
gress and the people will approve par
ticipation of the United States In a
league of nattons.
Failure of America to sanction such
a course would, he believes, be a great
moral blow to the civilized nations
now bending their efforts toward a
Just and lasting peace.
The president's historic journeys
through foraign lands and his
work at the peace table have con
vinced him that the European na
tions look to the United 8tatee as
the one great power without self
ish interests participating in the
conference. For the United States
to refuse to join in what he and a
majority of the nations regard aa
the foundation of a lasting peace
would, ha believes, break the heart
of the world movement for a new
order of things.
ONLY PRELIMINARY.
Hence, the president returns to make
a strong effort at convincing the coun
try and congressional members of the
vital Importance of the league. As
the covenant Is not In Its final form
and Is not therefore ready for ratifi
cation, the president's work Is therefore
now largely Informative. His big fight,
If one proves necessary, will come
after the Paris conference has finally
approved a league plan and the peace
treaty Is complete, ready for submis
sion to the United States senate for
ratification.
Then the president will go before
the people ,lf necessary, to ask sup
port. But that will probably not be
before mid-summer or fall. While In
Washington, the president will confer
not only with members of the senate
foreign affairs committee, but many
(Continued on Page Two.)
PRESIDENT STEPS ON
SHIM IT 111 TOM
Boston in Gala Dress Waiting
to Greet the Distinguished
Guest; Warboats Circle Ship
Throughout Night.
Boston, Feb. 24.—President Wil
son landed at Commonwealth pier
at 11:53 o'elock this morning.
Ranks of troops presented arms
as the nation's chief executive ar
rived home after his history-mak
ing trip to Europe. From the rev
enue cutter Ossipee which brought
him ashore; from the transport
George Washington to the elevator
in the pier building, the president
walked over a velvet carpet be
neath a canopy of flags.
As the revenue cutter came up the
harbor, with Its escort of naval ves
sels, salutes were fired and steamers
In the bay greeted the president with a
bedlam of tooting whistles and sirens.
The president left the George Wash
ington and went aboard the cutter ut
11:06 a. m. There was a strong west
wind, making the sea choppy. As the
president boarded the Ossipee his en
sign was broken out at the masthead.
PLANE8 SWOOP ABOVE.
When the president left the cutter
at the pier, he passed through the
ranks of a welcoming committee com
posed of high naval officials and offi
cers of the army, department of the
northeast.
Three airplanes which had been cir
cling about the transport earlier in the
morning, maneuvered ovor the pier,
when the president tended.
There was much oheering as the Oa
(Continued on Page Two.)
THE PRESIDENT'S SPEECH
"Governor Cooltdge, Mr. Mayor,
Fellow Citizens:
"I wonder if you are half as glad
to see me as I am to see you.
(Applause.) (A voice, 'You bet.)
It warme my heart to see a great
body of my fellow citizens again,
because in some respects during
the recent months I have been
very lonely indeed without your
comradeship and counsel, and I
tried at every step of the work
which fell to me to recall what
I was sure would bo your counsel
with regard to the great matters
which were under consideration.
"I do not want you to think that
I have not been appreciative of
the extraordinarily generous re
ception which was given to me on
the other side, in saying that It
makes me very happy to get home
again.
MEANT FOR AMERICA.
"I do not mean to say that I
was not very deeply touched by
the cries that cams from the great
crowds on th* other side. But I
want to say to you in all honesty
that I felt them to bo a call of
greeting to you, rather than to m*.
"I did not feel that the greeting
was personal. I had In my heart
the over crowning pride of being
your representative, and of receiv
ing the plaudits of men every
where who felt that your hearts
beat with their in the cause of
liberty. There was no mistaking
the tone In the voices of those
great crowds. It was not a tope
of mere greeting, It was not a tone
of mere generous welcome; It was
the calling of comrade to com
rade, the cry that comes from men
who say, 'Wo have waited for this
day when the friends of liberty
should come across the sea and
shake hands with us, to see that a
new world was constructed upon a
new basis and foundation of Jus
tice and right.' I can't tell you
the Inspiration that came from the
sentiments that came out of those
simple voices In the crowds. And
the proudest thing I have to re
port to you Is that this great coun
try of ours Is trusted throughout
the world.
NOT OF CONFERENCE
"1 have not come to spoak of the
proceedings or the result* of tha
peace conference; that would be
premature. I can say that I have
received very happy impressions
from this conference; the impres
sion that while there are many dif
ferences of judgment, while there
are tome divergencies of objects,
there it, nevertheless, s common
spirit and a common realization of
the necessity of setting up new
standards of support in th* world.
"Because the men who are in
conference realize as keenly ns any
American can realize that they are
not the masters of their people;
that they are the servants of their
people and that the spirit of their
people has awakened to a new pur
pose and a new conception of tlioir
power to realize that purpose and
that no man dare go home from
that conference and reort anything
less noble than was exected of It.
ALL WORLD AFFECTED
"The conference seems to you to
go slowly; from day to day In Paris
It seems to go slowly; but I wonder
If you realize the complexity of the
task which It has undertaken. It
seems as If the settlements of tills
war affect, and affect directly, ev
ery great, and I think every small
nation In the world, and no one
decision can be made which is not
properly linked in with the great
series of other decisions which
must accompany It, and It must be
reckoned on with the final result.
If the real quality and character of
that result Is to be properly Judged.
''What we are doing is to hear
the whole case; hear It from the
mouths of the men most Interest«
ed; hear It from these who are of
ficially commissioned to slate It;
hear the rival claims; hear the
claims that affect new nationali
ties, that affect new ureas of the
world, that affect new commercial
and economic connections that
have been established by the great
world war through which we have
gone. And I have been struck by
the moderateness of those who
have represented nutional claims.
"I can testify that I believe I
have nowhere seen th* glesip of
passion. I have seen earnestness.
I have seen tears com* to th*
eyes of man who plead for down
trodden peoples whom they wore
privileged te speak for; but they
wire not the tears of anger; they
were the tears of ardent hope.
U. 8. MOTIVES CLEAN.
I don't see how any man can fail
to have been subdued by these
pleas, subdued to this feeling, that
he was not there to assert nn indi
vidual Judgment of hie own, but to
try to assist the cause of human
ity.
"And in the midst of It all, every
Interest seeks out first of all,
when It reaches Paris, the repre
sentatives of the United States.
"Why? Because— and I think I
am stating tha most wonderful
fact in history—beoauoo there It
no nation in Europa that suapeots
tha motive* of th* United States.
"Was thsr# over so wonderful a
thing seen before? Ws* there
ever to moving a thing? Waa
there ever any foot that baund
tha nation that had won that eo
( Continued on Pag* Two.
DOWNTRODDEN NAUONS LOOK
TO 0. S. AS HOPE FOR FUTURE;
CONVMCED LEAGUE COVENANT
TO (ÏT COUNTRY'S APPROVAL
COMES BACK TO REPORT PROGRESS, HE SAYS, AND
DOES NOT BELIEVE PROGRESS WILL STOP SHORT OF
GOAL; MUST MAKE MEN EVERYWHERE FREE AS BE
COMES NATION FOUNDED ON LIBERTY; TREMEND
OUS OVATION GIVEN PRESIDENT BY PACKED HALL
Mechanics Hall, Boston, Mass., Feb. 24.—President Wil
son today accepted the challenge of those who oppose Amer
ica's entrance into a league of nations.
"And," he declared, "I have no more doubt of the verdict
of America in this matter than I have doubt of the blood that
"I have come back to report progress," he said.
"And I do not believe that the progress is going to stop
short of the goal."
His speech, the first answer to opponents of the league in
the senate, was planned to lay the background for American
support of his program. Its preparation followed a long con
ference on the George Washington last night and today with
Secretary Tumulty. Pending his audience with congressional
leaders, the president is not attempting to go into details of
the league—merely showing why he regards it necessary, and
what he believes will be its ultimate effect.
The president was cheered when he said:
"The confidence we have established throughout the world
imposes a burden upon us. Any man who opposes the tide
will find himself thrown upon barren ground.
"If America was now to fail the world, what would be
come of it? America is the hope of the world and if she does
not justify that hope the results will be unthinkable.
"Suppose Ave sign the treaty of
, peace," he said "and do no more, we
will have nothing but a modern scrap
of paper.
"No assurances would be given to a
downtrodden people that they would be
safe.
"We set this nation up to make men
free and now we will make men free.''
READY TO FIGHT FOR IT.
The president said he was ready to
fight for this.
The president finished his speech
at 3:42.
The old building was crowded to the
top gallery before the president ar
rived. A band of soldiers played
while the audience waited Wilson's
coming. At the head of each aisle
stood an army officer, a naval offi
cer and a Red Cross nurse silent and
solemn and most of the music was of
a subdued nature so there was atmo
sphere of gravity rather than of pat
riotic excitement. Mechanics hall was
surrounded by troops nnd credentials
of all those entering were carefully
watched by half a dozen guards. Au
tomobiles were turned back a block
from the building.
Pictures of Lincoln, Washington,
Roosevelt and Wilson were hung over
the platform. The president's place
was beneath a sounding board. Red,
white and blue predominated In the
decorations.
BOSTON MAYOR SPEEKS.
Before the president started talking.
Mayor Peters made a brief speech of
welcome.
A salute was fired as Wilson en
tered the hall at 2:40. He was given
a deafening ovation, the president ris
ing from his seat to bow a response.
John McCormick sang the "Star
Spangled Banner" the president ap
plauding vigorously.
"It warms my heart," the president
•old in opening, "to see my fellow
citizens again. Because I have at times
felt very lonely In recent weeks with
out your counsel.
"The extraordinarily generous recep
tion given me on the other side seemed
to be a call of greeting to you rather
than to me. I had the crowning pride
of being your representative.
"Men everywhere felt that your
hearts beat with theirs In the cause of
liberty."
The plaudits of the European crowds,
(Continued From Page One.)
LLOYD GEORGE TACKLES
BRITISH LABOR BUGABOO
London, Feb. 24.—Premier Lloyd
George was to open a week crowded
with possibilities In the labor situation
by introducing In parliament today a
bill creating a commission to investi
gate the miners' demnnds, particularly
nationalization of the miges. It was
expected he would discuBS the question
in detail.
Simultaneously, miners' «jxecutives
and labor party leader« were to confer
on tha proposed bill. * .
AT
(Capital News Special Service.)
Washington, Feb. 24—Some days
ago Representative Smith of Idaho
made a protest to the secretary- of war
against the demobilization of Idaho
boys arriving from France at Camp
Lewis, Wash., instead of some inter
mediate point between New York and
Idaho, because of the discomfort to
the boys and the expense involved.
He has received the following letter
from the assistant chief of staff indi
cating that Idaho troops from overseas
will be demobilized at Fort Russell,
Wyoming:
"I am directed by the secretary of
war to asknowledge receipt of your
communication of Feb. 4. regarding
the discharge at Camp Lewis, Wash.,
men belonging in Idaho, and to ad
vise you that while your letter con
veyed no information as to the or
ganization to which these men be
longed, it is assumed that they per
tained to a unit recently returned
from France which was formed and
mobilized at Camp Lewis of men from
the extreme northwest, and was as
signed to Camp 'Lewis because it has
been reported from France that this
was the place where this organization
belonged.
"The war department Is in entire
agreement with your statement that
men from Idaho should have been dis
charged at a point between the place,
of entry Into the service and the port
at which they arrived from France.
"An effort is made to place men for
discharge In the camp, nearest their
home In order that they may be In
duced to return thereto anti take their
former places In the community from
which they came, even though some
slight back travel is necessary. Under
existing instructions, all the men ar
riving from overseas are segregated at
the port and sent to such camp as
will place them nearest their home,
with practically no back travel, for
discharge. . In one regiment this sys
tem has resulted in the saving of $29,
000 in rail; oad transportation.
"Fort D. A. Russell, Wyo., wHl short
ly be In readiness to take care of men
from Idaho who arrive from oversea*.
In the meantime they are being dis
charged at Fort Logan, Colorado,
where space is available, or at Camp
Funston, Kansas, and occasionally at
Camp Dodge, Iowa."

xml | txt