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Evening capital news. (Boise, Idaho) 1901-1927, March 01, 1919, Image 1

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ALL THZ XTXWS
FIRST
WZATHZZ
SUNDAY.
Hill) or mow tonight
_ and Sunday,
VOL. Tt.n
BOISE, IDAHO, SATURDAY. MARCH 1, 1919
No.46
7,354,000 Fighting Men Pa the Supreme Sacrifice
FUUSÏÏR BY
U FOLLETTE IS
BECti AGAINST
Ml LEASE BILL
Wisconsin Senator Starts Talk
fcst as Bar to Passage of
Measure; Action Perils Other
Vitally Important Measures.
OPPOSES ENACTMENT OF
BILLS AT LAST MOMENT
Republicans, Nonplussed by
Sudden Attack, Call Parley to
Consider Matter; Widely at
Variance as to Wisdom.
Washington, March 1.—LaFol
lette and Senator Robinson, Arkan
sas, appeared on the verge of a
personal encounter, following a tilt
when Robinson attempted to break
up LaFollette f s speech.
Robinson, white with ang6r, seat
ed himself directly across the aisle
from LaFollette and leaning for
ward in his chair exchanged whis
pers with LaFollette. LaFollette
shook his fingers in Robinson's
face, whereat the latter seemed to
restrain himself with difficulty.
LaFollette announced that he
would refuse to yield the floor to
Robinson again.
Washington, March 1.—Senator L*a
Follette this afternoon announced to
the senate that a filibuster against the
oil leasing bill conference repctt is
on.
While La Follette was speaking, Re
publican leaders called a conference
for 5:30 to decide what they will do.
They made it plain that La Folle.tto's
filibuster was in no sense an organized
movement by the Republicans, but was
his own idea upon which he decided
more than 10 days ago, when the con
ference report on the oil bill was first
presented.
La Follette declared that ''from
this time on through this session
or any other session of which I
may be a member, no important
piece of legislation will get through
if it is possible to stop it when
ths conference report is brought in
V the closing days of the ses
sion."
This announcement dearly rn^ans
senators said, that La Follette has no
Intention of letting the bill pass.
SET FOR LONG TALK.
La Follette is known to have, pre
pared to talk for days if necessary.
If his filibuster is not broken it
means that the Victory loan and all
other appropriation bills will fail of
passage this session.
The La Follette filibuster is distinct
from a proposed obstructive campaign
designed by some other Republicans
to block the Victory loan bill.
La Follette's move may make It un
necessary for other Republicans to de
cide whether they will engage in such
a filibuster. They were widely at va
riance as to its wisdom up to the
hour when La Follette began speak
ing.
La Follette's filibuster began at 1:40
p.'m. During his protracted speech
he recited the origin and history of
the senate rule against applause,
which he has repeatedly violated dur
ing recent debates on the league of
dations.
TO CURB INSANE MAN.
La Follette's explanation followed an
outburst of laughter at his witty re
ply to an Interruption. He urged the
chair not to rebuke the galleries, add
ing *that the rule, which was adopted
after an insane man r*$n amuck in the
senate once, is now frequently violated
by senators themselves.
Senator Shafroth of Colorado. Demo
crat, Interrupted, but was shut off
when ba launched Into an answer to
La FolWtte.
"The Senator can answer these when
I am through," La Follette said.
"Will t\je senator consent to desig
nate a tin\e when he will be through?"
Shafroth ;Vsked.
•'Hardly,- answered La Follette.
nr-
CROWDER TO AID CUBA
REVISE ELECTION LAWS
Washington, March 1.—Judge Advo
cate General Crowder will leave soon
for Cuba to asslit that government in
revising its election laws preliminary
to the forthcoming elections, Secretary
of War Baker haq announced.
REPORT SCHEt
QUITS EE
IMANN
[RT CABINET
London, March
•gsney dispatch fr
day reported tl
Scheidemann had
alae said that othar
movamanta in
nanL
1.-—A nawa
Holland to
Chancallor
It waa
olutionary
are imml
LOUISIANA SENATOR TO
VOTE FOR SUFFRAGE IF
ISSUE OOMES UP AOAIN
Additional Ballot Mean. C.rt.in Pas
aaga of Amendment Should Re.o
lution Got Another Chance.
Washington, March 1.—Senator
Gay, Louisiana, today announced
his support of the woman suffrage
resolution, Introduced yesterday by
Senator Jones, New Mexico. Gay's
support insures passage of the res
olution at this session if an oppor
tunity can be found to bring it up,
Senator Jones said.
A joint resolution proposing a
woman's suffrage amendment to
tho constitution was favorably re
ported today by the house commit
tee on woman suffrage.
■ It provides that "the right to
vote shall not be denied or abridged
by the United States or any state
on account of sex."
Baker announced after the com
mittee meeting that he would at
tempt to bring up the resolution in
the house before final adjournment
Tuesday.
TURMOIL RAGES
INWASHINGTON;
VITAL BILLS ARE
IN DIRE DANGER
- j
I .. , „, , . _ .
Law Makers otnve to Bring
Order Out of Chaos ta
Choked Legislation, Bitter
Partisan Feud Also Delays. :
Washington, March 1.—The sen
ate judiciary committee today fa
forably reported the nomination of
A. Mitchell Palmer as attorney
general.
By L. C. MARTIN.
Washington, March 1—Fierce tur
moil raged today on capitol hill where
the 65th congress is expiring, a mass
of legislation choked the legislative
channels while a bitter partisan feud
was on between Republican senators
and President Wilson. The session
ends at noon Tuesday and in the in
terim the following vital measures are
in doubt:
Victory loan bill, army, navy, In
dian, agricultural, sundry, civil and
railroad appropriation bills.
Democratic leaders conceded to
day that some of these will not pass.
The big question with them was: Will
the victory loan bill be blocked?
FILIBUSTER POSSIBLE.
This loan provides $7,000,000,000
through notes and certificates for
carrying on the government until the
new taxes come in.
Some Republicans heartily favored
filibustering against the bill while
others were afraid that if they de
feated It President Wilson would tell
the country that his. political op
ponents, for personal purposes, saw
fit to Htop the wheels of government.
The effect of such a statement, some
Republicans felt, would be disastrous.
Senator Simmons, finance commit
tee chairman, announced he will do all
he can to pass the luun bill tonight.
MAY CONTINUE SESSION.
Senator Lewis, administration whip,
said if necessary the senate would be
kept in continuous session.
If the fight on the loan bill proves
as long drawn out as now appears
probuble the army and navy bills to
which the Republicans are opposed
may not be called up.
Administration Democrats agreed to
forego speeches on the league of na
tions so that nothing might hamper
the progress of the loan bill. Demo
crats hostile to the president, how
ever, planned to speak on the league.
HOUSE FAVORS REPEAL
OF TAXES ON CERTAIN
SEMI-LUXURY ITEMS
Washington. March 1.—The house
today passed a resolution to repeal the
semi-luxury taxes in the new revenue
bill.
Some of the taxee the house would
repeal are those on carpets and rugs
costing more than 85 per square yard;
those on women's hats costing more
than $15 each; those on men's and
boys' hats cost-ng more than $5; those
on shoes costing more than $10 a pair,
and those on pajamas and underwear
costing more than $5 each.
costing more than $5 each.
QUITS R. R. BOARD TO
HEAD MOVIE COMBINE
Washington, March 1.—Oscar Price
today resigned as assistant to the di
rector general of railroads, effective
April 1. Price leaves to become presi
dent of the United Artists' corporation,
an organization of film stars, lsd by
CbarLs Chaplin, Douglas Fairbanks,.
Mary Plokford and D. W. Griffith.
KNOX DECLARES
LEAGUE PERILS
INDEPENDENCE
OF THE NATION
Former Secretary of State
Charges Covenant Does Not
Prevent Wars but "Sanctions
and Commends Them."
SAYS PLAN UNDERMINES
BULWARKS OF AMERICA
Favors Making Nation That En
gages in War an Internation
al Criminal; Urges Establish
ment of World Court.
Washington, March 1. — Senator
Knox, Pennsylvania, secretary of state
under tho Taft administration, addod
his voice today to the heavy Republi-
can assaults upon President Wilson's
league of nations covenant. Declaring
the proposed draft docs not abolish or
prevent wars, but "does sanction and
commend them," he assailed it as an
Instrument "undermining the bul-
warks of our protection, robbing this
nation of its sovereignty and even
threatening our Independence of life."
Knox attended the president's league
of nations dinner Wednesday night. He
urged that discussion of the league of
tSlÄSK.-«
down hia own formula for it.
AT UNTOLD SACRIFICE.
"If the people of the United States
not a clamorous few of them, but
great majority—desire to establish
true league of nations," he said, "if
they feel either the need or the desir
ability of creating an organization to
stop war and not expand territorial
possessions, and if they are willing to
make the present necessary sacrifice In
independence and sovereignty and the
inevitable future sacrifice of untold
American treasure and life, then we
may proceed."
The first article of Knox's proposed
constitution would provide "that war
Is hereby declared to be an interna
tional crime and that any nation en
gaging in war, except in self-defense
when actually attacked, shall be pun
ished by the world as ah international
criminal."
It should set up an international
code to be administered by an inter
national court, Knox said.
WOULD DEFINE WAR.
The code would define what war is
and discriminate between aggressive
and defensive war.
"This code also would provide that
one nation could not summon another
before the international court except
(Continued on Page Two.
DECIDE FORT STRIKE
New York Boatmen and Em
ployers' Counsel to\3onfer on
Problem; Both Sides Are Op
posed to Macy Award.
New York, March 1—Settlement of
the threatened strike today hinges on
the outcome of a conference of boat
men and counsel for the employers to
be held this afternoon.
Paul Bonynge, counsel for the own
ers, announced his readiness to com
promise with the union leaders on the
question of increased wages. Both
sides continued to maintain their op
position to the award of V. E. Macy,
war board mediator, which gave the
men an eight-flour day, but no wuge
increase.
It was believed Bonynge would of
fer the men a substantial increase In
the event their waiving the eight
hour day. Even should the strike be
called the union leaders have agreed
to allow ferries, naval tugs and other
necessary harbor cruft to operate.
They declared they have no Inten
tion of Interfering with boats carry
ing food to sick and wounded or to
hospitals or with returning troop
ships.
rnDriDU nan nnan un a
rUnCluN nAILKUAU
BOLSHEVIKS ANGLE FOR
Stockholm, March 1.—The Russian
■ Soviet government has Issued a decree
stating that owing to its Inability to
| operate certain industries, concessions
[will be granted to foreigners, er&e
daily In railway construction, accord
ling to a dispatch from Petrograd.
JUGO-SLOVAKS
AND ITALY ARE
ON WAR VERGE
OVER ADRIATIC
America Chief Factor for Avert
ing Threatened Break; Can
Cut Off Supplies and Render
Impotent Both Countries.
ITALIANS HAVE CLOSED
THEIR ENTIRE FRONTIER
Paris Conferees Consider Mat
ter Informally but no Action
Taken; Trouble May Mean
Fixing of Boundary Lines.
London, March 1.—Tho corre
spondent of the London Nawa
stated today that tho new econom
ical council reported to the su
preme war council that a prelimi
nary peace must be concluded at
once with Germany or tho block
ade raised. The recommendation,
it was said, was based on the re
port of 14 British officers reveal
ing the seriouanesa of the situation
in the central powers.
By FRED S. FERGUSON.
Paris, March 1.—America stands to
day as the chief factor for averting the
latest threatened European war.
The squabble between the Italians
and the Jugo-Slavs for control of the
Adriatic has reached a stage bordering
on actual hostilities. Both countries,
however, are dependent on America,
economically. In case open warfare
results, America will immediately cut
off their supplies of food and money,
rendering them practically impotent, it
was understood from reliable sources.
Just how near Italy and Jugo-Slavia
are to an armed clash is evidenced by
the fact the Italians have closed the
entire frontier, as established by the
Austrian armistice, giving as their rea
son that they '"do not wish to have to
resort to military action In occupying
tho territories consented to in the ar
mistice."
FOOD TRAIN ATTACKED.
The Italians claim the Jugo-Slavs
have 11 divisions mobilized near the
border. They say an Italian food train
has been attacked and that in one in
stance the flag on a train bearing re
patriated Italians was torn down and
burned.
The trouble so far has centered in
Laibach. The Italians allege the Jugo
slavs forced departure of the Italian
military mission which had been sta
tioned there in conformity with the
armistice for the purpose of revictual
ing Jugo-Slavia and Czepho-Slovakia.
The Jugo-Slavs explain 1 they based
their action on the ground that they
have been recognized by the allies, as
a result of which Laibach can no long
er be considered a part of the empire
of Austria-Hungary. The Italians deny
that such recognition has yet been
granted. >
PARI8 WAITS WILSON.
The Jugo-Slavs deny the charge that
they have ordered a general mobiliza
tion and make the counter charge that
the Italians have still under arms an
army of more than 3,000,000.
The peace delegates are understood
to be discussing the situation infor
mally, but have taken no action. It Is
considered probuble that when the
general conference convenes again af
ter President Wilson's return, it will be
necessary to lay down definite boun
daries in disputed territories, beyond
which no encroachment will be per
mitted.
Meanwhile, the allies are holding the
club of American economic pressure
ready. Supplies furnished by the allies
to both Jugo-Slavs and Czecho-Slo
vakia move through Liabach and If
the situation seriously interferes with
their movement, it is accetped the club
will be wielded.
U. 8. TREADS WARILY.
Washington. March 1.—The 332nd in
fantry, 83rd, Ohio, and West Virginia
division, has been ordered to concen
träte at Genoa, according to a war de
partment dispatch from the Rome mil
itary attache today.
This is apparently preliminary to an
early return home. Behind the con
centration order is believed to lie the
motive of avoiding difficulties In con
nection with Icallan-Jugo-Slav af
fairs.
VAN LOAN M UNCHANQED. M
Philadelphia, March 1.—The condi- \
tlon of Charles B. Van Loan, noted j
wrUer ' ls "unchanged," It was an
hfcLr'nounced at the hospital here today,
I Van Loan la suffering from chronto
nephritis and Is seriously 111.
____
000 poui
period a
WOOL CONSUMPTION SLUMPS.
Washington, March 1.—Wool con
sumption In January dropped 34,900,
pounds compared with ths same
year ag*.
DRANUTIC PLOT BUBŒG VILEM'S FLIGHT
Sinn Fein Leader's Escape From English Prison Staged a La
Comic Opera ; Beautiful Maids, Bewitched Guards,
Secret Code, False Key, and He's Gone.
Paris, March 1.— P r o v 1 s io n a 1
Irish parliamentary members
planned and engineered the escape
of Professor Edward de Valera,
Sinn Fein leader, from the Jail at
Lincoln, England, It was revealed
today.
Sean O'Kelley, representative of
the Irish republic at tho peace con
ference, made this public in relat
ing the details of Do Valera's
flight, which was staged in a way
that would furnish an unparalelled
plot for a comic opera.
The Irish parliament appointed
a committee to arrange the Jail
delivery, O'Kelley said. A Sinn
Feiner, working in a garden near
the prison .attracted De Valera's
attention and revealed the plans
for his escape in a Gaelic song,
the wardens, ignorant of the lan
guage and being accustomed to the
Irish, suspecting nothing. The
FfHtLE OF PRESENT
paign of 1920 under way in all parties,
| Announcement by Senator Kenyon
that Progressives plan a meeting to
unite on the man they will support for
! the Republican nomination for presi
: dent caused a stir in "regular" Repub
lican cirçtes.
i The question was . being asked today
[how the Progressives will settle their
: obvious disagreement on the league of
[nations, which bids fair to be a cam
paign issue in one way or another, in
Immediately After Adjournment
Solons to Hurry Home to Po
litical Pow-Wows ; Minnesota
to Stage First One.
Washington, March 1.—The end of
I this session of congress finds the cam
the view of most Washington politi
cians.
But Progressives are not worrying
about the fact that some of them are
for the league and others against it.
They emphasized the point today that
their program Is one of domestic wel
fare—the advancements of the inter
ests of Americans at home, as distin
guished from world affairs.
Immediately after adjournment many
congressmen of both parties are to
hurry home for political pow-wows
with their state leaders. The first of
these will be held by Minnesota Re
publicans on March 7. Will H. Hays,
Republican national chairman, will
confer with state and county commit
teemen and Senator Kellogg plans to
attend.
Democratic organizations through
the national committee plan to begin
at once a series of conferences in every
state, to lay the groundwork for the
1920 fight.
Washington, March 1—Praai
dent Wilaon today approvad 16
oongrataional billa and öna joint
resolution.
The most important meaauree
signed were:
The postoffioe appropriation
bill.
Tho measure authorizing re- >
sumption of voluntary enlistment
in the army.
The bill allowing aoldiars. sail
ors and marines to retain their
uniforms and other equipment.
The aot authorizing the pay
ment of allotments of enlisted man
in casas where disputas have
arisen and dependants have con
sequently suffered from the dis
co ntinuanos.
The postofflca bill signed today car
ries the appropriation of 8800,000,000
f or the immediate construction of pub
n 0 ro ads.
Among the bills signed was an act
to extend the-time for the completion
0 f the dame across the Savannah river
by authority previously granted to thé
Twin City Power company.
Seven more bills were signed by the
president thin afternoon Including the
legislative and executive and Judicial
appropriation bills. The other* were
bills of a minor nature.
Postoffice Appropriation
and Several Other Important
Drafts Become Laws; $200,
000,000 for Boads Provided.
Bill
singer In a lilting tenor asked the
prisoner to obtain an impression
of the rear exit.
Two of the handsomest univer
sity co-eds. were brought from
Dublin and disguised at flower
girls. De Valera was warned In a
code note that February 8 had
been set for the date of his es
cape. On that date the co-ed. flow
er girls started a flirtation with
the guards and enticed them from
the rear gate. Two men cut a
path through the barbed wire bar
rier outside the wall.
Do Valera, walking through the
gate, which had been opened by
the false key, calmly entered a
watting automobile and was driven
away.
Pursuit was immediately organ
ized by the wardens, who were led
astray by four automobiles, packed
with Irishmen, which acted as de
coys, each taking a different road.
I.K.
ON AUTOS, BUT NOT
Artist Christy Declares Beauty
Should Lack Abnormalities;
Says Venus Poor Model for
Perfectly-Formed Woman.
New York, Morch 1—The stream
body line, so popular in automobiles,
can not be accepted as the model for
humans. Howard Chandler Christy,
artist told the United Press so today.
Christy said it has been recognized
that bo far as beauty la concerned the
human form should contain no ab
normalities. preserving an absolute
balance of development. In other
words, bulging muscles for men and
highly accentuated curves for women
most emphatically are not beautiful.
This goes for efficiency, too, Christy
declared, "since beauty must be prac
tical."
''You've got to go deeper than mere
physical attributes to obtain real
beauty," he said.
MU8T EMPLOY GRACE.
"Anyone who has a pleasing figure
can not be considered beautiful unless
he or she ls able to employ this beauty
gracefully. It ls Just the same prin
ciple on which a person cannot be con
sidered intelligent no matter how well
educated unless he can use his edu
cation effectively.
"The Apollo Belvldere would make
a good model for the modern man to
pattern after, as concerns physique,
but the Venus de Milo as a model
woman—impossible.
"This may be rank heresy" ex
claimed Christy, "but personally. I
consider the Venus too massive. Her
head ls too small for her body. Her
waist ls far too large, her hips are
out of proportion, her legs—ugh."
RIDICULES "36" THEORY.
Another superstition that Christy
exploded, was the perfect "thirty
six." He characterized It as a "catch
phrase to catch inexperienced shop
pers," and explained that he had seen
Just as many perfect "thirty-eights"
and perfect "forties."
Christy advanced the opinion that
the war, with its physical demands on
both men and women will result In
a greater premium being placed on
physical development and will even
tually greatly improve the physique
of both sexes.
The artist was asked what nation
ality produced the beBt models.
"America," he replied with hesita
tion. "The American man has the
best physical development In the
world and the American woman—
why, she's In a class by herself."
WHERE DID HE SEE 'EM.
Chicago, March X—' They have been
covered with drapery ever since I oan
remember, and I really don't know
when Mr. Christy could have seen
them."
This was the comment today of
George W. Eggers, director of the
Chicago Art Insltutte. on Howard
Chandler Christy's opinion of the
Venus de Milo's legs.
Eggers thoroughly approved Chris
ty's definition of true human beauty
in his interview with the United
Press.
THE WEATHER
Forecast for Boise and vicinity:
RAIN OR SNOW TONIGHT AND
SUNDAY.
For Idaho: Tonight and Sunday,
rain or snow.
Highest temperature yesterday, 40.
Lowest temperature this morning 83.
Mean temperature yesterday, 81.
HEAVIEST PRICE
PAID BY RUSSIA
WITH 1,700,000;
BOCHESSECOND
U. S. Trails List With Loss in
Battle and From Wounds of
50,000; Franco Thirds V
385,300, Austria Fourth.
DEMOBILIZATION TO DATE
TOTALS 1,301,959 YANKS
352,922 Troop Embarkations
From France Up to Feb. 20;
2,056,122 Yankees Sent Ov
erseas When War Ended.
Washington, March 1.—Seven million,
three hundred and fifty-four thousand
men died In the war, according to the
official figures given out today by
Chief of Staff March.
Russia paid the heaviest price, with
1,700,000 deaths, while Germany was
second, France third and the United
States last among the great powers.
Battle deaths are these occur
ring in action and from wounds
received in action, Tho totals
aside from Russia ram
Germany ................1,600,000
Franca ................. 1,335,000
Austria-Hungary ......... 300,000
Great Britain ............ 706,700
Italy ..................... 460,000
Turkey ................... 260,000
Belgium ................. 102,000
Bulgaria ................. 100,000
8erbia and Montenegro.... -100,00
United States ............ 50,000
284,919 LANDED.
Demobilizations to date number 77,.
45$ officers and 1,224,507. men .March
announced.
'Up to February 30, embarkation*
from Prance totalled 352,982 -men, of
whom 284,919 have landed. American
ships carried 70 per cent of these men
and British vessels 21 per cent.
Up to the signing of the armistice,
2,056,122 men had been sent overseas,
of which number the British carried
1,047,374, America 898,449, and other
nations a comparatively email amount.
CROSSES AWARDED.
A table of awards of distinguished
service crosses showed the Second
division received 664, the First 300,
Third 233, 26th 229, 42nd 205, 30th 177,
Fifth 163, 29th 150, 77th 146, 27th 139,
32nd 134, 91st 154. 89th 97, 79th 80,
33rd 76, Fourth 66, 2»th 58, 90th 67,
80th 42. 82nd 24, 70th 30. 37th 25, 36th
24, 62nd 21, 81st 19, 35th IT, Sixth,
Tenth and 88tb, 1.
FOR EARLY TRANSPORT.
Washington, March 1—The follow
ing organizations have been assigned
to priority;
Twelfth engineers; ordinance casual
Companys 22 to 29; 86th aero squad
ron; base hospitals 68, 26, 70, 9, 1, 67,
and the following tank corps units:
brigade headquarters 304th brigade;
medical detachments of the 303rd,
328th, and 844th battalions and medi
cal detachment and casual detach
ment of the 321st repair and aalvag*
company.
The following organization of the
30th division have also been assigned
to priority:
Division headquarters and head
quarters detachments; headquarters
troops; division postal detachment;
division gas defense unit; 118th ma
chine gun battalion; ,69th Infantry
brigade headquarters 117th, 118th,
119th, and 120th infantry regiments;
114th machine gun battalion; (0th In
fantry brigade headquarters; 115th
machine gun battalion; 105th en
gineers regiment and train; 106th
sanitary and supply train and train
headquarters; 30lb military police;
I06th field battalion; signal corps
108th mobile veterinarian section; 37th
and "fth sanitary squads; 66th field
artillery brigade headquarters; 113th
114th and 115th fUld artillery regi
ments; 106th mobile ordnance repair
shops; 106th ammunition train; sal
vage unit It.
The following organizations of the
18th engineers; headquarters and
companies B, O, D, F; 182nd asm
squadron; 341st aero squadron; 300th
aero squadron; base hospital It.
The following transportation corps
Companys: Companies 90, 81, It, 104,
107, 106. 108, 92. 93, 94. 95, 9«. 9«, 101,
20, 129.
Ths first, second, third and fifth
Companys of the 30th engineers are
also on priority.
WILSON APPROVES PLAN
TO AID SAN DIEGO, CAL
Washington, March 1.— Présidant
Wilaon today approved a bill granting
the city of Ban Diego, Cal., certain
lande In the Cleveland national forest
and the Caplt&n Grand Indian reserva
tion for dam and reservoir purpose*
for the conservation of water.

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