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Evening capital news. (Boise, Idaho) 1901-1927, March 04, 1919, Image 1

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ALL THS NSWS
FIRST
. PM 5 m nHi
WEATHER
WEDNESDAY
Fair tonight and
Wednesday.
VOL. XLn.
BOISE, IDAHO, TUESDAY, MABCH 4, 1919
Mo. 40
CONGRESS ADJOURNS; BIG BILLS ÜNPASSED
League F aces Sure Death in Coming Congress
37 REPUBLICAN
SENATORSVOW
REJECTION FOR
NATION LEAGUE
Four More Than Needed Votes
to Prevent Ratification of
League of Nations' Draft in
Its Present Form.
LODGE READS OFF NAMES,
DEMOCRATS KEEP SILENT
Several Republicans Not Con
sulted and Majority of These
Said to Oppose Covenant;
Majority Solons Not Asked.
By I., C. MARTIN.
Washington, March 4. — President
Wilson will carry back to France with
him the knowledge that 37 members
of thi next senate arc pledged to de
feat his league of nations plan in its
present form.
This number is four more than the
S3 votes necessary to prevent ratifi
cation of a treaty.
Following a night of bitter discus
sion, which was still raging against
the president at 8 o'clock tills morn
ing, a review of the situation disclosed
that 37 senators, of whom some will
come In next congress, are pledged:
"That the league constitution in
Its present form should not bo ac
cepted by the United States.
"That the peace treaty conclud
ing the war should be hastened
and the league proposal postponed
until after the treaty is finished."
PRESENTED BY LODGE.»
Tills was the substance of a resolu
tion preswnted by Senator Lodge,
Mass., around midnight. In present
ing tile resolution he. was careful to
read It so It would be spread on the
record. He sent it to the desk with
the request for unanimous consent for
Immediate consideration.
I.ike a flash. Senator Swanson, Vir
ginia, objected. Ixrdgo, anticipating
this, said:
"I now wish to read to the senate
the names of the members of the Six
ty-fifth congress and members-elect
of the Sixty-sixth, who. if they had
been given an opportunity, would have
voted for this resolution,"
Amid dead silence from the Demo
crats and tile packed galleries, Lodge
read the. names of the 37.
DEMOCRATS SILENT.
There was a hush for a moment
after he had finished. Kveryonc
turned to the Democratic side expect
ing a storm of protest and condemna
tion from Democrats—but not a word
came. In a moment Senator Tram
mel, Florida, began speaking calmly
on the general efficiency bill, the
pending measure.
The senators and senators-elect who
signed arc all Republicans. The reso
lution was shown to a number of
Democrats, but none of them was
asked to sign. Those who did sign
are:
Senator* Lodge, Knox, Sherman, *
New, Mosee, Wadsworth, rernald,
Cummins, Warren, Watson, Ster-
ling, Harding, Erelinghuysen,
Page, Hale, Borah, Brandegee,
Calder, Penroee, McLean, France,
Curtis, Spencer, Townsend, Hi-
ram Johnson, Dillingham, Lenroot,
Poindexter, Sutherland, Smoot and
Gronna, Senators-elect Edge, New
Jersey; Keys, New Hampshire;
McCormick, Illinois; Phipps, Colo-
rado; Newberry, Michigan, and
Ball, Delaware.
- NOT ALL CONSULTED.
Four or five others, absent or a
great distance from Washington, had
not been reached, Senator Lodge told
the senate. He said all would be
reached today and those who agreed
with the 37 will be added to the list.
Republicans who did not sign were:
Benators Colt, Kellogg, LaFollette, Mc
Cumber, McNary, Nelson, Norris,
Kenyon, Jones, and Fall In the present
senate, and Capper, senator-elect from
Kansas and Klkuns, senator-elect from
West Virginia.
Of these, opponents of the claim,
Kellogg, La Follette, Jones, Fall and
Elkins and possibly Nelson are op
posed to the present draft of the con
stitution. McCumber and Norris are
definitely with the administration.
Kenyon said today he had answered
hundreds of letters from his constitu
ents by saying he had an open mind
and will return to Iowa to discuss the
league with his constituents. Until
he has done so, Kenyon said he could
not attach his name to any pledge
either for or against the league. Cap
(Continued on Rage Two.)
MEN WHO DRAFTED CONSTUimON OF WORLD LEAGUE
__ THAT THE UNITED STATES WILL i ncr.i v REJECT
» WQOÆ
59 ®
This puoiogrupn of tne commit
tee named by the peace conference
to draft a' constitution for the pro
posed league of hâtions has just
been received from Paris, where it
PRESIDENT MAY
ENTER '20 RACE
TO WIN 0. K. ON
LEAGUE DRAFT
Reported Extremely Bitter
Against Lodge For Opposing
Covenant; Leaves Washing
ton at 2 o'Clock Today.
By ROBERT J. BENDER.
Washington, March 4.—President
Wilson plans to depart from Washing
ton at 2 o'clock today in the midst of
the bitterest fight of his political ca
reer. a r
Returning to France to complete his
work on a league of nations, he leaves
behind him the definite assurance that
a sufficient number of Republican sen
ators have pledged themselves to de
feat ratification of the league if it is
presented to the next senate in its
present form.
The issue is clean cut. Every Repub
lican senator who has been seriously
spoken of as a presidential possibility
has aligned himself against the presi
dent's league plan. Borah came out
early against the covenant and Hiram
Johnson, Harding and Watson, all of
whom have booms under way for the
Republican presidential nomination,
have placed themselves against it,
WITH RANK AND FILE.
The fate of the league reft» now
in the hands of the rank and file
of the American peopl^. Qn their
decision, when it is finally taken
up, will depend alto whether Wil
liam Howard Taft and those R*-\
publicans out of congress, who fa
vor the present league dooument,
will control the Republican party
in 1920 or whether Lodge and hie
colleagues in the senate will be in
the saddle when campaign year
rolls around.
It was stated by Republicans In the
senate today that the idea of approach
ing Democratic solons for signatures
on the Lodge resolution was abandon
ed primarily because the Republicans
(Continued on Pafce Two.
Salem, Ore., March 4.—James Withy
combe, governor of Oregon, died un
expectedly at his home here last night.
Death came without warning, due to
heart failure.
The governor gave his life to the
state. He had been In poor health for
several months, but continued his ex
ecutive duties though he was confined
to his home during the last two weeks.
He was very optimistic about his
health, however, yesterday saying he
felt better than he had for some time.
The secretary of state, Ben W. Ol
cott, automatically became governor
with the death of the chief executive
last night and will also serve as secre
tary of state.
Governor Wlthysombe was 64 years
old. He was born in Devonshire coun
ty, England, and lived there on a ten
ant farm until 17 years old. He had
been a resident of Oregon since 1871.
was snapped at the Hotel Crillon.
Left to right, sitting: Viscount
Chlnda (Japan), Baron Makino
Japan), Leon Bourgeois (France),
Lord Robert Cecil (Great Britain),
Signor Orlando (Italy), M. Kra
WH HIVED AGAINST EXTRA SESSION
Leaves Washington Determined Congress Shall Not Reconvene
Until He Returns Prom France; Confident People Will
Back Him in Fight for League.
By ROBERT J. BENDEft.
Washington. March 4.—President
Wilson left Washington at 2 o'clock
this afternoon, prepared for a
"show down" before the people on
his fight with senate Republicans.
There will be no change in his
plans to return to France on sched
ule and he has not relaxed his de
termination to «Bill no extra ses
sion of congress now, it was stated
officially.
The challenge set up by senate
Republicans on his league of na
tions covenant, the president is
confident, will bo accepted "back
home" and the people he believes
will demand its ratification when
the time comes.
The president regards the Issue
on the league of nations as clear
ly drawn along this line:
PRESIDENT BLAMES
In Statement to the Nation Wil
son Lays Full Responsibility
on Republican Senators for
"Impaired Efficiency."
Washington, March 4.—President
Wilson today In a statement to the
country, laid upon senators who "ob
structed" passage of appropriation' bills
the full responsibility for "Impaired ef
ficiency" of the government which, he
^aid, would result while he is in Paris.
. Upon adjournment of congress Pres
ident Wilson issued this statement:
"A group of mon in tho' senate
have deliberately chosen to embar
rass the administration of the gov
ernment to imperil tho financial in
terests of the railway system of
the oountry and to make arbitrary
uae of tho powers intended to bo
employed in tho interests of tho
people.
DUTY TO ATTEND PARLEY.
"It ie plainly my present duty to at
tend the peace conference in Parie.
It is alto my duty to be in close con
tact with the publio business dur
ing a sassien of eongress. I must
maka my choica batwaen thssa two
duties and I confidently hope that
tha psopla of the oountry will think
that I am making tha right choica.
It is not in tho interest of the right ,
conduot of publio affaire that I
should eall tho congress in a spe
cial asasion, while it ie impossible
for mo to be in Washington, be
cause of a mors pressing duty else
where to eo-operat* with tho
houses.
"I take it for granted that tho
mon who have obstructed and pre
vented the passage of ntoeeaary
legislation have taken all of this
into consideration and ara willing
to assuma tho responsibility of the
impaired officionoy of the govern
ment and tho ombarraasod finanças
of tho country during tho time of
my enforced abesnos."
marz (Czechoslavakla), M. Venl
zelos (Greece). Standing: M.
Pessoa (Brazil), Colonel House
(U. S.), M. Dimowski (Poland),
M. Vesnltch (Serbia), General
Smuts (Great Britain), President
League—and peace, or no league
and inevitable war, resulting from
competitive armaments.
He remarked not long ago to
some friends that when great com
petitive navies and armies are
maintained they cannot he kept
Idle forever.
And the Immediate result of such
armies and nhvies, his advisors
point out, is a heavy and constant
ly maintained tax burden, of which
the people now are getting a taste
as a result of the great war.
That the president will pursue
this thought in his final appeal to
the people in New York tonight,
was Intimated by his advisors to
day.
The president stepped aboard a
special train at 1:55 p. m. and it
left for New York two minutes
later.
. ,,, ... .
" 1 *" t W 'J* " ot re Pudlate any foreign
the
— -- - -
Government Also Plans Liqui
dation of all Foreign Debts
and Amendment of the Con
fiscatory Oil Law.
Mexico City, March 3.—The Mexican
government went on record tonight as
favoring payment of all just damages
resulting from the revolution, liquida
tion of all foreign debts and amend
ment of the confiscatory oil law.
The pronouncement was made at a
banquet to American newspaper men.
Robert Pesquiera said he had been
authorized by Luis Cabrera, whç, will
accept the ministry of hacienda next
week, to state that the Mexican gov
ernment will pass a new oil law, rec
ognizing the right of ownership of the
sub-soil in all properties purchased be
fore promulgation of the new legisla
ture. Properties purchased after that
date, he said, would be subject to the
Mexican law which gives the sub-soil
to the nation. He said It Is the inten
tion of the government to create a fed
eral oil reserve.
President Carranza declared through
Pesquiera that all Just damages In
curred as a result of the revolution
will be paid In full and the govern
presldent said, as the present revenues
amount to 3150,000,000 a year,and are
expected to reach $200,000,000. The
surplus,- he said, will be devoted to
paying the Interest on foreign debts.
BAKER TO TOUR CAMPS
ON DEMOBILIZATION*QUIZ
Washington. March 4.—Secretary of
War Baker today said he would tour
the camps of the United Sûtes next
week to inspect demobilisation work.
He leaves Sunday for Camp Custer,
and goes to Dodge and thence to the
Pacific coast.
Wilson, M. Dlamandi (Roumanla),
M. Hymans (Belgium), Major
Bonscll (U. S.), M. Wellington
Koo (China), M. Reis (Portugal),
M. Scialoja (ItalyJ and M. Lar
naude (France).
WORLD LEAGUE
SCHEDULED 10
BEGIN WORKING
BY EARLY FAU
Despite Apparent Opposition to
Covenant in U. S. Paris Con
ferees Confident League to
Be Ratified as It Stands.
By FRED S. FERGUSON.
Paris, March 4.—The league of na
tions, according to the opinion prevail
ing in official circles here today, will
start functioning soon after the gen
eral peace settlement is effected, cer
tainly not later than early fall.
The great majority of the peace del
egates apparently are agreed that the
present covenant represents the com
posit world view, as nearly as possi
ble, and that It will be adopted practi
cally as it stands. AVhile there Is still
Intense Interest In the attitude of
Washington, attacks on the. league con
stitution—such as those of Senator
Lodge and Senator Knox—have not
created the impression that was ex
pected among the foreign conferees.
CHANGE IN DETAIL.
The latter feel the American organ
ization hus touched only on plans that
were thoroughly threshed out and
agreed to in discussions by the league
committee.
While the basic principles of the
league are expected to remain as out
lined at present, there seems to be
no doubt that many of the details will
undergo some changes when the con
stitution comes up for open debate be
fore the general peace conference. Nu
merous suggestions have already been
recived from neutral countries and
others Will be asked to offer Ideas.
Discussion of military najval and air
terms of the preliminary peace terms
with Germany was not completed yes
terday and will be taken up again
Thursday by the supreme war council.
CAN KEEP SEAPLANE8.
It was reported that the aerial pro
visions as recommended by allied mili
tary officials, contemplate reduction of
Germany's air force to a few hydro
planes which would be used In search
ing for mines floating in northern wa
ters. Despite the fact of reports of
increasingly serious conditions in Ger
many, plans for partial reduction of the
economic conditions in Germany, plans
for partial reduction of the economic
blockade are being held up by the
French continuing (o refuse permission
for Germany to pay for food with
money and securities that otherwise
}might be available for reparation.
Member« of the food administration
and the economic council hope to
straighten out the situation and carry
out the original program for easing
the blockade.
THE WEATHER
Forecast for Boise and vicinity—
FAIR TONIGHT AND WEDNESDAY.
For Idaho—Tonight and Wednesday,
fair.
Highest temperature yesterday.... 44
Lowest temperature this morning.. *i
Mean temperature yesterday......31
FUBUSTER STRANGLES ACTION
ON VITAL MEASURES; WILSON
ANGERED BY OPPOSITION, SEES
END OF TUMULTUOUS SESSION
FALL OF FINAL GAVEL FINDS SENATOR SHERMAN
BLOCKING PASSAGE OF NEEDED APPROPRIATIONS,
TOTALLING MORE THAN $2,000,000,000; FOND FARE
WELL GIVEN "LAME DUCKS" WHEN 65TH CONGRESS
HAD PASSED OUT.
Washington March 4.—The 65th Congress died at noon
today, strangled by a filibuster As the final gavel fell in the
senate on the stroke of noon, it cut short a speech begun at
7:30 a. m. today by Senator Sherman, Illinois, which blocked
the transaction of all business.
All roads led to the senate end of the capitol, for it wa£
there that the filibuster raged all night long, and through the
final hours of what has been one of the most tumultuous ses
sions of the American congress. It was there also that Presi
dent Wilson with a trace of anger in his eye and a set to his
jaw—but wearing his usual smile, at times—signed the last
minute bills and cleaned up the business of the session.
ENDS WITH SQUABBLE.
The last legislative act of congress was a squabble in the
senate over a resolution providing clerks for members of the
house. House members by the score crowded the senate
floor to see what the upper house would do about it. ,
Half an hour was consumed in trying to amend the resolu
tion. Senator Gore wanted itto provide for demobilization of
the army in 30 days and Senator Lewis sought to incorporate
it in a senate resolution of hope for President Wilson's safe
voyage to France and return and his success in getting the
league of nations under way. 4
While the question of house members' clerk hire was
being seriously debated great departmental appropriation bills
totalling more than $2,600,000,000 were slowly dying.
The president, who Was 50 feet away
while the senate amused a huge crowd
with parliamentary maneuvers and
points of order, had asked that the
big supply bills be passed.
They died as he left the capitol to
return to the White House.
SOLONS FLOCK ROOM.
As President Wilson signed bills
cabinet officers, senators, congressmen
and other high officials crowded his
gilded, mirrored room. Chief of Staff
March and Admiral Grayson In uni
form added color. Several women were
presented to the president by Con
gressman Baer, North Dakota.
Frequently the president laid down
his pen to say a farewell word to a
senator.
After the Important bills were
signed, he penned his name In a dozen
autograph books for senate pages.
Meyer London, retiring Socialist
congressman, held an earnest conver
sation with the president for a few
minutes.
In the closing hour of the congress,
the house passed resolutions to pay the
salaries of members who served in the
army and to prevent payment of the
whole $3200, clerk hire allowance to
one clerk.
EXITS TO MUSIC.
The marine band in the lobby closed
the session to the accompaniment of
patriotic music.
Ab the clock touched 12 In the sen
ate Vice President Marshall called the
session officially at a close. In the
shuffle, the clerks' resolution was lost.
Vice President Marshall gave a touch
of piquancy to the occasion by vary
ing the usual farewell formula which
Is to declare the senate adjourned
sine die.
Marshall today spld, "sine deo," and
it got a big laugh from the gallery and
floor.
In both houses the last moments
were filled with farewells to "lame
ducks" who last November lost the
right to sit in congress. Representa
(Contlnued on Page Two.
Copenhagen, March 4.—Chancel
lor Scheidemann Is being urged by
many Majority Socialists to resign
and form a coalition government
of Majority and Minority Social
ists in order to avert possible suc
cess of the new revolution, It was
reported In dispatches from Berlin
today.
CALL 8TRIKE TONIGHT.
By FRANK J. TAYLOR
Berlin. March 3.—Following a
special caucus late today Indepen
dent Socialists announced the gen- ,
oral political strike against the
Martial Law Proclaimed in Ber
lin Following Violent Dis
order; Everyone Barred
From Streets After 6 o'Clock
Copenhagen, March 4.—The Ger
man national assembly will dis
solve today, according td dispatches
received from Weimar. It is not
expected to reconvene.
DECLARE MARTIAL LAW
Copenhagen, March 4.—Martial law
has been proclaimed In Berlin and Its
suburbs, according'to dispatches re
ceived from that city today. Military
Governor Noske has assumed executive
power.
Rioting preceded the declaration, It
was reported in other dispatches. Mobs,
disarming the police, succeeded In cap
turing the central police station.
Military Governor Noske has ordered
that everybody seen on the streets af
ter six o'clock In the evening shall bs
shot without warning.
DISTURBANCE CONTINUES
Copenhagen, March 4.—The anti-gov
ernment movement in Germany contin
ues unabated, despite the. government's
"nationalization" propaganda, It wss
said In dispatches received from Berlin
today..
present government will be called
at 8 o'clock tonight Instead of
Wednesday morning.
The Independents demand politi
cal recognition of the Soviets and
overthrow of the Scheldemann cab
inet.
The government announced
"there will be no compromise with
terrorism." There was every In
dication that the compromise be
tween proletariat and the Bour
geoisie will not go to a finish. The
people here, this evening appeared
unperturbed by the latest turn la
the political situation. '

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