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Evening capital news. (Boise, Idaho) 1901-1927, March 08, 1919, Image 1

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ALL THE NEWS
FIRST
EVENING CAPITAL NEWS
WEATHER
SUNDAY.
Probably rain or «now
tonight, Sunday.
VOL. XLH.
BOISE, IDAHO, SATURDAY, MARCH 8, 1919
No. 53
MaWV OF 509,909 WHI WILL BE RETAINED
BOCHE SOVIETS
END STM AS
PACT REACHED
WITH MINISTRY
Radicals Are Granted Constitu
tional Recognition by Cab
inet; Work in Berlin Will Be
Resumed Monday.
FIERCE BATTLE, HOWEVER,
CONTINUES IN THE CITY
Estimated 300 Dead, 500
Wounded, Mostly Rebels; U.
S. Red Cross Mission Safe as
Fighting Abates About Them.
By FRANK J. TAYLOR.
Berlin, March 8.—(7 p. m.)—The
general strike was called off by
its leaders this afternoon. Work
will be resumed Monday. A settle
ment was reached on the basis of
a compromise with the German
cabinet, whereby the soviets are
granted constitutional recognition.
At this hour (5 p. m.) the rebels
were battling desperately in the
northeastern section of the city be
hind cobblestone barracks and rolls
of print paper. They were holding
off a vastly superior government
force.
MANY CASUALTIES.
The Alexanderplatz had been bat
tered until it resembled a front line
village. The Kaiserstrasee was strewn
With dead and wounded. The latter
were without medical attention. It
was unofficially estimated that the
fighting has resulted in the killing of
JOO and wounding of 500, mostly rebels.
Additional regiments have arrived
from East Prussia to assist in the
work of mopping up.
The members of the American mis
sion were still safe In the Adlon and
Palace hotels, the fighting having died
down In the Immediate vicinity of these
places.
Taylor's dispatches indicate the
strike leaders may not be able to con
trol tliclr followers, who are battling
for political as well ns economic alms.
MEANS DRAW VERDICT.
If the fighting eventually ceases, as
a result of the agreement reached yes
terday, the latest revolution will have
ended practically In a draw. The gov
ernment gave In to the extent of grant
ing the soviets recognition as the
agents for control of labor and pro
duction, which will be written Into the
constitution — but the Spartacans
sought full political recognition.
The local revolution has resulted in
as bitter fighting as characterized the
previous uprising, which ended with
the death of Carl Liebknecht. United
Press dispatches reported the- govern
ment troops employed tanks and
barbed wire entanglements and yester
day dispatches said they were using
poison gas.
REBEL POWER EBBS.
By FRANK J. TAYLOR.
Berlin, March 7.—The Spartacans
determined this afternoon to break off
all negotiations with the government
and settle the issue by fighting. This
action was taken despite the fact that
the government forces were extending
their control of the city and apparently
has broken the revolution.
After a day of comparative success,
tho revolutionists were again on the
defensive tonight, and the battle had
become one of guerilla warfare. The
tide turned when government airplanes
began dropping huge bombs on the
roof of the royal stables, occupied by
the revolting sailors. The buildings
were practically demolished and scores
of soldiers killed or wounded. The re
mainder surrendered.
OVER 100 CAPTl/RED.
Shortly afterward the Alexandcr
platz, which had changed hands sev
eral times and where the chief Sparta
can resistance was centered, was taken
by storm by government troops. More
(Continued on Page Two.
PRESIDENT GIVES PHOTO
TO OFFICERS AND CREW
By CARL D. GROAT.
Aboard the U. S. 8. George
Washington, March 7,—President
Wilson walked five miles about tha
dsoks today, aetting a pace that
mad# his volunteer escort of ma
rines and secrat servica man puff
to koop up with him. Ho attend
ad tha shlp'a moviea thia afternoon
and again tonight.
The preeident presented the offi
cers and crew with a framad auto
graphed portrait of himself in ap
preciation of their efforts for hie
eomfert and safaty. Ho aloe gava
individual autographsd photo-,
(die to Captain MoCauloy and
Parkins.
MAN WHO SAID "TO HELL WITH RETREATING,
LET THE GERMANS DO THAT," COMES HOME
m
u
uiii
Colonel Frederick M. Wise and Mrs. W
on Steamer
ise, snapped on arrival In New York
Rochambeau.
Colonel Frederick M. Wise, the
man who led the Second battalion.
Fifth Marines, In the memorable
battle of Chateau Thierry, has ar
rived in this country with his wife.
it was Colonel Wise who remarked,
Official Probe Follows Outbreak at Rhyl on Irish Sea; Rioters
Seize Stores and Fire on Officers' Quarters; 20
Ring Leaders Are Under Arrest.
London, March 8—Early reports of the riots in the Canadian army camp
at Rhyl were exaggerated, according to authoritative information obtained
today.
The trouble which began Tuesday night and continued Thursday night
resulted in the death of five parsons and the wounding of 21 including two
officers, it was learned. Damage was estimated at 8150,000. The number of
rioters was estimated at from 600 to 1600.
One hundred men are under arrest, including 12 civilians. The New
Brunswick major, previously reported to have been trampled to death, is
said to have been only slightly injured. One man who raised a red flag
over the camp «sas shot dead.
HAYS INSISTS AMERICA
AVOID ALIEN ALLIANCE;
PUTS OLD GLORY FIRST
G, O. P. Chairman Declares Party
Must Not Accept Any Indefinite
International Policy.
St. Paul, Minn., March 8.—Ad
dressing a Rt'punblicun meeting
here last night, Chairman Will H.
Hays of the Republican national
committee declared the party "will
accept no Indefinite International
ization as a substitute for Ameri
can nationalism."
"Let us not for one moment lose
sight of oar own supreme national
ism, although we seek earnestly
and prayerfully for methods for
lessening future wars, and will go
far Indeed In an effort to that
end," he said.
"The Republican party has al
ways followed the flag and has
made the music for the nation.
We will not join any party that
does not follow the flag and keep
step to the music."
99-YEAR PRISON TERM
GIVEN TEXAS MINISTER
CONVICTED OF ASSAULT
Dallas, Texas, March 8.—The Rev.
Francis Berry. 60, convicted of crimi
nal assault against a young girl, will
not hang for his crime.
Judge R. B. Seay last night refused to
assess the death penalty, despite a dra
matic closing argument by District At
torney Pierson. Berry was sentenced
to 99 years in the state penitentiary.
Berry, an Episcopal minister, was the
respected chaplain of St. Matthew's
home for children, a charitable Insti
tution. Charges brought by tha older
sister of Irene Everett, 14 years old, an
orphan, resulted In Berry's arrest end
trial.
when ordered to retreat, "To hell
with retreating; let the Germans
do the retreating." His battalion
captured 500 Germans and many
machine guns at a cost of a 75 per
cent casualty list between June 2
and June 5.
London, March 8—Official Investiga
tion was being made today of the riot
of Canadian soldiers at Rhyl in which
from five to 27 were killed and 20 to
73 wounded. The disturbances began
Tuesday night and continued through
Thursday night.
Several of the 25,000 soldiers await
ing transportation home at Rhyl de
cided to hold a demonstration to air
their grievances over delayed demob
ilization and non-receipt of back pay.
The outbreak is said to have started
at a shoutpd signal, "Come on. Bol
sheviks." The rioters seized stores,
fired on the officers' quarters and soon
gained control of the camp. They al
so raided the barracks of the woman's
auxiliary corps and looted It of
clothes. A major of New Brunswick,
who had won the Victoria Cross, is
said to have been trampled to death in
an attempt to defend the officers'
quarters. /
CAVALRY CALLED OUT.
Cavalry was called out to the camp
Wednesday but did not use arms.
That afternoon a large number of the
rioters started to march to Abergate,
three miles southwest of Rhyl, were
cut off and turned back by troops
from Chester. The disturbances ap
parently were suppressed Thursday
but the rioting was renewed that
night. Friday morning, a major gen
eral who arrived at the camp from the
war office In an airplane, addressed
the men and assured them their griev
ances would be adjusted immediately.
He promised they would be demobil
ised at the rate of ten thousand a
week and said the next four trans
ports would be placed at their dis
posal.
The soldiers returned to their quar
ters and no further trouble had been
reported today.
20 UNDER ARRE8T.
Twenty of the ring leadere, alleged
to be of foreign extraction, Were said
to be under arreet. Owing to the lack
of official information, no definite re
port had been received of the casual
ties. One report said 12 officers had
been killed. The damage was esti
mated at (250,000.
HUNS' REFUSAL
OF BOATS' USE
FRETS EXPERTS
IN WASHINGTON
Germany Sunders Solemn Con
tract by Action; Made Pact
With Hurley to Turn Over
Her Merchantmen.
ENEMY MAY BE TRYING
TO DUPE VICTORS AGAIN
Discontent in Britain May Be
One Reason for Defiance,
Though Internal Peril Prob
ably Main Cause for Demand.
Washington, March 8.—Germany's
refusal to turn over her merchant ships
for shipment home of American troops
has aroused the widest speculation and
comment among officials and diplo
mats here.
In the absence of details of her ac
tion at Spa, officials hero know only
that Germany has broken the contract
her officials signed with Chairman
Hurley of the United States shipping
board and other allied representatives
last January, to turn over her mer
chantmen.
POSSIBLE MOTIVES.
The possible motives for Germany's
action are believed to be;
First—Her internal condition—
particularly as regards food—may
bo such that her present govern
ment ie afraid to turn over the
vessels for fear of giving the Spar
taeus group a cry of protest.
Second, the etrong sailors' coun
cils at Germany's ports may have
served notice on their governments
that the ships could not leave un
less they were manned by German
sailors (not provided in the con
tract Hurley offered and had ac
cepted).
MAY. BE TRICKERY.
Germany may be resorting to her old
trickery and, seeing discontent grow
ing in England at the delay in ship
ping troops home, has thrown a hitch
into a program of turning thousands
of tons of shipping over to Great Brit
tain as well as the United States for
troop transport, thus aggravating the
unrest.
In all events it Is held certain here
that her action is timed to end, If pos
sible .the allied delay in sending food
into Germany.
To meet any situation which may
arise out of the present "serious prob
lem" most of the United States gov
ernment will be in France.
CABINET OVER THERE.
President Wilson is on his way over,
Secretary Lansing Is already there,
Secretary Daniels will be there within
a couple of weeks, Secretary Baker
will arrive In France before the middle
(Continued on Page Five.)
niT SOVIETS TO
Moscow Advices Say Large
Concessions Forthcoming; to
Present Plan Whereby Rus
sian Debts May Be Paid.
London, March 8.—A new peace pro
posal granting large concessions will
soon be forthcoming from the Bolshe
vlki, a dispatch from Helsingsfora
quoting Moscow advices reported to
day.
According to this dispatch, President
Larin of the Russian economic coun
cil. declared officially that the Soviet
government would offer the allies a
concession for construction of a canal
connecting the river Amudaria with thi
Caspian sea, also the right to exploit
the great wealth of the cotton regions.
Under this scheme Russian debts
would be paid to the allies from th#
proceeds of export trade with the al
lies. The Soviet government would
demand that the allies not Interfere
with Russian Internal affairs.
THE WEATHER
Forecast for Boise and Vicinity:
PROBABLY RAIN OR SNOW TO
NIGHT AND SUNDAY; COLDER TO
NIGHT.
For Idaho: Tonight and Sunday,
probably rain or snow; colder tonight.
Highest taraperatura yesterday, 42.
Lowest température this morning, 28.
Mean temperature yesterday, S(. ✓
AMERICA'S DAMAGE BILL
AGAINST TEUTON ENEMY
HITS $750,000,000 MARK
And Claims Not All Rocordad; Will Bo
Submitted in Formal State
ment to Losers.
Washington, March 8.—American
claims for damages against Ger
many and Austria thus far total
2750,000,000, the state department
announced today. Additional claims
will Increase this to some extent, It
was stated.
The claims have been filed with
the sjate department by American
citizens and concerns. They cover
the following:
Death and injury from subma
rine warfare; destruction and dam
age to American vessels from sub
marines; lossss of American car
goes in both American and foreign
bottoms; loss of value of personal
property and destruction and requi
sition of American property by
Germany and Austria-Hungary in
enemy territory and territory oc
cupied by enemy forces.
At the outbreak of the war
American-owned property in en
emy and invaded territory totalled
about $300,000,000.
American claims In number ran
well into the thousands, the state
department said. They will be sub
mitted In a formal statement for
reparation by Germany and Aus
tria-Hungary.
Ambassador Bitterly Denounces
Bolshevism; Should Be Os
tracized by World; Are Los
ing Strength Every Day.
Washington, March 8.—The Bolshe
vist government of Russia has put it
self outside tho pale of civilization and
should be completely ostracized by the
rest of the world, David R. Francis,
American ambassador to Russia, told
the senate Investigating committee to
day.
"They dcgi't merit recognition," said
Francis. "We should not even have
business relations with them. They're
killing everybody that wears a white
collar or is educated. They hold wo
men as hostages to compel the men to
serve in the Bolshevik army. They
brought starvation to the country.
Even the two women and three board
ers whom I left In our embassy in Pet
rograd were starving the last time we
heard from them.
"In my opinion the Bolshevikl don't
represent more than 10 per cent of the
Russian people. They're losing strength
every day."
GOES INTO DETAIL.
Francis told in great detail of his ex
perience with the Bolshevik govern
ment after he left Petrograd with the
rest of the allied diplomats and mis
sions when the Germans were threat
ening the city. He told how the Bol
shevik! tried to get him and other al
lied representatives to go to Moscow,
from Vologda, and for some time re
fused to allow them to go to Archan
gel.
"The central Soviet In Moscow, while
appearing to desire us to leave Russia,
was in fact commanding the local So
viet at Archangel to detain us there as
hostages," said Francis.
Francis told how the government of
the north, set up at Archangel In op
position to the Bolshevikl, was kid
napped on the night of Sept. 5, the day
after American troops landed In Arch
angel.
WANT CZARI8M REVIVED.
The fighting, he said, was done by
Russian officers who favored return
of the old regime and It was timed so
as to create the Impression that Am
bassador Francis was backing It and
that he would use newly-arrived Amer
ican soldiers to support the counter
revolution.
"I had Just reviewed a battalion of
American troops with General Poole,
the British commander," said Francis.
(Continued on Page Two.
FREQUENT SNOWS AND
COLO IN COMING WEEK
Washington, March S. —Weekly
forecast—Northsrn Rooky moun
tain and platsau region*: Fra
qent loeal snows with tampsrature
below normal prebably during tha
coming week.
Southern Rooky mountain and
platsau regional Coming weak
will bo ono of generally fair woath
•r with temperature somewhat be
low normal.
Paoifio »tatoe—Frequent raina
and probably in Washington and
Oregon sold Northern California
and fair weather in southern Cali
fornia during the week. Temper
ature will average somewhat below
norm*!«
YANKEE BATTLE CASUALTIES
TOTAL 240,197, MARCH SAYS;
1.613.000 TROOPS DISCHARGED,
354,024 OVERSEA MEN HOME
Staff Chief Says Army Strength Not to Be Reduced Under
500.000 Till Congress Enacts Permanent Status; 1,390,
000 Americans Were in Action Against Bcfche; 339 Army
Suicides, Rate Less Than Civilian.
Washington, March 8.—The war department will hold an army of 509,909
until congrees provides otherwise. Chief of Staff March announced today.
Thia army will not be rsducad under any circumstances, March stated, until
congress panes a law outlining the permanent military organization. Ha de
clared that the United 8tatez could not get along with a small army. This is
tha strength asked by the war department in the military bill which failed to
paae congrees.
The total American battle casualtiee during tha war were 240,197,
March announced. Americans who took part in action against the enemy
in France numbered 1,390,000, h* added. These included: 1,100,000 divi
sional troops, including replacements; 440,000 corps and army troops;
50,000 in the service of supply.
When questioned later regarding whether drafted men would be hold in tho
army contemplated. March explained tho war department hopes resumption of
onlistments will provide tho specified strength.
Demobilization figures given by
General March show 419,555 men
sailed for the United States up to
March 3, and 334,824 had landed In
the. United States up to March 7.
The. number demobilized Is now
1,613,000.
March stated battle casualties in
cluding killed, wounded, missing In ac
tion and prisoners by division were as
follows :
Second division, 24,429.
First division, 23,974.
Third division, 16,256.
Twenty-eighth division, 14,417.
Thirty-second division, 14,268.
Fourth division, 12,948.
Forty-second division, 12,252.
Ninetieth division, 9,710.
Seventy-seventh division, 9,423.
Twenty-sixth division. 8,955.
Eighty-second division, 8,300.
Fifth division, 8,280.
Seventy-eighth division, 8,133.
Twenty-seventh division, 7,940.
Thirty-third division, 7.860.
Thirty-fifth division, 7,745.
Eighty, ninth division, 7,093.
Thirtieth division. 6,893.
Twenty-ninth division, 5,972.
Ninety-first division, 5,838.
Eightieth division, 5,133.
Thirty-seventh division, 4,303.
Seventy-ninth division, 3,223.
Thirty-sixth division, 2,397.
Seventh division. 1,546.
Ninety-second division, 1,399.
Eighty-first division, 1,062.
Sixth division, 285.
Eighty-eighth division, 63.
REDUCE HOSPITAL LIST.
On Nov. 11 the A. E. F. had in hospi
tal 193,448 men, General March stated.
By Feb. 20 this number had been re
duced to 81,231. Army suicides were
less than the proportion in civil life,
as revealed by census statistics, he
said. Up to Feb. 21 army suicides to
talled 339, of which 193 were in the
United States and 146 overseas.
General Pershing has been author
ized to start enlistments, it was said.
As men enlist for the regular army they
will be assigned to the A. E. F. to re
lieve men enrolled for the emergency.
The 33 camps originally designated
for demobilization camps have been cut
to 23. The regular army camps at Fort
Bliss, Fort Oglethorpe and Fort Rus
sell are also to be used as demobiliza
tion camps. The ad Interim appoint
ment of Colonel R. E. Noble of the
medical corps to brigadier general was
announced. The senate failed to con
firm Noble's appointment when (t was
sent up.
Superintendent Tillman of West
Point has been made a brigadier gen
eral on the retired list.
General March announced that he
and Secretary Baker would cover
practically all camps on their Inspec
tion trip beginning next week. They
will go over the northern route to
Gamp Lewis, down the Pacific coast
and back by way of the Mexican bor
der. arriving March 28, Just a few days
before Baker plans to go abroad.
Jury Convicts Chicago Slayer of
William Bradway; Defense
Asks fbr New Trial.
Chicago, March 8.—J. Norman Cook
was found guilty of manslaughter by
the Jury that tried him on a charge of
murdering William Bradway.
The verdict, which was reached and
sealed last night, was read today In
Judge Kersten's court.
Cook's attorney Immediately entered
a plea for a new trial. Manslaughter
in Illinois i* punishable by from on*
to 14 years In prison.
Cook heard the verdict calmly.
Norma Cook, the defendant's pretty
18-year-old daughter, who was the
oausa of the trouble between Cook and
Bradway, was not in the court when
tha verdict wa* read.
ln the armistice.
TO BE MADE BOCHE
TO EASE HARDSHIPS
Supreme War Council Expected
to Reach Decision by Mon
day; Austria Certain to Re
ceive Food Via Lifted Ban.
Pari*, March 8.—L'lntransignet
predicted today that the firat plen
ary conference with the German
delegate* will be held in Versailles
before the end of this month.
The general conference will take
up ratification of the preliminary
peace March 15, the newipaper
forecast, and the German plenipo
tentiaries will be called in for an
informal conference about March
20, after which the plenary confer
ence will be held.
By FRED S. FERGUSON
Paris, March 8.—The supreme war
council discussing the probftm of sup
plying food to the enemy countrlea, to
day was expected to reach an agree
ment by Monday. It was believed that
certain concessions would be made to
relieve the situation resulting from tho
dtsgreement between the German and
allied economic commissions at Spa.
The conferees already have approved
plans for feeding the people of dis
membered Austria, whereby the block
ade will be lifted. This principle may
be extended to Germany, it was un
derstood, through adoption of a reso
lution directing the supreme économie
council to carry out the provision of
re-vlctualizing that country contained
Prospeotiv* Program
From authoritative sources It wa*
learned the program now being dis
cussed under which the Germans will
be able to buy food, provides:
First, for permission for tho Gor
mans to engags in export trade,
particularly with auch commodities
a* coal and potash of which thay
have a plentiful supply. The money
thus obtained would bo applied on
food payments.
8econd, for establishment of neu
tral credit* by Germany.
Third, for uaa of gold assets, if
nseaasary.
A8 LAST RE80RT *
The latter method would be permit
ted oaly as a last resort If money raised
through other means proved Insuffi
cient. ' It Is estimated that Germany
has $500,000,000 In gold. The* French
are understood to have tentatively
agreed to such a plan, but have In
sisted that first the financing of Ger
many should be undertaken by on
American loan, taking long term note*
ln payment for food. This, the Amor,
leans refused to consider.
IDAHO CONGRESSMEN GET
COMMITTEE PROMOTIONS
(Capital News Special Service.)
Washington, March $—Commute«
assignments for the next house pro
mote Congressman Çr.neh, of Idaho,
to the appropriations commute* and
make Congressman Smith, of Idaho,
ranking member of the publie land«
committee and also places him. on th<
committee on irrlaetlnn nt arid

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