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Evening capital news. (Boise, Idaho) 1901-1927, March 08, 1919, Image 2

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ON COMMITTEES IN
Mine Appointed to Vacancies on
Ways and Means; Rep.
French Selected for Post on
Appropriations Committee.
New York, March 8—Nine Republi
cans have been named for vacancies
on the ways and means committee In
the next house. They are: Represen
tatives Bacharach, N. A; Bowers, West
Virginia; Copley, Illinois; Timber
lake, Colorado and Young, North Da
kota. V
There are no vacancies on the Dem
ocratic side of the committees and
there are six Republican hold-overs.
The six vacancies on the Interstate
commerce çommlttee which will
handle the railroad and packer legis
lation In the next congress were filled
with • the following Republican mem
bers:
Representatives Denison, Illinois;
Ellsworth, Minnesota; Merritt, Con
necticut; Sanders, Ind.; Watson,
Pennsylvania and Webster, Washing
ton, a new member.
ON APPROPRIATIONS.
Six vacancies qn the appropriations
Committee also were filled. The men
appointed are:
Representatives Cramton, Michigan;
French, Idaho; Magee, New York;
Hodgen, Kentucky; Shreve, Pennsyl
vania, and Tinkham, Mass. Hodgen is
successor to Representative Sherley,
retiring chairman of the appropria
tions committee.
Five vacancies on lire arglcultural
Committee and seven on the Judiciary
Committee were filled. Appointees are
Representatives Jones, Penn.; Mc
Laughlin, Nebraska"; Purnell, Ind.;
Reddick, Mont., and Voigt, Wisconsin.
The new members of the judiciary
committee are: Representatives Boles,
Iowa; Chrlstopherson, South Dakota;
Classon, Wisconsin; Currie, Michigan;
GoodyKoontz, West Virginia; Yates,
Illinois and Husted, New York.
(Continued From Page One.)
"Poole told me that there had been a
revolution last night.
"'The hell you say; who pulled It
off?' I asked hlm," said Francis, and
Poole replied that Chaplain, a Russian
Officer on his staff, had done so."
Francis said that immediately after
the kidnapping of the Archangel gov
ernment the street men and other
workers in Archangel went on strike
to protest against the counter revolu
tion. American troops were used to pa
trol streets and some of them to run
street cars.
YANKS EAGER TO FIGHT.
Francis stated the attitude of the
American soldiers in the northern sec
tion was Just like It was on the west
ern front.
"They wanted to get into a fight
with somebody," ho said.
Francis then related how he, as dean
of the diplomatic corps, bad forced the
return to Archangel of the kidnapped
soldiers to supress rioting. Francis
told the Committee he believed Lcnlne
was a German agent, from the very
beginning.
He said Kerensky made a fatal mis
take when he did not imprison Lenino
and Trotsky and try them for treason.
After the aboratlve Bolshevik uprising
in July, 1917, had Kerensky done that,
Francis said, the successful Bolshevik
revolution the following November
might not have taken place. "The Ker
ensky government tried to prosecute
the war and to keep Russia true to
the allies." He said Kerensky's gov
ernment was manned by able and
patriotic men.
BOCHES HOLD CONTROL.
"There was as much difference be
tween the Bolshe.vlkl and the provi
sional government ns there was be
tween the provisional government and
the Czarist regime," said Francis.
Francis began his statement by tell
lng how completely the Germans had
control of banks, the chemical indus
try, glass making and gie sugar busi
ness in Russia. He said Germans even
controlled the sale of American prod
ucts. This control of Industry and fi
nance was never relinquished after the
war began, Francis said.
"If the war had been postponed
five years," the ambassador declared,
"Germany would have had such a foot
bold In Russia tbat It would have
been Impossible to dislodge her."
Speaking of Lenine and Trotsky,
Francis said that the forther Is a great
Intellect while Trotsky Is an adven
turer.
"Trotsky has great executlS) abil
ity," said Francis, "but when he and
Lenine differ Lenine Is able to domi
nate Trotsky. Lenin«* In my belief. Is
• man with a sincere purpose but of
unscrupulous methods.
NAVAL CASUALTIES.
Washington, March 8.—Navy casual
ties were reported today as follows;
Lieutenant Joseph P. Williams, IJ. S.
N. R. F., died of gunshot wound re
ceived on board U. S. 8. Brooklyn; ad
dress, Paterson, N. J.
Ensign James H. Badle, Flushing,
N. Y., died of pneumonia at St. Nazalre
hospital, France.
Boatswain Arthur Grove, Lucerne,
Minn., died U. S. naval hospital,
Brooklyn, of Injuries.
Albert F. Habet, chief machinist's
mate, Roxbury, Mass., died of seaplane
accident.
CHIROPODY AND ELECTROLYS -
If . Room'll), Overland. Dr. D. E. Ann
rntmam. Adv. vt
ARCHBISHOP HAYES SUCCEEDS FARLEY:
I IS HEAD OF WORLD'S LARGEST DIOCESE
m
Archbishop Patrick J. Hayes.
Patrick J. Hayes has just been appointed archbishop of New York to
succeed the late John M. Farley. He is fifty-one and a native of New York, 1
where he entered the priesthood twenty-seven years ago. In his present
office he is administrator of the world's largest diocers.
"SHIPPERS' DUTY"
Commerce Commission Rules on
Liability of Loading Charges
at Chicago Stock Yards.
Washington, March 8—The inter
state commerce commission today
held that neither the railroads enter
ing Chicago or the Chicago Stock
Yard company could be compelled to
absorb loading 6r unloading charges
for livestock at that market.
Loading or unloading livestock, the
commission's decision points out Is
clearly the "shipper's duty." Tho
charges made for this service, there
fore, can not be regarded ns result
ing in discrimination against ship
pers, it was stated.
Members of the Chicago livestock
exchange and several shippers' or
ganizations began in 1917 a fight to
wipe out the loading and unloading
charges made by the 27 railroads and
stock yard companies at Chicago. Ac
cording to the commission finding,
these charges are absorbed at most
other large markets. But that fact, it
was determined could not be taken as
a reason why similar arrangements
should be compelled at Chicago.
U. S. GRANTS NEW LOANS
TO FOUR ALLIED NATIONS
Wnnhlngton, March 8.—Tho Unite«!
States government has given further
financial aid to four European powers.
A credit of 818,000,000 was established
in favor of the Zecho-Slovaks; $40,
000,000 for the Belgians; $100,000,000
for the French, and $20,000,000 for the
Italians.
This makes a grand total of $8,S41,
657,000 loaned to tho allies of the au
thorized $10,000,000,000. Today's cred
its make the total loans to the Czecho
slovaks $35,000,000; to Belgium, $338,
145,00; to France, $2,517,477,000, and to
Italy, $1,405,000,000.
PERSONAL TAXES.
Notice is hereby given that all per
sonal taxes due and remaining unpaid
on property situated In Ada county
must be paid within thi next thirty
days, or samo will be turned over to
sheriff for collection.
(Signed) ETHEL T. CLARK,
Tax Colleu'.or
Dated Feb. 24, 1919. M*4
PINNEY THEATER
2 Nights
Tussdsy and Wednesday
MARCH 11 AND 12
Special Matinee Wednesday
Not a moving picture. The same
No. 1 company and production com
ing from Chicago, St. Louis, Kansas
City, Denver, Salt Lake, stopping en
route to Portland and 8an Fran
cisco.
M.tt
-S..U »fiurdflg -
(Continued from Page One.)
than a hundred revolutionists were
captured here.
While the Spartacans were losing
their hard won military advantage, the
general strike was gaining.
Workman udopted a resolution to
night Indorsing tho Spartacans' latest
demands, which include abolition of all
war loans and debts. At the same
time the workmen decided to call out
the electrical, gas and water works
employes.
RADICALS CONFIDENT.
Tho radicals were taking steps
toward formation of their awn cabinet
tonight and were boasting that In spite
of the German government's present
strength, they would soon win com
plete control of the city.
As the workers Inclined toward the
side of the radicals, the soldiers were
being won over by the gqwernmçnt. It
is estimated that 25,000 loyal troops
are now pntrolling the streets, whereas
the Spartacans have only 4000 well
armed effectives.
ARMISTICE UNAFFECTED.
Berne, March 8.—Rupture of negotia
tions between the German and allied
economic commission will not affect
the work of the armistice commissions
which are continuing their conference,
It was announced in a dispatch from
Berlin today.
The Germans broke off negotiations
with the allied economic commission
after insisting that the latter must
guarantee to furnish Germany with
enough food to last until the next
harvest before Germany would consent
to surrender her merchant fleet. This
conference was entirely distinct from
the armistice commission, which deals
with military problems.
PRUSSIAN DIET TO OPEN.
Berne, March 8.—A Wolff agency
dispatch filed In Berlin Thursday and
received here today announced that the
Prussian diet would open next week.
This wns accepted as proof of the gov
ernment's confidence that the revolu
tion had fulled.
PART OF GERMANY.
Basle, March 8.—The special com
mission of the Austrian national as
sembly has unanimously ratified the
government's plan to declare formally
that the German Austrian republican
government Is an Integral part of tba
German republic, a Vienna dispatch
announced today.
TWO TRANSPORTS LAND
3995 YANKS IN NEW YORK
New York, March 8—The transports
Plattsburg and Chicago arrived here
today.
The Plattsburg carried 2286 men, In
cluding a number of casual com
panies, 49th aero squadron, »detach
ment of fifth machine gun battalloi^
and*three convalescent detachments.
On the Chicago were 1060 men. In
cluding the 348th infantry field and
staff headquarters and supply com
panles, headquarters third and first
battalions, sanitary detachment oom
panys A. B, C, D, E, F and I.
NOTICE OF TEACHER3' EXAMINA
TION.
j Teachers desiring certificates or en
dorsement will bejrlven an opportunity
j to write of the subject of st\te con
| stltutlon and high school law, Idaho
I course of study, on high school curri
culum, on March 22, 191*. Tho exami
nation will be held at the county court
.house. (Signed)
I LAURA V. PAINE.
Superintendent.
HARBOR WORKERS BACK
ON JOB; BIG CONCESSION
WON BY THE STRIKERS
New York, March 8.—Five thousand
harbor workers returned to their jobs
today following a vote to accept the
blgr concessions made fc^y the railroad
administration. All ferries and other
craft operated by the railroads resumed
service.
The terms granted the men by the
railroad administration cases gave
wage increases of more than the 30
per cent^asked by the unions.
The men returning to work today
constituted 40 per cent of strikers.
Federal Mediator Hughes declared his
belief that the private boat owners
would not delay in meeting the work
ers* demands in view of the railroad
administration action.
The returning workers also get an
eight-hour day.
W.C.T.U.T0 FIGHT
Women Resolved on World Pro
hibition; Declare Wets Plan
Transfer of Plants to Mexico
and the Far East.
New York, March 8.—Plans of
American brewers to transfer their
plants to Mexico and the Orient will
be fought by the Women's Christian
Temperance union In connection with
the campaign for world prohibition, it
was announced at national headquar
ters today.
"With prohibition a virtual certainty
in the United States, we arc going to
direct our endeavors toward ridding
the rest of the world of the liquor and
strong drink evil," declared Mrs. Ella
Boole, national vice president.
"The liquor traffic Is still a men
ace," she said. "American brewers and
distillers are Invading Mexico and the
Orient with their nefarious trade. Our
sitters in China have sent their appeal
to us. To defeat this menace we are
appropriating $300,000 of the $1,000,000
bydget we expect to raise between
March 20 and May 31, to that end."
TOBACCO NOT PERILED.
Although the W. C. T. U. has put
whiskey under, men who have fallen
back on tobacco for solace need have
no Immediate fears. The W. C. T. U.
as a national or world organization
holds no brief against "Lady Nicotine,
as long the she confines her attentions
to tho male sex, it was Intimated.
"There need bo no fear on the part
of men regarding tobacco,'' Mrs. Boole
said. "Local organizations may carry
on anti-cigarette and tobacco cam
paigns In their cities and. states, but
we are planning no nation-wide cru
sade against 'Lady Nicotine.' How
ever, the W. C. T. U, Is unalterably
opposed to women smoking, and will
do everything in its power to dlseour
age the habit. Through education, it
expects to prejudice the coming gen
eration against the use of tobacco."
SAMUELS GIVEN JOB
AS A LABOR AGENT
(Capital News Special Service.)
Washington, March 8-— H. F. Sam
uels, of Idaho, Non-partisan leaguer
who ran for governor against Gov
ernor Davis, has been appointed
special agent of the depaftment of la
bor to travel in England, France, Bei
gium, Norway, Sweden, Denmark,
Switzerland and Italy to collect data
on colonization and study industrial
and economic conditions. . Ho sails
frfim New York for Liverpool on
March 10.
PHONE 73 for bnggage wagons.
Prompt service. Peasley Transfer A
Storage Co.—Adv.
WALLACE
REID
ALIAS MIKE
MORAN
A DISTINCTLY
WORTH-WHILE
PICTURE
COMEDY AND
PATRE WEEKLY
IN ADDITION
STRAND
LAST TIMES TODAY
SMI DEFECTS
NELSON III FIST,
Champion Has His Hands Full
With Preston Boy; First Fall
in 86 Minutes, Second in 12
Minutes.
George Nelson, clean, clever, classy
wrestler, was defeated in two straight
falls at the j Plnney theatre Friday
night by Ad Santel, champion light
heavyweight of the world, in a fast ex
hibition. The first fall came in 86
minutes of scintillating, gruelling mat
work—the second In 12 minutes. Both
were secured by a combination arm
scissors. Dr. Dresser, wrestling author
ity. officiated as referee. The match
was staged by "Nifty Nick" Collins,
promoter.
Fully 500 devotees of fair sport sat
enthralled through tho match, which
was filled with dazzling, clever mat
work of the highest order on tho part
of both exponents of the manly art.
Nelson proved aggressive, but the su
perlor generalship and condition of the
champion won him the match. The
fine work of both men kept the audi
ence continually on its toes.
The preliminaries were super-excel
lent. Chet Camp of Boise and Jim
Morgan wrestled 20 minutes, hard and
fast, without a fall being secured. Then
"Kid Mex," Boise "pug," won his first
match by getting a decision over "Bat
tling" Leighton In a five-round tilt
filled with plenty of action. Jack Col
ltns, overseas hero, refereed the match.
The main event started promptly
with Dr. Dresser as referee. Both men
weighed 182 pounds; Santel, brown In
color, with knots of muscle sticking
out prominently—Nelson, snow white,
with lithe, long muscles that played be
neath the skin. Nelson was aggressive
from the start. Hold after hold were
put on by Santel and at times he would
have tho Preston boy's shoulders on
the way to the mat and defeat. Then
Nelson would come out clear like a
white flash, and go after Santel ham
mer and tongs.
At the end of an hour of gruelling
wrestling filled with action, clever
ness«, speed, strength and knowledge of
the art, Nelson got out of a bad toe
hold and, like a flash, had Santel In
a half-Nelson. At 70 minutes. Nelson
was hurt by Santel accidentally strik
ing him In the pit of the stomach with
his kneo In a scuffle. Nelson was ap
plauded by the crowd when he went
on again.
Like a bolt of lightning In hi* ac
tion, Santel, at 85 minutes, clamped his
famous combination arm-scissors on
Nelson. Nelson managed to get out of
it. Santel rolled him over once, and
immediately clamped the hold on again.
In exactly one more minute. Referee
Dresser tapped the broad back of San
tel for Nelson's shoulders were pinned
to the mat. Time, 86 minutes.
Then came tho comedy of the even
ing. "Kid Richmond" of Virginia,
"raised on peanuts," met "Battling La
tlirop" of Nampa in a five-round go.
with "Nifty Nick" refereeing personal
ly. yhis was more like a marathon
race than a boxing contest.
At 10:28 the main eventers returned
Nelson was plainly tired and his left
arm showed the effects of the painful
arm-scissors which won the first fall
for Santel. He was aggressive, how
ever, and went In after Santel right
from the start. At exactly 10:40 Santel
clamped another combination arm-sois
sors on tho big, good-natured boy from
Preston and the match was over.
Private first-class E. P. Grant, wrest
ling and jui Jitsu Instructor In various
army cantonments since the beginning
of the war, was introduced as meeting
Taro Miyake, champion jul jitsu wrest
ler of the world, In a finish match at
tho Plnney theatre March 13, und"r
the auspices of "Nifty Nick." Miyake
on Tuesday night defeated Ad Santel
OWING TO TRAIN
CONNECTIONS BEING
D E L A Y E D ON AC
GOUNT OF SNOW OUR
FIVE-ACT SHOW DID
NOT ARRIVE.
4-ACT
Vaudeville
Road Show
—AND—
CHAPLIN
POSITIVELY
TODAY
ADMISSION,
Adults, Matinee.....20o
Evening...........40o
Children, Matinee . . .IOo
Evening...........25c
ISIS THEATRE
War Tax PAid
TRY A WANT AD
In a match held on the coast, and Is a
wonder at the art. Next Thursday
night the fane will be treated to a real
exhibition of the art of self-defense by
two first-class exponents, and there
should be a large audience.
IE
Conference Committees Rein
state Appropriations for
Commission and Board.
The public utilities commission will
be given the total amount carried In
the appropriation bill as It passed the
house and this Is also true of the
state board of education. An agree
ment to that effect was reached by the
Joint conference committee of the
house and senate Friday night.
The senate sought to cut the oom
mission'e appropriation $59,000 and
the state board of education appropri
ation $8120. The house refused to con
cur In these and other reductions
with the result the Joint conference
committees were named and readjust
ments made.
Plano moving mad» easy. Call 71.
Peasley Transfer & Storage Co.—Adv.
The Capital Newa telephone numbers
are 24 and 25.
DUSTIN FARNUM
—IN—
A MAN IN THE OPEN"
■ «
FATTY ARBUCKLE in "LOVE" Additional
TJUTprjO MATINEE AND NIGHT
■txvlV^E/a. ADULTS, 30c—CHILDREN, 10o
MAJESTIC—LAST TIMES TODAY
E
PUBLIC SALE OF
MILCH tOWS
TUESDAY, MARCH 11th
Sale to be held at my ranch, 1-4 mile west of Mc
Dermott Station on interurbaii stub, 4 miles west and
1 1-2 miles north of Meridian, 3 miles north and 4
miles east of Nampa, 2 1-4 miles west of Victory
school, 2 1-2 miles east of Lone Tree school
Beginning at 1:OQ p. m. after
FREE LUNOH AT NOON
25-HIGH GRADE MILCH COWS-25
Holsteins, Jerseys, Guernseys
now, others will be fresh soon
some good cows from three to
Ayrshire, some fresh
An opportunity to buy
six years old.
nineteen months old,
030, with a long line of
BULL
Will also sell Holstein bull
Sou of Johanna Canary, No. 9f>
record producers behind him.
MRS. E. a HOUSEMAN, Owner
Col. E. Marsters * Bon, Auctioneers
Arthur Frazier, Olerh
Pacifie A Idaho Northern Railway Company
TO ALL CONCERNED
This road has broken the
are running regularly on the
except Sunday:
Leave Weiser 7 a. m. Arrive
Leave New Meadows 11:50 a.
Daily except Sunday stage
Meadows.
(now blockade and trains
following schedule, daily
l|lew Meadows 11:10 a. in.
Arrive Weiser 4 p. ni.
between Lakeport and New
Plans
Vis
to Leave Week for Short
lit Abroad; to Consult
Allied Navy Chiefs.
Was! Ington, March 8.—Secretary of
the Navy Daniels has announced he
plans to leave next week for a short
trip to Europe. He will be accompa
nied by Rear Admirals Griffin, Taylor
and Earle. ,
The purpose of the secretary's visit
Is to get first hand Information con
cerning types of additional vessels that
may be needed In the United States
navy. Daniels will consult with rep
resentatives of the French. Italian and
and accompany him to the conference
of navel athoritles.
Daniels does not expect to be gone
Brltist admiralties.
Admirals Simms and Benson and
their staffs will Join with the secretary
morq than a few weeks ,he stated.
The
A Timely Suggestion,
next time you have a cough or
cold tify Chamberlain's Cough Remedy.
It Is pleasant to take and you are surs
pleased with the relief which It
afford). This remedy has a wide rep
utation for Its cures of coughs and
colds.—Adv. T.Th.S.
Let
us mount your bead and tan
your Mds. R. W. Llmbsrt, Boise. Ida, tf

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