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Evening capital news. (Boise, Idaho) 1901-1927, March 10, 1919, Image 1

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ALL THE NEWS
FIRST
EVENING CAPITAL NEWS
WEATHER
Fair and warmar to
night. Tuesday. fair.
VOL. XLH.
BOISE, IDAHO, MONDAY, MARCH 10, 1919
No. BB
BOCHE TO KEEP
HIS AGREEMENT
BEFORE ALLES
PROVIDE FOOD
Must Carry Out Terms of Arm
stice and Hand Over Ships,
Then Will Be Helped With
Provisions and Credits.
GERMANY MUST TURN OVER
WHOLE MERCHANT FLEET
Supreme Economic Commission
to Confer With Germans Im
mediately; To Partially Re
move Economic Blockade.
By FRED S. FERGUSON.
Paris, March 10.—The supreme eco
nomic commission la espetced to re
aume conferences with the Germans at
Brussels immediately.
The new plan mapped out by the su
preme war council will, it is believed,
be readily accepted by the enemy. This
provides:
First—Partial removal of the eco
nomic blockade, permitting Uermany
to export such commodities as coal and
potash.
Second—Establishment of neutral
credits by Germany.
Third—Use of Germany's gold re
■erve if money raised by other means
falls short of the amount needed.
DECISION IMPERATIVE.
This program, accurately forecast
Saturday by the United Press, consti
tutes no backdown by the allies. It
fits in completely with additional terms
Included in the armistice during Janu
ary. Increasingly serious conditions in
Germany threatening the present gov
ernment merely made immediate allied
decision on details imperative.
The decision for enactment of this
program, which will enable the Ger
mans to purchase enough food until
their harvest is available in August,)
provides that the enemy must turn
over its entire merchant fleet. These
ships, which will be used largely in
repatriating American and Australian
soldiers, will bring back food supplies
on their return trips.
A report was circulated today that
Rear Admiral Wcmyss will preside at
the coming sessions of the economic
council of which Bernard Baruch and
Thomas Lamont are the American
members.
SUPFLIES NECES3ARY.
Foreign Minister Pichon in his week
ly conference with correspondents said
the allies recognized the necessity for
■ending supplies into Germany, know
ing that hunger would breed disorders
and act adversely to the allies' own
Interest. He said the allies took the
position that they were ready to sup
ply food and find the 1 cessary credits
but that the Germans must first de
clare themselves ready to carry out the
terms of the armistice and hand over
their ships.
Pichon said the union of German
Austria and Germany cannot be ac
complished until it is ratified by the
peace conference. This, lie said, was
doubtful.
The conference is making such rapid
progress, according to Pichon. that def
inite conclusions probably will be
reached earlier than seemed possible
two weeks ago.
T
Government Control in no Sense
Permanent and Property to
Be Returned After Limited
Period Says Bell Head.
New York, March 10.—Government
control of telephone and telegraph sys
tems I» in no sense permanent and the
property Is to be returned after a lim
ited period, according to Theodore N.
Vail, president of the Postal system.
In his annual report made public to
day.
Public ownership is not desirable,
according to Vail, and there is no long
er nny extensive conviction in the
minds of the public that there can be
effective compétition in the electric
transmission of Intelligence.
The Bell system now operates 10,
»12,373 telephones and has a wire mile
age In the United States of 23,281,325
miles.
The net earnings of the Bell system
during the last year were 354,293,018,
of which amount 335,229,698 in 8 per
cent dividends was paid out to share
holders. The number of stockholders,
now 112,000, increased more than 25,000
during the year.
The capital obligations of the con
cern outstanding In the hands of the
public at the end of the year were
•M1.074.2<4.
COURT AFFIRMS
CONVICTION OF
EUGENE V. DEBS
Washington, March 10.—The
supreme court today affirmed
the conviction of Eugene V.
Debs, former Socialist candidate
for president, found guilty of vi
olation of the espionage act in
a speech at Canton, Ohio, last
summer. At the same time, the
court upheld the espionage act,
which Debs claimed violated the
constitutional right of free
speech.
Along with the Debs case, the
court decided against Jacob
Frohwerk, a writer for the Mis
souri Staats Zeitung, who was
also Indicted and sentenced un
der the espionage act.
POLICE STAGE
Clash Over Interference by Bob
bies With Crap Game Near Y.
M. C. A. Hut; Believed Due
to Misunderstanding.
London, March 10.—American and
Britisli military officials were co-oper
ating with civil authorities today in
Investigating the riot which occurred
near the Y. M. C. A. Eagle hut yes
terday, in which several hundred
American soldiers and sailors aided by
Canadians and Australians clashed'
with London policemen.
There was a disposition to feel that
both the police and soldiers were at
fault, the former in exceeding their
authority and the latter in taking mat
ters into their own hands. The trouble
started when policemen interrupted a
crap game awd arrested several spec
tators. The players themselves were
said to have escaped. A great crowd
of soldiers and sailors marched to the
Bow street jail and demanded the pris
oners be released. Policemen charged
into the demonstrators. Clubs were
wielded and several on both sides were
injured. Military police were called
out. After two hours' Intermittent
fighting, order was restored.
.The riot on the Strand yesterday
resulted primarily fron' London civil
policemen attacking American military
policemen, according to information
obtained today.
ARREST STARTS ARGUMENT.
When the civil officers arrested two
Americans near the Y. M. C. A. Eagle
hut on a charge of gambling, and
started for Bow street jail, several mil
itary policemen followed arid asked
that the prisoners be turned over to
them for military trial, it was said. An
argument resulted, which turned into a j
fight. The military policemen wero
clubbed and placed under arrest.
The news spread to the Eagle hut.
Several hundred American soldiers and
sailors, together with a few Canadian
and Australian soldiers, started for the
jail. Police reserves charged Into their
midst swinging their clubs. A free
lor-oll fight ensued, in which Ameri
can soldiers and sailors were badly in
jured. Mounted policemen were called
out, but the fighting continued for two
hours. Order was finally restored
through the intervention of additional
military policemen, who persuaded the
soldiers and sailors to disperse. About
15 Americans who had been arrested
were later turned over lo the American
military authorities.
M. P. STATUS MISUNDERSTOOD)
The Americans are greatly Incensed,
charging the London policemen were
over-hasty in using their clubs against
military policemen, who really were
trying to quiet the disturbances. The
civil authorities make the counter
charge that the soldiers were attempt
ing to storm the jail. All jjiilitary po
licemen, soldiers und sailors were or
dered to report immediately to their
bases.
Army, navy and police officials were
co-operating in an investigation.
Major Campbell of the American
military police placed most of the
blame for the riot on British policemen
who attacked the military police. He
said, however, it was "probably due
to a misunderstanding*, the British po
lice having neglected to ascertain the
status of the American police."
The British police declare the Amer
icans were arrested under the law pro
hibiting gambling in the streets.
Colonel Mitchell, chief of staff at
American headquarters, said:
"I greatly deplore thé fact that there
should be the slightest friction. Every
effört will be made to maintain order
among the Americans,"
At Canadian headquarters ii was de
nied that Canadian soldiers had partl
pated in the riot.
It was estimated tpday that fully
1000 persons participated in the riot.
As there were only 550 American sol
diers in London, it would appear that
many > Britishers took part.
The corporal of the American mili
tary police who was seriously injured
was still unconscious today.
The Inspector at the Bow street po
lice station Issued a formal denial of
the charge that hip men clubbed Am
erican soldiers as they lay on - the
ground.
BLOOD-STAKD
HUH OFFICIALS
TO BE PUNISHED
FORWARHHMES
Preliminary Peace Treaty Prob
ably Will Include Clause Re
quiring Germany to Turn Men
Responsible Over to Allies.
UNABLE TO FIND WAY TO
LAND KAISER WILHELM YET
May Suggest That Germany Try
to Obtain His Removal From
Holland; Some Wish Kaiser
Branded as World Criminal.
By FRED S. FERGUSON.
Paris, March HI.—The preliminary
peace treaty ,it was learned today,
probably will include a clause requir
ing Germany to turn over all officials
found responsible for war crimes, to
be tried by an international tribunal.
While the responsibilities committee
Is not expected to complete its report j
for several days, it is understood a
decision has practically been reached
in this regard.
TO BRAND WILHELM.
Regarding the former kaiser, the
committee is expected to find that he
cannot be legally extradited, also that
it will be difficult to determine his
personal responsibility for the crimes
charged against him. A suggestion lias
been made, however, that the Germans
themselves will try to obtain his re- |
moval from Holland. If there is no i
other alternative, It is understood an :
international Indictment will be pub- I
lished, branding Wilhelm as the world's
greatest criminal, his punishment be
ing limited to this historical docu
ment.
GOING TO TEAR THE LID
OFF TO LEARN TRUTH OF
MEX AND YANK CITIZENS
New York, March lOi—The truth
about Mexico, in order that the United
States may adopt some definite policy i
in regard to the future relations witli |
the southern republic, is the object of I
hearings before the Mexican committee
of the council on foreign relations, >
which are to be held immediately. |
"We are going to tear the lid off," j
Mark Osmand Prentiss, manager, an- I
nounced today. "We want to learn the
truth about Mexico, and our citizens '
there. Our intention is to rip things j
ope,n, let the sunlight In. And indi
cations are that some very unpleasant
things are going to be disclosed, both
for the Mexican government and for
private Interests operating there.
"If It ts true that American citizens
are being deprived of their rights, their
property confiscated and their persons
outraged by responsible or irresponsi
ble authorities In Mexico, vve want to
know ii. On the other hand, if Amer
ican Interests or any other Interests
are fostering revolution there, we want
lo know that, also."
The Mexican committee which ln~
cludes Mayor Ole Hanson, Seattle;
Judge Ben Lindsay, Denver; Alton B.
Parker. Frank H. Walsh and others,
will begin their hearings next week
here. It is planned that one member
will devote several hours each day to
hearing testimony.
"The clock is about ready to strike
in Mexico," PrentisH declared. "We
have learned from absolutely reliable
sources that largo amounts of ammu
nition arms and war materials are
being imported from the east and
west. Also that shipments are cross
ing the border despite the embargo."
TO LOWER WAR PRICES
First Effort to Effect Reduction
in Price of Iron and Steel:
Food, Textiles and Building
Materials to Gome Next.
Washington, March 10—The gov
ernment this week expects to take Us
first direct step to bring down war
prices. Through the newly organized
industrial board an effort will be
made to realize a big reduction in the
price of iron and steel. There will be
a conference here Wednesday of a
ComiAittee and steel and Iron men, re
cently appointed by the United In
dustry and headed by Judge E. H.
Gary of the United States Steel cor
poration. The plan ia to have the steel
men and the board agree on prices at
which Iron and steel will be sold and
the Industry has agreed to co-operàte
In reducing prices to relieve the pres
ent business stagnation.
The prices of food, textiles and
building materials will be taken up
after the steel and Iron problem la
settled.
PRESIDENT WILL CONFER
WITH DELEGATES BEFCV.E
CHANGING LEAGUE DRAFT
Will Await Rssult of Talk With Con
freres Before Making Definite
Statement Regarding Matter.
By CARL D. GROAT.
Aboard U. S. H. George Washington,
March 10—President Wilson was suf
fering from a slight cold today but
Rear Admiral Grayson said it was not
serious. The president received a
great quantity of wireless messages
from Paris, detailing the progress of
the peace work. He spent some time
in his state room going over this data.
It was announced that he will go from
Brest direct to Paris and get into im
mediate touch with Secretary Lans
ing, Colonel House and other mem
bers of the American delegation.
According to those close to the pres
ident. he is not disposed to consent to
any radical changes in the league of
nations draft but will await the result
of conferences with other delegates
before making a definite statement in
this regard.
TEN NATIONS TO
DISCUSS LEAGUE
Covenant to Be Gone Over,
Clarified, Amended and
Strengthened by Representa
tives; Will Meet in London.
London, March 10—The league of
nations covenant will come up for dis
cussion by representatives of millions
of its supporters here tomorrow.
The discussion will take place at a
conference of delegates of .various
league of nations societies from ten
countries.
Resolutions will be drafted, aiming
to amend, clarify and strengthen the
constitution. These resolutions will
be presented to the peace conference in
the form of recommendations. It is
planned to have the program complet
ed before President Wilson arrives in
Paris.
Premier Venlzelos of Greece, Pre
mier Passhitch of Serbia and several
other officials of the peace conference
will attend. The American represen
tatives will be Arthur Kuhn, Oscar
Strauss, Hamilton Holt and Mrs.
Fanny E. Andrews.
"The meeting probably wiil take up
the section of the covenant with
which France already has declared she
is dissatisfied." Kuhn told the United
Press.
"We want to see France's security
guaranteed, but not to the extent of
formulating laws which would auto
matically send .the United States to
war in case some member of the
league were attacked, or would force
America to maintain permanently a
large army force on the frontier of
freedom."
"We may try to clarify the coven
ant regarding some of the objections
raised by senators especially the
clause covering a nation undertaking
to go to war. This might be subject
to several Interpretations and we hope
to make It clear that the meeting was
held in London Instead of Paris for
the purpose of getting away from the
peace conference and the atmosphere
of officialdom. We wanted a new en
vwonment which would give us a
broader version. There was no fric
tion with the French. That is evident
from the fact that Sena*qr Bourgeois
will attend the meetings.''
NO "SLEEPING SICKNESS"
IN SAN FRANCISCO
San Francisco, March 10—There
have been no cases of "sleeping sick
ness" in Ran Francisco, according t\>
City Health Officer Dr. Wm. Hassler.
"Sleeping sickness" has been re
ported from different parts of the
country and is said to fo'low an at
tack of Spanish Influenza. During the
sickness the Victim is known to sleep
some times several weeks, being
aroused only to take nourishment.
GERMAN OPERETTAS
ARE NOT DESIRED
Now York, March 10—Soldier» and
saUors here today are * ,lannlnK a
demonstration to prevent performance
Of the first of a series of German
operettas scheduled at the Lexington
^theater tonight.
CALIFORNIA S0L0NS
TO ADJOURN IN APRIL
San Francisco, March 10— An as
sembly joint resolution calling for ad
journment of the 43rd California leg
islature on April 18 will be Intro
duced today, It was agreed at an In
formal gathering of legislators Bun
day.
35 PERSONS INJURED
IN RAILROAD -CRASH
Tglado, Ohio, March 10—Thirty-five
persona were Injured, none fatally, it
Is believed, when a Toledo, Bowling
Green and Southern Traction car,
southbound, collided with a Clover
Leaf passenger train near here today.
MANY MEMBERS OF THE NEW CONGRESS WILL
BOAST OF SONS WHO SERVED IN THE WAR
*0
m
ifcs
Representative Carl W. Riddick of Montana, above at right; eon Rolland» at
left ,and son Morrill, below.
A large number of members of th
served Uncle Sam on the battlefield o
when called. Representative Riddick,
ond Montana district, has two sons j
aviation branch.
e incoming congress have sons who
r who were in service ready to go
newly elected member from the Sec
ust home from war. Both were in the
E1DPE1LUED DID EERH SECRETS
Washington, March 10.—Secretary of
the Navy Daniels plans to bring back
from Europe revealed allied and Ger
man naval secrets for congress, it was
learned today. Daniels originally
planned to sail in April, but moved up
the date to March 15, so as to be back
in time to have his new naval program
based on the lessons of the war ready
when congress meets. This will be
1-Va In May or June, according to the
present expectations, Daniels said.
Suggested sinking of the German
fleet is one big question certain to face
Daniels when he arrives in Paris, al
though the secretary preferred not to
discuss that matter prior to his con
ference with Admiral Benson there.
Daniels and his party of naval ex
WINDY CITY INHABITANTS
WORRIED BY APPEARANCE
OF MYSTERIOUS DISEASE
Believed to Be "Sleeping Sickness,"
Brought From Africa—Malady Is
Form of Infantile Paralysis,
Chicago, March 10.—The first fatality
among 15 cases of Illness resembling
sleeping sickness was reported here to
day. The death certificate of Joseph
Feldman gave the cause of death as
"lethargic encephalitis."
Fifteen cases of the mysterious dis
ease have been reported in Chicago.
One arousing especial interest was
that of Miss Lydia Dray, Evanston,
who has been In a comatose state for
the last 18 days. A consultation was
to be held over her today.
John D. Robertson, health commis
sioner, said 50 per cent of the physi
cians who had/seen the new ailment
believed it a form of infantile par
alysis.
"The real sleeping sickness exists
only in Africa, since the fly carrying
the disease, can live nowhere but there.
Another proof that this is not sleeping
Sickness is that the disease is always
fatal, while recoveries from lethargic
encephalitis are a rule," Robertson
said.
HOOVER TO RESIGN
TO MAKE A LIVING
Paris, March 10. — Herbert Hoover,
discussing the world crop situation,
intimated that he and other members
of tie; food administration would re
sign in July, because of the necessity
of earning a livnlg.
"These problems will need to be
solved by someone else," he said, in
reference to questions of price fixing
and food distribution, "because neither
myself nor most of the men In the food
administration will be able to continue
In the service of the government after
next July. We also must earn a liv
ing."
GOVERNMENT TROOPS
SURROUND LEIPZIG
10—German
surrounded
Copenhagen, March
troops had completely
Leipzig Saturday and were expected to
enter the city Sunday, according to
delayed dispatches received here to
day. Aviators from Weimar were
heavily bomblnr the Spartacsns en
trenched on the outsklrte.
THE WEATHER
Fortcast for Boise and vicinity—
FAIR AND WARMER TONIGHT'
TUESDAY, FAIR.
For Idaho—Tonight, fair and warm
er; Tuesday, fair.
Highest temperature yesterday.... 48
Lowest temperature this morning.. 28
Mean temperature yesterday ...... 11
perts sail Saturday on the Leviathan,
arriving at Brest and immediately go
ing to Paris for conferences with Ad
mirals Benson and Sims. Later the
parly will go to London and Rome, for
consultation with the admiralties.
One question to be settled during the
trip is the debate as to the relative
merits of the heavy dreadnaughts as
against light but swift battle cruisers.
American naval officials are hopeful
of developing a new type which will
combine the speed of one with the
defensive and offensive strength of the
other.
The German submarine developments
and other naval secrets of the enemy
are now available, and Secretary Dan
iels has announced that he will make
a thorough study of these.
TO WILSON ATTITUDE
"Will President Do Anything
About Ireland?" Question Is
Uppermost in Minds of Irish
Politicians ; Have Hope.
Dublin, March 10.—"Will Wilson do
anything about Ireland?" is the ques
tion uppermost in the minds of Irish
politicians, particlarly the Sinn Fein
ers, today.
Thus far the republicans have been
bitterly disappointed at President Wil
son's silence to their appeals. On the
other hnnd, the few surviving Irish
Nalionalist politicians of any impor
tance see in the president's action some
hope; for the revival of their party.
John Dillon, leader of the National
ists, said:
'Tlie day is not far distant v|rhen
the country will awaken to the great
mistake made by the majority of Na
tionalists at the recent elections in vot
ing for the Republicans, and it will
fall back on the parliamentary or con
stitutional policy pursued so long by
the late John Redmond."
The Sinn Felners, however, have not
yet lost hope of Wilsonian interven
tion, according to Jerry Boland, M. P„
acting head of the Sinn Fein during
the imprisonment of the leaders.
"We realize the very difficult posi
tion President Wilson is in," Boland
declared, "but we cannot believe he
\ I turn down Ireland's claim at the
peace conference. We are satisfied
that American opinion Is behind It."
1100 TROOPS RETURN
ON U. S. NEBRASKA
Boston, March 10—The battleship
Nebraska with 1100 troops on board
docked here today. The big warship
arrived in the harbor und anchored in
President Roads last nlgflït docking
at 10 o'clock this morning. The troops
were divided as follows; battery F,
54th regiment C. A. C., ten officers
and 230 men, eight casual companies.
GERMAN-TURK OFFICER
ARRESTED GOING TO BERLIN
Paris. March 10.—General Liman
Van Sanders, former German comman
der in Turkey, has been arrested while
en route to Berlin, according to a dis
patch from Constantinople today. He
was taken to Malta, from where he
will be returned to Constantinople for
trial, together witli several Turkish of
ficers. charged with violation of the
rules of warfare.
MAIL PRAISING
HIS STAND ON
WILSON LEAGUE
FLOODS BORAH
Idaho Senator Deluged With
Letters From All Over the
Country Applauding Position
He Has Taken.
MANY WOMEN OPPOSE
ENTANGLING ALLIANCE
One Correspondent Declares
Pact "Most Dangerous Prop
osition Ever Advanced"— «
Menace to Americanism.
(Capital News Special Service.)
Washington, March 10—A backfire
from the nation in opposition to any:
such international entanglement as
that feared possible In the conatltu-l
tlon of the league of nations Is re- 1
fleeted In the correspondence of the
three senators who have attacked the
document.
Not In batches but In bales the let
ters and telegrams are plied In the
offices of Senators Borah, Idaho;.
Poindexter, Wash., and Reed, Mo.
It has been a veritable avalanche of
congratulations to the senators who
have assailed the league. More than
95 per cent of the communications
are commendatory in form and phrase.
Other senators at the same time have
been besieged by their correspondents
among constituents giving or seeking
advice, and the same flavor is main
tained in this correspondence as in
that which the three speakers have
received.
EXCERPTS FROM BORAH
LETTERS.
As illustrative of the general tenor ol
the correspondence the following briet
excerpts from the correspondence of
Senator Borah discloses the feeling
throughout the United Stated! The se
lections have been made at random,
except that an effort has been made
to present those which show the scope
of the opposition geographically.
The following paragraphs were ad
dressed to Senator Borah by a novel
ist and writer of popularity in New
York. He was a member of the group
of supporters of the cause of America
in the recent war who designated
themselves the Vigilantes and gave
time and effort to helping the nation
in the great fight. The writes says:
I have never doubted your sin
cerity. I believed that you would
hit the league of nations a hard
blow. I did not even hope that you
would rise so greatly to the oc
casion and hit the foolish thing
quite so severely. I believe that we
should Interfere very violently In
European politics whenever these
politics menace our peace and
contentment.
With a president who knows
the difference between black and
white and right and wrong the
moment a case is presented Am
erica is as big a force for peace
as the world needs and England
has proved that she will not lie
down under injustice. That's
enough. We want to be a little
more careful what men we put In
high office. That is all.
NEW YORKER IS STIRRED.
A manufacturer's agent In New York
In a letter approving the Idaho sena
tor's warning that a little league of
nations was a dangerous thing, said:
In the minds of many thousands
of Americans, Wilson's Ideas as
regards the league of nations will
be a terrible blow to the future
success of this country and drag
us into everlasting war. Wilson
appears to be doing everything he
can to make an easy, soft settle
ment for Germany.
He seems to have forgotten the
great sufferings France and Bel
gium endured at the hands of the
Germans. Now he ts crying for
no indemnities and endeavoring to
let Germany off easy.
It la an outrage and a disgrace
and a shame that he should be al
lowed to attempt to represent that
his personal ideas are the senti
ments of this country. He was
the man who formerly used the
phrase 'too proud to fight' and he
Is the man who was elected by
the women -an the basis of 'he
kept us out of war.'
Is the United States congress
going to back up Wilson's per
sonal Ideas that are undoubtedly
opposed by a very great majority
of the voters of this country, who
look to congress to defeat Wilson's
league of nations and his desire tc
protect Germany at the expense of
France and Belgium.
A Kansas attorney wrote:
* The WUaon-Taft league of na
tions for us is the most dangerous
proposition ever advanoed. It Is In
violation of all that our Indepen
dent republic has ever maintained
or attained In war and peaoe, It
subverts all we have ever gained
(Continued on Page gixj

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