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Evening capital news. (Boise, Idaho) 1901-1927, March 12, 1919, Image 1

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ALL TBE HEWS
FIRST
EVENING CAPITAL NEWS
WEATEXB
THURSDAY.
Rain or 8 nOw tonight
and Thursday.
VOL. ZLn.
BOISE, IDAHO, WEDNESDAY, MARCH 12, 1919
Bo. 57
BLOODY REVOIT
FREUND NOT
GIVEN FREEDOM.
DEWUERASAYS
In Interview With United Press
Correspondent, Fugitive Irish
Leader Predicts Reign of
Strife if Liberty Refused.
BRITAIN SCOURS IRELAND
IN VAIN FOR SLY CHIEF
Scribe Has Thrilling Adventures
to Get Interview With Valera
Who Constantly Is Changing
His Hiding Place.
(Copyright 1910, By United Press.)
New York, March 12—Edward
De Valera, fugitive Sinn Fein
leader wlio escaped from Lincoln
prison in England and is being
bunted by the British government,
hns been found and interviewed
by tlie United Press staff corres
pondent.
De Valera, who will probably
be named president of Ireland in
event of revolution there, was lo
oted near Dublin by Ralph F.
Couch, of the United Press. Couch,
a cap pulled down over his eyes
so he could not see, was led to
the rebel leader's biding' place
where De Valera gave the inter
view.
Later, the correspondent se
cured a signed statement in which
the Sinn Fein chief predicted vio
lence and bloodshed in Ireland if
the peace conference does not act
to prevent it.
WlJJi De Valera's statement and
the interview and with much first
hand knowledge about actual
conditions in Ireland, the corres
pondent returned to the United
States thus insuring safe delivery
of bis information in New York
without interference by the cen
sors.
By RALPH F. COUCH.
(Copyright 1919. By United Press.)
Dublin, Feb. 24—"Violence will be
the only alternative remaining to Irish
patriots if the peace conference, at
Paris fails to take steps 1o extend
self-determination to Ireland." Ed
ward De Valera, president of the
revolutionary Sinn Fein party, made
this statement to me two hours ago
at a secret night interview.
"This means something like con
tinued revolution until Ireland's rights
are recognized," he said. His black
eyes flashed when he said it, his big
jaw squared. He spoke quietly. Never
theless. he was emphatic.
Do Valera, American born son of an
Irish mother and Spanish father, is
the sdul of Ireland's revolutionary
movement. British secret police have
been hunting him ever since his ro
mantic escape 11 days ago from Lin
coln jail on the east coast of England.
I am told that only five persons in the
United Kingdom knew he was hid
ing within a few miles of Dublin.
TROOPS EVERYWHERE.
Not far from where we met. there
were thousands of English soldiers.
Dublin swarms with them, as does all
Ireland. These troops, tin-hatted, fully
equipped and armed, guard public
l uildings and bridges, docks and rail
road stations. Their presence has
created a tense feeling. Many« con
tinually fear clashes between soldiers
and civilians.
"De Valera is risking his liberty in
permitting this Interview," said the
Sinn Feiner who arranged it. But
the chief is willing to take the chance
in the hope that he will be able to get
across to the American people a mes
sage from the Irish Republican gov
ernment."
De Valera quoted from President
Wilson's 14 points to prove that Ire
(Continued on Page Two.)
LODGE-LOWELL DEBATE
BOOKED FOR MARCH 19
Boston, Mass., March 12.—Practically
gll arrangement« for the debate be
tween Senator I.odge and A. Lawrence
IX)well, president of Harvard univer
llty, on the league of nations, were
completed today. The debate will take
place in Symphony hull on the evening
of March 19, it was announced.
Dowell will defend the league of na
tions plait favored By President Wilson.
REPORTS DECREASE IN
UNEMPLOYMENT RANK
Washington, March 12.—For the first
time since the signing of the armistice,
unemployment throughout the country
shows a decrease, according to depart
ment of labor representatives.
The total surplus of labor in the *0
cities reportingjls estimate dat 356,566,
» decrease of 8000 from last week's
total.
«2£00,000 FOR TROOPS' JOBS.
Melbourne. Mach 12.—The govern
has appropriated <2,500,000 for
etton of publio works to pro
i work for returned soldiers, it was
today.
Both Sides Ablaze With Smouldering Rebellion; Democrats on
Trail of Champ Clark's Scalp While Longworth Leads
G. 0. P. Insurgents for "New Deal."
Washington, March 12.—Party
revolts are smoldering on both the
Democratic and Republican sides
of the house of representatives.
Younger members of the parties
are out to overturn their old lend
ers and put new blood into parly
policies.
A combination of northern and
southern Democrats Is after
Champ Clark who has been the
leader of house Democrats for a
dozen years.
They declared frankly that
Clark should step aside for a
younger man who is more in sym
pathy with the party policies as
expressed through President Wil
son. Representative. Sanders,
Louisiana, is head of the anti
Clark combination.
Representative Longworth, Ohio,
Is protesting against the Republi
can organization as effected in the
Y. M. C. A.
AS RESULT OF DRIVE
Spirit of Loyalty Predominates
and First Big Civic Problem
Solved—Raise $165,000 —
Bells Ring.
Boise's first public building move
mont, this year, represented in the Y.
M. C. A. drive, was a pronounced and
enthusiastic success. At midnight
Tuesday night it was officially an
nounced $165,000 had been subscribed
for the erection of a new admin 1 stra
tfon building for the association by
4100 subscribers. There is heard on
all sides the greatest satisfaction over
the success of the drive. Men and
women in all walks of life, of all politic
cal faiths, worked shoulder to shoulder
to make the new edifice possible for
Boise, Comment was freely heard that
the spirit displayed indicates Boise
proposes to keep abreast of the times
in the matter of building a bigger and
better city.
In honor of the event, Mayor Hays
directed the fire bells to ring at mid
night. proclaiming to everyone that the
"Y" drive had gone over and the pledge
had been made to erect a handsome
new building for the Boise Y. M. C. A.
Many pledges from outside the city
were received. The city was combed
from one end to the other, and every
one was given an opportunity to help.
Team No. 12 of the Nationals cap
tained by \V. H. Coppedge took first
honors with a total of 275 subscribers
for a total of $11.060.50. The W. R.
Wilkcrson team. No. 2 of the Ameri
can, was second with 203 subscribers
or a total of $7632.50. The boy workers
secured 1718 subscribers or a total of
$4520. The women workers reported
310 subscribers or a. total of $14.485.15.
The National reported a total of 1110
subscribers or a total of $13.872.50, and
the Americans 822 subscribers or a
total of $32,386.50 F. F. Johnson, chair
man of the executive committee, re
ported 132 subscriptions or $65,300.
C. A. Barton, chairman lor the drive,
was greatly pleased over the result
due to the co-operation shown Under
his direction. At midnight when the
quota was announced addresses were
made before the big clock at the corner
of Ninth and Main streets by Chair
man Barton, (\ C. Anderson, Richard
E. Randall, Albert Grilley, F. I. New
house, E. A. Crooks. Mrs. Edwin Her
rington, Rev. ^Yillsie Martin, Ernest
L. Moggie, W. H. Coppedge. 1. B.
Rhodes and others, all praising % the
spirit of progress displayed In the
drivé.
STRIKE HALTS LINERS' SAILING.
New York, March 12.—Many trans
Atlantic liners are held at their piers
today as a result of inability lo get
coal becaustf of the harbor strike.
Cunard, White Star, Red Star and
French line vessels postponed sailings
until adequate supplies of coal can be
received. *
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'PEARS LIKE CHICKEN OUGHT TO BE CHUPEI1
Washington .March 12.—If the
old fashioned law of supply and de
mand was in good working order
today, chickens, meat, eggs and
butter certainly ought to be cheap
er eating.
Just listen to these department
of agriculture figures: Frozen
poultry stocks in store March 1,
totalled 110,003,382 pounds, an In
crease of 93 per cent at compared
with the same date a year ago.
Additional reports showed these
Increases over March 1, 1918:
Broilers, 98.1 per cent.
Roasters, 105.1 per cent.
last few days in the meeting of the
Republican committee on commit
tees.
Longworth has risen day after
day In the committee meetings and
told his colleagues that the men
they are choosing to head Import
ant committees are unfit for the
jobs and have grown out of touch
with the wishes of the people.
If Longworth takes his fight to
the caucus against the committee
choices, all of which have been
mado under the seniority rule, he
is certain to gain some support.
Insurgents In both parties are
asking a "new deal all around," to
help the character of legislation
and to further party chances in
1920, they say.
The men who are being attacked,
however, declare privately that
personal ambition rather than
party ambitions are responsible
for the party turmoil.
CONFIDENT PEACE
TO BE
T FI
Speakers at Franco-American
Meeting in Paris Predict
Complete Understanding Be
tween U. S. and the Allies.
I
Paris, March 12.—That peace will he
concluded soon with the most complete
and cordial understanding between
America and the allies was the keynote
of speeches delivered at last night's
Franco-American meeting in the Press
club.
The principal speakers were Marshal
Porh, Captain Tardieu, Secretary
Lansing and Ambassador Sharp.
Among the other prominent officiais
present were General Pershing, Ad
mirai Benson, Henry D. White, Colonel
[House and Ambassador Jusserand.
Frenchmen led in the applause, which
greeted Foch's eulogy of Americans
[participation in the war. His toast to
President Wilson and the American
army was the occasion for a great out
burst of cheering. His audience list
ened spellbound while he described
how the Americans flung themselves
into the lighting, "thanks to which the
tide was turned.''
"Germany has suffered bitterly, Is
suffering bitterly ,and Is entitled to
suffer for what she has done," said
Lansing. "She has paid a fearful pen
ally for the crime of plunging the
world into four years of blood and fire.
Today starvation and want are the
[^portion of the German people. Violence
and murder stalk through the streets
of their great cities. It is the price
for their own evil-doing. Just retribu
tion for I heir crimes.
MUST AVOID HATRED.
"But it is no time to allow senti
ments of vengeance and hatred to
stand In the way of checking the ad
vance of this conflagration, which will
soon be at the German borders, threat
ening other lands. We must change
the conditions on which social unrest
feeds and strive to restore Germany
to normal, (hough it be a weakened,
social order. Two words tell the story
—food and peace. To make Germany
capable of resisting anarchism and the
hideous despotism of the red terror
she must he allowed to purchase food;
and to earn that food, Industrial con
ditions must be restored by a treaty
of peace. It is not out of pity for
the German people that this must be
done, and done without delay; but we
victors in this war will be the chief
sufferers If it is not done.
CRISI8 REACHED.
"I say to you. men of France and
men, of America, to you men of the
allied powerB, no time is to be lost tf
we are to save the world from the des
potism of anarchy, even as we have
saved it from the despotism of autoc
racy. We ought to—we must—make
peace without deluy. We have reached
a crisis in the affairs of the world.
We must meet it without passion and
without permitting our judgment to be
warped by the natural and unavoidable
desire for vengeance on a nation which
has committed such atrocities as those
the Germans have committed."
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Fowls, 121.1 per cent.
Turkeys, 2.9 per cent.
Miscellaneous; 119.7 per cent.
But that isn't all. Creamery
butter in storage shows an In
creuse of 80.9 per cent, while .pack
ing stock butter gained 61.2 per
cent over 1918 figures.
And while chickens were piling
up in storage, eggs were keeping
pace. Case eggs held March 1
had increased 28.1 per cent giver a
year ago. Frozen eggs, however,
showed a decrease of 29.5 per cent.
Meats ,too, joined the growing
food hoards.
SOVIET THREAT
FROM THE EAST
PERILS BOCHES;
INVASION NEAR
Martial Law Proclaimed in Dis
tricts of West Prussia, Brie
sen, Thorn and Kulm Owing
to Advance of Reds.
MAY BE RUSSIANS OR
LENINITE-LED TROOPS
Berlin Menaced Anew by Soviet
Outbreaks; Rebels' Artillery
Endangers Capital as Radi
cals Entrench in Suburbs.
Basle, March 12.—Martini law lias
been proclaimed in the districts of
West Prussia, Briesen, Thorn and
Kulin, owing to the advance of Spar- I
tacan forces from the east, according]
to dispatches here today.
The dispatch would indicate that the
Spartacans are advancing upon the
districts referred to from Russian Po
land. Thorn is situated on the Vistula
river, just inside the Russo-German
boundary. Briesen Is 20 miles north
east of Thorn and Kulm 25 miles
north. From the wording of the dis
patch, it would seem the Spartacans
either are under direction of the Rus
sian Bolshevlkl or that the name has
been applied to the Bolsheviki them
selves.
REDS RENEW FIGHTING.
By FRANK J. TAYLOR.
Berlin, March 11.—(Noon.)—Berlin
was menaced by Spartacan outbreaks
today.
Government troops, after desperate
fighting, captured the greater part of
the suburb of Lichtenberg. Most of
the Spartacans fled from there to the
southeastern part of the city proper.
Strongly reinforced by recruits, they
cntrencLsd themselves. From these
new positions their artillery now en
dangers a large portion of the city.
Meanwhile, the Insurgent forces re
maining in Lichtenberg fell back to the
railway station, where they organized
new defenses. Detachment of a large
part of the government forces to com
bat the Spartacans In the southeast
ern section of the city rendered cap
turc of the Lichtenberg station a serl
ous problem.
NO HALT TO SOCIETY.
The. government's position was made
Increasingly difficult by public demand
that use of artillery and airplane bombs
cease. Their fear that resistance to
this demand might turn the people
against the government made it s»em
possible that War Minister Noske
would ttecede.
While fighting gained in intensity,
the center of Berlin was the scene of
gay social affairs, cafes and dance
hulls being crowded to capacity.
FIVE TRANSPORTS ARE
Steamers Sachapa, Polar Land,
Haverford, Rijndam and the
Princess Matoika Are Due in
U. S. Ports Next Week.
Washington, March 12.—Transport
sailings were announced by the war i
department today as follows:
The transport Zaehapa, from Bor- j
deaux for New York, due March 17, j
with the following: Bordeaux conval- '
escent detachments 166, 167 and 179; ;
detachment base \ospital 13; detach
ment 26th engineers; 32 casual officers, I
two army field clerks, five civilians, 14
nurses and 18 sick and wounded.
The transport Polar Lund, Bordeaux,
due New York March 24, with the fol
lowing: Two casual officers and one,
casual civilian.
The transport Haverford from Bredt,
'due Philadelphia (no date), with the
following: 318th field battalion signal
corps complete for Camps Upton, Gor
don and Dodge; mobile hospitul 103
for Camp Funston ; casual companies
984, 993, 996, 1419, 1380, 1421 (Cali
fornia); 1423, 1424» (North Dakota);:
1425 (regulars); 1430, 1433 regulars) ;
1436 (Illinois); 1438, 1439, 1468 (Mon-'
tana) : 804 (Colorado) ; 80 casuals and
nine naval officers.
The transport Rijndam from St. Na
zaire, due Newport News March 21,
with the following: 133rd field artil
lery for Camp Lewis; 114th machine
gun battalion, less Camp Funston de
tachment for Camps Lee. Dodge and
Sherman; 20 casuals: St. Nazaire con
valescent detachments 96 to 106* In
clusive; a medical detachment and
over 600 sick and wounded.
The transport Princess MatoUta
sailed from St. Nasaire, due Newport
News March Î1, with the following
units: 37th engineers for Camps Sher
(Continued on Page Two.)
I
ONE CANDIDAT!
SUDE TO STAND
'RIGHT ON THE
LEAGUEDECREE
Major Political Parties Certain
to Present Presidential En
trant Whose Views on Cove
nant Meet People's Favor.
THERE'RE WILSON, BRYÄ\I,
CLARK WITH VARIED IDEA
Republicans Also Hold Diversi
fied Views on Project, With
Taft Leading Advocates; and
Don't Overlook Progressives.
Washington, March 12—Presidential
candidates, past, present and future,
have so lined up on the league of na
tions that no matter what American
public opinion decides, the major par
ties will have a candidate who stood
for that very thing.
Among the Democrats:
President Wilson favors ratifi
cation of his league of nations
plan without amendment.
Bryan favors a league of na
tions which safeguards the Mon
roe doctrine, gives the United
States more votes and each na
tion the right to reject the coun
cil's decree.
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While Champ Clark haa not
made public his opinion, hit op
ponents credit him with intimating
that the present league of nations
plan has little chance of adoption.
Among the Republicans:
Former President Jaft favors
adoption of the present covenant,
unamended if necessary, amendad
slightly if possibla.
Republican Senatorial Leader
Lodge favor, a league whioh would
preserve the Monroe doctrine and
maintain the sovereignty of the
United States.
Senator Knox has offered a sub
stitute plan which would declare
war an international crime and es
tablish a court to administer an
international code.
Senator Harding signed the
"round robin" as oppossd to the
Wilson cpvenant.
As tp the Progressives:
Senator Borah demands a refer
endum on the league to determine
what the people want and would
abide by the decision.
Senator Johnson, California,
signed the "round robin'' aa op
posed to the Wilson covenant.
IE;
SOON TO LEAVE POST
Director Public Information
Bureau to Clean Up Details,
Then Retire ; Disembarks
From Transport Agamemnon
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New York, March 12.—Among the
passengers on board the transport
Agamemnon, which arrived here yes
terday, was George Creel, director of
the bureau of public information. Crcei
was the first person to leave the ves
sel and entrained immediately for
Washington. He declared he intends
to return to private life as soon as
some details are cleaned up in his
department.
"The work of the bureau of public
information ended in December," Creel
said, "and I am now making arrange
ments for the discontinuance of the
American foreign preÿt work. My
own relations with the bureau since
March 1 have been purely nominal.
I intend to go back to private life
just as soon as I can clean up a few
details requiring attention at Wash
ington."
80VIET8 CAPTURE KHERSON.
London. March 12.—Ukrainian soviet
forces stormed and captured the city
of Kherson March 8 , It was reported
In the official communique of the White
Russian republic received today.
THE WEATHER
Forecast for Boise and vicinity—
RAIN OR SNOW TONIGHT AND
THURSDAY.
For Idaho—Tonight qpd Thursday,
rain or snow.
Highest temperature yesterday____60
Lowest temperature this morning.. 35
Mean temperature'yesterday 45
PRESIDENT MAT RETURN
LATE IN MAY; CONCLAVE
FAR AHEAD OF SCHEDULE
By CARL D. GROAT.
Aboard tha U. 8. 8. G.org.
Washington, Mareh 12.—As Präsi
dent Wilton nssrsd Franca today
his advisors war* confidant ha
would ba able to return to tha
Unitad States by tha last of May.
All information reaching the
Gtorgo Washington indicatsa tha
peaoa work it being spaedad up to
such an extant that it it really
several weeks ahead of the origi
nal schadula.
A naw group of daatroyars has
joined tha Gaorga Washington, re
placing those which put "into the
Azores yesterday and last night.
The Gaorga Washington was mak
ing slower progress today but was
axpaetad to reach Brest tomorrow
afternoon.
LUDY SAYS HUN TO NEED
CENTURY TO "COME BACK"
Washington, March 12—Ger
many will need a century or longer
to regain supremacy in Europa,
declared General Ludendorff in a
Berlin interview received here to
day by diplomatic cables.
Ludendorff named von Moltke'e
defective strategy, War Minister
Falkenhayn's looee organization
,and lax intelligence service as
technical reasons for the German
downfall.
PEICETHEITYWITH
Final Consideration Given Mili
tary, Naval and Air Terms
Today; Discussion of Enemy
Boundaries Near Completion.
London, March 12—The Paris
correspondent of the London
Chronicle says the alliee have
agreed to limit tha German flaet
to six battleships, five cruieers,
12 800-ton destroyers and 26
smaller destroyers.
By FRED S. FERGUSON.
Paris, March 12—The peace treaty
with Germany may be completed this
week if the present schedule of the
supreme war council Is maintained.
Final consideration was to be given
the military, naval and air terms to
day.
Discussion of Germany's eastern
boundary is expected to be finished
tomorrow. Her western frontier is to
be taken up Friday when* President
Wilson is expected to participate in
the discussion. On Saturday, repara
tion and financial assistance for Ger
many will be settled.
Disposition of all scheduled busi
ness, will, of course, mean comple
tion of terms for the preliminary
treaty. The next step wlU be calling
In the German delegates for submis
sion of the draft. The plan for es
tablishment of a new "buffer state,"
composed of the Rheinish provinces, is
expected to permit rapid progress in
determination of Germany's western
boundary, probably on Friday, the day
it is taken up.
ARGUE FRENCH PROPOSALS.
l^ondon, March 12.—The league of
nations societies in convention here to
day considered amendments proposed
by the French for greater guarantees
of security. These consisted of pro
posals for fixing the limitation of
armaments and provding a permanent
body to foresee and ' prepare military
measures necessary to assure the ful
fillment of obligations to the league.
The chief objection to these amend
ments comes from the Americans. Ac
cording to one of the American dele
gation, they nre agreeable to giving the
FYench guarantees so long as they do
not make demands which interfere
with the United States constitution.
They wish to preserve the right for the
American congress to decide when the
United States shall make war.
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'ENOCH ARDEN,' YANKEE,
RETURNS TO FIND WIFE
WEDDED TO SALESMAN
Los Angeles, Cal., March 12.—The
story of Enoch Arden with a few vari
ations is being re-enacted in Los An
geles.
Several years ago Clarence Lummis
married a pretty Missouri girl. He
Joined the army and went to France.
Seeing her husband's name listed
among the killed in a casualty list,
Mrs. LummU thought herself free to
marry. She and D. McLaren, a sales
man were wed. She was astounded to
day to meet Lummis on street. After
a conference with attorneys, Mrs. Mc
Laren filed a suit to annul her mar
riage to McLaren, and her attorneys
says she will then sue to divorce Lum
mis and remarry McLaren.
8HËRLEY NAMED HINES AIDE.
Washington, March 12.—The ap
pointment of Swagar Sherley. chair
man of the house appropriation com
mittee, as director of finance for the
railroad administration has been an
nounced by Director General Hines. I
FIGHT CENTERS
ON EMBODYING
LEAGUE DRAFT
IN PEACE PACT
Opponents to Amend Covenant
Out of Treaty if Presented in
That Form for Ratification
by Senate.
REED SAYS "SWALLOWING"
ATTEMPT IS SURE TO FAIL'
Democratic Chairman Declares
Separation of Covenant and
. Treaty Would Postpone Ef
fective League Indefinitely.
By L. C. MARTIN.
Washington, March 12.—Following
word from Paris that the peace treaty
is nearly complete, with many leading
articles contingent upon a league of
nations, the fight raging about tha
league took a new turn today.
Opponents of the idea will try to
amend out of the treaty application
to the league, if it is embodied in the
pence covenant when it comes up for
ratification. Senator Reed declared to
day.
At the same time Chairman Cum
mings of the Democratic national com
mittee, In a statement on the subject,
declared: |
"The ill-considered talk about a
peace treaty first and a league of na
tions afterward is ^persuasive only
with those who do not understand the
problems Involved. Such a po|icy
would postpone an effective league for
generations and it would reduce the
treaty to a mere scrap of paper, to ba
torn to tatters the moment interna
tional interests came into conflict with
each other."
NOT SO, SAYS REED.
Senator Reed, speaking for the "bit
ter enders," predicted, however, that
efforts to make the senate "■wallow"
the league plan by so interweaving it
with the peace settlement that one
canrißt be acted upon without the other
will fall! There is no way, Reed de
clared, that the two can be conjoined
so that it will be impossible to sepa
rate them.
"We can ratify the peace treaty as
amended," said Reed. '
"We can amend by striking out ob.
Jeetionablejclauses, such as that en
dangering the Monroe doctrine or
American sovereignty. This will be
done, in my opinion, because within
9» days this country will be ablaze
with opposition to the league."
Other opposition senators believe the
senate could render the league, as now
proposed, impotent by adding to the
peace treaty if the league were em
bodied, a provision expressly stating
that "nothing herein shall be binding
oa the United States if it conflicts
with the Monroe doctrine and other
American policies."
EXPECT REVISIONS.
Anti-league senators expect radical
amendments of the proposed constitu
tion in an effbrt to "take tlie wind out
on their suils," they said today. They
regard Taft's suggestions of amend
ment as inspired by President Wilson.
They are, therefore, preparing to bat
tle in the senate to the very end fo*
complete defeat of any league plan in
connection with the peace treaty. This,
does not npply to all senators opposing
; the present draft of the league charter,
! but it does represent the views of tha
: most extreme opponents.
I Preparations are being made by them
: for the invasion of the middle west
land far west, mass meetings having
been planned for Chicago, St. Louis,
Kansas City and many other points,
though dates are not yet fixed.
Meantime, Chairman Cummings of
the Democratic national committee to
(Continued on Page Two.
MUST IE TICKET
Sinn Fein Leader Valera Barred
From U. S. Unless He Garries
Proper Passports.
Washington, March 12.—Immigration
officials today stated that Edward De
Valera, prospective Sinn Fetn presi
dent. would be adfnltted to the United
States only If he presents satisfactory
passports. This is necessary under the
war restrictions, they stated.
England undoubtedly would refuse
to issue the passports, and In case De
lfalera should be smuggled into the
United States, it would be the duty of
the American government Under inter
national law to apprehend him and'
turn him over to British authorities.
Just as Is done with stowaways, offi
cials Stated.
Sinn Fein leaders In Ireland told
Ralph F. Couch. United Press staff
correspondent, who interviewed De Va
lera. In hiding there, that De Valera
Intended to see the United 8 tates.
that ha might be here as soon as
Interview appeared In print. It
the purpose of the Sinn Feinere, .
sal4 to smuggle De Valera i
Ian« and Inte «jjgf 1

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