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Evening capital news. (Boise, Idaho) 1901-1927, March 15, 1919, Image 1

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WEATHER
SUNDAY.
Rain or anow tonight
and 8unday. _
VOL. XLH.
BOISE, IDAHO, SATURDAY, MARCH 15, 1919
No. 60
YEAR AGO HUNS
READYTOLEAP,
NOW HE BOWS
AS VANQUISHED
Then German Planes Swarmed
Oyer Paris With Streets De
serted, Now Boche Waits
Loser's Part of Peace Edict.
HUNGER AND REVOLUTION
TAKE JUNKERDOM'S ROLE
Enemy Prepares to Turn Over
Magnificent Merchant Fleet
in Return for Substanence to
Thwart Hunger Peril.
By FRED S. FERGUSON.
Paris, March 15.—One year ago to
day the world cowered in anticipation
of the launching of Germany's master
offensive of the war. On March 21 the
blow was struck.
Today the final work of the peace
aettlement was well under way, the
terms of which will bring Germany
militarily, to her knees.
No greater picture of the triumph of
right over might could be presented
than the contrast of the president of
the world's greatest democracy riding
through the streets of Paris today on
Ids way to the peace deliberations and
these same streets a year ago.
THEN AND NOW.
Then German airplanes were above,
sirens shrieked, the streets became de
serted and the city seemed scarcely to
breathe. Tonight laughing crowds will
throng the streets. Hundreds of chil
dren played in the Champs Elysee this
afternoon beneath the wheels of long
lines of German guns, which a year ago
were hurling death in support of au
tocracy's last assault.
In Germany, hunger and revolution
have taken the place of junkerdom. Al
lied delegates at Brussels have present
ed final conditions to Germany by
which she is forced to turn over her
magnificent merchant fleet as payment
for food from the larder of her ene
mies. Completing the picture part of
these ships will be used to carry home
these thousands of American fighters
which the general staff assured the
German people would never reach
these shores.
U. S. AS ARBITER.
A year ago America in France meant
a scant four line in the midst of the
mud "northwest of Toui" which wa
held by the first division. What Amer
ica in France now' means is written tn
terms of Chateau Thierry, the Vesle,
Cantignv, St.' Mihiel and the Argonne,
But even more significant is the fact
that now all the Europeans turn to
America as the arbiter.
In the final, delicate negotiations to
come she stands out as the only dis
interested pafrty. Delegates come to
the American representatives to pre
sent arguments and claims expecting
to get from them an unbiased opinion.
As the committees are winding up
their work of final resolutions the word
from every delegation was "We are
now waiting for President Wilson."
HIS FINAL WORD.
Numerous questions arc awaiting his
final word. For instance the matter
of disposition of the German fleet will
be presented to him for his opinion.
• With France and Italy desiring a por
tion of those vessels, the fact is ap
parent that friction also has developed
between naval and civilian represen
tatives on other delegations. The na
val men in w'hat might be regarded as
a curious manner, from the standpoint
of precedent, favor sinking the ships.
One of their arguments is that such a
course will be in alignment with the
disarmament move. The civilians op
pose sinking the ships on the grounds
of economic loss.
Excepting such side Issues the stage
has been set for speeding the work of
bringing about peace. If all moves on
schedule the treaty may bo ready and
the Germans* summoned by the anni
versary of the very day when they be
gan their last desperate attempt to con"
quer the w'orld.
TONIGHT'S THE DEAD LINE
ON INCOME TAX RETURNS
Washington, March 15—Stop!
Look! Listen! Midnight's the dead
line on your income tax returns.
If you don't get under the wire by
that time with your innermost fi
nancial secrete and maks pay
ment number one of a series of
four antes, then the penalties
atart to pilo on.
And thoy pila on fast—at the
rata of ono par cent per month of
procrastination.
PREDICTS WILSON WILL
BE RENAMED PRESIDENT
. Richmond, Va. t March 15
Wood row Wilson will again sorva
. tho United State, at president ac
cording to Norman E. Mack, New
York national committeeman.
Maok, hare on a visit, predicted
Wilson will bo tho choice of tho
people in 1920.
Pershing, Harding or Wood will
ha the Republican candidate in
Mask's opinion.
IEI
Paris Papers Again Acclaim Him as World Leader; Fear of the
President's Idealism Overcome; Now Demand
League as Salvation otf the World.
By WILLIAM PHILLIP SIMMS.
Paris, March 15—''Because ot
the attacks to'which he has been
subjected by certain Americans
whose political interests are ex
aggerated nationalism. President
Wilson came back to us dearer to
our hearts than ever."
This sentiment from the pen of
Auricede Walef, editor of the
Paris Midi, tells In a nutshell the
opinion of the average French
man.
Thus, President Wilson enters
the third phase of the peculiar
status of his relations witli the
French people, whose Latin tem
perament has given full sway to
their emotions in the past three
months. When the president ar
rived in December everybody
lauded his sense of justice but
many feared his scheme for the
league of nations was too utopian.
However, he was considered the
Committee of National Defense
Council to Continue Work
Dropped by the United States
Employment Service.
Washington, March 15.—To provide
employment for returned soldiers and
sailors, an emergency committee of the
council of national defense was organ
ized today.
With unemployment again increasing
the committee was believed to be nec
essary because of the 80 per cent re
duction of the United States employ
ment service. It will take over the
soldiers' and sailors' work of the serv
ice.
Appeals were telegraphed today to all
governors and-mayors of the principle
cities and chairmen of all state coun
cils of defense asklg assistance In the
work and suggesting the immediate
opening of state anti municipal employ
ment offices to succeed the one of the
federal government that will be closed
March 33.
TAKE OVER AGENCIES.
The board will take over the 2000
branch agencies of the welfare asso
ciation which have been directed by the
soldiers' and sailors' bureau of the em
ployment service.
"It will be the task of the commit
tee," said the organizations' first state
ment, "to secure the continuance of
every such bureau and establishment
of them in communities where they are
needed."
Colonel Arthur Woods of New York,
Uason officer of the war department
in charge of soldiers' employment, is
chairman of tho committee.
NOTABLES ON BOARD.
Other members are Chairman Hur
ley of the shipping board; Assistant
Secretary of the Navy Roosevelt; Na
than A. Smyth, department of labor;*
G. I. Christie, assistant secretary of ag
riculture; B. S. Cutler, commerce de
partment; S. F. Bush, industrial board;
E. J. Ayers, interior department; El
liott Goodwin, United States chamber
of commerce; Matthew Woll, American
Federation of Labor; Director Clark
son, council of national defense, and
John W. Ilallowell of Boston.
To Operate Aerial Carriers Be
tween Los Angeles and San
Diego and Possibly Across
the Continent in Future.
New York, March 15.—An aerial
passenger service, operating between
I-os Angeles and San Diego and Los
Angeles, Pasadena and Riverside,
which later will be extended to El Paso
and possibly across the continent, will
be in operation by August 1, according
to plans of western promoters and
Wesley A. Hill, announced today.
Hill has placed orders for four
American bombing planes, so altered
as to carry 1 2 passengers and baggage.
A schedule or !>0 minutes for the 120
mile trip between Los Angeles and San
Diego will be maintained. Hill declared.
The fare will he *12.50 for the River
side and *25 for the San Diego trip.
If the route proves popular another
Los Angeles to San Francisco service,
470 miles, will be established. Hill
says.
TO FORCE STOCKS' RETURN.
Rome, March 15—A commission will
go to Austria to compel the return of
170,000 cattle which the Austrians
requisitioned from the invaded terrl
tories, it was announced today.
world's super-thinker and was ap
plauded. Later the league appear
ed to be practical but many feared
that same sense of Justice they
had praised might lead him to be
over-lenient with Germany. His
popularity decreased. Today the
French admit the necessity of
feeding Germany out of sheer
self-protection, while they demand
formation of the league as the
only means for salvation of the
world.
Wilson's principles have won
out to such a degree that the
French press defends him from
the attacks of some of his own
countrymen.
Tlie Temps says the French "re
joice at President Wilson's re
turn," and the Liberté declares,
' the shouts of the people serve as
a reminder to President Wilson
that Paris is faithful to her
friends."
AMENDED LEAGUE IF
SENATEWILLO. K. IT
Defends Opposition of Borah,
Reed and Thomas ; Says Cov
enant Can Be Revised to Ov
ercome Present Objections.
Fort Dodge. Iowa, March 15.—Sena
tor W. S. Kenyon of Iowa. Republican,
has issued his first formal statement
on the league of nations.
While Senator Kenyon favors the
league, he Insists there should be
amendments the proposed constitu
tion before it is ratified by the senate.
Tile question of taking the league now
offered or losing it forever has not
miser, and in Kenyon's opinion, never
will.
Referring lo the activities of Sena
tors, Knox. Borah, Thomas, Reed and
Cummins. Kenyon said:
"Those senators are just as patriotic
as those who denounce them, and far
more. able. Thoy are actuated only by
patriotic motives.
CLARITY NECESSARY.
"Get the peace treaty first and then
discuss the ihague," said Kenyon.
"People have the right to demand that
ambiguous clauses are made made
plain in such a document which af
fects the whole world."
Kenyon urged that the voting power
of tile United. States be increased in
the body of the peace conferences. '
"President Wilson should be praised
for what he has done in helping for
mulate the league plans," added Ken
yon. "I have no patience with those
who are trying to embarrass him,
either for political or other reasons.*'
Kenyon said, however, that Presi
dent Wilson should encourage discus
sion and suggestions on the league.
By L. C. SMITH.
Washington, Mardi 15.—Senator
Kenyon's statement on the league of
nations was received here today with
undisguised satisfaction by those fight
ing the proposed constitution.
Kenyon's statement, declaring for
amendment of the constitution before it
is submitted to the senate for ratifica
tion, was made after he had spent
nearly a week in ills home state. Iowa,
talking to his constituents. Further
than that, Kenyon declined to sign the
"round robin" of the opposition sena
tors. He announced before leaving
Washington that he had not made up
his mind on the proposal and would do
so only after he had gone directly to
his people and got their views.
AS IT NOW STANDS.
The fact that ho now takes the same
stand as the "senate 37" who signed the
round robin indicates, league oppon
ents said, that the sentiment in Iowa
at least Is against the league in its
present form.
"People have a right to demand,"
said Kenyon that ambiguous clauses be
made plain in such a document which
affects the whole world."
This was taken here to mean that
Kenyon's people are demanding that
the league pact's language be cleared
up.
GOTHAM HARBOR STRIKE
ON EVE OF SETTLEMENT
New York, March 15.—The New York
harbor strike dwindled rapidly today
as the boat owners met the men's de
mands for an eight-hour day and high-,
er pay.
According to the estimate of Presi
dent Delahunty of the Marine Work
ers' affiliation. 4000 men were still on
strike this morning. This Is-about 30
per cent of the number that originally
quit. *
Conciliator Hughes today made a
further effort to mediate between the
strikers and private boat owners who
have not yet agreed to the union terms.
FAMOUd ACTRE8S ILL.
Cleveland, Ohio March 16—Lauretta
Taylor, actress, is, seriously 111 with
Influenza, her husband, J. Hartley
Manners, announced today.
DUBLIN MAYOR
FEARS REVOLT
SOON TO VISIT
EMERALD ISLE
Says Situation Most Serious
With People Constantly
Stirred by Continued Pres
ence of British Soldiers.
FEARS AMERICA LOSING
SYMPATHY WITH IRISH
Cites Wilson's Refusal to Visit
Ireland as Rebuff; Taxpay
ers Strike One Form of Pro
test Now Considered.
By RALPH COUCH.
(Copyright 1919 by United Press)
New York, March 15.—Foreseeing
possible bloody revolution, the one pub
lic official in Dublin who has the con
fidence of all factions is trying to unito
the various Irish political elements In
some form of colonial home rule.
That man is Laurence O'Neil, lord
mayor of Dublin. He was recently in
augurated for his third term. This is
unusual, as custom long ago decreed
tho lord mayor could serve but one
term.
Although I went to the Mansion
house to interview O'Neil just before
leaving Dublin a fortnight ago. I soon
found that I was being interviewed in
stead.
'Is America against us?" he asked
immediately.
"That is the only interpretation I can
put on the failure of President Wilson
to acknowledge the Invitation to come
to Ireland."
SERIOUS SITUATION.
When asked to give his view of con
ditions in Ireland, he said:
"The situation Is most serious. The
feelings of the people are stirred by the
continual presence here of thousands
of soldiers. Nobody knows what will
happen and everybody fears the worst.
The military rule is severe. Men are
arrested and imprisoned, often without
trial. Nearly 100 are in English pris
ons. (Reports have since been re
ceived in this country that these pris
oners are being released.)
"America, we are hoping, will use
her Influence to help us better our con
dition. But if the Americans have lost
their sympathy for us, I don't know
what will happen."
In appearance O'Neil is not at all
what imagination pictures the wearer
of the gold chain of a lqrd mayor's of
fice. He is small and thick-set, not
big and pompous. He speaks with a
slight musical brogue and there is a
continual look of weariness in his eyes.
His friends say he works longer hours
than any man in Dublin. He sometimes
makes appointments as early as 7
o'clock in the morning. Visitors are
not infrequent at the Mansion house
at night after dinner.
DIFFICULT POSITION.
O'Neil is credited with having made
the big yellow Mansion house the
"only free building in Dublin."
"My position has been difficult be
cause I had to please so ma"y ele
ments,' lie explained. "My duty has
been one of pouring oil on troubled
waters.- Any group can meet here no
matter what their political opinions.
"It seems as if everybody comes here
at least once a (lay to protest against
something. Perhaps some day the
Irish won't have to protest continu
ally. Meanwhile, we are sitting on the
lid, nobody knows when it will blow
off."
A tax payers strike is one form of
direct action now being considered by
the Sinn Eeln national council, di
recting revolutionary tactics in Ire
land.
This is one of several measures
short of open rebellion which the Sinn
Feiners will call tho world's atten
tion to what they call "Britain's army
of 200,000 bayonets accupyiug Ire
land."
Leaders say the strike will be
adopted as a national Sinn Fein policy
If the party is successful in winning
majorities In the county councils at
the local elections in June.
ANTI-TAX CAMPAIGN.
Under the strike plan, the national
council would begiu a country-wide
campaign to persuade all Irishmen
not to pay taxes. The cmmcil would
issue a general appeal to this effect.
The appeal would be followed up by
solicitations to tax payers directed
through the 1900 Sinn Fein clubs scat
tered throughout Ireland with their
750,000 membership.
The government would soon find it
almost impossible to collect taxes on
real property, it is believed. Liens on
furniture and other effects would be
wasted in legal action, leaders say.
The furniture could not be sold to pay
the indebtedness, they predict.
"No Irish auctioneer would consent
to act at such rates," sa\d a Sinn Fein
leader.
"Then Irish laborers would refuse to
remove the sold goods to the wharves
and Irish sailors would refuse to carry
it on their ships. England soon would
find herself without tho mllions of
pounds sterling that she now squeezes
' out of Ireland."
HM M TOTAL 0FT.4I9.3IK
Washington, March 15—Demob
ilization of the American army
now stands at 1,419,386, the office
of the chief of staff announced
today.
The demobilization work has
been slowed up, a table shows but
this is due, It was said to the
fact that nearly all the men in
this country except those needed to
maintain the camps have been dis
charged. This week's total of de
mobilization of 34,031 is the small
est of any week since November
23. Future demobilization work,
it was stated, depends now almost
entirely on the rapidity with
which men are returned from
overseas. Orders issued November
11 for demobilization approximat
ed 1,678,500, showing that all but
about 250,000 of the number are
now back to civilian life. The
original orders included 1,305,000
EMILE GÖTTIN, PREMIER
CLEMENCEAU ASSAILANT,
WILL BE EXECUTED SOON
Young Anarchist Givsn Death Sentence
After Brief Trial; Realized What
Waa Coming.
Paris, March 15.—Emile Cottln,
under sentence of death for shoot
ing Premier Clemenceau, probably
will be executed within 15 days, it
was announced today.
The young anarchist was con
victed and sentenced late yester
day after a trial lasting but a few
hours. He was pale and nervous
throughout the proceedings, but
declared during his examination
that had he escaped he might have
made another attempt on the pre
mier's life.
He admitted he was "filled with
emotion" the day of the ehooting,
saying that only a lunatic would
have failed to show emotion at
such a time, "especially as I real
ized what was coming to me after
ward."
A great crowd attended the trial
which began shortly after noon.
Cottin was In the chargo of four
republican guards.
OFFICER DENIES EVER
Major Browne, Said to Have
Wired Money to Victim's
Companion, Vigorously Dis
claims Knowledge of Girl.
San P'rnncisco, March 15.—Denial
that he even knew Miss Inez Elizabeth
Reed, army nurse here, found dead in
San Mateo last week, was telegraphed
to police today from Fort Riley, Kan.,
by Major Charles H. Browne, 164th
depot brigade, according to detectives.
This followed a statement by a girl
accompanying the nurse here from
Kansas, that she exchanged telegrams
with a Major Browne, who telegraphed
her $75. The dead girl frequently
mentioned an attentive major in her
letters to friends. Major Browne is
said to publish a newspaper at Horton,
Kan., and is the nephew of Ewing Her
bert, owner of several newspapers in
northeastern Kansas and a livestock
paper in St. Joseph, Mo., say the po
lice.
A board of army officers is working
on the case today.
That Miss Reed met her death by a
criminal operation was the verdict of
the coroner's jury last night.
LOW MERCURY AND SNOW
PREDICTED COMING WEEK
Washington, March 15—Forecast
for the period March 17 to 22, in
clusive:
Rocky mountains and northwest
—northern Rocky mountaine and
plateau regions: Low temperature
greater pert of tho coming weak
with much uneattlac weather and
occaeional enow.
Southern Rocky mountain and
plataau regions: Low tempera
ture during coming week; raina
and anowe probable firat part of
weak and generally fair weather
thereafter.
Pacifio coaet states: Frequent
raine probable during the coming
waok with temperature balow nor
mal. .
THE WEATHER
Forecast for Boise and vicinity—
RAIN OR SNOW TONIGHT AND
SUNDAY. >
For Idaho—Rain or snow tonight or
Sunday.
Highest temperature yesterday.... 47
Lowest temperature this morning.. 33
Mean temperature yeaterday...... 40
troops In the United* States and
373,500 overseas men.
1074 ON NEW JERSEY.
Newport News, Va., March 15—
The battleship New Jersey arrived
here today with the 412th tele
graph battalion complete; casual
Companys from Virginia, Illinois.
Mississippi, Texas, Oklahoma and
Nebraska. The total aboard was
1074.
'115th ON HIGH SEAS.
Washington, March 15—The 115th
field artillery sailed from Havre
March 13 on the Köningen der
Niederlanden, war department
cables said today. It is due to
reach Newport News on the 23rd.
The 105th ammunition train al
so sailed on the Nederlanden, be
sides headquarters motor battalion
company A, B, C and D, medi
cal and ordnance detachments.
IE COII
INTO FEDERAL TILL;
Reports Reveal Unusually Large
Number of Taxpayers Disre
gard Installment Privileges;
Many Tangles Are Presented.
Washington, March 15.—Approxi
mately *2,000,000,000 in federal income
taxes will be in the hands of revenue
collectors tonight, treasury officials ex
pect.
If only one-fourth of the estimated
tax, assessed by the new revenue laws
were paid in, the payments to midnight
would exceed *1,600,000,000.
But reports from every collector dis
close an unusually large number of
taxpayers are disposing of their feder
al taxes without taking advantage of
installment privileges.
NOT ALL IN TILL.
Although a *2,000,000,000 payment Is
believed certain, it does not mean the
government will have that sum in its
coffers. There were more than *800,
000,000 In treasury certificates of in
debtedness Issue with the privilege of
redemption in tax payments. Many and
perhaps all of these will be turned back
to the treasury, according to officials.
Reports received early today indi
cate that collectors were doing a bar
gain-day business. Nearly every col
lector some time during the past week
has advised the bureau of revenue that
he has been forced to expand his office
force. They were unable to handle the
late payments promptly, advices state.
PUZZLING PROBLEMS.
To add to the difficulties of 11th
hour payments, the number of puzzles
arising out of the present law appar
ently have Increased as the time limits
draw near. It was officially predicted
here that the number of specific cases
coming before the bureau for decision
would be at least 4 per cent larger
than »Inder the old law.
These, of course, aid in slowing up
collections and will cause congestion In
every revenue office until the strike
of 12 tonight, it was said.
BRADYSTILL AFTER IT
Pocatello Promoter to Offer
Rickard $160,000 for Wil
lard-Dempsey Fight.
Pocatello, Idaho, March 15—Robb
Brady, millionaire son of former
United States Senator Brady, is still
after the Dempsy-Wlllard light.
Today Brady wired Tex Rickard,
asking him to consent to a long ilis
tance talk from New York •> Salt
]*ake with Brady and Fred ltulse, once
Rickard's partner.
They will ask Rickard under what
conditions he will consent to staging
the Wlllard-Dempsey match as a 20
iround fight tn Pocatello. Brady Is
prepared to offer *160,000 to buy the
fight outright and is prepared, he
says, to raise a cool quarter million
if necessary.
Brady left at noon for Salt Lake.
REPORTS U. S. FOOD SHIP
HITS MINE OFF SCOTLAND
Washington, March 16—The shipping
board's vessel. Yselhaven, with a cargo
of food, is reported to have struck a
floating mine north of Scotland, Ad
miral Sims stated today in a dispatch
to the navy department. No details are
yet available.
The vessel left Baltimore for London
Feb. 18. The ship was of 3558 gross
tons.
i
NATIOH LEAGUE
TO BE PART OF
PEACE TREATY,
WILSON CABLES
Tumulty Announces Paris Con
ferees Definitely Decide the
Question; President Officially
Informed of Progress.
EVERY MOMENT IS FILLED
WITH A RUSH OF ACTIVITY
Wilson Confers With Lloyd
George and Clemenceau, Then
With Mrs. Wilson Calls at
President Poincare's Home.
New York, March 15 —The coun
cil at Paris haa definitely decided
that the league of nations is to bo
part of the peace treaty, Joseph P.
Tumulty, secretary to Präsident
Wilson, announetd today. He de
clared the president had se oabled
him.
Secretary Tumulty's statement was
made with reference to reports that the
league would not be Included In the
peace treaty. Tumulty's statement fol
lows:
"I cabled direct to the president at
Paris, asking him If there was any
truth In these reports and I am this
.morning in receipt of a cable from the
president stating that the plenary
council has positively decided the
league is to be part of the peace treaty;
that there Is absolutely no truth in any
report to the contrary."
By CARL D. GROAT.
Paris, March 15—President Wilson
today was expected to »irge Inclusion
of the league of nations In the preli
minary peace treaty with Germany. It
was understood he believes that such
a course not only is possible but ad
visable.
The president's attitude In this re
gard was to he made known. It was
understood, either at an Informal
meeting this noon or at the session of
the supreme war council, called for 3
o'clock this afternoon. At the noon
meeting he was to be officially ac
quainted with progress made in the
pence work during his absence.
Despite the activities of the various
committees while he was away, his
return has given new impetus to every
department of the peace conference
owing to the fact that settlement of
many questions was contingent on his
judgment and leaders were more hope
ful than ever today that the prelimi
nary treaty would be ready for sub
mission to the Germans beginning
March 20 and 22.
TO SOUND OPINIONS.
Under this rule there will be an
early meeting of the league of na
tions committee of which Wilson Is
chairman and .various nationalities, in
cluding neutrals, will be sounded for
suggestions and ideas.
It is pointed out that he does not
expect the complete structure of tha
league to be created at once but It is
understood he favors adoption of the
present constitution with minimum of
amendments as a foundation.
The meeting of the supreme council
this afternoon was called for the pur-'
pose of discussing military terms otj
the treaty, preparatory to drawing up
the complete pact next week.
The president did not have an idle
moment from the time he arrived hero
yesterday noon until he retired. Pre
mier Lloyd Gearge was waiting at the
Wilsons' new residence in the Place
des Etats Nnis. Their conference last
ed until 2 o'clock.
CONSULT CLEMENCEAU.
Both spent 45 minutes at lunch and
then hurried to the Hotel Grillon
where they conferred with Premier
Clemenceau until 5:30. Then the presi
dent. accompnnied by Mrs. Wilson,
i called on President and Madam Poin
care, after which they returned lo their
residence for dinner.
Great crowds gathered outside the
Crillon before Wilson's arrival. They
cheered him when he entered then
waited patiently until he emerged
r.early three hours later with Premier
Clemenceau when he was given an
other ovation. Lloyd George, who ap
peared later, also was cheered.
PARIS EDITOR SAYS HUN
ACCEPTS DEMAND THAT
FLEET BE TURNED OVER
Paris, March 15—L'lntrasigeant
said today tt understands the eco
nomic negotiations at Brussels
have been concluded and that the
Germans signed the allies eco
nomic demands.
Dispatches received here yester
day said the allied economic coun
cil had presented its program,
permitting the Germans to make
Interrogations for clarification of
Its provisions but refusing to dis
cuss them with the enemy repre
sentatives. The allied prograni
provides for Immediate food ship
ments Into Germany, continuing
until the new German crops are
available in August. In return,
the Germans will surrender their
merchant fleet, the rental of which
will be applied on payments for
*he food.

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