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Evening capital news. (Boise, Idaho) 1901-1927, March 16, 1919, Image 2

Image and text provided by Idaho State Historical Society

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn88056024/1919-03-16/ed-1/seq-2/

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HUI PIECE
{Open* Short Boute to Great
Payette Lakes on Easy
Grade and Through Scenic
Wonderland.
COUNTIES TO HELP BUILD
State Appropriates $76,000
Forest Service $87,500 and
Counties Through Which
Boad Buns Will Build Sec
tions.
What ia regarded as one of the most
Important pieces of road construction
1 b southern Idaho to be started this
year Is the Star-McCall highway, run
ning through Ada, Gem and Valley
counties to the great Fayette lakes, the
summer playground of southern Idaho
residents.
An appropriation of 175,000 for this
highway was made by the legislature
and the bill was signed by Governor
Davis. Added to this amount the for
est service will expend 187,500. Valley
county has agreed to expend 125,000 to
build that portion of the road running
from a point near Smith's Ferry
through Round Valley. Gem county is
expected to bear the expense of putting
the road from the Valley county line
to the Ada county line In as fine shape
as the highway and it will be up to
Ada county to bring up to standard the
road between Star and the Gem county
line, a distance of some nine miles,
TO ESTABLISH EASY GRADE.
The completion of the work will mean
• that a road with a maximum grade of
less than six per cent wljl be opened
through one of the most scenic sec
tions of southern Idaho, the great tim
bered belt of the Payette river valley,
the rich agricultural section of Round
and Long valleys to the prosperous
town of McCall on the shores of Pay
ette lakes.
The actual point of construction for
the new highway will begin four miles
West of Horseshoe Bend, which Is the
dividing county line between Gem and
Valley counties. The highway will
be built along the beautiful Payette
river to Smith's Ferry on a water
grade. The cost of construction of this
portion of the highway, according to
Surveys and estimates made, Is 5200,
000. It is learned that the share to be
contributed for the construction by the
forest service exceeds the amount ap
propriated by the legislature.
CUT8 DOWN DISTANCE.
The highway Is one which has long
been In contemplation and for which
surveys have been made. It will make
B direct connection with the north and
south highway, cutting the distance
from Ada and Canyon county to the
northern section of Idaho some 70 miles
over the route of the regular highway,
which will bo so valuable to the resi
dents of the southwestern portion of
the state.
The distance from Star to McCall 1*
approximately 130 miles, which on
grade of six per cent can be run at
a pace of 20 miles an hour, easy go
ing thus making a trip from Star to
Payette lakes of six and one-half hours
and not over seven hours from Boise,
Caldwell or Nampa.
By leaving Boise early In the morn
ing autolsts can easily be into the pine
tree country before the heat of the day
and have a cool beautiful drive to the
lakes. It Is predicted that the road will
be one of the most popular of any In
the state.
There have been many strong boost
ers for thlb highway and It was largely
through their persistent effort# in keep
ing its need before the public that won
the appropriations for Its construction.
These men are E. K. Hayes of Emmet,
'Cbm.'R.&Peaey.
Upon his Last Trip
again carried several
HOWARD
WATCHES
I evidence of their most remarkable eccurscy,
rreeoeetlre of atmospheric conditions. In tbe
walks of life they hare given perfect
m ans generation to another.
__jhow yon these
optional Timepieces
Howard uwnera are .yplcally leading
Cltlaona. Mon of affairs—big In com
(parce. Industry, finance and profes
sions—fancy The Howard because of
Its beautiful Unes and 76:year-o!d rep
ntaUpns
Howard models typify periods of mas
ter designers—the Augustan, Victorian,
Tudor—designs that * please ths dis
criminating.
iWaTl be pleased to show thorn.
J. T. LAUGHLIN
JEWELER
Quality-Service
fee
Harry C. Bhellworth of Boise, Mark
Bates of McCall, Bert Venable of Cas
cade, Elmer Davis of Horseshoe Bend
and Pete Cruzen of Donnelly.
FILES SUIT TO CURB DRY
LAW BAN ON BREWERIES
New York, March 15.—Joseph E. Ev
erhard of Plalntleld, N. J., filed suit In
United Status district court here to
day asking an Injunction to prevent
the James Everard breweries, of which
he Is a stockholder, from going out of
business May 1, as a result of "war
time" prohibition laws. In addition to
alleging that the law Is unconstitution
al, Everard contends that beer con
taining only 2Ü alcohol such as man
ufactured by the defendant, cannot be
classed ns an Intoxicant. The entire
text of the armistice Is appended to the
bill of complaint as an "exhibit." Eli
hu Root is chief counsel for the com
plainant.
FRISCO TONG WAR ENDED;
HIP SENS PAY INDEMNITY
San Francisco, March 15.—Peace
again reigns in Chinatown. Heads of
the "Six Companies" today announced
that the Bing Kong-Hip Sen Tong
trouble, which threatened a bloody tong
war, has been settled by the Hip Sens
paying an indemnity.
Settlement of the trouble is regard
ed as a great victory for the peace-lov
ing faction in Chinatown. These men
believe tong wars are forever ended
hero.
Grant Transferred to Command
of Washington Navy Yard;
Wiley to Head Fleet.
Washington, March 15—Vice Ad
miral A. W. Grant, who has been
commanding battleship force Number
1 of the Atlantic fleet, has been trans
ferred to command of the Washngton
navy yard and gun factory.
Captain Adthur I* Waillard, present
commandant of the yard, has been as
signed to command the new battle
ship New Mexico, succeeding Captain
Bostwick.
Rear Admiral H. E. Wiley, will be
the new commander of battleship force
Number 1 of the Atlantic fleet.
Rear Admiral A. F. Fechteler who has
been commandant of the Norfolk navy
yard has been made commandant of
the fifth naval district which Includes
Norfolk.
(Continued From Page One.)
ting up some of the claims and ad
justing some of the minor boundary
agreements, one official stated.
With the light thrown on the peace
treaty situation today, It would ap
pear that President Wilson would be
ready to return to the United States
with the final treaty for senate rati
fication about the middle of May. The
extra session of congress, therefore,
may be called early that month and
the fight over the league of nations Is
expected to begin immediately.
Tho president's course, according to
his friends, will be to take a short
rest upon his return and Immediately
thereafter start out ton a campaign di
rect to the people for support of the
league covenant as part of the treaty
proper.
(Continued From Page One.)
food stored In Europe to begin revic
tualing Germany, which will receive
eupplles at the rate of 270,000 tons a
month.
ONLY CERTAIN EXPORT8.
German exports will be confined to
raw materials, such as coal, potash
and certain dyestuffs. She will not
be permitted to export manufactured
articles because of the unfair commer
clal advantage this will give her over
France and Belgium, whoso factories
she deliberately destroyed. In return.
Germany will turn over practically her
entire merchant fleet. Most of these
ships ^jl be used to repatriate Amerl
can and British cotanlal troops. On
their return trips, It Is believed, they
will bring back food for Germany. The
rental of these ships will be applied on
food payments'. The balance will
come from the money obtained through
exports, and If thlH la not sufficient,
from Germany's gold reserve.
Meanwhile the peace conference Is
setting a rapid pace In an effort to
perfect the preliminary treaty In time
for submission to the enemy the last
of next week or first of the next.
NEUTRA L8 TO CONVENE.
A conference of neutral representa
tive# has been set for Thursday, at
which returns will be reserved for
amendments to the league of nations
covenant. In case It le decided to In
corporate the covenant In the prelimi
nary treaty, the Germans may not be
called to Versailles before next Tues
day or Wednesday, at the earliest.
Several questions affecting the boun
daries of allied states are still far from
Settlement, but all allied matters will
be shoved temporarily aside If they
Interfere with the progress of drawing
up the preliminary treaty. Within
few days after the German treaty Is
signed, according to semi-official an
nouncement, separate treaties will be
presented to Asstrla, Bulgaria and
Turkey.
LAURETTE TAYYOR IMPROVED.
Cleveland, Ohio, March 16.—Pbyst
clans attending Laurette Taylor, ac
tress, who Is suffering from an attack
of 8panlsh Influenza, tonight an
nounced ths actress' condition Is much
Improved.
the
A.
In
DUIUNTWINSSIliri
M 1 CUI 1 OUSE
MGIMM
One Driver Killed and Another
Narrowly Escapes Death ;
Hearne Finishes Second,
Lecocq Third; Winner Never
Headed.
Santa Monica, Cal., March 15.—Cliff
Durant, in a Chevrolet, driving a con
sistent race from the start. In which he
never lost the lead, won the Santa
Monica road race here today.
His time was three hours, four min
utes and 45 seconds, the average being
81.26 miles per hour.
Of the field of 16 carkssyh'ch started
only eight were on the track when Du
rant finished.
W. Melcher, who substituted for
Christenson, who had been killed, Ros
coe Sarles was put out of the race and
narrowly escaped death. Engine'and
other, mechanical troubles had disqual
ified the others. *
Eddie Hearne, driving a race which
was little less brilliant than that of
Durant, finished second, little more
than a lap behind Durant.
DE PALMA 8ETS MARK.
Hearne's time was 3:11:59. Like Du
rant, be had maintained position in
the race from the opening lap. Lecocq
in a whirlwind finish came under the
tape third. He held that position for
most of the race, although at different
times he had been passed by Elliott and
Toft.
Prior to the start of the road race.
De Palma, driving his Packard special,
made aa exhibition drive over the 7.34
mile course. His speed averaged 92.7
miles an hour.
Eddie Pullen finished fourth. Early
In tli' race he was nearly put out of
the rt lining when his Hudson special
caught fire. He extinguished this,
however, and picked up enough speed
to get in on the money.
Following Pullen, Frank Elliott (Mil
ler special), Omar Toft (Ascot special),
W. W. Brown (Richards special) and
Eddie Kaster (Duesenberg special) fin
ished In the order named.
DIES IN HOSPITAL.
Al Melcher, who piloted a Duesen
berg special in the race, is a brother of
W. Melcher, San Francisco chauffeur,
who was killed. The latter took the
place of Christianson as a Hudson spe
cial driver, just before the race. His
car overturned on the sharp turn at
the Sawtelle end of the track and skid
ded over 50 feet before it crashed into
a telegraph pol# and stopped. Melcher,
who remained at the wheel, died of
skull fracture soon after reaching a
hospital. His mechanician was unin
jured.
Sarles' Roamer crashed into a fence
on Its second lap, smashing a rear
wheel, but leaving the driver slightly
bruised. He later re-entered the race
but was unable to overcome the lead
of his rivals.
TWO BOYS SENTENCED
TO INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL
AND ONE IS PAROLED
Antone Hinkey, aged 15 years, and
Stanley Jones, a youth over 14, were
sentenced to the Idaho industrial train
ing school at St. Anthony Satusday
afternoon by Judge D. T. Miller. Glen
Stewart, a third boy, was put on pa
role and placed In the custody of his
father.
The trio, who had a hearing In the
juvenile court, were the boys who, on
Thursday night, entered the Sutton
grocery store. They |had espied
barred window in the rear, removed
the screws at a convenient time and
arranged all details for breaking into
the store and helping themselves to
merchandise.
All three of them confessed to being
the leaders of the boys who annoyed
A. A. Wilson, an aged man, broke the
windows In his house and tore up his
board walk.
VLADIVOSTOK SCENE OF
MANY HUGE ROBBERIES
Washington, March 15.—Big rob
beries have been of frequent occurrence
In Vladivostok during the lest week,
according to state department advices.
Securities valued at nearly two and a
half billion rubles were taken from the
offices of the leading co-operative as
soclatlons there and a gang of armed
robbers obtained 260,000 rubles and
other securities by blowing up a safe
in broad daylight.
KILLS 8POUSE, 8LAY8 SELF.
Duluth, Minn., March 15.—In a fit
of Insanity Aaron Llndstrom, 66, killed
his wife with a flatiron and slashed
his own throat with a raior. Thalr
children found the bodies upon return
lng from school Friday evening.
Hair On Face
De^IUraefe
rsrjsnc
VMCtT <W
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______
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tsMB.as l> »L — —
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F REE keek
Vr—Wrtsi
KfïL-LTSSL.
why It
$5,000,000 DAMAGE DONE
TO FLORIDA TOMATO CROP
Miami, Fla., March 15.—Damage es
timated at 15,000.000 was dons to ths
tomato crop on the east coast of Flor
ida by a heavy rainstorm during ths
last 24 hours, It was estimated today.
Practically the entire crop was ruined.
Considerable damage resulted In the
city of Miami. Wood paving blocks in
the business district Were torn away
and the downtown section resembled a
lake.
iff*
TEN-POUND BABE BORN TO
SLEEP-SICKNESS WOMAN
Murpheysboro, III., March 15.—The
three weeks' sleep of Mrs. Thomas De
Witt, "sleeping sickness" patient, was
disturbed just ÿmg enough to give
birth to a 10-pound baby today.
Mrs. DeWitt sank back Into the leth
argy and all efforts to rouse her again
have failed. The child was born in
perfect health.
NIPPON TO REFUSE
(Continued from Page One.)
plain language by some of Its authors.
Sines Japan has expressly de
clared she will not ratify ths league
until an anti-racs discrimination
clause is embodied in its constitu
tion, it io obvious that no such con
stitution can be agreed upon, and
not boing agreed upon by tho Unit
ed 8tates and Japan, oannot be
given effect."
8ENATOR KING ANTI-LEAGUER.
Senator King of Utah, Democrat, de
clared that "If Japan Insists upon rad
ical equality In Immigration It simply
means that the United States or Japan
will not be signatories to the peace
pact. In my opinion American labor
will never submit to the Indiscriminate
admission of orientals—Hindoos, Chi
nese and Japanese. Japan cannot be
blamed 4 for insistence, because this
question closely touches her honor. The
whole situation clearly indicates the
urgent necessity for making peace Im
mediately and leaving for later deter
mination the decision of forming some
International league to avert war. This
would not necessarily be a league of
nations, as we have come to under
stand the term. But there should be
provided an International tribunal of
arbitration to decide International dis
putes."
King today announced that until the
league constitution Is amended he will
ote against It.
MUST BE MODIFIED.
I was a pioneer In the movement
for a league," said King.
More than 10 years ago 1 toured my
state, organizing clubs favoring a world
organization to insure peace. Then, as
now, the people were for It. They say
If there was a panacea for war they
wanted It. But with this concrete pro
posal before them, they ara analyzing
It and finding so much In It that Is
dangerous and objectionable, that they
will Insist on its modification. Unless
it is modified In several important par
ticulars I cannot vote Tor It."
Senator Jones, Washington, em
phatically declared that the American
worker will not agree to a compact
opening the doors to Japanese immi
gration.
As I read the remarks of Viscount
Ishil," said Jones, "the demand of Ja
pan Is that In the very constitution of
the league there be a provision which
will obliterate our laws restrictive of
Immigration from the far east.
The opponents of tho league were
very wise when they demanded that the
proposed compact be scrutinized close
ly, so that there should be revealed
just what It means. They predicted
that this question of immigration from
the Asiatic nations would arise. The
supporters of the league, however, in
sisted-that the Immigration laws of the
United States are purely domestic and
would not come within the league's
jurisdiction. It would seem that they
were wrong in their estimate of the sit
uation.
As a body, I believe American labor
has been standing for the league, but
when It understands this Immigration
matter I do not believe it will support
the proposal."
IT
Local Advertising Man Named
by A. B. Eaton to Boost Sale
of War Savings Stamps.
Allen B. Eaton, state director of war
savings for Idaho, has just announced
the appointment of William H. P. Hill
as state publicity director of the state.
Mr. Hill had charge of the adver
tising for Ada county during the Lib
erty loans and United war work cam
paigns.
In speaking ot the plans for contln
ulng the work of the war savings, Mr.
Hill said: "1 am convinced that the
people of Idaho have learned to appre
elate and understand ths value of tho
method of war savings ,and I am sure
will avail themselves of this patriotic,
safe and easy means of providing
against the possibility of that inevita
ble rainy day."
Just aa soon as a detailed plan can
be worked out every corner of the state
will be linked up with a comprehen
sive scheme of publicity that will have
for.its purpose not only tho making of
Idaho's quota but in perpetuating the
benefits of practical thrift among all
her people.
ACCIDENT, NOT MARRIAGE.
Bt. Paul, Minn., March 16 .—One in
come taxor today wanted to pay bis
26 cents tax In four Installments.
Another, whan asked if he was mar'
rled, replied:
"No; I got this black eye la an auto
mobile accident."
M and 28 are tho tetepheno number*
of Ths Sapital News. tf
would
ist a fortune
to brine/ the areatest
artists into your home
You would have to pay thousands of
dollars to get these great artists to come
to your home and entertain you; Caruso,
de Gogorza, De Luca, Farrar, Galli-Curpi,
Garrison, Gluck, Jascha Heifetz, Homer, Kreisler, Martinelli,
McCormack, Melba, Paderewski, Ruffo, Schumann-Heink, Scotti,
Sembrich, Tetrazzini, Werrenrath, Zimbalist and others.
But with a Victrola in your home you can hear them all, and
as often as you like, just as though they were actually in your
presence—so life-like are their Victor Records.
Why not get your Victrola now, and begin to enjoy its pleas
ures today ? We arrange deferred payments, if desired.
Victrol a
SAMPSON MUSIC COMPANY
Exclusive Boise Victrola Dealers
913 Main 8t. Sampson Bldg.
Phone 252
3
BOISE LYCEUM COURSE, PINNEY THEATER MARCH 17, APRIL 15 AND 23
MISS M'GOY RESIGNS
Dean of Women of Lewiston
Normal to Enter Community
War Work.
The resignation of Miss Bernice Mc
Coy, as dean of women at the state
normal school at Lewiston to take a
position with the community war serv
ice, was announced Saturday by Dr. E
A. Bryan, state commissioner of edu
cation. Miss McCoy takes up her new
work April 1. She is widely known
over the state as former superintend
ent of public instruction.
It was also announced by Dr. Bryan
that C. Richardson, an architect
Moscow, had been selected as architect
for the new administration building to
be built at the Lewiston normal. He
will move to Lewiston to supervise con
struction work which Is to commence
soon. The plans will be reviewed by
the state board of education at Its
meeting here March 24.
The presidents of the four state ed
ucational institutions will meet with
the state board. Evan Evans, chair
man of he. boarrf, will probably not be
present. He Is now In California visit
ing relatives.
COMMISSIONERS DIVIDE
SCHOOL DISTRICT NO. 47
INTO THREE DISTRICTS
School district No. 47, one of the
largest districts In the county, border
ing on the Canyon, county line, was
carved Saturday afternoon by the
county commissioners and made InU
three separate districts. The action
was taken upon a petition of a large
number of patrons whose children were
obliged to go from three and one-half
miles to five and one-half miles to
attend the Highltne school, situated
but a half mile from the Canyon coun
ty line.
That portion formed out of the
northeast section of the old district
will be known as district No. 6S. Im
mediately upon Its formation Miss
Laura V. Paine, county superintendent,
named W. R. Green, Leonard Sundell
and E. G. Feebler, trustees of the
district.
The other district has not yet been
numbered nor the trustees named.
New schoolhouses will be built In both
districts.
WILL EMPLOY HUDSON BAY
METHODS IN BALKAN TRADE
San Francisco, March 16.—The old
Hudson Bay method of trading with
the Indians is to be used In the Balkan
countries by J. Chapman, a New York
importer. Chapman Is here today se
curing an assignment of shoes .and
stockings to be taken to Bulgaria and
Asia Minor—America's first trade
shipment there since the armistice
signing.
As there Is little money In these dis
tricts Chapman will accept tobacco and
raw silk In payment for the footwear.
Detroit. Mich.—Useless signs pasted
on a great mass of Iron weighing
about twenty tons lyihg in a yard is
tbs following: "Don't carry away,"
7m
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mA BmUm. iBtfcl m «**• ylUfe Fla^Iy-I
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unlMt
W7 tuly JRNt
om KlfSLAlt
It It the wondét remedy for gout, lumbago and rheumatism.
Accept no substitutes. It your druggist cannot supply you,
you can get this wonder remedy from the manufacturer,
f 1.90 par bottle.
H. E. MACHOL
RHSUMACHOL LABORATORIES, Idaho Springs, Colorado
■▼err battis seid nndrr a gvaraatee.
ANNOUNCEMENT
Mesdames Blanche Spofford and L. M. Hasbrouck are
pleased to announce that on Tuesday, March 18th, they
will open an up-to-date
JUVENILE SHOP
at 309 North 8th Street, opposite the postoffice.
This new shop will fill a long felt want in this city,
and surrounding country, particularly, as it will make a
specialty of made-to-order garments for the little tot and
growing miss.
The public is invited to visit this new institution.
TO THE MAN
WITH
MODERATE MEANS
Use Hawks* Ventilating Gas Radi
ator.
Fuel only burned when heat Is
needed: small Initial outlay; heat
Instantly available day or night; all
at the touch of a match.
BOISE QAS,
LIGHT A OOKE OO.
211 N. 10th
-L
aEHJŒ~NW3TN2E
THE HOME OP
HART 80HAFFNER * MARX
Good Cloths» MB Main St.
Household Goods
for Sale
Wilton rugs, Ivory bedroom set, tap
estry chair, baby bed, porch furniture,
Jewel coal range In excellent condition,
refrigerator, and miscellaneous kitchen
utensils.
J. L. DRI80OLL
1721 WA8HINQTON
Phone 920- R.
CITY DY| NOMS
Best equipped in the state: all kinds
of clothes Cleaned, Dyad, Repaired and
Pressed. Phones 44 and IMS.

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