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Evening capital news. (Boise, Idaho) 1901-1927, April 11, 1919, Image 1

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400^000 Train and Engine Men_Granted Large 'Wage Increases
ALL THE NEWS
FIRST
VOL. XLII.
EVENING CAPITAL NEWS
WEATHER
Fair tonight and Sat
urday.
BOISE, IDAHO, FRIDAY, APRIL 11, 1919
No. 87
OPEN WAY FOli NATIONALS TO TRY FORMER ME RULER
$15 TO $53.30 A
MONTH, $1.31 TO
$1.53 A DAY IS
ADDED TO PAYS
Director Hines Announces Wage
Increase to Railroad Workers
Retroactive to Jan. 1 ; Over
time Decision Held Up.
TO READJUST '-OBVIOUS
INJUSTICE," HINES SAYS
Dining and Sleeping Car Em
ployes Case Still Under Con
sideration; R. R. Police
Raised Four Weeks Ago.
Washington, April 11 — (United
is) —Train find onginemen on lines
of the mit loivil railways today were
grunted unother increase In wages by
Director General Hin . The order af
fects more than 400,000 employes and
the increases are i" troaetive to Janu
ary I. Claims of the employes for time
and a half for overtime in road ser
vices' was left to a bi-partisan board
for decision.
Practically completing the "war
cycle" of wage advances, Hines
gave the four great railroad broth
erhoods increases ranging from
$15 to $53.30 for men paid by the
month and from $1.31 to $1.53 for
men paid on a day basis, over
their 1917 wage scales.
TO RIGHT INJUSTICES.
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The a
dv
anc
es h
re designed to read
just "obvious
in ju
isiices''; wrought bv
the ge
nei
pa 1
ad\
ance granted rail
workers
; May
25,
1918. Claims of tlie
conduct'
ors
, tr
ainmen. firemen and on
gineors
ha
Lve
been pending since last
Decenib
or.
L
'onsr
deration of the case
has ore
til tied
the
time of the railroad
adminis
t ra
tion \vu
go board since the
firm of
th
e y
oar i
$vhen the hearings
ended.
Only ;
in
api
uoxii
mate estimate of the
ridded l
>ur
den
of
expense which will
accrue l
a rc
■SUll
of the increases was
obtainn)
>le
by
rail
road offici i y. They
estimati
thn
t if
increases sought by
the trni
in
am
l en.
ginemen and sleep
ii.g car
er
npl
oyes
and railroad police
Ik d her
n
in
effet
:t under last year's
conditio
th(
* a dt
litional advances on
these amo:
LI 111:
* WO
uld total about $67,
&00.000 annually.
TWO CLASSES LEFT OUT.
With the disposition of the brother
hoods' claims for readjustment of wage
scales, only two relatively small
classes of railroads remain to be dealt
with, the Hines' statement announced.
Dining and sleeping car employes have
presented ttieir arguments and their
cares are before the railroad ad minis-*
tration. Members of the railroads' po
lice force were given increases about
four weeks ago.
In announcing his decision in the
brotherhoods cases, Hines gave an
inkling of the problems which lie faced
In arriving at a settlement.
"When the reports of the board of
wages and working conditions on these
claims were made," Hines said. I was
faced with the following alternatives:
SEVERAL ALTERNATIVES.
"(1)—To refuse to make any re
X Continued on Page Two
CALIFORNIA SOLONS
HEED LANSING PLEA;
KILL ANTI-JAP BILLS
Sacramento, Cal.. April 11.—(United
Press.)—With the dispatch of another
message to Secretary of State Lansing
at Paris late yesterday. Senator Inman
won the last tilt in the anti-Japanese
scrap and the legislature is on record
today as petitioning «against the Ori
ental peril.
After being allowed to withdraw
the bills which Lansing stated would
be embarrassing to President Wilson
and the administration, on motion of
Inman ,the following message was
sent by the senate to Lansing.
"Notwithstanding great public de
mand that legislation such as men
tioned in our cablegram be enacted,
solely in deference to the earnest plea
on the part of the president, such leg
islation will not be introduced or con
sidered by the senate at this session.
We earnestly petition that such action
•be taken by the president on the Ori
ental immigration question as shall
make future state legislation on such
•ubjects unnecessary."
BIG FIRE AT PITTSBURG.
Pittsburg, .Pa., April 11—Fire early
today did approximately $30,000 dam
age in the down town business district.
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BARE BOLSHEVIK PLOT TO PUT
WORLD IN WHIRL OF ANARCHY;
SPARTACANS FIRST WORKED ON
With Boche Radicals in Power, Victors' Demands Would Be
Ignored in Passive Manner; Invasion by Allied Armies
Courted to Spread Germs of Redism.
PARIS, APRIL 11.—(UNITED PRESS)—THE "BIG FOUR" TODAY CON
SIDERED A PROPOSAL FOR SELLING FOOD TO RUSSIA, IT WAI
LEARNED FROM RELIABLE SOURCES.
WHAT DECISION WAS REACHED, IF ANY, COULD NOT BE ASCER
TAINED.
By WILLIAM PHILLIP SIMS.
Paris, April 11.—(United Press.)—Confirmation of a Bolshevik plan to s,
' eize Germany as the initial step in aworld proletarian revolution has been
j received in government circles here, it was announced today.
According to available information the Bolsheviki scheme is this:
| Spartacans—with
possible ac
quiescence of the present govern
ment—will assume administrative
power in Germany durir^j or im
mediately after the Versailles con
gress.
Once in control, the Spartacans
will greet the allies' demands with
folded arms and a general atti
tude of "do what you like, but as
far «as we nre concerned wc will
do nothing"—meaning they will
MUNICH SOVIET
POWER WANING;
ANTIS RECOVER
Wurzburg Recaptured by So
cialists and Capital Sur
rounded; Strike in Saxony
and Ruhr Zone Growing.
By FRANK TAYLOR.
Berlin April 10 (Delayed) (United
Press.)—Wurzburg lias been recap
tured and Munich entirely surrounded
bv forces of the deposed Socialist gov
ernment, according to advices received
here today.
After retreating from Nuremberg to
Bramberg, Premier Hoffman of Ba
varia and several of bis ministers are
reported to have succeeded in rallying
a formidable anti-Soviet army, con
sisting of soldiers, workmen and stu
dents. A large force retook Wurz
burg (140 miles northwest of Munich)
from the Bolsheviki after a brief en
counter in which most of the Soviet
officials and soldiers are said to have
surrendered. Another detachment has
Munich completely surrounded.
SEE EVEN CHANCE.
The Scheidemann government, which
has been temporarily removed to Wei
mar. was reported today as increas
ingly optimistic regarding the situa
tion in Bavaria. Restoration of So
cialist control is now believed to have
at least an even chance.
Th<* general strike in Saxony and
the Ruhr districts is reported to be
growing, but the government has suc
ceeded in regaining control of the sit
uation in Madgeburg capital of Sax
ony». Street fighting in that city re
sulted in heavy casualties.
Spartacans stormed an unnamed
newspaper office in Hamburg. but
their activities were reported to be
limited and government forces were
said to greatly outnumber the radicals
in that city.
The situation in Berlin Is tense. The
city is quiet, however, under the siege
conditions directed by War Minister
Noskc. The government, has taken
special precautions to protect the Red
Cross mission, which is housed in the
American embassy. The square in
front of that building Is bristling with
machine guns nad armed motor cars
form a constant patrol. Although the
National Soviet congress has devel
oped unmistakably radical tendencies
it apparently does not dare to under
take any violence.
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ALEXANDER SAYS McMILLAN WILL BE THE
NEXT MAYOR OF BOISE; TELLS HOW BELIEF
IS GAINED; PUBLIC THINKS FAVORABLY
By MISS TJSRIIY.
Alexander says: "M'MILLAN WILL.
WIN."
lie says so from the stage and in
private conversation, t asked him
about his deduction,
Thought impressions on what might
he termed a collective subject are out
of the bounds of my capabilities. X
must work with individuals not
groups.
"It is my belief McMillan will be
elected mayor of Boise because so
many people, of all classes, who come
to me directly or in contact with me
indirectly, such as sitting in the
theater, have him favorably in mind.
refuse to pay indemnities or carry
out any of the other peace terms.
BAIT TO INVASION. *
The Spartacans thus hope to force
the «allies to occupy central Europe,
which they believe would embitter
the allied peoples against theft' gov
ernments.
With the allied armies in the inter
ior of Germany the Hpnrtacans would
(Continued on Page Tvyo.)
BAVARIA WON'T
BE INCLUDED IN
ALLIED TREATY
German Government Notified
to That Effect; Regarded
Recognition of New Regime,
Though Not Necessarily!
Soviets.
Basle, April 11—(United Press)—The
allies have notified the German gov
ernment that Bavaria will not be in
cluded in the peace treaty, a dispatch
from Stuttgart reported today.
Such action by the allies would be
regarded as virtual recognition of the
independence of Bavaria, though not
necessarily of the new Soviet govern
ment.
SERBS FIGHT TEUTONS.
By EDWARD BING.
Budapest, April 9 — (Delayed) —
Heavy street fighting in Agram, 160
miles southwest of Vienna, where
Serbian troops attempted to restore or
der brought a riot which resulted In a
peasants' mass meeting, a Fiume dis
patch reported today several radical
agitators were arrested.
Half a million men and women
voted in Monday's Soviet elections in
Budapest, it was announced today. A
new vote was ordered in one district,
the government charging illegal bal
loting.
A hundred carloads of American
Vom Trieste today,
the serious food
fats arrived he
greatly roliovi
shortage.
The government has issued «a decree
declaring all cinema theaters, cinema
producing companies and pharmacies
public property.
SAILOR, CRAZED BY BLAZE
IN ROOM,LEAPS TO DEATH
San Francisco, April 11—M. A. Han
son, 26, of Seattle, was killed early to
day in a leap from the sixth story
In an effort to escape a fire at the Y*.
M. C. A. hotel on the Kmbarcade road.
Hansen, sailor, was awakened by
fire In his room. Rushing into the
hallway, he leaped to his death before
comrades could detain him. The fire
did slight damage.
Friends said Hansen planned to
leave for Seattle today to visit bis
mother.
"They are home owners, to a large
extent, or renters who are as inter
ested in their city as any home owner.
They are opposed to experimentation
in city government. They wunt sta
bility plus progress. They feel way
down deep in their heart sthat McMil
lan is th safe man from every view
point.
T have no specific interest in the
matter whatsoever, not being a resi
dent of your city, but my information
would lead me^to lay a wager on Mc
Millan if I were disposed to bet."
Another crowded house at the Fin
ney theater gieeted and acclaimed Mr.
(Continued On Page Eight.)
DEMAND PROBE
LEAGUE PAPER;
SCHOLTZFACING
NEW TROUBLES
Manager of the New Non-Par
tisan Organ at Nampa Fails
to Appease Fellow Stock
holders' Antagonism.
ATTORNEYS INSIST ON A
THOROUGH INVESTIGATION
Boise Barristers Appear on the
Scene and Demand Peep at
Records; Case May Be Taken
to the Courts.
(Capital News Special
Nampa, April 11-W.
Boise, manager of the
league daily paper in this
succeeded in stifling the
his management of his
assumed such force thn
among the stockholders
and the members of the
Service.)
G. Scholtz of
Non-partisan
city, has not
opposition to
paper, which
e weeks ago
of the organ
league.
This was evidenced today when
the legal firm of Davidson &
Davidson of Boise arrived and,
supported by a power of attorney
issued them by a number of the
original stockholders of the paper,
demanded permission to make a
thorough investigation of its rec
ords with a view to ascertaining
the exact methods through which
Sholtz secured and holds control.
WILL DEMAND BE RECOGNIZED?
Schollz was absent in Boise when the
demand was made for the records and
those in charge of the office declined
to grant the demand until his return,
but agreed to get in touch with him Ty
telephone communication, which was
done and Scholtz advised that he would
return late this afternoon.
In the event he refuses to rec
ognize the power of attorney grant
ed the Boise attorneys they will
immediately apply to the court of
redress.
THOROUGH INQUIRY PROPOSED
The investigation of the methods
employed by Scholtz as proposed by the
Boise attorneys, if carried out, is to be
a thorough one and will be made with
out anw recognition of the audit re
cently made by former State Auditor
Clarence Van Deusen.
One of its essential phases will be
a complete examination of the stock
in the paper which has been issued.
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RETURN OPEN VERDICT IN
SOCIETY WOMAN'S DEATH
Chicago. April 11 -Circumstances «•
tlie death of Mrs. Irving C. Black,
Winnetka, III., society woman, will
probably remain a mystery. A final
open verdict was returned by a coron
er's jury yesterday declaring Mrs.
Black died by a rifle she field in her
own hands."
Mrs. Black, wife of a Chicago busi
ness man and a former resilient of
Fort -Madison, Iowa, was found in a
private rifle range in the basement of
her home ten days ago. Black declared
his belief she bad been accidently shot
while others were inclined to believe
she committed suicide.
STORM-STRICKEN TEXAS
BEGINS RELIEF CAMPAIGN
Dallas, Tex., April 11.—North Texas
settled down today to a definite cam
paign of relief for the areas stricken
by Wednesday's disastrous storm.
Reports of the completion o£ relief
organizations in the larger towns in
each of the storm districts were; re
ceived here. Funerals of most oL' tho
97 known dead were held yesterday.
Reports from several other town., talc*
of heavy prone; ty damage from wird
and torrential rains, indicating the
losses are tremendous.
2700 YANKS REACH GOTHAM. !
New York, April 11.—The 157th In
fantry complete. 2700 men for Camps
Funston, Kearney, Meade, Sheridan,
Custer, Lewis, Dodge, Humphreys,
Grant, Taylor, Sherman and Wads
worth Arrived on the transport Juliu
Luckenbach today.
The Pannonia was scheduled to ar
rive this afternoon bearing the 287th
and 238th field artillery headquarters,
second battalion; batteries D and E, 12
officer* and 413 men.
BOCHE BARES FANGS
AGAIN; SNARLS "NEIN"
IF TERMS TOO HARSH
Weimar, April 11.—(United
Press)—Foreign Minister Brock
dorff- Rantzau, addressing the na
tional assembly today, again threat
ened that Germany will not sign a
peace which does not conform with
the armistice terms.
"Confronted by hard enemies, we
have only one weapon—that is an
ippeal to the basis of peace agreed
to in November," he declared.
"Wo will not sign a peace devi
ating from the essential points con
fined in the armistice."
HOPE PROMISE
EARLY EXIT TO
CALM YANKEES
U. S. Troops in Russia to Be
Reassured of Withdrawal
Before June 1 : Not Surprised
at Mutiny Threats.
Washington, April 11. — (United
Press.)—Yankee troops In northern
Russia will be reassured by the war
department that their tenure of Arc
tic service against the Bolsheviki will
soon be over.
Chief of Staff March already has
announced that the last man should
be out of that region by June 1. Re
assurances are expected here to quiet
the unrest among American troops
some of whom nearly mutinied sev
eral days ago as a climax to a long
period of discontent at being held in
service.
The refusal of some of the troops
to go into front line trenches, an
nounced by the war department late
yesterday, has not been unexpected,
it is known here. The morale of all
the allied forces in northern Russia
is exceedingly bad. That of the Brit
ish is generally rated best, the Yanks
second, while the French morale is
understood to bo lowest.
NOT INCLINED TO CENSURE.
Washington, April 11. — (United
Press.)—General staff officers today
reiterated General March's recent dec
laration that American forces in
northern Russia are perfectly safe and
able to hold their own against Bolshe
viki attacks.
Despite the unrest in the Archangel
region, it was' stated, it is physically
impossible to bring the troops home
earlier than announced because of ice.
What disposition will be made of the
men who mutinied March 20, and re
fused to fight, staff officers were un
able to state. Technically the offense
is a grave one and usual disciplinary
measures would appear to be inevit
able. In this case, however, it is
pointed «out there is difficulty in ap
plying the usual punishment for such
offense because public opinion ap
pears to be with the men. Also re
ports indicate even some of the offi
cers have not had the highest morale
and probably have not been particu
larly energetic in bolding the men in
check.
CANADIAN TROOPS BAR
ENTRY OF MEN0NITES;
TURNED BACK AT LINE
Winnipeg, Hun., April 11.—A crisis
has been reached between returned
soldiers aftd Menonites because num
bers of the latter are preparing to
come in from South Dakota.
The veterans number 8000 members
in Winnipeg, and there are almost us
many more unattached and all are ter
ribly in earnest about stopping these
Germans. Today many messages were
received from the western branches of
tile veterans expressing sympathy and
Telling tlie men to stick to their reso
lution that no more of these aliens
shall come into Canada. These mes
sages were all signed "yours for a
white Canada."
Careful watch Is being kept at the
border and cars of Menonite bouse
furniture would not be allowed to
come Into Canada, the soldiers say.
1 HE .WEATHER
Forecast for Boise and vicinity:
FAIR TONIGHT AND SATURDAY;
KILLING FROST TONIGHT.
For Idaho: Tonight and Saturday,
fair; cooler north and southeast por
tion tonight; killing frost tonight.
Highest temperature yesterday... 63
Lowest temperature this morning.. S3
Mean temperature yesterday....... 53
EX KAISER MAY NOT ESCAPE
JUST DESERTS IF FRANCE OR
BELGIUM SEEK PROSECUTION;
HIGHER-UPS MUST PAY PRICE
ABANDON IDEA OF INTERNATIONAL COURT TO TRY ARCH
FIEND BUT NATIONALS TO HAVE CHANCE TO EXTRA
DITE BOCHE WAR LORDS ON LOCAL INDICTMENTS;
EX-EMPEROR BARRED FOREVER FROM POWER.
New York, April 11.— (United Press)—Sailing under
rush orders the transport George Washington, otherwise
known us the presidential liner, will start lor llrest at 4:30
o'clock this afternoon.
Washington, April 11.—(United Press)—The peace
conference has made more progress in the last two days
than in the previous two weeks, private advices to the
White House stated today. Officials were plainly pleased
with the turn of events and cables today indicate that the
American delegates in Paris expect a settlement of the
major points shortly.
By FRED S. FERGUSON.
Paris, April 11.—Germany must pay in full for
"frightfulness."
The former kaiser and his accomplices will be branded
as the greatest criminals of the age, with the way open for
their legal prosecution in the countries where their crimes
were committed.
This in substance is the findings of
the committee on reparation and re
sponsibility* for the war as learned to
day. Although the "big four" has main
tained official silence in this connec
tion. these tangible conclusions have
reached the surface.
CAN'T FIND PRECEDENT.
Tho Idea of an international high
court to try those indicted for war
crimes is understood to have been
abandoned. No local precedent could
be found under which criminals could
be extradited to such a court. It has
been decided, however, that this situa
tion will not prevent nationals, such
as Belgium, from extraditing enemy
officials on local indictments, provid
ing sufficient evidence is obtained.
Submarine officers and crews,
prison camp commandants and
guards and provisional command
ers of conquered districts would be
the ones most easily reached un
der such a plan.
Efforts would then be made to
trace the sources of their orders
to "higher ups."
CAN'T REGAIN THRONE.
While capital punishment for the
kaiser is regarded as not feasible, it is
pot entirely clear whether his punish
ment will rest with a mere moral in
dictment, according to reliable infor
mation. It is certain that steps will
be taken to prevent him from ever re
gaining his old position. It bas also
been intimated that a way would be
found to bring him under allied con
trol but by what means, outside of a
local indictment, it is not made clear.
So far as Wilhelm's moral responsi
bility for most of Germany's crimes is
concerned there isn't the slightest
doubt among any members of the com
mission. But the difficulty lies in e«
(Continued on Page Two.)
20 BRIDGES ON AMUR
R. R. BURNED BY REDS
Tokio, April 9 (Delayed)—(United
Press)—Bridges of the Amur railway
have been burned at more than 20
points as a result of Bolshevik dis
turbances. All traffic has been sus
pended. according to a Tsuruga dis
patch to the Jipi newspaper. The dis
patch declared 11 passenger trains
bound for Vladivostok had been de
layed at llabarovsk, where there is
great confusion.
HAWKER MAY START LONG FUGNT TODAY
St. Johns, April 11.—(United
Press)—That Lieut. Harry Haw
ker would start to fly across tho
Atlantic in his Sopwith plane
sometime today was the be
lief expressed by representative
aircraft officials here. The gov
ernor inspected th* Sopwith piano
this morning and it is believed
thst if good weather continues to
prevail Hawkar may make his
start this afternoon.
Hawker's plane made a success
ful flight of 35 minutes from tho
time of ascending here yesterday.
It took just savait minutes for
SMALL NATIONS
TO AIR WRONGS
AT MEET TODAY
Resent "Big Four's" Seizure of
Authority; Clause Inserted
in League Covenant Recog
nizing Monroe Doctrine.
By CARL D. GROAT.
Paris, April 11—(United Press)—The
plenary session of the peace confer
ence called for today to receive the re
port of the committee on interna
tional labor legislation was expected
to develop into a foruin for airing the
dissatisfaction of small nations.
Many of the countries not repre
sented in the "big four" are known to
resent tlie assumption of supreme au
thority by that body.. The belief was
expressed that, despite the fact that
formation of the "big four" has re
sulted in unusual speed in arranging
a peace settlement, representatives of
the little powers would seize the op
portunity to place on record their dis
approval of what they regard as de
liberate evasion of their rights.
'The league of nations commission
last night agreed to insertion in
the Covenant of a clause specifi
cally recognizing the Monroe doc
trine. The amendment was pre
pared by Colonel House.
The "big four" was expected to an
nounce shortly further agreement on
important questions in line with Presi
dent Wilson's 14 points and the armis
tice terms.
UNFILLED STEEL ORDERS.
New York. April 11.—Unfilled steel
tonnage of the United States totaled
7,430,752 as of March 31. 1919, It was
announced today. This compared with
60,010,787 February 28 and 6,684.36$
January 31st, 1919.
Hawker to reach the desired alti
tude when he sailed in the direc
tion of Cape Race. The wireless
stations at Mount Peal kept in
continual touch with tha machine
all through the flight. Hawker de
clared his speed while in the air
had averaged 100 miles an hour.
The machine carried full equip
ment, the same as will be carried
on the transatlantic flight. Hawker
expressed entire satisfaction with
tho result of thx test. Officials of
tho Sopwith company who wit
nessed tho trial ware slated ovar
tho prospect c? an aarly start
•cross tha oesan.

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