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Evening capital news. (Boise, Idaho) 1901-1927, April 11, 1919, Image 2

Image and text provided by Idaho State Historical Society

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn88056024/1919-04-11/ed-1/seq-2/

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ENGLISH QUEEN,
STIRRED UP BY
SLUMS EXPOSE,
ORDERS UPLIFT
Mary Takes Look at London
Poverty District and Is
Shocked Into Action; Ap
palled at Conditions.
London, April 11.—(United Press)
Stirred by her personal discoveries In
''slumland," Queen Mary today took
the unprecedented step of summoning
the leading British housing and health
authorities to discuss and draw
plans for immediate betterment of liv
ing conditions of the workers.
King George made a speech of wel
come to the delegates who numbered
about 100 and also evinced the liveliest
Interest in the proceedings, out it is
known the queen's desire for first
hand Information on all matters con
cerning the nation's homes was re
sponsible for this "housing Durbar,"
the press calls it.
SURPRISE VISITS
Dr. Christopher Addison, president of
the local government board, introduced
the deputation, which was thoroughly
representative and Included the coun
try's leading social workers and public
health experts.
Queen Mary recently paid a series of
surprise visits to the East London
slum area and was shocked at what
she saw. Hitherto, carefully stage
managed "visits to ttie homes of the
workers" had provided nice, clean cot
tages belonging to the better class
workers and energetic officials had
seen that everything was in order for
the royal visit.
SEES OTHER SIDE
''Very nice and clean," the queen was
always able to say on departing, but
her unofficial visits showed the other
side of the picture.
"Terrible terrible," she exclaimed,
aghast at the squalor and unsanitary
conditions she found everywhere. Then
"why wasn't I told of this?" The court
officials had nothing to say. So Queen
Mary turned to a man who would
know. Colonel W. J. Lewis, mayor of
the East Side district of Bethnal
Green.
"I am afraid I have always stuck to
the highways too much," she said.
"I want you to show me the by
ways."
ALSO AFRAID OF MICE
Lewis did and afterwards he told the
United Press "the queen was disgus'ed
witlj the whole situation."
Overcrowding was the chief evil.
One house the queen visited contained
a mother and seven children in two
•mall rooms. They all slept in the
upstairs room for fear of mice. The
queen assured the woman that she also
was afraid of mice.
Today's conference Is due to the per
sonal Investigations In the "byways."
A thoroughly energetic housewife her
•elf, Queen Mary is determined to "get
things moving." It will not result In
prosaic official reports and their ulti
mate pigeonholing by officialdom.
Beal progress Is assured and the queen
Is delighted to find a subject so thor
oughly womanly in which she can in
terest herself.
EX-1
(Continued from Page One.)
tabitshing legal evidence before a regu
lar court.
Grand Admiral von Tlrpitz may be
charged with the Lusitania deaths, for
moral responsibility would include no!
only crimes ordered, ijut those whicli
might have been prevented.
REPARATIONS BILL.
The reparations bill, while not nam
ing a definite figure, will require an
initial payment of J5,000,000,000 within
two years.
The permanent financial commission
will receive claims from each nation
• nd will determine the amount which
can be collected from Germany, to
gether with apportionment among the
claimants. A final report will be made
by the commission at the expiration
of the two year period in which Ger
many will make the first payment. The
various items of damage are under
stood to have been divided into a
series of "treaties," the least of which
will be pensions. There is still some
discussion ns to whether the pensions
Item will be allowed to remain but
otherwise the terms are not expected
to be altered.
TO REIMBURSE IN FULL.
A sub-committee will report within
a few days on the method of estab
lishing guarantees of payment while
■ similar commutes will report on the
constitution of the permanent finan
cial commission.
While probable apportionments have
been a closely guarded secret, it is un
derstood Germany will be required to
reimburse each nation in full not only
for property damage, but In some de
gree for lost man power.
More •thon
one kind
of com
flakes
Ï:
,<0o«dy
Post Toasties
•re-the best
Ten Years' Suffering from
Etching, Burning Skin
Trouble Stopped by
Reslnol
Gretna, Va., Oct. 20:—"I suffered for
over ten years with itching: and burn
ing of my skin. It neveç broke out
at all, but just Itched and burned
__ terribly. I tried al
m o s t everything,
but got no relief.
As soon as 1 be
gan using Hesinol
Ointment and Rew
ind Soap the Itch
ing and burning
left me almost at
once. I used one
jar of Reslnol
Ointment and two
cakes
Soap
completely cured.'
T. Shelton.
Reslnol Ointment and Resinol
sold by all druggists.—Adv.
,
of Resinol
and was
SNOW PLOW ENGINE
SMASHED IN DRIFTS;
TRAINMAN IS KILLED
Denver, April H.—Engineer J. M.
Hinchey, of a Union Pacific snow plow
special, wrecked near Colby, Kan., yes
terday was brought to Denver and
taken to Mercy hospital today, suf
fering from severe scalp wounds. His
fireman, Charles Gowdy of Palnville,
Kan., was instantly killed when caught
between tender and boiler as the big
locomotive was stood on end by piling
heudon into a 14-foot snow drift in a
deep cut. Two engines on the plow
were badly smashed.
The escape from injury of Superin
tendent W. P. Vickroy and other men
on the plow train was miraculous.
Fireman Bob Burnett of Sharon
Springs, Kan., was slightly hurt. The
wreck occurred on the Colby branch
of the line. Hinchey, whose home is in
Oakley, Kan., was pinned by one leg
for 15 minutes before he could be re
leased.
(Signed) Richard j
I
soap !
j
I
FIGURE LENINE ABLE TO
THROW 800,000 TROOPS
AGAINST ALLIED INVADER
Washington, April 11 .—If the Bol
shevik! launch their threatened spring
offensive, they will be able to throw
a maximum force of 800,000 troops
against the allies, according to de
pendable estimates here.
Plans laid some time ago by the
Bolsheviki military' leaders calling for
an army of 1,250,000 by April 1 have
failed to materialize. Details of allied
plans for meeting the promised offen
sive can not be revealed at this time,
but it can bo said that they will not
necessitates holding the present Amer
ican troops in northern Russia longer
than spring unless unexpected devel
opments occur.
FRISCO CEMETERIES IDLE;
GRAVE DIGGERS ON STRIKE
San Francisco, April 11. — There
have been no burials in six San Fran
cisco cemeteries since the grave dig
gers' union went on strike two weeks
ago.
The cemeteries have been unable to
get men to replace the strikers. Bodies
are being cached in vaults.
The strikers demand a raise from
$4 to $5 a day.
"There is something about a ceme
tery that even a strikebreaker doesn't
like," said John. O'Connell, secretary
of the San Francisco labor council.
"I predict the grave diggers will win."
Holy Cross cemetery is paying the
new scale. Those tied up by the strike
are Cypress Lawn, Mount Olive, Hills
of Eternity, the Italian and the Jew
ish cemeteries.
BRITISH CITIES TO HONOR
YANK FOR FINE BEHAVIOR
London, April 11.—British cities
near which American soldiers camps
are located are preparing to pay thetr
respects to the good behavior of the
yank.
A memorial to be signed by the
mayors of more than a score of muni
cipalities is being prepared and will
be presented to American officials
shortly. It will praise the fine con
duct of the American soldier In Great
Britain, his good nature when con
fronted with hardships, and will ex
press the regrets of the people at see
ing him leave. The memorial will he
presented to Ambassador Davis by the
lord mayor of London. A similar doc
ument will be presented to President
Wilson.
THINK HARDING TO ESCAPE
IMPEACHMENT PROCEEDING
Des Moines, April ll.-j-Govemor W.
L. Harding and Attorney General
Havner probably will be censured but j
not Impeached for their part in the ,
pardon of Ernest Rathbun.
This was the opinion of several
prominent members of the house Ju- !
diciary committee which has been |
conducting the legislative probe Into j
the issuance and revocation of the
pardon of the youth sentenced to life j
for a social crime.
BUILDING AT IDAHO FALLS.
Idaho Falls, April 11—The indica
tions are there* will he no lack of em
ployment In Idaho Falls, during the
present season. The city council has
adopted ordinances for street paving
that will cost over $400,000. Among
the more extensive buildings are: The
L. D. S. hospital, costing $175,000; the
Spath, Cline & Mittry theater and
mercantile building, costing $75,000, the
additions to the high school, costing
$30,000, the Presbyterian church, cost
ing $50,000, with several other struc
tures costing from $10,000 to $15,000,
and at least 100 residences, at an aver
age cost of $2500, and many blocks of
cement sidewalks; and probably a new
courthouse costing $150,000.
(Continued from Page One)
carry on an active propaganda to con
vert the troops to Bolshevism. Con
fident of their success in this the
Spartacans believe the troops return
ing to their own countries would"carry
the seeds of revolt into a soil made
fertile by miscarriage of the allies'
peace plans, combined with the gen
eral social unrest in the world.
Meanwhile a closer alliance between
the Russian and Hungarian Soviet
governments is being effected, accord
ing to official advices received here.
LENINE AIDE IN BUDAPEST.
M. Lamelll, personal representative
, of Premier Renine, is said to have ar
rived in Budapest. He Is reported to
(have promised the Hungarians an
army of 150,000 to aid them In
strengthening their control of the
country. Lenlne, it Is said, continues
to counsel moderation for the Hun
Rurlans and advises them to avoid
Russia's excesses. He hopes soon to
establish physical communication with
Hungary, which is impossible at pres
ent because of the fact that strong
Rumanian and Czecho-Slovak forces
now form a barrier.
Lenine also is reliably reported to
be making preparations to install Bol
shevism In Rumania and Bulgaria,
thus directly linking Russia up with
Hungary and Bavaria.
515 TO Ml
(Continued from Page One.)
adjustments whatever, because of
the present unsatisfactory condi
tion of railroad revenues, in spite
of the fact that this class of em
ployes had reason to expect re
adjustments because of readjust
ments accorded other classes of
employes.
"(2)— To establish relative jus
tice between the various classes of
employes by cutting down the
wages established for the other
classes during the war.
''(3)— To make readjustments
proportional with those which had
been made other employes.
"Of these three possibilities, I am
satisfied that only the last was prac
ticable and Just and I therefore
adopted It."
As a result of his stand In this
case, Hines said that after dealing
with the dining and sleeping car em
ployes, wage questions will be handled
in the future "only in the light of con- I
ditions hereafter arising."
This statement, however, does not |
infer that the pay of employes of the I
American Railway Express company |
will not bo given Just consideration, I
officials said. The expressmen's!
wages have been discussed for several i
months and It is not unlikely they !
will be decided within two weeks, ac
ordlng to officials.
O WE BUY FOR CASH We Sell For Cash
JT rate Store
We Sell For Cash
PASCO NEUMAN, PROP.
719 MAIN STREET
BIG SPECIAL
$ 4.25
1 pair of these shoes free with every 3
pair you buy. Florsheim, Walk-Over,
American Gentleman oxfords, shoes,
for men and young men. Black and
tan; sizes 5 ,/a , 6, 6 1/a ,' 7. All shapes and
styles. Saturday and Monday only.
Children's play suits, blue or khaki,
extra heavy .........................
85c
Children's wash suits, big value,
only...............................
95c
Children's white dresses,
best make......*....................
75c
Women's union suits for
summer............................
50c
Women's oxfords, 200 pairs, big special,
all leather shoes, sizes 2 to 4 with C. D. . . .
$1.25
Children's sandals ..........S5o
Children's Keds, rubber sole 95c
Men's bib overalls, heavy ..$1.50
Men's khaki whipcord pants $2.2S
Men's work shoe, good value $2.95
Men's dress shoes, good
values ...................$3.50
Men's dress sox, gray .......10o
Men's linen khaki hapdker
chlefs,, 3 ..................25o
Men's linen collars, 2 .......25o
Men's union suits for summer 95o
Our store Is chuck full of such
bargains In merchandise, but
first and last you will get high
grade guaranteed goods here. We
have no cheap stuff to sell you.
U. S. War Edi
tion French Book
"What You Want
to Say and How
to Say It in
French," for
I
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i
!
CORKS PEEL
OFF PAINLESSLY
There's Only One Genuin« Corn-Peeler
That's "Gets-It"
There h only one happy way to get rid
nii 1 V' y cor ? ?- r <'ulhis, and that's the
painless-peel-off W uy. "Gots-lt" is the
J , . n |y com remedy in the world that does
it that way—effectively, thoroughly. "Why
get (town on the floor, tie yourself up into
a knot, and have to fool with "packagey"
planters, greasy ointments that rub off,
Hticky tape, and digging knives and bcIh
hoi-h, when you can peel off your corn or
callus in one complete piece, peacefully
surely, with magic, simple, easy
Gets-It? It takes 2 or seconds to
apply "Gets-It;" you uso 2 or 2 drops,
and that's all. "Gets-It" does the rest!
Get rid of that corn-pain at once, so
that you can work and play without corn
torture. Be sure to use "Gets-It." It
never fails.
"Ccts-lt," the guaranteed, money-baeft
corn-remover, the only sure w-ay, costs
but a trifle at any drug store. M'f'd. by
E. Lawrence & Co., Chicago, 111.
Sold in Boise and recommended as the ]
world's best corn remedy by Whitehead's I
Beck- J
-Adv.
PREDICTS SOCIALISTS EXIT
WHEN LABOR FORMS PARTY
Springfield, April 11.—Wreckage of
the American Socialist party by a na
tional labor organization In the near
future was predicted here today by
Charles DoAd, Chicago labor leader, In
a speech at the opening of the con
vention called to form a state labor
party.
The new party will become one of
the country's greatest political organ
izations, drawing its membership not
only from trade unions but from every
class of workers, Dood said.
IDAHO FALLS VOTES BONDS
FOR HIGH SCHOOL BUILDING
Idaho Falls, Ida., April 11—At a
school bond election held on Tuesday
to .vote upon the proposition of issuing
bonds to the amount of $80,000, to
make additions to the new high school
building and build a ward building,
561 vote3 were polled, (the largest vote
ever cast at a school «lection in this
city.) The result was 673 for the
bonds and 185 against. An election
was held on the same proposition In
February and defeated, owing to the
people not understanding what was to
be done with the money.
Anything in
POPULAR MUSIC
10 cents each, 11 for
$1.00 at
Sampson Music Go.
913 MAIN
]
I
J
THE big demand forseats on this picture
has compelled us to mo ve it to the
MAJESTIC
RIDERS
of the
PURPLE
SAGE
Zane Grey's
Greatest
Picture
With
WILLIAM
FARNUM
A real photodrama of the west.
Better than "Light of Wsstern
Stars" or "Man in the Open.''
Prices
Adults 25c, Children 10c
MAJESTIC
TODAY, TOMORROW
BY POPULAR REQUEST WE ARE HOLDING THIS COMEDY OVER FOR
THE BALANCE OF THE WEEK AT THE ISIS IN ADDITION TO THE
VAUDEVILLE
YANKEE DOODLE
IN BERLIN
Made by the men who
made "Tillie's Punc
tured Romance." .
ffacA SevneHy
rÄNKeC DOODLe IN BERLIN
VAUDEVILLE
AI Cotton
Black Face Com
edy
Martin Zinder
Tenor
PRICE8
Adults, 30c
Children, 15c
Matinee and Night
ISIS—TODAY, TOMORROW
u
HE
OP
yp
A
LOV
ÖRE
TM
TL
Fl
C
Owing to the
extreme length of
this photodrama
(12 reels) only 2
performances will
be given each day.
PRICES '
Matainee, 2:30
Evening, SMS
Adults 50c
Children 25o
Matinee and Night
STRAND-Today & Saturday

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