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Evening capital news. (Boise, Idaho) 1901-1927, April 14, 1919, Image 1

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn88056024/1919-04-14/ed-1/seq-1/

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war Veterans of Idaho to Play Role in the Erasing of Bolshevism
ALL THE NEWS
FIRST
WEATHER
Tonight and Tuesday
fair.
VOL
XLH.
BOISE, IDAHO, MO NDAY, APRIL 14,1919
No. 90
FRANCE HOTTED 55 PER CENT OF TOTAL
U-Boat Chaser Explo 10 Injured
CLAMP MARTIAL
LAW OH SAXONY;
DRESDEN SCENE
Of HARD BATTLE
Ukrainian Artillery Shells Lem
Berg Killing Many Civilians;
Ebert Rushes Troops to Sup
press Dresden Radicals' Dis
«
orders.
Germany, With Grave
____T- ... „„ . ,
CanS 11 y Union With Munich
REDS' REGIME IN RUHR
PREVENTED BY TROOPS
Strikes Continue Throughout
Grave Dig
gers Last to Join; Sparta
cans Try
Soviets.
Copenhagen, April 14.—Martial
law has been proclaimed through
out Saxony according to a dis
patch from Dresden today.
London, April 14.—Ukrainian ar
tillery heavily bombarded Lem
berg Thursday and Friday, killing
and wounding many civilians, ac
cording to dispatches received here
today.
Lemberg was recaptured from
the Ukrainians by the Poles a few
weeks ago.
Copenhagen, April 14.— (United
Press)—Bitter fighting has broken
out in Dresden following the
murder of War Minister Neuring,
according to dispatches received
today. Government troops are be
ing rushed from Berlin to suppress
the radicals who are fighting under
communist leadership.
Bv RUDOLPH KOMMER.
Berne. April in (Delayed.) (United
Press.)—War Minister Noske has
threatened to send a military expedi
tion against Munich, according to ad
vices received here today.
The situation in Munich is still con
fusing. Reports of the overthrow of
the Soviet government have not been
confirmed, nor have later reports, of
a second coup restoring the Soviets
to power.
A Soviet republic is said to
have been proclaimed in Bruns
wick. The change in government
was accomplished without blood
shed, it was said.
Communist rule in the Ruhr
district has been prevented only
through the overwhelming num
bers of government troops occu
pying that region.
Strikes are continuing throughout
Germany. Grave diggers have joined
the movement and there have been no
funerals in Stettin or Weld for two
days. New Bolshevik! attempts have
been made to obtain control of the
Kovno-Koenigsberg railroad for strat
egic purposes.
Reappearance of sailors in the cities
of northern Germany is regarded as
an ominous sign. Spartacans are fe
verishly attempting to join hands with
the communists in Munich.
MRS. PHOEBE HEARST
DIES; WAS MOTHER OF
HEARST THE PUBLISHER !
j
Oakland, Calif., April 14.—(United
Press)—Private funeral services for
Mrs. Phoebe llearst, who died yester
day afternoon at her home in Pleas
onton. will be held at the home Wed
nesday morning. A public service will
be held in the afternoon.
Mrs. Hearst died at the age of 76,
following an attack of influenza,
which developed pneumonia. She had
been in poor health for three years.
At her bedside was Wm. Randolph
Hearst, her only son.
Mrs. Ilearst's life was devoted to
charitable acts. Among the institutions
owing much to her is the University
of California.
68 DEAD IN CAIRO RIOTING.
Cairo, April 12. (Delayed)—Casual
ties resulting from riots in the last 48
hoiits total <8 killed and 100 wounded,
it was officially announced today. In
Alexandria, troops fired into a mob,
killing 20 and wounding many.
IDAHO SOLDIER COMMITTEE
NAMED BY GOVERNOR DAVIS
FOR ST. LOUIS CONVENTION
First Real Organized Effort Made in Idaho to Strike at Bol
sheviki—Will Provide Plan For Se
lecting Delegates.
The world war veterans of Idaho
Will take a hand in curbing the activ
dies of the Bolsheviki.
Governor Davis has named a state
comittee of soldiers at the request of
lJeut.-Col. Theodore Hoosevelt Jr.,
temporary chairman of the World War
Veterans' national committee, and
" ü Am!. h T« T\ ln Bolse Sat ;
jUiuay, Api H 19, to devise ways and
[means by which state delegates shall
i he selected to the national convention
to he held at St. Uouis May 8. Maj.
C. M. Booth of Twin Falls is made
chairman of the state committee.
Tills committee is empowered to call
a state convention, if necessary, to se
lect delegates, or to arrange for pri
maries, if that is thought feasible.
Governor Davis has requested the
Dig-j*"o? f th" "mYnu "Id £«.!
taries of all war veteran associations,
I and if there are ntme formed to name
*' vo representative soldiers "absolutely
without regard to party affiliation or
their rank In service ,as this is one
prisonment
CHARGES BOCHE
IS CARRYING ON
ARMY REVIVALS
Czecho-Slovak Envoy Tells
France of Alleged Effort By
Enemy to Rebuild Teuton
War Machine in Secret.
Paris, April 14.—(United Press.)—
The Matin published an interview to
day with M. Broda, president of a
Czecho-Slovak delegation represent
ing the Slavs of Saxony and Silesia,
who declared that Germany is se
cretly carrying on extensive military
preparations.
According to Broda tlie Germans are
remobilizing 30 batteries of artillery
near Nurzittau, 30 near Sichizen and
others in Prussia and Brandenburg,
between the Baltic and the Czech
frontier. There are 50 recruiting bu
reaus, enlisting about 300 each daily,
Broda said. Everything is being done
outside the (owns to avoid any more
publicity than is actually necessary,
Many war factories supposed to bo
closed are working, according to
Broda.
New trucks are being hidden in
Kottbus forest. Guns, shells, airplanes
and machine guns are being moved
into Silesia and Saxony.
Broda charged that Field Marshal
von Hindenburg is backing tilt* mili
I tary preparations.
HANG TURK COMMANDER
WHO SLEW ARMENIANS
London, April 14.—Kiamil Mahmud
Pasha, former governor of Diarbek,
has been publicly hanged as the insti
gator of the Armenian massacres at
Vozwhad, a dispatch front Constanti
nople reported today. The former com
mander of the gendarme army in that
district was sentenced to 15 years' iin
SAYS REDS TO CONSULT ALLIES.
Zurich, April 14.—The Deutche Tages
Zeitung reports that Bolshevik emis
saries have left Moscow to begin the
first semi-official pour parlera with
the entente governments."
BOLSHEVIST PROPAGANDA IS SCATTERED BROADCAST
THROUGH ITALIAN CITIES; SERIOUS DISORDER FEARED
Washington, April 14. (United
Fressj - Bolsheviki propaganda is
being spread broadcast in certain
Italian cities, creating a situation
of grave possibilities, a message to
the state department intimated to
day.
Extra police are patrolling the
streets of Turin, big industrial
center, and 500 cavalry troops are
reported to have been quartered
there to suppress possible upris
ings. The troubles are officially
spoken of as "an impending strike"
and the Italian authorities, the
state department said, have the si
| of the underlying principles of the
suggested national organization and I
insist on strictly adhering to it."
The state committeemen as appoint
| ed by Gov. Davis are as follows : Major
j C. M. Booth: Paul Davis, Boise; Major
] Frank Estabrook, Kampa: John S.
/ûu tenant
'
Green, Twin Falls; Lieutenant Paul T
Peterson, Idaho Falls; Harry Cherpil
lods, Moscow; Lieutenant Thomas A.
Feeney, Lewiston; Captain F. A.
Jeter, Coeur d'Alene. The alternates
are: LaVerne Collier of Pocatello and
Sergeant H. G. Knight of Idaho Falls.
All of these men were In the service.
PURPOSES OF CONVENTION.
The purpose of the St. Louis con
vention is to further the principles of
"justice, freedom and democracy,"
Colonel Roosevelt an
nounces, but behind that, it is given
out on excellent authority, is a de
termination on the part of the veter
ans of the recent war in this country,
of whom there are 4,000,000 who will
(Continued on Page Two.)
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FRENCH AVIATOR
FLIES TO AFRICA
TO CROSS OCEAN
CO : .
l PllPl ||
m
* *
m
A ;
St^su! ïSoçks
Î3k> dö*
May shows route taken by Leut. Fon
tan, French flier, in trans-Atlantic
voyage and total distance he will
travel If successful.
Lieutenant Fontain, noted French
aviator, is the first man to start a
flight which he hopes will end in the
crossing of the Atlantic ocean. He
is said to have left Versailles in a
flight to Casablanca, Morocco. His
route lays from Casablanca to Dakar.
Cape Verde, thence to the St. Paul
rocks in midocean and on to Perain
buco, Suiith America, and thei* over
land to Kio de Janieru.
JUDGE DIES OF WOUNDS
Richmond, Mo., April 14.—Judge F.
P. Divelbiss of the seventh judicial
district, last night succumbed to nine
knife wounds inflicted on April 7 by
R. C. Lyon, editor of the Richmond
Conservator. Lyon was immediately
charged with first degree murder and
held In jail without bond.
!
:
I
I
I
I
tuation under control.
The extra military and police
precautions were taken, it was
stated in the message from Romo,
because of the reports circulated in
Turin and because of the fact that
posters containing Rolshevikl pro
paganda were posted on houses
throughout the city.
Turin is one of the largest in
dustrial centers in Italy. President
Wilson ivislted It enroute back to
Paris from Rome and was acclaim
ed by one of the greatest crowds
—mostly workers—that greeted
him on his first European trip.
HUGE GAS TANK
BLAST AS BOAT
TIED TOWHARF
San Diego, April 14. — (United
Press)—Ten officers and men of
the United States submarine chas
er 297 were seriously, some fatally
injured here today when a 1000
gallon tank of gasolene on the craft
exploded at 12:30 p. m.
The submarine chaser at once
burst into flames. Prompt action
by the fire department saved the
hull and chasers 299 and 300, an
chored close by.
The seriously or fatally injured
are:
Lieutenant A. Belknap, acting
fleet commander.
Seamen E. W. Drake, J. P. Chad
derdon, W. W. Conover, W. J. Bar
ron, T. P. Perrego.
Four others, names not yet
known, are badly burned. The
commander is not fatally burned, it
was said, but several of the seamen
will die.
Sixteen chasers which had been
on convoy and sub-hunting duty
in the Atlantic during the war per
iod, arrived in the harbor Satur
day. They are all from the 12th
and 13th Pacific coast naval dis
tricts and were bound for their
home ports.
peaceInvoys
SCHEDULED TO
RAISE CURTAIN
"Big Four" Members to Lift
Higher This Week Curtain of
Secrecy; Wilson May Issue
Statement Soon.
Ry ROBERT J. BENDER
Washington, April 14.—(United Press)
I—Peace conference statesmen are be
ginning to inform the world of the
progress of their deliberations.
Following publication of a summary
of the new league covenant Saturday,
members of the "big four" this week
are to further lift the curtain of se
crecy and let their peoples know what
they are doing.
Lloyd Georgs is scheduled to ad
dress the British parliament to
morrow on the peace work.. Presi
dent Wilson, according to informa
tion available here, is also planning
to issue a statement. Others may
fellow these.
SEEK HOME OPINIONS.
The purpose of these public utter
ances at this time is to gc-t the reac
tion from "back home" on what is be
ing done before it is too late. In a
sense it is designed as fulfillment of
the promise of "open covenants openly
arrived at." Administration leaders
today were optimistic in their discus
sion of the league of nations coven
ant ns amended and believed it would
meet all Republican objections.
"Tlie changes in the covenant are
very satisfactory." said Senator Hitch
cock. "I think they must review the
objections raised by senators. Presi
dent Wilson has won a great victory."
MYERS HAS HOPES.
Senator Myers. Montana, who ob
jected to the league covenant original
ly because it (ailed to safeguard the
Monroe Doctrine, sees hope in the new
draft, though still in doubt as to the
exclusive right of the United States to
regulate its immigration.
Senator Lodge was in Boston.
General discussion of the officially
announced amendments to the league
constitution, however, was still some
what guarded today. This was par
ticularly true of those whose opposi
tion was based on objections which
may have been removed by the alter
ations made in Paris.
The generally expressed view among
the less extreme opponents of the
league, however, was that the amend
ment will probably pave the way to
senate acceptance, unless some new
obstacles present themselves.
PERTINENT -QUESTIONS. .
The questions which a number of
the 39 senators who signed the Lodge
(Continued on Page Two.)
IF BURLESON TURNS DOWN
DEMANDS, 20,000 WALK
Burleson of their demands for in
creased wages is the only action that
will avoid the strike of nearly 20,000
switchboard operators and other tele
phone employes In New F.ngland, ac
cording to union officials today.
Boston, April
acceptance by
14-—The unqualified
Postmaster General
HERE'S WHAT ENEMY
PLANNED AS WINNER;
HE'S NOW LAMENTING
Zurich, April 14. — (United
Press)—Bavarian newspapers by
order of the Soviet government have
reproduced textually the recom
mendations made in September,
1914, by Mathias Erzberger, then
leader of the Centrist party, regard
ing indemnities to be demanded by
Germany. They were in substance:
"Reimbursement for all war
damages and all state debts, 80
per cent of which are due to
army and navy expenses.
"Payment of a $1,000,000,000
fund.
"Restoration of all commer
cial cables and stations.
"Payment of rewards to vic
torious generals for excsptional
services.
"Payment of funds to improve
living conditions in Germany."
Ei-zberg^r, as chairman of the
German armistice commission, com
plained at the "harshness" of the
allied terms.
POINDEXTER DECLARES
NEW LEAGUE DRAFT IS
PERIL TO U. S. FREEDOM
Spokane, Wash., April 14.—De
claring that the new dra^t of the
league of nations covenant de
stroys American Independence and
is a shameful affront to peace,
Senator Miles Poindexter has Is
sued a long statement against the
document.
The senator says in part:
"So far as reported the consti
tution still contains the provis
ions of article 12 , giving the
league and tribunals created un
der it jurisdiction over every in
ternal dispute, including immigra
tion and everything else, whether
justiciable or non-justiciable, a
provision utterly destructive of
American independence. It is still
as President Wilson has said, a
'supreme sacrfice.'
"'It still contains the agreement
to guarantee the personal and ter
ritorial independence of every na
tion member of the league—a
cruel and unconscionable burden
to place upon the American
people."
VANGUARD OF ATLANTIC
FLEET ENTERS GOTHAM
HARBOR; 103 WAfe BOATS
New York, April 14.—Twenty
four hours ahead of time, the At
lantic fleet of 103 war vessels be
gan steaming into the New York
narbor today.
The first units to arrive were de
stroyers, in long gray ranks, some
of them bearing the sears of shell
fire from German submarines.
Admiral Mayo, on the Pennsyl
vania, was expected during the af
ternoon. The battleships include
those which co-operated with the
British grand fleet in the North
sea.
SAXON WAR MINISTER
LYNCHED BY TROOPS;
SHOT, THEN DROWNED
Copenhagen, April 14. — War
Minister Neuling of the. .Saxon
government was lynched by some
wounded soldiers from hospitals
■in Dresden, who were holding a
demonstration against the reduc
tion in their pay ordered by Neu
ring, according to dispatches from
that city today.
Keuring was reported to have
been thrown into the Elbe and
then shot as lie tried to swim to
the other bank.
DEBS BEGINS SERVING HIS
10-YEAR PRISON SENTENCE
Moundsville, W. Va., April 14.—
Eugene V. Debt, many timaa So
cialist candidate for president, be
gan asrving hia 10-year santonca
in fedaral penitentiary bars.
Dsba gava himaalf up to federal
authorities in Cleveland yestaday
on arriving thero from hia horns in
Terre Haute, Ind. Ho was con
victed soma months ago of sedi
toiua uttaranooa during an address
in Canton, Ohio.
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WINO CURBS TRANS-SEA FLIGHT
London. April ».-Major Wood's at
tempted transatlantic flight from Ire-:
land has been delayed by weather con
dltions. the air ministry announced to
day. High winds have been prevail
ing on this side of the Atlantic since
Saturday.
j
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PEACE BAROMETER AT CREST
WITH PROPHETS SURE TREATY
READY MAY 1; CLEMENCEAU IS
CONTENT WITH NEW AWARDS
Every Indication Points to Completion of Pact Soon; Lloyd
George Quit Paris With Data to Give Parliament; France to
Get Perpetual Use of Saar Coal Mines and about $13,750,
000,000 Reparation.
London, April 14—(United Press)—The Paris correspond
dent of the Mail reported today that France will get fifty-five
per cent of the total reparation collected from Germany.
By WILLIAM PHILLIP SIMMS.
Paris, April 14—The peace barometer was higher today.
The treaty will be signed by May 1, according to French cir-i
des. This has been said before, but this time the political
prophets declare they will be able to make good.
Premier Clemenceau told a delegation of deputies headed
by Rene Renould: "I am happy to tell you the question of re
paration has been settled to oar satisfaction; also the Saar
valley."
This
This was pointed to as one sign of
the approaching event. Another is the
fact that Premier Lloyd George left
for England today, after having public
ly announced he would not leave Paris
until an agreement was reached on ail
the main Issues.
THE THIRD SIGN.
A third sign is that the George
Washington is due in Brest shortly for
the purpose of carrying President
Yvilson home. The French insist this
is an indication that he considers his
work nearly completed. A fourth is
the general understanding throughout
Paris that the ''big four" will summon
the Germans to Versailles not later
than the end of next week.
The latest version of the Saar
settlement is that France will be
a mandate under the league of na
tions over the whole territory,
which will be administered by a
council of five delegates, one of
which will be a resident of the re
gion. The French will police the
coal basin, the mines of which, ac
cording to the version, will belong
to France in perpetuity,
CONCERNING REPARATION.
In the matter of reparation, accord
ing to this same source of information,
France has been allotted 55 per cent
of a total provisional sum of $25,000.
000,000 which Germany will be required
to pay in gold, materials and negoti
able paper. It is pointed out, however,
that it is now impossible even to cal
culate the exact amount of reparation,
owing to fluctuations in the prices of
materials and values of securities.
In general, the tone of the French
lias been belter than in some weeks,
only the extreme right and left con
tinuing to growl. The Echo de Paris
accused Wilson of trying to placato
Germany. The Populaire, which is
extremely radical, charges the peace
conference, with the exception of Wil
son, is trying to turn the leugue of na
tions into a war machine instead of a
peace machine.
RENTL0W URGES LIMITED
MONARCHY FOR GERMANY
Basle, April 14.-—Count von Rent-1
low, former military expert of the Ber
liner Tageblatt, in an interview tele
graphed here today declared he favors
restoration of a limited monarchy.
"The military spirit does not exist
in Germany," 1A was quoted as say
ing. "It Is a spirit of defense, nat
ural everywhere. If we had a national
spirit as strong as the French, we
would have won the first battle of the
Marne.
"1 do not believe the present confer
ence will make a general and lasting
peace. Further war Is Inevitable.
i x aux, * ...v. " »a iiirt i ta uic,
Peace cannot be just unless Germany
is considered a belligerent and treated
as such."
JAPANESE PEACE ENVOYS
WAIT ORDERS FROM T0KIQ
Paris, April 14.—Japanese peace
delegates today were awaiting instruc
tions from Tokio, for which they
cabled Saturday following the defeat
of thelr amenJnlent t0 the league of
^iX. C0V *"" t Pr ° V ' dlnS f ° F raC ' al
The Japanese are known to be fear
ful of disturbances in Japan, where
feeling was said to be high in support
of the amendment. They would make
no statement today, pending receipt
wor( j from their government.
APRIL 25 DATE
SET FOR HONS
TO SIGN PAPER
Reported Lloyd George So In
formed When Seeking Data
to Tell Britain; Italian Dele
gation Has Domestic Row.
BV CARL D. GROAT
Paris, April 14.—President Wil
son was expected to make a state
ment today outlining the progreea
of the peace conference and show
ing the work it nearly complated.
The "big four" met unexpectedly
from 6 to 8 o'clock last night for
the purpose of reaching an agraa
ment on certain details that would
permit Premier Lloyd George to
leave for London today. Tha prä
mier requested information to Ver
sailles, that he might inform par
liament. it ie understood ho was
told "April 25."
GEORGE MUST EXPLAIN.
Lloyd George will be called upon
to explain why the ag-eement re
garding reparations does not in
clude provision for Germany to pay
the entire coet of the war, when ho
faces parliament tomorrow. Wil
ton's statement was expected to
assiet Lloyd George in showing
the futility of trying to revoke the
agreement on reparations.
Italian claims were to be discussed
by the "big four" today. It was un
derstood that Premier Orlando and
Foreign Minister Sonnlno are at odds.
Tlie premier's followers are the ones
recently represented as being ready to
quit the conference If they did not get
Flume. Now they are said to havo
agreed tentatively to internationalism
when
of the city, with Sonnlno supporters
threatening to withdraw.
WILSON MORE HOPEFUL.
President Wilson, however, was rep
resented as entertaining a much mors
hopeful viewpoint than a week ago,
he ordered the George Wash
ington to Brest. His closest friends
say "he's got his fighting clothes on
still and is determined to force things
through quickly." The George Wash
ington will be used, according to these
, , , .. . . ,
en ^ 8 ' ^ matters do not proceed as
rapidly as it now' appears they will.
Clemenceau, asked regarding the
suggested date of April 25 for calling
in the Germans, said it had not yet
been definitely decided, and that poa
sibly it might be earlier.
THE WEATHER
Forecast for Boise and vicinity—
FAIR TONIGHT AND TUESDAY;
FREEZING TEMPERATURE TO
NIGHT.
For Idaho—Tonight and Tuesday,
fair: freezing temperature tonight
Highest temperature yesterday ....47
Lowest temperature this morning ,.8t
Mean temperature yesterday ......41

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