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Evening capital news. (Boise, Idaho) 1901-1927, April 19, 1919, Image 1

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Japanese Papers Demand Secession From League Wants Denied
ALL THE NEWS
WEST
EVENING CAPITAL NEWS
WEATHEB
Probably ahowars to
night and 8unday.
VOL. 3CI.II
BOISE, IDAHO, SATURADY, APRIL 19,1919
No. 95
DECLARE BASIC
LAW Of LEAGUE
FALSE; BRITISH
ACTS ASSAILED
Nipponese Press Runs Riot Ov
er the Alleged Mistreatment)
of Jap Demands for Racial
Equality Amendment.
THREATEN MONROE POLICY
CREATION FOR THE ORIENT
Hochi Blames British Delegates
.
for Not Placating Australian
u .__ _. .
Premier hughes, Who Stood
Firm Against Jap Demands.
-
Tokio, April 16—(Delayed)—(United
Press)—Declaring Japan should secede
from the league of nations, and that
the principles of humanity underlying
iho i„o.mo ___- .. -
ini th , uA B aI
1tv ZL?r s "T U T~
l u o f " ", nd ff'
mon.led a Monroe doctnne for the
un '
The outburst was occasioned by pub
lication of news from Paris that the
league of nations had rejected the
Japanese amendment providing for the
principle of equality of nations.
- 11 leading papers appeared today
with strong editorials regarding the
rejection of the Japanese amendment.
ABUSES DELEGATES.
The Hochi Shimbun abuses the
delegates to the peace conference
and declares the Japanese empire
should take this opportunity to
secede from the league.
"The acceptance of the Ameri-
can Monroe doctrine and the re-
jection of the Japanese plea/' says
the Hochi, "shows that the princi-
ples of justice and humanity un-
derlying the league are mere false-
hoods."
!

!
Jlnchi blames the British delegates
for not placating Premier Hughes of
Australia. "The real sentiments of the
British are now apparent," it adds. j
OWN MONROE DOCTRINE.
Nichi Nichi insists that since the
commission recognized the American
doctrine Japan can properly demand
n Monroe doctrine for the Orient. i
Yamato Shimbun fears for the I
A agio-Japanese alliance "when the!
votes of Hughes is so much stronger'
than the votes of Saionji and Makino."
Tomato refers to the question of clos
ing Japanese schools in Hawaii.
"What if the authori
.
ies ordered the
closing of American schools here?" it
rs 'Y s - I
i omiuri Shimbun admits Japan con* j
ti ibutod little to the winning of the
war and declared it was a fundamental
mistake to raise the great question of .
racial equality.
It calls upon the people, however, tç*j
nwake an< * "attend to the solidiflca- I
turn of the nation s strength and to
in staking the
determine not to flincl:
state's late against a great foe."
First positive word with details of
the defeat of the 'Japanese amend
ment was dispatched to Tokio by wire- j
less by the United Press April 12—,
one week ago. In view of the fact j
that both cables and wireless are five j
and six days behind on dispatches, the
above cable, giving the Japanese at-I
titude following Japan's defeat, was |
received in remarkably quick time.
AGAIN DELAY HARBOR STRIKE.
N'cw York, April 19—The third gen
eral harbor strike, scheduled to start
at 6 a. rn., has been postponed another
24 hours while Mayor Hylan confers
With parties to the dispute.
FRENCH FLYER FONATAN
STARTS THIRD ATTEMPT
FOR TRANS-OCEAN HONOR
Paris, April 19 —(United Press)—
Lieutenant Fonatan, French avi
ator, started on hit third attempt
at a trans-Atlantic flight for Casa
Blanca at 6:10 a. m.
The actual trane-Atlantic por
tion of Fonatan's proposed flight
would be oovered in two jump*,
from Dakar to St. Paul'a Rocks,
1100 miles, and from there to Per
nambuco, 750 milae. The total dia
tanoe to be covered between Villa
' Coublay and Rio Janeiro ie 5500
milee.
Fonatan'a firat attempt waa
made March 16. Ha wae forced to
land bacauaa of angina trouble, af
ter making 100 milae.
Hie aecond attempt, April 8, el
eo ended in failure owing to a mie
hap to hie motor, after ha had
been in the air a iittLa more than
an hour.
FLYING CIRCUS Of VICTORY
LOAN GREETED BY THOUSANDS
Great Multitude of People Bank
Grounds and the Foothills
Watching Maneuvers of Fa
mous Birdmen.
SPECIAL
ARRIVES TODAY
English Aviators Join It At Po
catello--Machines and Equip
ment Transferred to Grounds
Without Difficulty.
Thousands of people crowded the
Boise barracks this afternoon and
banked about the foothills, occupied
the roofs of high buildings and lield
other points of advantage to witness
the greatest combined air program of
ÄT
j circus of the victory loan performed,
I directing their operations from the
Th *
' St ™}\ T , , ? S'
- *, a f
in which both the American and Ger
man machines participated. Probably
™ torm ( > f propaganda has aroused
more interest in a government bond
drIve than the one afforded by { he fly .
• ing circus.
Business was virtually suspended In
'
j the clty . Under proclamation of Mayor
Hayg all bllfdncss houses closedi whlle
federal, state, county and city offices
j suspended operations for the after-
noon. Boise entertained more visitors
during the day than it has at anv other
■ tlme for years. All incoming trains
land electric cars brought them to the
city.
FLY IN MORNING
The first view of the birdmen was
afforded during the morning hours
when the miichines were tested out.
They flew over the business section of
the city executing graceful maneuv-
! ers, while thousands of people watched
• from the streets. The weather was
ideal for flying, the sky being
from dark clouds, the sun »shining and
! only a slight breeze from the south
east. The machines in operation dur
ing th^ morning climbed to high ele
vations at time, while at others they
j skirted the roofs of buildings so that
[the drivers could be plainly seen. E.
M. Hoover, secretary of the state lio
erty loan committee, was one of the
passengers given a trip over the city
i this morning.
SPECIAL ARRIVES EARLY
The circus with its 14 cars, 18 air
planes, 11 flyers, 47 mechanics, officers
and aides slid into Boise this morning
at 5 o'clock, two hours ahead of ached
ule. Their early arrival was not un
heralded, however, and a few people
were at the depot to see the special
arrive, but it was not until 6:30 that
the crowd began to gather and it was
that hour before the mechanics, bird
men and a few distinguished citizens
accompanying the train to Boise, beg in
to stir about.
The officers In charge of the circus !
I and flyers were accorded a welcome !
shortly after 7 o'clock by a committee |
of citizens composed of Ed IT. Peasley, ;
O. G. F. Marchus, Adjutant General
A. H. Wilson. Tom Martin, Captain
Harry Boies. F. F. Johnson, Frank
Davidson, Crawford Moore, Craig Cof
Hitt and Mowbray David
j fin, G
son.
j The special stopped at Eleventh
j street. The baggage cars containing I
the planes were separated, the ends
taken out and the crowd given a view
| of the idg plunes. Gradually median
les, awakened from their slumbers, and
began to appenr and Interest Increased.
WERE IN ACTUAL SERVICE
The planes consist of five Gorman
fokkers, three French spads, three 8.
E. fives, English planes, und seven
Curtis planes. The foreign planes all
came from the war zone, the German
fokkers being those captured during
the war. All tile foreign planes saw
actual service, but the Curtis planes
have only been used in the training
(Continued on Page Two.)
TBMS-SEA FLYER HOPS' BUT FALLS IN DRINK'
St. John*, N. F., April 19—Wea
thor condition* for tho trans-At
lantic flight woro unfavorable to
day.
There waa a moderate east
wind, however, which gave eigne
of drifting away the fog.
London, April 19— (5:40 a. m.)—
(United Press)—Major J. C. P.
Wood, flying to Ireland on tho
firat lag of a trana-Atlantic at
tempt lata yeaterday, fall in the
Irish aaa off tho coaat of Angleay,
it waa learned today. Ha and hia
navigator, Captain C. C. Wylia,
ware unhurt. Their machine ia be
ing towed to Holyhead.
NEW ENGLAND TUMBLES
BACK TO REVERB'S TIME
Boston. April 19—Just 144 years
ago Paul Revere made his famous
ride from Boston to Concord and
Lexington, because there was no
other means of quick communica
tion. Today, New England, with
telephone service paralyzed, found
itself resorting to some of the
means of communication employed
in Paul Revere's days.
In many small towns and villages,
with only limited telegraph facili
ties, men on foot and on horse back
went from town to town carrying
messages and transacting business
usually carried on over the tele
phone. In many places the automo
bile supplanted the time-honored
steed and small boys as messen
gers, reaped a rich harvest.
GLASS REFUSES
TO PLAY ROLE IN
LOANSQUABBLE
Treasury Department Dodges
Controversy Raised Over
Sunday Observance; Relig
ious Advocates Oppose Sab
bath Day Exhibition.
Washington, April 19 — (United
Press)—The treasury department has
pulled itself out of the tight over ob
servance of Sunday in the demonstra
j tions in the victory loan campaign.
Any controversy over whether the
free'flying circusses should be permitted;
! that being the only available date—
! they would refuse to subscribe to the
| loan. A similar situation in Walla
; Walla, Wash., obtained according
whether motion pictures promoting
bond sales should be shown, or whe
ther other exhibits should be kept
open, will be left entirely to the local
loan committees concerned, it was
declared today.
But a great long distance fight has
been raging, regardless of the stand
taken by war loan organization offi
cials. Secretary Glass' office lias re
ceived a veritable deluge of tele
grams some protesting against any
kind of demonstration on Sundays dur
ing the campaign but more demanding
that no cancellation of flights, ex
hibits, parades, etc., be made. So the
treasury withdrew.
At Butte, Mont., the ministerial ob
jection to a Sunday exhibition of the
French, British and American aces
brought a very emphatic move from
the union labor contingent. leaders
of Butte miners' unions announced that
if the flying circus was not permitted
to stage Its show there on Sunday—
I f rom France, the war department an
noli need today.
telegrams received at war loan head
quarters.
, FOR EARLY CONVOY.
Washington, April 19—All organiza
tions of the 33rd and 78th divisions
have been assigned to early convoy
The following organizations have
also been assigned to early convoy:
Salvage squad 4; 66th company,
transportation corps; aero squadrons I
60, 637, 660 and 110; first, second and |
4th engineers service companies of the j
20th engineers and base hospitals 64, j
SO and 86.
SEVEN U-BOATS LOST IN GALE.
Paris, April 19—Seven German sub
marines being towed from England to
France have been lost in a storm, it
was announced today. One of the
fleet, the U-155, has reached Oher
burg.
Wood's ropresantativ* announced
the aviator would not attempt an
other flight for sovaral day*.
Wood'* plana, tho Shamrock, es
corted by another machin# piloted
by L. Parker, left East Churoh,
England, for Limerick, which waa
to bo the starting plao* for th#
"big hop" at 6 p. m. No details
of the accident had bean raoaivad
early today.
Th# ninth entry in the Daily
Mail's 850,000 trans-Atlantic flight
contest is an alliance bi-plans, fit
ted with a 450-horse powered Na
pier-Lion motor. J. A. Peter* is
th# navigator and Captain W. ft.
Curtis, R. A. F., th* pilot.
CHICAGO SWEPT
BYCRIMEWAVE;
105MURDERSIN
LAST 4 MONTHS
Due to Post-War Conditions,'
Says Police Chief, Who Fore
casts More Law Breaking in
Months to Come.
MANY EX-CONVICTS TURN
N FROM SERVICE TO CRIME
'
Unemployment and Massing of
Aliens Responsible; 3Q Delib
Chicago. April 19.—(United Press)—
Chicago today was in the midst of a
crime wave .attributed by Chief of
Police J. J. Garrlty to "unavoidable
post-war conditions."
The crime record here to date listed
105 homicides since January 1, hun
dreds of hold-ups and burglaries and
many more minor crimes. Unemploy
ment, return of ex-convicts, embold
ened by army service, a slackening of
morality for some returned soldiers
and the crowding together here of
many nationalities were points in
Gnrrity's explanation of conditions. He
said there would be more breaking.
Instead of less. In the next few
months.
FEARS INCREASED CRIME.
"Clilcako's record, though appalling
in my opinion, is no different from
that of any other large American
city." said Chief Garrity.
"Since the signing of the armis
tice there have come home scores
of criminals, ex-convicts and
thugs who are returning to their
old haunta after being permitted
ot join the army. With the factor
of unemployment and the massing
of dozen's of nationalities in the
narrow limits of a city, crime will
not decrease, but will go to unbe
lievable heights. That is true of
the larger cities in the whole
country. It is an unavoidable
post-war condition."
Following the murder of 20-year-old
Bertha McMillan by a jealous lover
and the prabably fatal shooting of a
70-year-old druggist by a youthful
bandit, Chief Garrity today was in
conference with his 36 police captains !
in efforts to make plans to cope with
the situation.
30 COLD MURDERS.
In addition to the shootings the last
two days have seen a $34,000 bank
hold-up, murder of a watchman by
four negro robbers and scores of mi
(Continued on Page Two.)
I
|
j
j
2892 YANKS REACH N. Y.
ON TRANSPORT STEUBEN
New York. April 10.— (United Press)
-The transport Von Steuben arrived
here today with 2892 troops aboard. !
She sailed from Brest on April 11. j
included in the troops on the steam- :
ship were brigade headquarters of the !
60th fiel artillery, nine officers and 66
men; the 110th engineers complete, 46
officers and 1611 men; the general i
headquarters A. E. F. band, three offi- ,
cers and 101 men; 12 officers of the
128th field artillery; the 102nd aero
squadron, three officers and 133 men; :
the 835th ambulance company, three i
officers and 113 men; Brest convales- !
cent detachments numbers 166 to 170, 1
inclusive, 600 men; casual companies. I
—____ - ++■* - — - , !

BURGLARS AND COPS FIGHT
DUEL; ONE DEAD, 3 INJURED
Des Moines, April 19.—A burglar Is
dead and three persons are wounded
seriously as a result of a pistol duel
between police and burglars early to
day.
Among the Injured is a police ser
geant, the owner of the store, in which
the burglars were surprised, and a
second burglar. A third thief was ar- j
rested. ,
t -1
j
!
j
!
'
THE WEATHER
Forecast for Boise and vicinity:
PROBABLY SHOWERS TONIGHT
AND SUNDAY.
For Idaho: Tonight and Sunday, rain
ln north portion, probably showers In
south portion.
Highest temperature yesterday.... 60
Lowest temperature this morning.. 54
Mean temperature yesterday.......41
'
!
TmifllillTIAll nr
TERMINATION OF
FOOH PREDICTS BOCHE
ASSAULT IN 50 YEARS
IF GIVEN OPPORTUNITY
London, April 19.—(United Press)
—Marshal Focli, In an Interview
with Ward Price, Paris corres
pondent of the Dally Mall, predict
ed that 60 years hence the Ger
mans. If given the opportunity, will
make another assault on France
and Great Britain.
"Now that we have reached the
Rhine we must stay there," Foch
was quoted as saying.
"It is our only safety. We must
have it as a barrier and we must
double lock the door.
"Remember those 70,000,000 Ger
mans will always be a menace to
us. They are a people both en
vious and warlike. Their natural
characteristics have not been
changed by the events of the last
four years. Fifty years hence they
will be what they are today. The
next time the Germans will make
no mistake. They will break
through into France and seize the
channel ports as a base of opera
tions against England."
ITALIAN CASE IS
KEPTINSECRET
Silence Veils Proceedings of
Crucial Conference; Japs'
Territorial Claims Leading
Issue at Today's Parley.
By FRED S. FERGUSON.
United Press Staff Correspondent.
Paris, April 19—With the Italian
situation still In a critical stage—so
far as available information is con
cerned—the "big four" was expected
to be confronted with the additional
problem of adjusting: Japan's terri
torial claims in China.
Premier Orlando was scheduled to
present a demand for Immediate ac
ceptance of the annexationist program
granted Italy under the pact of Lon
don, at yesterday's session of the "big
four." In some quarters It was even
believed he would threaten to wreck
the entire peace settlement by refus
ing to sign the treaty and holding the
other powers to their agreement not
to riiake a separate peace, unless Italy's
aspirations were recognized. What
transpired in the meeting remained a
mystery, as the entire proceeding was
! surrounded with the deepest secrecy.
From certain unofficial sources it was
learned the Italian question was con
tinued until today. This could not be
confirmed.
The Japanese are seeking, princi
pally. ratification of their concessions
in the Shan Tung, peninsula and re
tention of Kiao Shau which they
seized from the Germans. The Chin
ese are bitterly opposed to Japan's
claims and it is understood the ma
jority of the peace delegates are in
clined to favor the Chinese.
CRISIS APPROACHES.
Rome, April 19.—(United Press.)—
... ...
Th ' territorial dispute between Italy
a . n<1 ; U *°-S "V a is approaching a crl
?'*• J* Wtt " Indicated In advices reach
ln ~/ iel f,
10 ^ebenico correspondent of the
'-»poca reported the local Jugo-Slav
l ,lesB had published an order for gen
era * mobilization of men between 20
an( * >' earM of age. Police were said
to he preventing an exodus of male
citizens.
Reports from Paris were admitted
In government circles today to have
Produced a "painful impression." The
Italian press is unanimously exhorting
Premier Orlando not to sign a peace
that does not include the new boun
darles claimed by Italy.
The Oourlere d'ltalla states the
American mission dispatched to the
Adriatic made a report to the pence
conference "wholly unfavorable to
Italian claims."
The Giornale d'ltalia publishes a
Paris dispatch claiming President
Wilson is obdurate in his stand
against awarding Flume to Italy. Ac
cording to more optimistic but uncon
firmed reports, Italy will receive
Flume, the port of which will be In
teinnttonallzed under Italy's sover
eignty and will also receive a manda -
tory over Dalmatia, together with an
Indemnity of 15,000,000,000.
ENTERTAIN COLORADO YANK8.
New York, April 19—Seven hundred
Colorado men. members of the 167th
Infantry, will be guests of "home
folks" here today. Arriving from
Cnmp Merritt, they will parade and
then take a sight-seeing trip l n auto
mobiles. In the afternoon they will
be entertained at the Rocky Mountain
club. Governor Gunter of Colorado
will participate ln the reception.
DECLARED M FREKCH CIRCLES
HALF OF CITY ON WEST BMK
OF RECMO RIVER AWARDED TO
ITALY; REMAINDER FOR SUIVS
ITALIAN DELEGATES, HOWEVER, INSIST NO DECISION
REACHED AND THAT REPORTED AWARD WOULD NOT
BE ACCEPTED; S0NNIN0, EXTREMIST ON ITAL
IAN TERRITORIAL EXPANSION, REPLACES ORLANDO
AS SPOKESMAN AT CRUCIAL CONCLAVE.
Paris, April 19.— (United Press)—British troops
have landed at Libau, (Russia), where German troops
have overthrown the Lettish government, according
to the Deutsche Allegemeine Zeitung,
By FRED S. FERGUSON, United Press Staff Correspondent.
Paris, April 19.—A compromise was reported to have been
reached on Italy's claim to Fiume at today's session of the
"big four." This could not be confirmed.
In French circles it was declared that the half of Fiume
on the west bank of the Reczina (Recino) river which cuts
the city in two will be given to Italy, and the remainder of the
city to Jugo-Slavia. Italian delegates declare that no decision
had been reached and that, furthermore, such an award would
not be accepted.
Foreign Minister Sonnino, known to be an extreme advo
cate of Italian territorial expansion, was said to have replaced
Premier Orlando at today's meeting in order to press Italy's
claims.
MOB CZERNIN AT BORDER.
Berne, April 19—Count Czernin, for
mer Austro-Hungarian foreign minis
ter, has been arrested in Feldkirch
while attempting to escape across the
frontier into Switzerland, It was
learned today. Feldkirch is ln Austria,
five miles from the border.
ITALIAN STRIKES EASED.
Rome, April 19—Work has been re
sumed in every city where 24-hour
strikes were called as anti-govern
ment demonstrations, it was offi
cially announced today. During the
progress of strikes there were some
casualties as the result of clashes be
tween Socialists and antl-Soclalists
in Rome and Milan.
HUNS TO LEAVE ON 24th.
Berlin, April 19—The German peace
delegation will leave for Versailles on
April 24. It was announced today.
The enemy representatives are
scheduled to arrive ln Versailles April
25. Under normal conditions, the trip
from Berlin to Paris can be made ln
18 to 20 hours.
SOVIETS HAVE 20,000 TROOPS.
Copenhagen, April 19—Communists
defending Munich were reported today
to have gathered 20,000 well armed
troops.
General Kpps, according to Berlin
reports, is marching upon Munich with
30,000 government troops from Stutt
gart. The population of that city has
protested against removal of troops
fearing a Spartacan outbrouk. The dis
patch added that "a bloody Faster is
expected."
DISORDERS IN VIENNA.
Copenhagen, April 19—Five police
men were killed and 40 wounded and
20 soldiers and workmen were wound
ed in a clash before the parliament
building in Vienna Thursday, accord
ing to a dispatch from that city to
day.
Wounded soldiers and unemployed
workmen attempted to interview the
ministers who refused to see them. The
delegation began firing and stormed
tho building. Policemen who oposed
them were swept aside. They occu
pied tha building and disarmed the
police. The cabinet members fled. The
demonstrators were reported to have
voluntarily evacuated the building a
few hours later.
WILSON TO PROBE ARMY
COURTSMARTIAL STATUS
Washington, April ig—President
Wilson has informed war depart
ment official* of his determina
tion to investigate th# whole sys
tem of army eeurtmartial on hia
return to tho United Stats*. Tha
firat concarn ef tha présidant will
ba to aoo that just santancas ar*
meted out to all man who have
bean found guilty under tha army
eourtmartial ayatam, h* Has indi
cated to hi* advitora. It i* ex
pected that in many eaaas h* will
ua* his axaeutiv* clamanoy pow
er*.
WISON CABLES
INS NUBILITY TO
ACTINWJNKOUT
More Than 8000 New England
Telegraph Operators Threat
en to Quit if Telephone Strike
Not Settled Soon.
Paris, April 19.—(United Press.) —
President Wilson, responding; to tho
appeal of the governors of Massachu
setts, Rhode Island and New Hamp
shire to settle the telephone employes
strike in New England, has cabled the
following to Secretary Tumulty:
"Tell them I appreciate the serious
ness of the situation, but that I am
unable to act intelligently from this
distance."
TELEGRAPHERS ON EDGE.
Boston, April 19.—A strike of more
than 8000 commercial telegraph oper
ators in New England may be called
early next week if the strike of 2(\
000 New England telephone operators
is not settled within a few days* ac
cording to indications today.
STRANDED U-BOAT FOUND
20 MILES FROM ENGLAND
Boulogne, April 19.— (United
Press.)—Th# steam trawler Saint
Joachim found a Gorman subma
rine flying th* imperial ensign
floating in th# open oca 20 mnas
south of tha English coast last
night. The crew of tho trawler
waited until dawn and than
boarded tha U-boat. They found
th* craft deserted and unarmed,
but intact. She was identified as
th* U-136, on* of the latest mod
al*.
Th* U-boat waa towad Into
port here and a roper, mad,
the navy authorities.
Th* mysterious submarin* may
be one of the seven Gorman sub
marines reported lost in a storm
while being towed from an English
to a French port.
SAY8 LANDLORDS-AID REDI8M
Washington, April 19. — "Pirate"
landlords ln the District of Columbia
are causing conditions that aid Bol
shevism, Captain Julliis Peyser, head
of the United States housing corpora
tion during the war, charged today.
Washington property owners, Pey
ser says, are trying to raise the high
rental* now being charged from 10 tc
100 ptr cent

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