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Evening capital news. (Boise, Idaho) 1901-1927, April 19, 1919, Image 2

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ide wit» Oman
MUf DISRUPTED
8Ï CIBLE UK
Frisco Business Men Practically
Helpless; Pacific Wire Six
Days Behind Schedule; 25
Days to Receive Replies.
San Francisco. April 19— (United
Press)—Cable and wireless communi
cations with the Orient are so con
nested that importers and exporters
here are "practically helpless'' It was
declared today.
The Pacific cable Is six days behind
the business In sight. The government
wireless is'five days behind.
J. G. Shipp, manager of the cable
department of W. R. Grace and com
pany, importers and exporters, told the
United Press that in a record he had
kept on 20 messages it had required
and average of 2B days to get cabled
replies from Japan.
U. S. CABLES IDLE.
"The situation is so serious that
business men are practically helpless,"
•aid Shipp.
The government, however, which
controls wireless communications as
well us cable, is using only one-half
of its wireless equipment in this dis
trict and is confining its high powered
station at C'hollas Heights, near San
Diego, to government messages, al
though it was originally built to com
municate with Hawaii.
The high powered Marconi station
nt Bolinus, Cal., is not operating, al
though it is the most powerful station
on the coast. It was closed down by
the government during the war be
cause Its powerful signals could be
read in Germany.
"ROTTEN SERVICE."
Of the three high powered stations
on the coast, only one, that at South
California, is being used for commer
cial messages, and one of them is Idle.
Shipp gave an instance of what he
termed "absolutely rotten service."
On April I. lie said, be sent a messn
to Japan at the urgent rate of $5.16
per word. He learned, lie said, that
it had not been transmitted nine days
later.
RED FORCES SUFFER
CRUSHING DEFEAT IN
LAKE VIGOZERO ZONE
London, April 19—(United Press)—
Russian troops, under General May
nard, the British commander, erush
lngly defeated the Bolsheviki in the
Lake Vigozero region Thursday, driv
ing them 12 miles to the south, tho
war office announced today.
The allied attack directed at a point
along the south eastern end of the
lake gave them complete control of
the lake and the main road to the
White Sea.
DISASTER THREATENS.
Washington. April 19—Collapse of
the Bolsheviki army in eastern I'.us
sla under the pressure of the Siberian
forces is imminent, official advices
from Omsk to the Russian embassy to
day reported.
Three entire Red divisions defied
Trotsky's order to attack the Republi
cans, it was stated, and were ordered
to the rear.
DISHEARTENED SERVICE
MEN GET FIRST CHANCE
IN ROAD BUILDING JOBS
Mineral Wells, Texas, April 19.—Dis
heartened soldiers, sailors and ma
rines will be given preference in public
road construction if a resolution passed
b.v the United States Good Roads asso
ciation In convention is followed out.
The convention entered its final ses
sions today. The following officers
were elected:
Senator John H. Bankhead, Alabama,
re-elected president: Governor Charles
H. Brough, Arkansas, first vice-presi
dent; Governor C. A. Larralzolo, New
Mexico, second vice-president; R. M.
Hubbard of Texas, third vice-presi
dent, and J. A. Rountree, Birmingham,
Ala., director general.
MANY KILLED, SEVERAL
SHIPS ARE CRUSHED IN
AVALANCHE IN ICELAND
London, April 19— Many persons
have been killed and several
ship« were overwhelmed in an
avalanche at Hjedins, IcelJhd, it
was reported in a dispatch re
ceived here today. A great quan
tity of oil wae destroyed. Damage
wae estimated at more than two
million.
GRAVE YAWNS FOR MEX.
BANDITS.
Vera Cruz, April 19—Courtmartial
of General Francisco Alvarez and other
Insurgents, captured when General
Aurelio Bianquet was killed, began
here today. The proceedings were ex
pected to be brief. The law provides
for prompt execution of persons bear
ing arms against the government.
The head of General Bianquet was
severed from his body and brought
here for Identification and was burled
here yesterday after It had been
viewed by more than 20,000 persons.
NAME8 BARNES WHEAT
DIRECTOR.
Washington, April 19— Julius H.
'Barnes, president of the federal grain
corporation, has been appointed by
President Wilson to be United States
wheat director, upon recommendation
of Herbert Hoover, it was announced
today.
Barnes cabled the president his ac
ceptance of the post.
! FRISCO LABOR COUNCIL
MAKES DRASTIC MOVE
TO CURB RLDISM LURE
San Francisco, April 19.—(United
!"res*.)—Sun Francisco labor Is tak
ing an important step today In the dl
dection of "solidarity." It la said to
tie the most radical move taken by the
labor council In years.
A committee of five will be elected
to study agreements between workers
and employers to devise some plan
whereby all future agreements shall
expire on the same day.
The council's desire Is that all trades
may be in a position to strike in sym
pathy simultaneously in a. general
strike In case the demands of any one
union are refused.
The more conservative element of
tho council, which had been expected
to fight the proposal, sat silent while
delegates who have not spoken in
years advised favorable notion.
Labor leaders said today the step
was an attempt to forestall desertions
to the I. \V. \V. They said the move
would rob the I. W. W. of their big
argument.
CONFIRM BANDIT'S DEATH
Washington, April 19.—Consul Fos
ter at Vera Cruz today cabled, the state
department that Mexican authorities
have confirmed officially the death of
General Bianquet.
Later the Mexican embassy here is
sued a statement declaring it had re
ceived official advices that General
Bianquet was killed by troops under
General Candido Aguilar during a bat
tle near Vera Cruz.
FAMILY OF FIVE FOUND DEAD
Detroit, April 19.—Five Italian per
sons, members of the Deluvla family,
wore found dead In their home here
early today. Their death Is believed
to have been caused fnjm poisoning
which followed the eating of spaghetti
furnished them by another family.
FlîïiCBS
(Continued from Tage One.)
ramps, being lighter model machines,
not fast enough for war service.
The fokkers are the most powerful
planes which the Germans used dur
ing the war. They are driven by 260
horsepower engines and make a speed
of 13» miles per hour. The French
and English planes are also powerful
machines, and while their engines are
not as powerful they possess other
superior qualities and can maneuver
at as fast a speed.
From three to four planes are car
ried in each car. Ten to 12 are used
in the demonstration given in the
cities selected for boosting the Vic
tory Loan campaign. The other ma
chines are held In reserve in case of
accident, but so far on tho great con
tinental trip nothing serious has hap
pened. Barring a fow minor accidents
alighting on muddy aviation fields
there has not been an accident of any
kind.
Tlie flyers say they have been ac
corded a warm welcome in every city
and if the enthusiasm displayed in
seeing the machines in operation can
ho taken as a criterion of American
patriotism the Victory Loan will go
over with a whoop.
Three, and four planes are carried in
each car. They are assembled at tlie
cars, the tails placed on trucks and
are then hauled to the fields on their
own wheels, the wings taking up al
most tlie entire street.
NOTED FLYERS INCLUDED.
Noted flyers, w'hose services during
the war have brought recognition,
who will soar in tlie air today are,
Lieut. Col. William Thaw, who re
ceived numerous decorations for
valor; Maj. Carl Spatz, a member of
the 13th aero squadron, credited with
smashing three Hun planes. He fought
his first air battle over Metz and was
commended by the French government
for his dash and valor. The others
are: Lieut. George W. Furyear; Lieut.
H. W. Follmer; Capt. W. J. Hoover;
Maj. John Hambleton ; Lieut. Janies E.
Reid; Lieut, C. V. Getchell; Lieuten
ant Wirt, Captain Smith, Lieutenant
Halverson, Lieutenant Miller, photog
rapher; C. M. McMullen McClain and
S. Cavanough.
LOCAL PASSENGERS SELECTED
Numerous applications were made
by Boise citizens to soar skyward with
the famous oversea pilots, but as the
program in tlie air lasts an hour and
liait', but five were chosen by the
committee to enjoy the privilege.
Those selected were Mrs. C. C. Ander
son, Mrs. Sam Ballarityne. Ed Peas
ley, Jack Sharp and Governor D. W.
Davis. Passengers are taken up only
in the Curtis plans, each of which con
tains two seats. It is thought that
Governor Davis may surrender his
privilege today to some other as he
enjoyed a trip at Pocatello Friday and
was given all the thrills of the air
even to making the loop.
Victory loan speakers will occupy
some time in telling the multitude why
they should buy victory bonds. A pro
gram of music will also he given under
the direction of Eugene Earner and
tlie crowd will sing, "Uncle Sammy,
Hero's My Share."
The city is today harboring the larg- j
est crowd in its history. For two :
days every hotel lias been crowded to !
its capacity.
Private homes have been opened ■
and every available room in the city i
has been placed at the command of ;
the visitors. People who drove ma- j
chines to Boise were fortunate as many j
were obliged to occupy them for beds, j
The restaurants and cafeterias did a
heavy business, but by adding extra I
help handled the crowds well, serving
meals almost continuously.
CHICAGO SWEPT
(Continued from Page Ope.)
nor hold-ups, slugglngs and purse
snatchlngs.
Of the 105 killings—which Includes
30 deliberate murders, besides many
to
GENEVA DEFINITELY DECIDED UPON AS CAPITAL OF LEAGUE
4 MV photograph of Geneva, Switzerland, the capital of the league of nations.
j
:
!

i
;
j
j
j
I
President Wilson's speech in be
half of Geneva, it seems, is wholly
responsible for the selection of
that city ns the capital of the
league of nations. This pictur
esque and ancient city which has
been selected for the capital of the
league is on the banks of the
cases of mansluaghter and homicide—
63 mysteries still baffle the police.
Guilt was established In only 42 cases.
San Francisco, April 19—There is no
unusual crime wave on the Pacific
coast at present, Duncan Matheson,
captain of detectives, told the United
Press today.
"No doubt there is a crime wave in
the east, due to post-war conditions
as reported," he said. "But this will
not affect the coast. There was not
so much war activity on the coast, and
as a result there is less unemploy
ment r.ow. Also, fewer soldiers and
sailors are being discharged here.
Conditions here are about normal, and
discharged soldiers and sailors have
had very little crime to their discredit."
KEPT UNDER COVER
Philadelphia. April 19.—Police here
claim that no increase in erimo lias
been noted since the first of the year.
But numerous reports from authentic
sources indicate that holdups and rob
beries are more prevalent now than a
year ago and In many Instances evi
dence that police have suppressed pub
licity of crimes committed has been
discovered.
BLAME FOREIGNERS
New York, April 19.—The crime
wave, which has been sweeping New
York since the first of the year, is
continuing unabated, although police,
officials are taking energetio measures
to stamp it out. Twenty-two holdups
were reported within 24 hours during
the last week.
Officials place the blame upon the
non-resident population which is
flooding the city. Unemployment is
also blamed while a few crimes have
been fixed upon discharged soldiers
and sailors.
From January 1 to March S more
than 200 robberies were reported to
Manhattan police. The loot ran Into
hundreds of thousands.
INCREASES IN CLEVELAND.
Cleveland, Ohio, April 19—There has
been n slight Increase in crime in
Cleveland since demobilization be
gan, according to a report compiled by
Dr. Christian, chief probation officer.
Christian andtthe police attribute the
increase to the end of the "work or
fight" order.
The crime epidemic, here since 1916,
PINNEY
3 DAYS
AND 8ATURDAY
MATINEE
COMMENCING
FRIDAY, APRIL 26
AL WOOD'S
LAUGHING PLAY
Mary's
Ankle
IT'S WELL WORTH
8EEING
THE 8HOW THAT MADE
ALL NEW YORK LAUGH!
AUDRA ALDER
and large supporting
CA8T
note THE PRIOE8
28o, BBo, 83c
TAX INOLUDED
in
Rhine in Switzerland at the south
ern end of Lake Geneva. The town
is divided into two parts by tlie
Rhine. On the left bank lies the
"Old Town" seat of the govern
ment and the center of traffic,
while on the right is the quarter
of "St. Gervais." Ôeneva dates
reached its crest this year in January,
but has ebbed somewhat since, be
cause of newspaper publicity and
heavy sentences imposed on crim
inals.
St. Louis, Mo., April 19—St. Louis
has been on a wild spree of crime for
three months.
Chief of Detectives Hannlgan and
other police heads today declared the
crime orgy had got beyond propor
tion with former years and to date has
shown no tendency to decline.
St. Louis has averaged one murder
a day for three months. Added to this
more than a score of hold-ups, in
which large sums were secured, have
been staged. The city has been treated
to all varieties of criminal life from
a
!
is
j
'
!
is 1
is I
j
to
in
or
ar news.
Notice to Elks
As a testimonial of our appreciation of the service
rendered during the past ten years by our worthy
Chaplain, the Rev. David H. Jones, members of Boise
L t°^n e I 0 ' P* 0. J'-., are requested io assemble
at Elks Home, Easter Sunday, April 20th. at 7:30 p. m.
to attend in a body the special services at Christ
Church, 15th and Ridenbaugh Streets.
brothers having automobiles will confer a favor by
having them at Elks Building at time above mentioned.
W. J. STOLLE, Exalted Ruler.
E. W. JOHNSON, Secy.
g FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH ■
isr Ninth and State Streets
=5 Robert M. Donaldson, D. D., Pastor
I EASTER SUNDAY, APRIL 20,1919
=e 11:15 a.m.—Life and Immortality.
§e 8:00 p. m.—Sacred Cantata.
I SEVER LAST WORDS OF CHRIST
By Double Quartette Choir
Louise Woodruff
Musical Director
5= The Public Is Cordially Invited __
ATTENTION!
Lawyers, Accountants, Corporation
Executives
And any one Interested in Corporation Income Tax returns.
Corporation Income and Profits Tax
Returns
REQUIRE MANY
Supplemental Schedules and Balance
Sheets
No blank forms are furnished by the Government for this purpose.
A publishing house In New York City under the direction of George
C. Holton, Esq., of the New York Bar, an expert In Tax Lew, assisted
by a staff of expert accountants, has just Issued a complete set of
some twenty-five Schedules and Balancb Sheets, arranged in accord
ance with Government requirements. —
The entire set Is suitably Indexed, printed In triplicate, and bound
In book form, perforated so that any or all the forms may be de
tached. This provides an original to file with return, a copy to retain
and a triplicate for working eheet purposes. It also includes a work
•heat which gives an accurate and ingenious formula for computing
the Corporation Tax.
A BET OF THESE FORMS. USED TO PREPARE AND FURNISH
THE MASS OF ADDITIONAL INFORMATION REQUIRED BY
THE GOVERNMENT. WILL BE OF GREAT ASSISTANCE TO TAX
PATERS AND WILL SIMPLIFY THE PREPARATION OF THIS
MOST INTRICATE AND IMPORTANT RETURN.
PRICE $3.00 PER BET
FOR »ALE BY
The Capital News Pub. Co.
•OISE, IDAHO
Ave Bi'incl
Organist
from the first century B. C., and
its history as it emerged through
tlie centuries is indeed interesting
and varied. The city will he much
more accessible from France and
England, as well as tlie new cen
tral European states, when the
new British channel tunnel is com
pleted.
murder and bank robbery to <!etty
thievery.
Conditions following the war re
fining in unemployment and a gen
eral unrest have been responsible for
tho crime wave. Chief Hannlgan de
clared. •
NO MARKED INCREASE
Boston, April 19.—There has been
no marked increase in crime since the
end of the war, according to the police
here.
The police say that the impression
gained by the public that burglaries,
holdups and murders have increased Is
due, not to an actual Increase In these
crimes, but to the fact that during
the war little newspaper space was al
lotted to accounts of crime because of
ar news.
—and When "\ou \\foke »WÄe Morning
Complexion is Rpsy.
All Headache Gone.
Breath Right. Tongue Clean.
Stomach, Liver and Bowels
Regular—So Convenient!
CANDY CATHARTIC.
*398
Vi
X
Pinney 2 Days "jBZ Apr. 21-22
MATINEE TUESDAY
Kiaw L> Erlanger and GeorgeCTvier
. - Present . _ •
The Glad Play
K 6y Catherine Chisholm Cushing
D isca on the hook of the Same Name by Eleanor H.fbrter
A Comedy for Grown-Ups That^ung Folks Eojcy
SEAT8 NOW 8ELLING
NIGHT ....................$2.00, $1.50, $1.00, 75o. 50c
.............. »1.50, $1.00, 75c, 50c,
PRICES
MATINEE
Where are the
Soldier Dead?
This important question will be the
theme for discussion by Benj. H.
Boyd, V. D. M., of New York, at
PINNEY THEATRE
SUNDAY, APRIL 20,
8 P. M
Many have lost loved ones on tha
field of battle. Where are they7
What say the Scriptures?
Coma and hear a message of hops.
Auspices International Bible Stu
dents.
Seats Free. No Collection.
NOTICE TO THE PUBLIC
THE CHESAPEAKE CAFE
is now open day and night. We serve special
merchants' lunch for 35c.
Ill N. 9th Street
+
REMEMBER JESUS CHRIST
"The Resur root Ion a Fact"
Morning subject at the First Christian
Church, coruer Ninth and Franklin
+
Evening Sermon—"THE RESURRECTION CREDIBLE."
Why not viait tha Pastor'a olass of man in ths Church School at 10 a. m.f
AAAAAMMMMAMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMmMWMMMMIMMMMAAMIMt
EASTER
FIRST METHODIST CHURCH
7 a. m.—Marly Service.
10 a. m.—Easter Exercises In the Sunday School.
11:16 a. m.—Master Services and Sermon by Wlllsle Martin. Idaho
Commandery No. 1, Knights Templar, guests of honor.
• :45 p. m.—Epworth League.
• :0# p. m.—Easter Cantata. "The Resurrection." by quartette.
■MMMMNWMWM

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