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Evening capital news. (Boise, Idaho) 1901-1927, April 23, 1919, Image 1

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Chinese Control of Disputed Territory by Peace s
ALL THE NEWS
FIRST
EVENING CAPITAL NEWS
VOL. XLn.
BOTSE, IDAHO, WEDNESDAY, APRIL 23, 3919
WEATHER
8howera tonight and
Thursday. Warmer to
night.
No. 102
ITALY'S REQUEST FOR FIUME FLATLY DENIED BÏ WILSON
PRESIDENT WILSON DECLARES
EMPHATICALLY THAT ITALIANS
CANNOT HAVE FIUME; PORT TO
RE HELD FOR SMALL NATIONS
SEPARATE RULES CANNOT BE MADE FOR BALKANS, HE
SAYS: THREAT OF SEPARATE PEACE WITH GERMANY
MADE BY ITALY AS RESULT OF DEADLOCK; GREAT
BRITAIN AND FRANCE ALIGNED WITH THE UNITED
STATES; ITALY'S ACTION AWAITED.
By FR KD S. FERGUSON, United Press Staff Correspondent.
Paris, April 23.—President Wilson declared flatly this
afternoon that Italy cannot have Piume.
Possession of this seaport is the bone of contention which
has resulted in the Italians' threatening to withdraw from the
peace conference Nothing now remains for the Italians to do
but put their threat into execution—or back down completely.
The Italian delegates also failed to attend the afternoon
session of the "big four."
A new set of principles can not be
?sl.iblished for the Balkans, be said.
The president held that Fiume can
not be given to Italy, but must be
made available as a seaport for the
small nations behind it.
Wilson pointed out that conditions
existing at the time the pact of London
was signed (1915) have been altered by
the dissolution of Austria-Hungary
and the establishment of new Balkan
states. He insisted the peace confer
ence must apply, the principles estab
lished in the nrmfschc and the "14
mt.s."
If th
pm
•iplo
to be ad -
hered to.
Fima* mu
st serve a
s an
out
b i
for 1h
o commerc
•e, not of
Italy
hut ■
of
tho 1,
nuis to th
e nor tho;
istwa
rd— !
Hui
ns'ary.
Bohemia
(Uzecho-f
Slova
kia).
Itoi
itnanu
i and the
state of
the
new j
Jug
o-Skn
group.
FEAR NOT VALID.
assign Fiume to Italy would bo
ite a feeling that we had dellb
(Continued on Page Two.)
J
Clear Majority of 571 Given
Successful Candidate —Big l
Lead Genera! Surprise—Re-'"
turns in Early.
By a majority of 571, Ernest a. Ka
gleson was Thursday elected mayor of
Boise, defeating John McMillan.
Mayor-elect Eagleson will he inaugur
ated next week, succeeding Mayors. H.
Hays, who was not a candidate for re
election.
The result was never in doubt after
the first two precincts reported. It
was just a question of how large the
majority would be. Mayor-elect Eagle
son received a total of 2214 to 1643 for
McMillan. The easy defeat of McMil
lan by Eagleson was somewhat of a
surprise us it was generally believed
the race would be closer.
RETURNS IN EARLY.
A record was made in the compila
tion of returns. The Capital News
had complete returns from the 11 pre
cincts posted on its bulletin board at
7:45 Tuesday night. The polls did not
close until 7 o'clock. This record was
possible because there were but two
candidates to tally votes for, the candi
dates for short and long term council
men having beep elected at the nomin
ating election April 1.
The total vote cast was larger than
the vote cast for mayor then, a total
of 3629 votes were counted. For the
two candidates for short term council
man, 3398 votes were cast. The elec
tion was very quiet and until a late
hour It was feared that the total vote
would be much lighter than it finally
turned out to be. Most of the voting
was done between 4 o'clock in the aft
ernoon nnd'7 o'clock, in the evening.
Mayor-elect Eagleson carried every
precinct except one, or No. 2, which
was carried by McMillan. In Nos. 3
and 6, two of the larger precincts In
the city, the vote was .very close. In
precinct No. 3, which Eagleson carried
by one vote, the early returns Indicated
he had lost it, but a check was made
and ballots that had been questioned
.(Continued on Page Two.)
BOND SALES IN TWO
DAYS OF CAMPAIGN
REACH HALF BILLION
Washington, April 23. — (United
Press)—The treasury today estimated
the sale of Victory notes for the first
two days of the campaign totalled
$500,000,000.
Incomplete reports received to noon
told of high totals being rolled up in
1 reserve district. If the'
ys is j
mini- I
Pare set
for the first
two da;
maintain
ed, officials s
aid, the 1
mum of
$4,500,000 won
ild be obt;
without
dii l icult > .
An a
verage of $2.'
iO,000,000
must bo
kept up, how*
ever, to "1
jtlie job" on time.
1
I
.
'
TENNESSEE LAUNCHING
IS SET FOR APRIL 30
---- j
Washington, April 23.—Plans are be- !
ing completed by the navy department
l'or the launching April 30 at the
Brooklyn navy yards of the 33.000-ton j
battleship Tennessee, the first of the I
three-year building program battle- [
ships to be built. I
The Tennessee is of the same class I
as the Maryland and Idaho, already j
completed. Though her weight will bo
th« same as that of her sister ships j
when she is completed, '.hi* Tennessee j
will be the heaviest ship launched by
*the navy in point
J 000 tons.
Acting Secretary
]velt will attend the
The governor
>f deadweight—16,
l ™ r ' k
1
■ als
f flip Navy Rouse- !
launching ceremo
of Tennessee anfl j
ted to he pres
•'M
FLYING BOAT TESTED
BY NAVAL AVIATORS
TO CROSS ATLANTIC
New York, April 23. — Naval
aviators Have tried out the N. C.
H.-2, one of the flying boats which
is preparing to attempt a cross
ocean flight shortly. The N. C.
H.-2 rose and landed on the water
several times and then arose to
considerable height. Only a short
time was spent in the air. Sixty
destroyers will act as a patrol
when the flight is staged.
TWENTY-ONE COUNTIES
OF OREGON OVER TOP
Portland, Ore., April 23.—Twenty
one counties of Oregon have attained
their Victory Loan quota. Thirteen
of the remaining 15 have nearly
reached the goal.
FOOD EXPORTS EXTENDED.
Washington, April 23—Limited
quantities of food may now be ex
exported to other parts of Germany
than the zone occupied by the allies,
the war trade board announced L»
day. Export permits for these ship
ments must be obtained from the
board.
,
Forecast for Boise and vicinity—
PROBABLY SHOWERS TONIGHT
THURSDAY; WARMER TO
NIGHT.
I-or Idaho—Tonight and Thursday,
probably showers; warmer tonight.
Highest temperature yesterday ... 76
Lowest temperature this morning.. 47
Mean temperature yesterday ..... 58
LEADING BOND SELLER
AND PURCHASER TO BE
GIVEN TRIP IN PLANE
Washington, April 23.—Here's a
chance for a ride in an airplane.
The treasury department has in
structed local loan committees to
grant a flight daily to the loan
workers selling the largest amount
of bonds in that community that
day. Also the purchaser of the
largest amount of bonds In that
community that day. Also the
purchaser of the largest amount
of bonds will he given a "lift" in
one of the machines.
REPORT THAT'MEN IN
ITALY WILL DISCARD
UNIFORM UNCONFIRMED
Washington, April 23.—The war
department has issued no confirm
ation of the report from Paris that
American soldiers remaining in
Italy will be ordered to wear ci
vilian clothes because of the high
feeling on the part of the Italians
over President Wilson's opposition
to Adriatic claims.
Several units of the 332nd in
fantry still are in Italy, inwhole or
in part, it was stated.
SHIPBUILDERS STRIKE
BECAUSE NEGROES ARE
EMPLOYED IN YARDS
j
I
Toledo, Ohio, April 23. — Two
thousand members of the snip
builders' union, employed at the
yard of the Tolado Shipbuilding
company, struck at noon today, be
cause company officials refused to
discharge 40 i»groes, hired this
week. An nil-morning confj-ence
between union and company offi
cials failed to settle the difficulty.
TRANSPORT MERCURY
DUE IN PORT MAY 4
shington,
(transports are
1 department as
I Transport A
. Newport New
' Detachment 2
April 23.— Sailings of
announced by the war
follows:
Iercury, St. Nazaire to
s. is due May 4 with:
8th division headquar
ters; 2Sth division headquarters troop;
112th Infantry headquarters; first bat-
talion headquarters, medical detach-
ment first battalion and companies A,
j B, C and D, 107th, 110th, 112th and
! 303rd trench mortar battalions; com
pany C,( 114th supply train; sales com
missary unit No. 8; 103rd train head
j quarters, sanitary and ordinance de
I tachments; 103rd train headquarters,
[ sanitary anfl ordnance detachments;
I 103rd mobile ordnance repair shop;
I bakery company 323; base hospitals 2S,
j 31, 56. S3 and 115; evacuation hospital
6» and special casual company 6G0
j dischargees, and 661, furloughs,
j Major General Charles H. Muir, corn
nianding the 28th division, is a passen
J»er.
!
j
BRITISH AND AMERICAN
PRISONERS RELEASED
Washington, April 23. — Six
Americans and six British prison
ers from a Moscow prison have
arrived in Finland in charge of
Louis Penningroth, Y. M. C. A.
secretary, the state department an
nounced today. The American
prisoners are:
George Alborg and Walter Hous
ton. Muskegon, Mich.; William
Schmuclke Stronaster, Manistee.
Mich., all of the 339th infantry;
and Merle Arnold, Y. M. C. A. sec
retary, of Polk, Neb. Among the
British are Mrs. Kean, of the Brit
ish Bible society, and Miss Ah
werst. financial secretary of the
Y. M. C. A. war prisoners' aid.
BREMEN NOW UNDER
COMMUNIST CONTROL
Amsterdam, April 23—(United
Press)—Communists have estab
lished martial law in Bremen, ac
cording to dispatches from that
city today.
All shops, restaurants, theaters
and churches are closed and
street cars are stopped between
6 p. m. and 6 a. m., during which
period the public is not allowed on
the streets. Private use of tele
phones and telegraphs is forbid
den. Only one mail it allowed
daily and this is censored.
The middle classes are striking
in protest.
FIVE FIRES START IN
TOWN OF HILLYARD
, Spokane, Wash., April
mysterious fires breaking out almost
simultaneously threatened the town of
Hillyard, north of this city, last night.
The estimated damage will exceed
$10,000. For three hours every avall
able man from tile Great Northern
railway and Spokane fire department
fought the fires. One fireman was in
Jured by u fulling cornice,
23.—Five
CZECHOSLOVAK
RUMANIANS AND
SERBSADVANCE
ON WIDE FRONT
*
*
*
Reports From Vienna Indicate
That Soviet Government Is
Overthrown; Allied Repre
sentatives Leave Budapest.
HUNGARIAN SITUATION
BECOMES MORE ALARMING

Union of Serbia and Monte
negro Effected Sunday; As
bpmhlu Trancfprc Pm»/or tn
dGIHUiy IldlOICIb ruwei IU
Governor of Serbia.
Vienna, April 23.—Czecho-Slovak
troops were reported today to have
begun advancing along a 45-mile
front between Tyrnau and March
egg
Serbian forces are moving north
ward between the Tisza and the
Danube. Rumanian troops are ap
proaching the Danube.
Marchegg Is only 25 miles, east of
Vienna. The Tisza parallels the Dan
ube about 50 miles to the eastward
n Budapest south to the Hungarian
border.
COLLAPSE IMMINENT.
London. April 23.—Conflicting re
ports continue to be received today re
garding the situation in Hungary. A
dispatch from Berlin said that inform
ation brought from Vienna by airplane
showed the Soviet government had
been overthrown, and that the Ruman
ians were advancing on the whole
front. The latest news direct from
Eudapest, dated Monday, said there
were no disorders, but that the situa
tion was alarming and a collapse im
minent.
The Vienna correspondent of the
Mail said that Professor Brown,
American member of the allied
mission, together with a majority
of the other allied representatives,
had departed from Budapest, leav
ing two Italian diplomats and jun
ior officers of the American food
commission behind.
SERBIANS IN POWER.
A dispatch to the News from Pod
goritza (38 miles north of Scutari) re
ported that the kingdom of Montene
gro ceased to exist Sunday when the
national assembly transferred power to
the Serbian governor, completing the
union of Montenegro and Serbia.
Reports concerning the union of
Montenegro and Serbia as part of the
new Jugo-Slav empire have shown a
wide variance. The Serbs claim the
majority of the Montenegrins favor the
union. Montenegrin representatives,
however, contend their national assem
bly has been packed with pro-Serbians
and that the Montenegrin people wish
to continue their kingdom. They have
even charged that Serbia " has dom
inated Montenegro by military force
since the armistice was signed."
Copenhagen, April 23—A dispatch
from Vienna filed yesterday, said it
was reported in diplomatic circles
that Czecho-Slovak forces were before
Waitzen (15 miles north of Budapest.)
WORKMEN CALLED.
By EDWARD BING.
(United Press Staff Correspondent.)
Budapest, April 20.—Foreign Minis
ter Bela Kun, addressing the work
'men's and soldiers' council, declared
today that Hungnry relies on an inter
national proletarian revolution to pre
vent the allies from overthrowing the
Soviet republic.
"The Rumanians have taken Scath
mar Nemethi (175 miles east of Buda
pest), where the bourgeoisie have re
established the capitalist system," he
said. "The Rumanians are now in
" v " r " "" "
allies intend to strangle us. We px
pent the French, Serbs and Czechs
also to attack us. The allies will
abandon thçtr offensive against ns if
we will form a purely Socialistic or
coalition government. But we refuse
The assembly unanimously passed,
resolution to the effect that "as
many workmen as possible from every
to do this. We rely on an interna
tional .proletarian revolution, as well
I as our own strength."
factory shall go to the front."
The government ordered the muni
tlons factories to work all day Faster;
Monday, which is generally a legal;
holiday. All reserve officers have also
' beep called upon to Join thq Red army,
*****************

CASUALTIES INCREASE. *
Washington, April Ü3. —Total *
* casualties of the A. E F. were *
285,950, according to latest cor- *
* rections, the war department *
* announced toc\ay. This is an *
* increase of 1614 over previous *
* totals. Total deaths now re- *
* ported number 75,344, an In- *
* crease of 305. The Bolshevik! *
* hold. 15 American prisoners, ac- *
* cording to the report. *
* *
*****************
GERMANS INVITED TO
SEND COMMISSION TO
CONFER WITH ALLIES
open the conference aaI soon as pos
sible so that commercial relations l>e
Paris, April 23—Inlvitation to
the Germans to send a commis
sion of food, shipping, (finance and
trade experts to confer with allied
representatives was regarded to
day as the most important step
yet taken toward resumption of
the world's normal business.
The meeting will be held in Versail
les to send commissioners having full
powers to negotiate regarding every
question involved and t(> prepare to
tween Germany and tho allies m iy be
cleared up speedily.
FORMER CANDIDATE
FOR GOVERNOR OF
WASHINGTON SUICIDE
Tacoma, April 23.-j-Faeing trial
In Seattle today on a criminal
charge, Orville Billings, until re
cently president of I tho Pacific
Building and Loan association and
former candidate for governor of
the state, was killed instantly last
night by a bullet fired from a re
tvolver in his own hands.
Billings' five daughters were ab
sent from the home ft the time.
The coroner announced that no
inquest wilj be held.
RETURNED SOLDIER
COMMITS SUICIDE
AFTER DISCHARGE
Dps Moines, Iowa, April 23.—Corpor
al Fred 17. Smith, 23,1 honorably dis
charged member of the 446th field ar
tillery, ended his life with gas during
the night. His body teas found in a
hotel today. In a note he asked that
his mother, who lives at 1509 East
Tenth street, Chicago, forgive him.
Smith returned frqm six mon hs'
overseas service last week and v.'as
discharged Tuesday.
BLANQUET'S DEATH
REPORT UNFOUNDED
New York, April 2|.—On the same
day that Gen. Aurelio Blanquet was
reported killed by the Mexican gov
ernment, combined Diaz and Blanquet
forces captured the tjown of Medellin j
m the state of Vera (Muz and entered
the suburbs of Vera Icruz and posted j
proclamations. Rnberl (layon, secre- !
tai v to General Blanquet, asserted. !
"We have begun to believe Blanquet j
ls alive and expect ! important news
from him in a few days," Gayon added.
The Mexican governpnent has offi
cially announced tl|at Blanquet is
dead.
LATE FLASHES ON THE WIRE
TODAY'S BASEBALL
national League.
New York 10, Philadelphia 7.
Brooklyn 6, Boston 1.
Pittsburg-Chicago, rain.
S'. Louis 2, Cincinnati 2 (7 innings.)
AMERICAN LEAGUE.
Boston 10, New Y<>rk 0.
Philadelphia 0 r Washington 1 (13
innings.)
Cleveland-Detroit, rain.
al;..-- q e* I * • o /c • \
Chicago 9, St. Loqis 3 (5 innings.)
CONFERENCE BROKEN
Paria, April 23.—"president Wilson's
•"T"* -s ,?•
delegate said that Prpmisr Orlando will
j leave for Romo tonight or tomorrow
and that the remainder of tho delega
tion will go aa quickly aa possible
| thereafter,
ADVANCE CONTINUES
Budapest, April 2^.—The Rumanians
continue to advance into the interior
j of Hungary, it was officially announc
jed today. Hungarian forces have mob
to the east and
sin 125 miles east
French are report
large force of
jjlized immodistoly
'south of Grossward
of Budapest). The
ad to be gathering
colored troops in Skegedni (100 miles
southeast of Budap
UNITED STATES REMAINS FIRM
IN STAND AGAINST ALLOWMG
JAPANESE CLAIMS TO CHINESE
TERRITORY ON SECRET TREATY
BIG FOUR EXPRESSES DESIRE FOR POSTPONEMENT OF
QUESTION UNTIL AFTER SIGNING OF PEACE TERMS;
DELEGATES AGREED THAT GERMANY SHALL LOSE
RIGHTS IN CHINA; ITALIANS SHOW DISPOSITION TO
COMPROMISE.
FRENCH GOVERNMENT
AWARDS FOURAGERE
TO AMERICAN UNITS
Washington, April 23. ■— The
French government has awarded
the fouragere to several American
units that fought with the French
army, General Pershing cabled the
war department today. The four
agere of the colors of the croix
de guerre was awarded to the
103rd aero squadron and the 539th
and 625th ambulance sections. The
fouragere of tho colors of the méd
aillé militaire was awarded to the
646th ambulance section.
COLFAX TEACHERS ON
STRIKE FOR MINIMUM
OF $150 PER MONTH
Colfax, Wash., April 23.—Demanding
a minimum of $150 a month, high |
school teachers of this city have gone
on strike. The school board has con
tracts calling for $127 a month already,
but the teachers won't sign. The
hoard is standing pat. declaring that
five mills will be added to the school
tax levy If the demand is acceded to.
j
i
!
j
I
I
CALIFORNIA COMPANY
TO DISPOSE OF ALL
VINEYARD PROPERTY
San Francisco, April 23.—Sale by
the California Wine association of
Its immense vinyard property to a
Fresno syndicate represented only
the beginning of a move to sell
every bit of its property, M. J. Fon
tana. president of the association,
said today.
MATCH COMPANY ASKS
$25,000 FOR LIBEL.
j Pa., began a libel'action against Dou
blertny, 'Page & company, in Brooklyn
j federal court today fur $250,000.
! In the March issue of "World's
! Work" an article entitled "pirates of
j promotion" was published, exposing al
leged get-rieh-quick concerns. The ar
New York, April 23.—The Fred
r Match company of Hioomburg.
tide charges many firms with trading
worthless stocks for Eiberty bonds. A
list of concerns printed with the at
tack Included the mach company.
sistants, arrived here today.
__ 7
RIOTING INCREASES
Hamburg, April 23.—Rioting, which
began here yesterday, increased in vio
lence today. Rioters marched through
the streets, robbing pedestrians. They
stormed the police stations and suc
ceeded in capturing one. A pitched
battle occurred y.aterday in St. Paul',
suburb.
HOOVER IN BERLIN
Berlin, April 23.—Herbert Hoover,
accompanied by a large staff of as
RUSSIANS ARE WATCHED.
Milan, April 23.—The police have
'"°'t ! S—•VU'S' "!Si,*LST!
steamship
FIRE DESTROY* « 5 TFAMCQ
JJMTROYS ISTEAMER
Portland, Maine, A P rl1 23.— Tho
Hoy rl. Beattie was de
stroyed by fire at sea April 18, ac-|on
cording to information received hero
today. Lewis B. Huntley, third offi
cer of the Beattie, was drowned while
leaving the burning ship.
BRITISH TAKE TOWN.
London, April 23.— Th» British wa f
office today announced tho recapture
of Bolshoozorki, on the Archangel
front, together with two field guns,
1000 rounds of 3- inch ammunition, a
quantity of etor«s and eome prisoners,
|
By FRED S. FERGUSON
(United Press Stall' Correspondent.)
Baris, April 23.—The "big four" are
expected to continue today the discus
sion of Japanese claims to Chinese ter
ritory based on the secret treaty to
which Great Britain, France , Italy,
Russia and Japan were parties.
Premier Orlando decided not to
attend the meeting this morning.
Admiral Di Revel left for Italy
last night and General Diaz was
scheduled to depart tonight. Or
lando and Foreign Minister Son
nino possibly may accompany Diaz,
though, so far as known, this has
not been decided.
JAP CLAIMS HEARD.
Word reached the Hotel Crillon at
1L o'clock a. m. that the Italian repre
sentatives wore coming to call on Col
onel House. The latter was just leav
ing the hotel, however, and was un
able to remain.
Japanese and Chinese representa
tives presented their respective cases
yesterday afternoon. No official con;
firmation could be obtained on what
transpired in the meeting, but it was
understood that the United States has
made no recession from its stand that
the pact constituting the foundation of
Japan's claims, in common with all
other secret agreements, was nullified
by acceptance of the armistice terms.
Aside from
recognition ol
is known the
delegates are
the stand against
secret treaties, it
majority of peace
inclined to favor
China's contention that Kiao Chau
and the Shan Tung peninsula,
(Continued on Page Two.)
SENATOR BORAH
MAKES DEMAND
FOR PUBLICITY
' studied and Persistent Effort at
«" c C'i ° u
Up ° n the flr8t l,raft ' wh,ch was
Secrecy Charged; American
People Are Entitled to Know
Contents.
By L. C. MARTIN.
I'nited Press Staff Correspondent.
Washington, April 23.—Senator
Borah today charged a studied and
persistent effort at secrecy with
respect to the league of nations
covenant, and demanded that the
state department make public im
mediately the revised text just re
ceived from Paris.
"This studied persistent effort at se
crecy," said Senator Borah, "is an un
mistakable admission that the Instru
ment as amended, will not bear discus
sion. Its proponents doubtless have In
mind the effect of the 60 days debate
sup
posed to be perfect and unassailable
when It came forth."
DEBATE TO BE OPEN.
In the same connection. Mr.
Borah served notice that when the
covenant comes into the senate
no rules devised will be sufficient
to enforce secrecy In regard to a
"matter of such vital and imme
diate concern to the people at
large."
The subject will be debated "in the
The new draft should no longer b«i
held secret ' Mr - Borah declared, if the
! people are to have time to read and
understand It before President Wilson
returns, presumably to address them
it. They have thus far been given
nothing, Mr. Borah said, but an offi
rial interpretation of what the
amendments mean.
"Who Is more deeply concerned In
the exact terms and provisions of thla
amended draft than the American peo
ple?" asked Mr. Borah.
"We are entitled to It at once. Wt
should then have a law providing for
a vote of the people before we sur
j render tho vital powers of this gev
eminent to a tribunal controlled by
foreign powers,"

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