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Evening capital news. (Boise, Idaho) 1901-1927, September 16, 1919, Image 1

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THE NEW«
FIRST
EVENING CAPITAL NEWS
WEATHER
Unsettled weither te
nicht and WednaHer.
VOL. ZLm
BOISE, IDAHO, TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 16, 1919
Vo. 59
1000
STORM
M ore Than200Bodies Recovered Along Beach In
District Surrounding Corpus Christi , Texas and
Waves W ash Up Others On Shores Nueces Bay
PRESIDENT ENTERS HOME STATE
OF SENATOR JOHNSON SHORTLY
AFTER HUM; SPEAKS TOMORROW
Believed Wilson Will Explain His Views on Shantung In Ad
dresses at San Francisco and Oakland Where He Will
Spend Two Days—Body of Cleveland Newspaperman
Who Was Killed in Accident Yesterday Is Sent Home.
BY HUGH BAILLIE, United Press Staff Correspondent.
Aboard President's Train, Sept. 16.—California,
home state of Senator Johnson, who is on tour in op
position to the peace treaty will be entered by Presi
dent Wilson in his campaign for ratification. The
president will meet his first California crowds this
afternoon, his train being scheduled to cross the line
into that state about 12:30 p. m.
It was considered unlikely that there would be rear
platform speeches, as Wilson is saving his voice for
his efforts in the big California citties. His voice
seemed to show some evidences of a slight strain at
the beginning of his Portland speech last night but as
he talked it improved and grew stronger.
TO EXPLAIN SHANTUNG.
Rhantung has not been touched upon
by the President since he reached the
Pacific coast. 11 is one of the princi
pal points of opposition attack and it
was expected Wilson would fully ex
plain his viewpoint of it in California,
where the Japanese question is alive.
He mentioned it in several middle
western speeches.
The presidential train had no stops
scheduled for today. It will reach San
Francisco tomorrow the President re
maining, two days in San Francisco and
Oakland speaking in both cities.
Wilson in recent speeches has
seemed to be addressing his remarks
partly to those senators who oppose
the treaty as well as to their constitu
ents. At Portland last night he said
flatly he had no respect for some of his
opponents, but with regard te» others,
he said:
"1 pray God that the gentlemen who
are delaying this tiling may presently
see it in a different light."
The body of F. Allen of Cleveland,
one of the newspaper con espondents
who was killed in an automobile ac-I
cident at Portland yesterday is being
gent home in charge of a secret serv
ice man.
Robert T. Small, one of the Injured
newspaper men. was able to continue
the (rip. Stanley Reynold« of Balti
more was left behind In the Good Sa
maritan hospital with a fractured arm
and shoulder.
FORMAL ACTION
ON THE TREATY
WILL GO OVER
Speeches to Be Made This
Week but Actual Reading
Probably Will Not Come Un
til Next Week.
Washington, Sept. 16.—Senator lead
ers today decided that there would be
no real action this week on the peace
treaty, formally called up yesterday.
There will be speeches, but actual
reading of the treaty Is to go over
probably until late In the present week
or even to next week, Senator Curtis,
said.
It is said that Senator Lodge and
others opposing the pact In its pres
fCnntJnuad on pars two I
Jaccc
i he
SENATOR BORAH
CALLED BACK
TO WASHINGTON
Senator Lodge Asks Him to
Return to Capital to Aid in
Fight Against Peace Treaty
in Senate.
Moines, la.. Sept. 18.—Ratifica
tion of the leaitup covenant may mean
the establishment of a British world,
rdinjr to Senator Hiram Johnson,
senator, after speaking In Des
Moines last night from the Rame plat
form on which President Wilson ar
gued for the league, was to resume the
executive's trail at Sioux Falls, S. D.,
today. A crowd of 8000 heard John
son. The prolonged cheers which have
greeted him before were silenced In
tears last night. The senator silently
talked of the mothers who have ap
pealed to him to help bring soldiers
back from Siberia.
Johnson's theme was Bolshevism,
which the president here urged should
be cured by the government.
"Bolshevism Is bred In the hearts
of women whose sons went to fight
Germany and who have been shot
down In Siberia," Johnson said.
"When men tn power violate the
constitution, they become breeders of
Bolshevism." he said, asserting the
purposes of the military activity In
Russia were unknown.
Senator Borab. who was scheduled
to speak here with Johnson, was re
called to Washington by Senator
I.odge, to aid in the fight on the peace
treaty.
A LA NOSE BAG8.
Springfield. 111.. Sept. 16.—Central Il
linois farmers drive to Springfield with
sponges tied under their noses. Due
to a lack of rain the dust Is eight
Inches deep on the ronds.
WEATHER
For Boise und vicinity: Unsettled
weather tonight and Wednesday.
For Idaho: Tonight and Wednes
day, unsettled weather.
Highest temperature yesterday ____8*
Lowest temperature this morning ..68
Mean temperature yesterday .......<7
Ö0737
TRAIL PRESIDENT WILSON ON PEACE TOUR
- ■ . ...... .
Senator Hiram Johnson In typical speaking poao, and Senator William K
Borah.
Senators Hiram Johnson of California and William E. Borah of Idaho
1rs "following up" President Wilson on behalf of the senate majority to
talk against the treaty arguments of the president The two men started
their "drive" in Chicago, speaking from um same platform. Johnson will
speak in cities in which President Wilson delivers his "report to the na
tion." Borah is taking a different routs.
TREMENDUOUSINCREASESHOWN
IN DEPOSITS BOISE BANKS UNDER
SEPTEMBERCALLOVER YEAR AGO
Amounts to $4,596,693—Taken As Evidence of Exceptional
Prosperity, Sound Financial Condition and Increased Trade
—Banks Now Carry $4,903,234.50 In Government Se
curities, Which Also Represents a Big Advance.
Boise business houses and citizens |
are today enjoying the most prosper
ous financial season In the history of j
trade .reports of the national banks
under call of last Friday, Sept. 12,
show.
Depositors In the local hanks had on
Friday to their credit the usm of *14,
861,898.34. This Is an increase of *4,
596,693 over the amount shown under
the corresponding call of a year ago,
Aug. 31. or 31 per cent. The deposits
last year were *10,256,204.68.
HEAVY SAVINGS DAILY.
The exact difference In time between
the making of the two reports was
one year and 12 days, or 387 days. Di
viding this Into the increase of *4,596,
693 In total deposits for that period,
the average dally amount added by
customers of the four banks to their
accounts was *11,877.76.
These flugres reflect a great and
prosperous Increase In business activ
ity, and a gratifying stability of con
ditions.
GOVERNMENT SECURITIES CLIMB.
Responding to the government's call
for war activity financing during the
year .the banks of Boise Increased
their holdings of government securi
ties from *1.998.370.47 to *4,903.234.50.
These securities are included among
the bank's assets and represent a
strong financial reserve.
COMPARATIVE STATEMENT.
Comparative statements of the four
banks show the following Interesting
figures.
BOISE CITY NATIONAL.
August 31, 1918, deposits, *3,348,343.
23; Kept. 12, 1919, *6.430.421.67.
Government securities, August 31,
1918. 8798,164.87; 8«ptsmbsr It, 1111,
ll.7«3,960.M.
FIRST NATIONAL.
Deposits, August 31, 1918, *3.798.604.
76; September 12. 1919, *5,418,761.73.
Government securities, August 31,
1918, *715.167.13; September 12, 1919,
Jl, 622,289.00.
OVERLAND NATIONAL.
Deposits. August 31, 1918. *1,556,
980.46; September 12, 1919, *1,788,396.71.
Government securities, August 31,
1918, *224,254.46; September 12, 1919.
*707.900.00.
PACIFIC NATIONAL.
Deposits. Auust 31, 1918, *1,561,278.28.
September 12. 1919, *2,214,219.33; Fed
eral Holdings, *280,794.51; September
12, 810,150.50.
LATE FLASHES
ON THE WIRE
CHARGES GRAFT.
San Franciaco, Sept. 16. — Quoting
from privats telegram« and corres
pondence of General Brios P. Disque,
who oommanded the spruce division
during the war. Lieutenant Eugene J.
Kerrigan today made chargee of graft.
TODAY'S BASEBALL
NATIONAL LEAGUE.
Brooklyn, 3; Pittsburg, 4.
Boaton, S; 8t. Louie, 4 (firet game).
AMERICAN LEAGUE.
Chioegd at New York, postponed,
wet greunda.
Cleveland, (; Philadelphia, 2 (firet
game).
Cleveland, 12; Philadelphia, • (eec
c '
4L Louie. 3; Washington, ft,
Thousands Made Homeless By
Tropical Gale Which Strikes
Gulf T Relief Trains Ou
(BULLETIN.)
Austin, Texas, Sept. 16.—"At least one thousand bodies are strewn along
the shores of Nueces and Corpus Christi Bays," according to a telegram re
ceived by Governor Hobby from Brigadier General J. F. Wolters, Texas Na
tional Guard, headquarters here today. General Wolters wired that reliable in
formation to that effect had been received at Houston.
200 BODIES RECOVERED.
Houston, Texas, Sept. 16.—More than 200 bodies have been recovered from th
beach in the district surrounding Corpus Christi according to a message received
day by W. G. Choate, assistant general manager for the federal railway offices he"
from Dr. W. P. Rinehardt of Corpus Christi.
Over 100 bodies were washed ashore near the ranch of S. B. AU#>n, the messag
said. The message came over a railway wire from Van Allen, Texas, where Dr. Rine
hardt went from Corpus Christi in order to get in communication with the outsid
world.
JEWISH NATION
PLANS TALKED
IN CONVENTION
Zionists of America to Adopt
Resolutions for Upbuilding
of Palestine and Its Future
Government.
Chicago, Sept . 16. —''Foundation
stones" of the Jewish nation were to
be laid today by the Zionists organ
ization of America, in session here.
The "Foundation stones" are the res
olutions to be adopted by the con
vention. These are expected to In
clude: One introduced by Dr. Ste
phen S. Wise, New York, calling a
meeting of the American Jewish con
gress immediately after peace treaties
have been ratified.
A Hec3nd. outlining the extent of
Jewish relief in Europe and the third
approving American plans for financ
ing relief work in Palestine.
The convention is also expected to
approve the proposed form of govern
ment for Palestine—a partial democ
racy ruled by a governor-general and
two commissioners.
SENTIMENT M
FAVOR GENERAL
STRIKE GROWS
Boston. Mass., Sept. 16.—Sentiment
In favor of a general strike in sym
pathy with the striking police wae
growing In Boston today,
The United Hebrew trades of the
city, with a total membership of 30,900
workers voted to walk out If the cen
tral labor union calls a general striko.
Other unions voting on the strike
question gave unmistakable signs that
they are In favor of such action.
Central labor union executives
stated that in the event of a general
walkout workers in Industries vital to
the life of the city would not be called
out. Firemen tn hospitals, members of
the city fire department, milk wagon
drivers and others employed In neces
sary work would be exempt from a
general strike call It was understood.
Complete order prevails throughout
the city.
It was announced that 400 riot guns
and 20.000 rounds of ammunition was
expected here today from Montpelier.
RELIEF TRAIN DELAYED.
The Houston-Galveston relief train will not leav
Houston until 9 o'clock tonight because of delay in a r
sembling supplies. Army officials at Camp Logan
sending blankets and medical supplies for the relief
Sinton, Texas, Sept. 16.—At least 100 persons are dea
in Corpus Christi and vicinity Mayor Sparks of Sinto
said today.
At 10 o'clock this morning 70 bodies had been identifie
according to the mayor's information.
He said the bodies were recovered in the followin
places.
Corpus Christi, 14; White Point, 38; Aransas Pas
10; Rock Port, 8.
Thirty other bodies were found at scattering point
along the coast by searchers who worked all night.
Rescue parties in boats had removed 75 persons fro
floating debris up to 9 o'clock this morning, Mayor Spar
said.
PORT ARAMIS DEMOLISHED
The town of Port Aramis was completely demolishe
Rockport and Aransas Pass were severely damage
Rescue work is continuing. It is believed the death to
may amount well past 1 he 100 mark as many bodies we
washed for miles. There were scores of thrilling escape
Several survivors who had been washed clear across t
bay, clinging to wreckage were resejued fit Odom,
group of soldiers from the army convalescent camp pe
formed utmost heroism, helping in the work of rescue a
preventing looting in the wrecked district.
MANY DEAD IN ROBSTOWN.
San Antonio, Texas, Sept. 16.—Fifty bodies have be
recovered and 500 persons are believed to have be
drowned in the vicinity of Robstown, Texas, 15 miles fi
Corpus Christi, according to a radio message receiv
from Brownsville at Fort Sam Houston here today.
Brigadier General F. C. Marshall left Brownsville
assume charge, the radiogram said. Martial law has be
declared throughout the storm area.
A military relief train carrying 60,000 pounds of flo
30,000 pounds of sugar and general supplies in five
left Brownsville today. More supplies are needed. Sev
light Curtis planes left Kelly field today to visit the vi
ity of Corpus Christi and search for survivors of the at
who may have been marooned on the many keys along t
gulf coast.
FIRST DETAILS RECEIVED.
Houston, Texas, Sept. 16.—Details of Sunday. 's tro
cal storm, reaching here today over crippled wires,
folded a story of the loss of scores of lives and milli
of dollars worth of property.
Corpus Christi and vicinity was the hardest liit
wave and wind. Reports regarding the number of d
there varied from 20 to 200. Seventy bodies have
recovered, according to a message to the mayor of
in which an appeal for aid was made.
A tidal wave, driven inland by a 65-mile-an-hour
wrought the havoc. Water was reported 10 feet deep.
(Continued on Puce Two.)

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