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Evening capital news. (Boise, Idaho) 1901-1927, December 17, 1919, Image 1

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FELLOW FUS.
E YOU MADE YOUR DONATH
My*
% À,.. inB ii^m
«iF
Fair Mi
night and
VOL. ZUS
BOISE, ID/tko, WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 17,1919
at. ii
HIM GOVERNMENT CONTROL Of RAILROADS ASKI
COLLUSION OF
OPERATORS AND
MERS PROBED
Federal Grand Jury at Indian
apolis Begins Hearings on
Charges That Owners and
Men Worked Together..
Indianapolis, ind., Deo, 17.—"Wheth
er we shall be governed by law or by
threat! and force," was the laaue put
before a federal grand jury, which
began here today the investigation of
charges of collusion between miners
and operators.
Judge A. B. Anderson put the Infor
matloa In the hands of the jurors at 11
a. nl. today. The jurors, Judge Ander
son slid, must determine If the miners
and operators have worked together to
violate the Lever act and anti-trust
laws.
"Let your conclusions," Me said, "be
a f!ll answer to a question which has
beeti uppermost In the minds of pur
tltltcns for the past two weeks; that Is
whether the government of the United
States or a group of men shall rule
this country and whether we shall lie
governed by law or by threats and
force."
'fhe grand Jury will also Investigate
charges that the coal miners violated
the government's anti-strike Injunction
by falling to return to work after the
Injunction was Issued.
"You will Investigate fully this de
fiant violation of the criminal' law of
the country," Anderson Informed the
fairy.
The court laid particular stress upon
alleged violations of the I-ever act. Lit
tle time was devoted to the anti trust
ÏÏH0F
COAL NEAR
I PEAK IN MINES
Union Miners Back on Job
Practically 100 Per Cent In
dicating Desire to Live Up to
Agreement.
Chicago, Her. 17. Coal production
nearing tbs p-ak, operators here si d
\><la>.
\Miners arc swinging their picks with
a\will, they :iakl, indicating a desire
tollve up to their agreement. Kansas,
Inuiina and Illinois mines were al
mi«t buck to noimil in the number of
mcl nnd in production. Transporta
tloilbcltig in goof shape, operators be
be* l in giving badness the "highball."
Coatwill keep up with the demand for
It, tlVy said.
Cos weather, which Hcttled over the
coal anion did nol hamper production
MiueiV tratnpod nr usual to the shafts
and d|>pprd to depths where cold Is
forgot
COMMITTEE ON CONCILIATION
ATWORK IN SENATE TO BRING
_IUT COMPROMISE ON TREATY
ELEVEN\YEAR OLD
BOY Up HILLS
THE CITY
(A
dohard Lackel Leaves Home
Tuesday^ dàernoon at 3
o'Olock for Yvip Into Hills
nnd Fails to •turn.
Richard Lackey, u|
lleved to be lost sor
above Boise. He
Eighth street near
Tuesday afternoon
Ms to bis aunt
'
living a I
to ths 1
nüänl
11 year«. Is be
fhcre in the hills
hie home on
Lonpttol building
1 o'clock, tn a
Whom he has
[ said hs was
__ hs left
l Etant was
tbs lost
•Of men
Mile' above
KP
iASKPUBUSHERS
TO CUT PAPERS
10 PER CENT
House Postoffice Committee!
Appeals to Newspapers in
Effort to Conserve Paper
Supply of the Nation.
Washington, Dec. 17.—An appeal to
the newspaper publishers of the coun
try to make an Immediate reduction
of 10 per cent In the size of their pub
lications, because of the paper short
age was made today by the bouse
postoffice committee.
Buch action is necessary to prevent
"destruction of a large number of
newspapers In the smaller cities and
towns and Inflict Irreparable Injury on
the communities served by them," the
committee declared.
The 10 per cent reduction should
continue for six months, the commit
tee declared.
The appeal Is the result of promises
by leading publishers of the country
made at a hearing Monday that with
some action by congress the paper
shortage could be relieved voluntarily
by the papers themselves.
The committee at present will not
consider ths bill of Representative An
thony of Kansas to exclude some pa
pers from the malls but is ready to
damp down restrictions If conserva
tion is not accomplished voluntarily.
The appeal to the newspaper pub
lishers of the United States read:
"We consider the shortage In the
newsprint 'paper supply and believe
that unless consumption can be mate
rially reduced It will result In the de
struction of a large number of news
papers In the smaller cities and towns
and inflict Irreparable Injury on the
communities served by them, end hav
ing ih mind the great results accom
plished during the war by the volun
tary and patriotic co-operation of the
people In saving foods, fuel and other
necessaries In which you had credit
able part, we appeal to reduce con
sumption or newsprint paper by at
least 10 per cent during the next six
months, thereby averting the threat
ened Injury and obviating the neces
sity for repressive measures In the fu
ture."
UTAH IDAHO SUGAR
COMPANY S SUPPLY TO
GO ON SALE AT ONOE
Spokane. Wash., Dec. 17.—Un
der an agreement signed hy Federal
authorities and the. I tah-Idaho sugar
company. G,300.00(| pounds of sugar,
libeled by the government, will be
pl mod on sale at once.
(>f the total 3,600,000 pounds must be
disposed of by the company this
month. The January distribution must
total 1 . 800,000 pounds.
The libel will be dlsmiaied upon
completion of the distribution.
The best sugnr Is held 4n warehouses'
in the Yakima valley.
MISSISSIPPI MARBLES.
New York, Dec. 17.—Add to African
ffotf-KHllopln* domin«»**« and agitated
Ivorien a new one—Mississippi Mar
ble«. Prisoners who told the judge
(hut wa« the gamo paid $1 each.
Senators Say Democratic So
ions Imbued With New Spirit
and Hope for Settlement
Soon Is Expressed.
■ 1 ■ —
... . , _ ,, .
Washington, Dec.
conunlttee on conc'haUon Is « wort
n ; côntroverev 1
compromise the tteaty controversy.
Thls committee, composed pf one
Republican ami one Democrat an.l
evoking to negotiate a basts upon
which lalltlcation can be arranged, U
Ignoring Senator Lodge. Republican
l<ader, and Senator Hitchcock, Demo
cratic leader. ________
SOU NO SENTIMENT.
The first step of ths committee, now
being taken, ie to sound out sentiment
among senators on both sides In an ef
fort to crystallise their views into com
promise proposals to be used In fram
ing a set of reservations. Progress
along this line has been «low. but ac
cording to one member of the unoffi
cial committee has been encouraging.
The compromising spirit Is stronger
today among Democratic senators than
It has been since ths treaty failed, sen
ators declare
"We can w
hasard," gal
"We ran*
com]
PROSECUTOR TO
RELEASE IHIE
FROM CUSTODY
New Evidence Discovered Will
Exonerate Accused Man
From the Charges of Mur
dering Little Billy Danzy.
Atlantic City, N. J.. Dec. 17.—We
have discovered new evidence which
points away from Charles White and
Mrs. Kdlth Jones In the Billy Dansy
murder case," Prosecutor Qaskell an
nounced. Release of the Hammonton
man and his father's housekeeper, is
only a matter of a few days, the prose
cutor Indicated. Friends of the ac
cused took the prosecution's statement
as verifying their contention that the
arrest of Whits and Mrs. Jones was a
"tragic mistake."
"The prosecutor said hs now had
evidence Indicating the perfect baby"
was killed by two men whose names
he refused to divulge.
These two men, he added, are under
surveillance and will be arretted. Mrs.
Hercules Dansy, mother of the child,
was questioned at length by detectives,
the prosecutor admitted. He said Mrs.
Danzy testified at the Inquest October
8 that she followed "Billy" to the
White dahlia field and heard smoth
ered cries coming from a weed patch.
"The cries were of my aon," Oaskill
said Me. Danzy testified.
Mrs. Danzy hunted several minutes
for the boy, but failed to find him.
Oaskill said that his men now wsre
working on*ths theory "Billy" was ta
ken to an abandoned house by two men
and killed there.
WOMEN ON JURY
IN NEW TRIAL
SEEMSCERTAIN
Two Members Fair Sex Passed
as Temporary Jurors to Try
Self-styled Son of United
States Senator.
I.os Angeles, Cal., Dec. 17.—Two
women end nine men, passed as tem
porary Jurors, were In the Jury box
today when the second day of the trial
of Harry S. New for the alleged mur
der of pretty Frieda Lesser, his sweet
heart, opened.
Kxcreise of peremptory challenges
probably will reduce the number In the
box considerably, observers predicted.
In yesterday's examination of pro
spective Jurors six of eight women
who were called Into the Jury box were
excused because they opposed capital
punishment while only one man was
rejected on that ground.
nie name of Senator Harry S. New
of Indiana, whom the accused man
claims sa his father, Is expected to
become more 'and more prominent lit
the case. The question "do you know
Senator New of Indiana?" has been
asked frequently.
Mrs. Alice Lesser, mother of the dead
girl, Is to be called as a witness and it
Is said she is remaining away from
court to conserve her fading strength
for her hour upon the w rtess stand.
RELIEF SUGAR FAMINE
UP TO GOVERNMENT
Washington, Dec. 17.--Relief of the
sugar famine Is squarely before the
government today.
Congress, by action of the bouse last
night, gave notice to the president that
it appro', ed extension of the powers of
jthe sugar equalization hoard, through
j 1 he year 1920. The bill extending the
life of the board now goee to confer
ence ns the house conferred more dras
____powers than did the senate bill.
I The house measure practically re
^ all the war tlme authority of the
of th * Including the licensing of
dealers The rv.wer to buy en
I 1 power eo miy «m
i f.ï* J. r " p * or " ny 1 k
i "kewlse is continued.
,„»f , .■ ,........—
WEA THER
Forecast for Boise and vicinity—
PAIR TONIGHT AND THURSDAY;
NOT BO COLD TONIGHT.
For Idaho— Tonight and Thursday,
" lr *n the south and rain or enow in
the north portion; not so cold tonight.
SNIFFERS' FORECAST.
sa I T* Uct ah| pmente during Urn next
«• hours against ths following mini
msa temperatures: Gsing wsst to Ba
eSjp
WILSON USIB OANE
ONOB 'WORN" BY THB
FIRST PRSSmiHT
Washington. Dae. 17.—A cane
once carried hy George Washington
was loaned Präsident Wilson to ski
him in his walks about the White
House.
The «ana Is tbs property of Ed
ward C. Creecy of Baltimore, who
pereonally brought it to the White
House
DRIGGS MAN IS
GIVEN PLACE IN
STATE CABINET
C. B. Walker Succeeds Guy E.
Bowerman as Idaho Finance
Commissioner—Takes Up
Duties Immediately.
C. B. Walker, a prominent young
busineae man and broker of Drlggs,
Ida., was today announced by Governor
D. W. Davis as the succesaor to Guy
R Bowerman, state finance commis
, sloner.
j Walker was tendered the position
I about 10 days ago, but did not accept
j until after a conference with Governor
Davis this morning, at which the poll
1 ciea and functions of the flnanoe de
partment were discussed.
GOE8 TO NEW YORK.
Mr. Bowerman, the retiring commis
sioner, will leave Thursday evening for
St. Anthony to wind up his private
business affairs' before going to Ifew
York to take up his new duties as sec
retary of the American Bankers' asso
ciation, for the purpose of which he
tendered his resignation.
The new commissioner comas with
ths recommendation of Hr. Bowerman,
having been associated with Mr. Bow
erman In the banking business at St.
Anthony several year« ago.
(Continued on Page Two!
The Well Known Old World
Seems to Be Functioning
San Francisco, Dec. 17. — Professor
Albert F. Porta, scientific observer
nnd forecaster, Is standing pat today
on his predictions that general meteor
ological turmoil will affect the eaith
curing the period beginning today.
' The world Is not going to end," he
said. "Only those who have distorted
l iy original prediction are responsible
for the seeming widespread fear that
the end of the world has come.
"'lut I am very well satisfied to iet
the turn of -vents prove my conten
tions," lie asserted.
The original prediction was as fol
lows, according to the professor;
Due to unusual grouping of planets
on December 17, with 18 distinct
"conjunctions" and "oppositions," se
vere storms will strike the Pacific
coast about December It. The storms
WOOD CHOPPING THE VOGUE AGAIN SINCE MINE SHUT
DOWN CAUSE0 COAL SHORTAGE
WM
FIUL NOTE TO
ROMANY Ml
GOTHS WEEK
Supreme Council Decides to
Grant Austria Loan of $70,
000,000 and Each Aliy
Asked to Contribute.
Paris, Dec. 17.—The peace confer
ence expects to submit a final note to
Germany this week, fixing a Ume limit
for the signing of the protocol. It was
learned today. Some disagreements
have arisen between the allied and
German experte as to the amount of
compensation Germany Is able to pay
for the sinking of the Sea pa Flow fleet.
It was learned today but these were
not expected to prove serious enough
to delay signing of the protocol.
The supreme council today decided
to grant Austria a loan of seventy mil
lion dollars. Each ally will be asked
to contribute.
The council also decided all German
customs will be paid In gold In the
future. This le necessary because of
the varying rates of exchange and the
decreased value of paper money. The
United States heretofore has been the
only nation paying In gold.
INVESTIGATION INTO
MEXICAN SITUATION
RESUMED ON JAN. 1
Washington, Dee. 17.—Investiga
tion of the Mexican situation by
the senate subcommittee appointed
seme months age for that task will
be resumed at Ban Antonie, Texas,
about January 1, Senator Fall,
chairman, said taday. Publie hear
ings will be held. The extent of
the hearings will depend on re
ports Fall ia to r ec e ive at (I Pees,
after Christmas from Investigators
at work along the border and In
Mexico, he said.
krill travel east and strike the middle
west about December 22. They are
due tn the east about December 24.
Earthquakes, together with thunder,
rain and other severe disturbances will
accompany the "storms."
Severe volcanic eruptions may be
expected during the periods December
18-24 and January 8-1 and January
26-81.
The earthquakes and volcanic erup
tions will affect the earthquake and
volcanic belts: Italy, Japan. Java, Al
aska. California, Hawaii and Central
America
'T've never once predicted that the
world was to come to an end," he re
peated. "The sun-spots caused by the
conlunctton of the planets will have
a very severe effect on the earth. The
Pacific coast will be visited with the
most sertous storms In history."
MEXICAN REPLY
TOILS. IHIE
RECEIVED TORE
Communication Declares Since
Jenkins Has Been Released
on Bail Mexico Presumes
"III Feeling" Disappeared.
By RALPH H. TURNER.
(United Press Staff Correspondent.)
Mexico City. Dec. 17.—The Mexican
government, replying to the second
American note demanding release of
W. O. Jenkins, American consular
agent, declares that since Jenkins had
been released on ball, Mexico pre
sumes the "111 feeling" between the
two countries has disappeared, It was
learned today. (Jenkins, charged with
collusion with the Mexican bandits
who kidnaped him, was released on
SS0O ball furnished by J. Halter Han
sen, an American, without consulting
either Jenkins or American officials.
Jenkins has since been trying to have
the ball revoked and himself recommit
ted to the Puebla Jail.)
"Since Jenkins bas been released on
ball furnished by an American citizen,
the Mexican government believes any
motive for the 111 feeling between the
two countries has disappeared nnd
that the Jenkins case has taken a very
different form from that it previously
presented," said the Mexican note,
which was signed by Hllario Medina,
uctlng foreign secretary, and was pre
sented to the American embassy here
last night.
The note, however, takes Issue with
the refusal of ths United States to
enter into a legal discussion and de
(Continued on Page Two)
RHODE ISLAND
STARTS FIGHT
ON PROHIBITION
Will Contend That Enforce
ment of Amendment Is En
croachment by Government
on Police Powers of State.
Washington, Dec. 17.—Rhode Island
In the supreme court today will begin
Its fight against constitutional prohi
bition.
Backed by an appropriation of 86000
from the state legislature Attorney
General Rice today stated he will aak
the court at noon for permission to fils
an original bill of complaint against
the enforcement of the constitutional
amendment on the main grounds that
It Is an encroachment by the federal
government upon the police powers of
the «täte.
"If the court agrees to hear the peti
tion announcement of which is expect
ed next Monday, an Injunction to re
strain federal authorities from enforc
ing the amendment as provided for In
the Volstead law In Rhode Island, will
be asked.
Rhode Island's case Is the second
brought to the supreme court attack
ing constitutional prohibition. New
Jersey dealers started one yesterday,
but this was hacked by private indi
viduals while Rhode Island's action Is
a state suit against the entire United
States.
Rhode Island. Rice said. Intends to
make the point that prohibition can
not be enforced in Rhode Island against
Its consent, the state being one of the
four that haa not ratified the amend
ment
' The state will make the further
point that the amendment was not
paesed legally by the house. The vote
was two-thirds of the members pres
ent, but Rice contends the amendment
must receive the votes of two-thirds of
all the members. The state also Is
banking upon the withdrawal of Ohio«
ratification torclng the secretary of
state to issue a new proclamation nam
ing the date when constitutional pro
hibition shall be effective. The briefs
to bo filed today olaim this must bo
one y»ar aftei the date of the procla
mation. _ _ _
LUNACY COMMISSION
* to mvxsnoATi mind
OF MM. BLAXX TODAY
Atlantic City, W. J» Dae. 87.—Tbe
lunacy commission appointed to con- ,
sider the oaae of Mrs. Esther Blake,
charged with the murder of her aan
"Buddy* will make Its lnveeUgatlon
■one time today, a oc or din« to Dr.
Lewis Bouder, county physMan.
The Ending of ths commission will
determine largely the state's future
notion In the case, B. C. Gaskin, oounty
GOWERS KB
» Mini me Qui!
I llflmlliw DU I
8EWITO0MM
Head A. F. of L Before Sen
ate Committee Pleads That
Government Control Be Con
tinued For Two Years.
Washington, Dec. 17.—A pie* that
the Cummins railroad bill, now before
the Benate, be withdrawn and that gov
ernment control be continued for at
least two years, was made today by
Samuel (Jumpers, head of the American
Federation of Labor, reprosentatlvaa
of railroad brotherhoods and officials
of several farmers' organisations who
appeared before the senate interstate
commerce committee.
The delegation, numbering M 'wifi
call at the White House later today
in an effort to induce President Wilson
to retain the railroads two years long
er, It was announced.
At the White House it was Intimated
President Wilson's special railroad
message to congress will be ready
within a few days. Samuel Gompers
j in an attack on the Cummins bill be
fore the senate committee today se
verely criticised its anti-strike pro
visions, declaring It wonld make law
breakers out of patriotic citizens who
would not obey It. "If men cannot ob
tain justice ,ln any other way they aro
going to stop work," Gompers de
clared.
CITES INJUNCTION.
He cited the effort of Judge Ander
son's federal injunction in the coal
strike.
"Injunction hasn't produced one
ounce of coal," Oompers said.
"The object of such measures Is to
insure continuity of production but
experience shows thoy do not noeom
pllsh It.
"I am not nnd have not been an
advocate of government ownership
added. "I believe, howwvor, that
roads ought not be turned
private owners until a thoroi
In peace time has been made.
"Notwithstanding thy own )
I should prefsr to see. and I
that operation and control of raA
be continued not less than two years."
Other witnesses took substantially
the same view as Gompers although
several declared outright for govern
ment ownership.
Cummins was the only member of
the senate committee present.
Gompers said he came by authority
of the executive council of the Ameri
can Federation of Labor. Cummins
said he had agreed with Gompers that
"people cannot be made to work by In
junction."
CUMMINS DOESN'T AGREE.
"But I don't agree with you on the
other point." he told Gompers in
answer to the assertion that the Cum
mins bill will not slop strikes.
Cummins gave no intimation that
he will either snek withdrawal of the
hill or attempt to have tbe anti-strike
clause eliminated, hut It was believed
that the protest will result In prevent
ing any railroad legislation until af
ter the holidays.
H. H. Wilis, representing the Loco
motive Engineers, denied existance of
an organized propaganda against the
bin.
Fred J. Chamberlain, representing
western state granges, declared gov
ernment ownership. Is the only "ulti
mate solution." hut asked for g t
year test period of federal control
PRESIDENT MAY
HOLD CONGRESS
OVERHOLDAYS
Wilson May Insist on Di
of Cummins Railroad.
Before Christmas Room
P ermitted.
Washington, Dec. 17.—Hints
President Wileon may Inter
prevent a holiday renoag gif
unleee railroad legislation ia
of today centered the ini
bera more keenly on tbe i
now before the senate.
No official statement
talned regarding
that Wilson will m
age shortly,
terect of ml trend_____
Senator Cummins, In
bill, add Senator Und ere
cratlc member of
meres
united
should___
latlon has 1
Both —
ronds

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