OCR Interpretation


Evening capital news. (Boise, Idaho) 1901-1927, December 19, 1919, Image 1

Image and text provided by Idaho State Historical Society

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn88056024/1919-12-19/ed-1/seq-1/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for

£
▼OL. ZLm
BOISE, IDAHO, FRIDAY, DECEMBER 19,1919
CHICAGOIRAN)
OPERA LEADER
PASSES AWAY
Cleofontl Campaninii Dies in
Chicago Hospital of Pneu
monia — Worshipped by
Singers and Opera Patrons.
Chicago, Dec. XI.—Cleofonte Cam
panlni, world famoui musical director,
died at St. Luke's hospital early today
following a two months' illness from
pneumonia.
Campanlnl was director of the Chi
cago Grand Opera company for the last
six years. He probably had a wider
acquaintance In the musical world than
any other man. Several of the most
famous singers on the stage today owe
their success to him.
Campanlnl was born in Parma, Italy,
Septem bef 1, 1110. He made his debut
as a conductor at the age of 20. For
the last 20 years he bas been one ol'
the prominent figures in the musical
world and was the recipient of honors
from Kuropeaa and South American
government«. He has filled engage
ments in practically »very leading city
In Europe, South America and tlio
United States. He first came to tills
country 15 years ago at the request
of Oscar Hammerstein, to hecopie gen
eral director of the Manhattan Opera
company.
Campanlnl is survived by his wife,
who at one time was a famous singer
appearing under the name of Eva Tet
razzini. She is a sister of the famous
Luisa Tetrazlnnl. A nephew, Italo
Is manager of the Campanini estate.
Campanini was worshipped by sing
ers and opera goers. Some of the
Stars whom he gave recognition and
helped to fame aro: Gall! Curcl and
John McCormack, Rosa Raisa, Mury
Garden. Maurice Renaud and other
famous French opera singera sang for
the first time in America under his di
rection.
SOVIET AMBASSADOR
RELEASED BY OFFICERS
San Francisco, Dec. 19.— Vladimir K.
Vochmetroff, acting president of the
Central Union of Consumers' Societies
of Russia, was released today by the
immigration authorities and permitted
to land.
Vochmetroff, who claims to represent
20,000,000 Russians and who came to
urge Washington to throw Its weight
against the blockade of Soviet Russia,
will proceed to Washington.
"We have nothing against Vochme
troff," said Immigration Commissioner
White to the United Press.
AVIATOR JOHN ALC0CK
DIES FROM INJURIES
Rouen, Prance, Dec. It.—Captain
John Alcock, British aviator, and
flret air pilot to complete a non
stop trane-Atlantic flight, died
here today from injuriai euetained
when hie plane crashed yeeterday.
PRESIDENT WRAPPED IN
FURS BRAVES SNOW
Washington. Dec. m.—Braving a
snowstorm, President Wilson sat for
more than an hour on the south portico
of the White House, wrapped in furs.
He also walked about his room. It was
stated.
HIGH MEXICAN OFFICIAL SURE
THERE NIL BE NO BREAK IN
RELATIONS KITH TINS NATION
Aguilar Berlanga Takes Point
of Vieiv That People of the
United States Are Opposed to
Intervention.
(Halted
Hi »at there
feme with the
J»lY fceeaus* n
said in
•gal
sntkm
desire«!
« H. TURNER.
Staff Correspondent).
11.—Mexico is con
> Bo break in rela
ted SUtea, particu
le the American
to taterventlon
minister of guber
lew today. His
that of premier,
that )to break
Berlanga de
view taken by
the penaihiUty
Ur based on
the people of the
tcftjt In
by certain
OBd a. certain
_ who do not rep
l the true seBji Bi e n f » of the Amer -
/
between
there is
NEW ORDINANCE
DOES NOT AFFECT
PRESENT HOURS
While City Council Acts and
Makes Restrictions Stores
Will Remain Open to Accom
modate Trade.
Although the city council passed an
ordinance Thursday limiting and re
stricting the closing hours of business
houses, under the commies ion form of
government law. It cannot become ef
fective for 10 days following passage,
and to accommodate their trade stores
will therefore remain, dpen their reg
ular hours Including Saturday evening.
The Christmas shopping is now at ltt^
height and all of the stores are excep
tionally buey taking care of the Yule
tide wanta of their customere.
Boise business houses muet open not
earlier than 9 o'clock and close not la
ter than 6 o'clock, says the ordinance
passed by the city council at the re
quest of the city fuel commission. Pool,
billiard and card rooms and cigar
stores are given these same hours.
When the commission first formulated
its rulings several days ago these were
allowed to remain open until 9 o'clock.
They proteeted with the result that
three hours more were lopped off their
business day.
However, the ordinance does not go
into effect for 10 days, because under
the Bluck law, that is the minimum
time In which emergency measures
may become law In first class cities.
Ko the cigar stores may and doubt
less will keep to their present sched
ules till after Christmas.
TEXT OF ORDINANCE.
The ordinance reads ns follows:
"Whereas. It appearing to the mayor
and council of thé City Boise that
the city is now threatened with a fuel
famine, and to conserve the present
supply of fuel now on hand;
"Therefore, Be It ordained by the
(Continued on Page Three.)
frencîTagree
TOTURN LOOSE
HON PRISONERS
Premier Clemenceau Will Give
Germans Freedom Immedi
ately Without Waiting for
Signing of Protocol.
Paris, Deo. 19.—The German
delegation here announced today
Premier Clemenoeau hae Informed
them that the German prisoners
will be returned immediately with
out waiting the signing of the pro
tocol.
Final oenfereneee between Ger
man and allied representatives to
ward making the treaty of peace
effective will start naxt week.
WILL KEEP CHECK ON
USE OF WHITE PAPER
Washington, Dec. 1». —Steps were ta
ken In congress today to keep an ac
curate check on tbe amount of paper
the publications of the country will;
conserve as the result of the recent ap
peal of the house poetoffice committee
for an Immediate reduction of 10 per:
cent in paper consumption.
The postmaster general was aeked In
a resolution of Representative Steen
arson, Minnesota, chairman of tbs
house postoffice committee to make
monthly reports of the weights of the
dally editions of all papers h> thecoun
try. using the mails until December 1»,
192°. , _ _
CONGRESS EXPECTS
WILSON'S MESSAGE ON
RAILROADS TODAY
Washington. Use. 1 ».— Congress to
day expected to hear fresn President
Wilson on the railroad situntton either
late this afternoon or tomorrow, it
was ceMMÜ^.'YMRlIfcW.tN P»«"»
dent
with
latlon
!
WILSON TAKES
MEXICAN CASE
IN OWN HANDS
President In Full Charge of Sit
uation in Southern Republic
—Jenkins Affair Holds At
tention of Executive.
Washington, Deo. 1». —President Wil
son today was In full charge of the
Mexican situation. Carranxa'e reply
to the last United States note de
manding W. O. Jenkins' release has
been submitted to the executive, It was
learned authoritatively. Wilson is con
sidering whether the Jenkine oaap
should be closed by aimply forgetting
to answer the last note or by sending
another communication, to clear away
all evldsnoas of hostility. Although
this government feele It was tricked
In the Jenkjns case the consular agent
is free on bail and that makes It Im
possible to continue demanding his re
lease without {retting into a technical
debate which might merge upon the
ridiculous, It Is felt. »
The entire Mexican oil situation,
brought to a critical stage by Car
ranza's recent option In preventing
American companies from drilling new
wells, also is before the president, It
Is understood and action will be de
termined hy him.
PRESIDENT IS
ASKED TO LIFT
BAN0NUQUOR
Former Senator Lewis of Illi
nois and Representative 01
ney Believe Liquor Dealers
Should Be Considered.
BULLETIN.
Wsshigton. Dec. 19,—President
Wilson oan net lift the war-time
prohibition ban until the peace
treaty has been ratified, and a
proclamation of demobilization Is
sued, Attorney General Palmer
declared today. The supreme court
decision on war-time prohibition
strengthens him In this opinion,
which he held previously.
Washington, Dec. 19.—Request
ing that President Wlleon lift the
war-time ban on liquor, former
Henator Lewis of Illinois held a
long conference today with Sec
retary Tumulty.
Lewie believes that as a business
proposition, owners of large stocks
of whiskey should be given a
chance to dispose of it before the
eighteenth amendment becomes
operative.
Representative Olney, of Mas
. (Continued on Page Two)
PLANE AND MEN WHO FLEW FROM ENGLAND TO ANTIPODES
■w
;
j
;
j
•**«*». : Mm
J§A'
Try 1-------------
AMERICAN SAILORS
HELD BY MEXICANS
FOR ALLEGED ASSAULT
Washington, Deo. 19.—Two
Amorloan sellers hove been held In
loll at Mazatlan, Mexico, ainoe
November 12, on tho charge of aa
eaulting a Mexican citizen, the
state department announced to«
day. The American eenaul at Ma
zatlan has attended to the oaee
and haa aeked far a speedy trial
for the man.
The sailors ara B. V. Leonard
and H. O. Martin, the department
aald. They are from the subma
rine tender Pocomoke.
ATTEMPT MADE
TO ASSASSINATE
MILITARY HEAD
Lord French, Commander in
Ireland, Escapes Shots of
Anarchists — Escort Kills
One of Assassins.
Dublin, Dec. 19.—An attempt to as
aaastnate Lord French, military com
mander In Iroland, failed today. One
of the aaaosains was »hot dead by
French's escort».
French was returning from a tour of
western Ireland. While he was driv
ing from the Ashtown station a num
ber of shots were fired at him. Several
bullets struck his automobile.
A bicycle policeman, one of French's
escort, returned the fire of the attack
ing party, killing one of their number
Who had bombs In each hand.
*" One of the escort was wounded und
a report was circulated that he died.
The attack on French was made In
Phoenix park. Dublin police, rein
foreed by two army tanks, were rushed
to the place, where great excitement
prevailed.
Field Marshal John French has been
lord lieutenant of Ireland alnce 191*.
Previously he was commander-in-chief
of the British armies In France and
directed the retreat through Flanders
In the early days of the war. Ths
skilful handling of this retreat delayed
the German armies to such an extent
that the great victory of Marshal Jof
fre at the first Marne was possible.
French is 67 years qld. He first
came Into International prominence In
the last Boer war.
WEATHER
Forecast for Boise and Vicinity —
FAIR TONIGHT AND SATURDAY.
For Idaho—Tonight and Saturday,
fair; colder tonight extreme north por
tion.
8HIPPERS' FORECAST.
Protect shipments during the next
36 hours against-the following mini
mum temperatures: Going west to Ba
ker, 20 degrees; east to Pocatello, 16
degrees. Minimum temperature In
Boise tomorrow about 18 degrees.
Highest temperature yesterday.....22
Lowest temperature this morning ..14
Mean temperature yesterday .......15
The sun rises tomorrow at 7:19 a. m.
and sets at 4:09 p. m.
CLOTHMGWU
COST MORE M
COMMGSHHNG
National Retail Clothiers Will
Meet in Chicago Next Month
to Try and Work Out
Solution.
Chicago, Deo. 19. — Indications that
clothing prices next spring will be
higher resulted In a call today- for a
meeting of the National Association of
Retail Clothiers to be held here Jan.
uary 19 to If.
The meeting will try to combat the
threatened Increase in prices, Charles
Wry, secretary of the organisation,
stated.
"The only possible chance retailers
see of holding down prices Is to have
garment workers work 41 hours a
week Instead of 44. This resulted In
increased production.
"One of tho main reasons for In
creased cost of clothes la that the peo
ple demand the better grade of cloth
ing, causing a scarcity in beat classes
and an oversupply of cheap clothes.''
Wry said if consumers would pur
chase more of the cheaper grades. It
would stabilize the market and bring
down the prices of better clothes. The
government will be represented by H.
R. Figg, assistant attorpey general, and
the garment workers by Sydney Hill
man.
INQUEST INTO
TABORMURDER
STARTS TODAY
Mother of Murdered Gtrl Tells
Story to Jury but Is Not
Made Public—Joseph Virgo
Cleared?
Paw Paw, Mich., Dec. 19.—The story
of the death of Maud Tabor was ex
pected to be revealed here today when
the Inquest Into her death waa re
sumed with her mother, Mr*. Sarah
Tabor, as the main witness.
The mother of the girl, whose body
was hidden for three years In a trunk
In the basement of the Tabor home,
talked today for the first time since
her arrest In California. She told the
story of the girl's death to Prosecutor
Glenn E. Warner and Sheriff Andrew
Lang.
The details of her story were not
made public but It Is understood they
will be revealed by the mother when
she testifies at the Inquest.
Reports were that she exonerated
Joseph Virgo, who married Maud Ta
bor shortly before her death and who
faces a murder charge. Warner and
Lang declfned to confirm these
rumors.
Following the consultation with the
prosecutor, the aged woman was al
(Contlnued on Page Two)
a
a
It
IQEPIMEMIHf
OHDTOEXFUi
DEMIM,
Public utilities commission
Aaka Explanation of Moun
tain States Goncern
Also Involved.
-Kates
The public utilities commission today
ordered the Mountain States Telephone
& Telegraph company to explain why
ft has fatled to file an Inventory of
Its physical properties, and also di
rected that company to show cause
January 5 why rates, tolls and charges
In effect prior to February 17, 1919,
when rates were Increased, should not
again go Into effect.
Under a law passed by the last legis
lature, utilities corporations were re
quired to file inventories of their prop
erties within six months after passage
of the act, or by September 20, but an
extension of time was granted the
Mountain States Telephone A Tele
graph company to December 1. This
the company has failed to do, accord
ing to the order of the commission.
STATE MAY DO WORK.
"Said company Is hereby ordered,"
says the utilities commission's order,
"to show cause before this commission
January 6, 1920, why said company has
failed to file Its Inventory within the
time granted by the said commission;
and further that said company, at said
time and place show causo why the
public utilities commission should not
at once send Its agents upon tl)e
ground and mako an Inventory of the
properties of said company within the
state of Idaho, and In connection there
with why the commission should not
order that the entire cost for making
such Inventory by the agents of the
commission bo paid hy said public
utility from its profit and lose ac
count
In granting an extension of time, tho
commission continued In effect the
rates established b i the federal tele
phone administration. When the mat
(Con tinned on Page Three)
COMPLETE JURY
FOR TRIAL OF
HARRIS. NEW
Court Room Sobs as Mother of
Murdered Girl Walks on
Crutches to Witness Stand
Late Yesterday.
Los Angeles, Cal., Dec,. 19.—The big
battle opened today for the life of
Harry K. New, the smiling mystery
man, alleged to have murdered Frieda
Lesser, hts sweetheart.
After hours of wrangling and monot
onous questioning of jurors, attorneys
suddenly announced late yesterday aft
ernoon they were sattsllifcd with the
12 men In the box und testimony
(Continued on Page Two)
AGREEMENT BETWEEN PACKERS
AND ATTORNEY GENERAL GOMES
UNDER CLOSE SCRIfmY TODAY
TWENTY PERSONS HURT
IN TRAIN COLLISION
Omaha, Neb., Dec. 1».— Twenty
four persons were Injured, eleven
seriously, two of whom will prob
ably die, when the Chlaago and
Northwestern fast mall train from
Chicago telescoped the rear Pull
man coach of No. 2U. a train from
Minneapolis, at Missouri Valley,
Iowa, near here this morning.
No. 215 wae standing on a side
track with the switch open, ac
cording to reports. The speeding
mall train, unwarned, it Is said,
crashed into the rear coach. Ns
flagman was stationed to warn No.
9, It la said. If ths block signal
gave warning of tke open switch
the engineer on No. 9 tailed to no
tlot flt.
Medical attention was rushed
from Omaha and the Injured were
taken t o hospitals here.
ITALY SEEKS PEACE
WITH SOVIET RUSSIA
London. Doe. 19.—Tho Italian
■gvtat Ruaata ta
r »tapi ng about
A WWM
USERS INI TO
BE PROSECUTED
BY GOVERNMENT
Attorney General Tell* Commlt
tee He Will Drop Charge*
Against Coal Workers—
Agreement Not Settlement.
Washington, Dec. 1».— Attorney Gen
eral Palmer does not intend to prom
cute coal miners for violating tho anti
strike Injunction because tho Injunc
tion has accomplished Us purpose he
told a sub-committee of the interstate
commerce committee today.
''I had my choice of proseouting the
miners In the criminal court* for vio
lations of the Lever act or of proceed
ing against them in the civil courts,"
said Palmer.
"I deemed It my duty to adopt a
course which would best serve the gen
eral public welfare and therefore asked
for an Injunction in the civil courts.
That Injunction has now been obeyed
and Its purpose is accomplished, I do
not think criminal prosecutions at the
beginning would have accomplished
anything in the way of producing coal
und I do not now think I should go
back and begin criminal proceedings.
In my opinion l.must stand by my
course In wing in the civil courts.'*
Senator Townsend. Michigan, asksd.
Palmer whether the miners understand
they will not be prosecuted for violat
ing the Injunction.
''I do not know what they under
stand," replied Palmer.
•T haven't discussed It with them.
Palmer aald he did not regard the
agreement between the miners, 1 s e d e r s >
and himself as a settlement, bat allied ;
It. a "compliance with Use taw.**
Palmer gave the cosad
derstand the* h* ■•sals: i .
shape the depaHmeSTef Justice policy
toward the miners as he deems proper
in the light of future nations of the
miners.
SURVIVORS OF BRITISH
STEAMER PICKED UP
Halifax. N. 8., Dec. 19.—The steamer
British Isles Is proceeding to Now York
with the captain, first offteer, chief
engineer and 39 of the crew of tho Brit
ish steamer Manxman, which found
ered in mid-Atlantic Thursday, accord
ing to a wireless message from the
British Isles intercepted here today.
The remainder of the officers and
crew of the Manxman perished the
message said. It did not say how many
were drowned.
REICHSTAG RATIFIES
PROTOCOL TO TREATY
Berlin, Dec. 17.—(Delayed.)—Tho
relchstag today ratified ths protocol
to the peace treaty, which the German
delegates signed at Versailles in Sep
tember, whereby the clause of the
German constitution providing for the
future Junction between Germany and
Austria is annulled.
NORMAL PRODUCTION
OF COAL IS NEAR
Washington, Dec. 19.—Miners are
obeying Instructions to return to work
landing Inquiry Into whether further
wage increases ure justified, and big
strides are being made toward resum
ing normal coal production, the rail
road administration announced today.
Senator Borah Considéra Ras#?
lution Asking Palmer to ST
mit More Detailed Report
Congress at Once.
Washington, Deo. 19.—At teems? (
eral Palmer's agreement with the
live" packers was under clog*
in ootifreee today.
Palmer's detailed statement
tng the terms of Dm agreement
which the packers are ta get
ths groooty business and rnl
hold of etookymrda woo é
studied.
Tho attorney general
to appear before the «
lure committee to
how tho agreement
and what sort of pr
made to tho packers in i
acceptance of hie tel
Senator . orah. Idaho, f
enee with other -------
pending
control of
ho n
Palmer ta i
Minstnrs 1

xml | txt