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Evening capital news. (Boise, Idaho) 1901-1927, December 26, 1919, Image 1

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Fair tonight and
urday.
TOL. ZLm
BOISE, IDAHO, FRIDAY, DECEMBER 26,1919
COMMISSION TO BEGIN MINE INVESflCATIONS NEXT
GOMPERS CALLS
UNION CHEFS
HTO MEETVK
Heads Railroad Workers Or
ganizations Gather Monday
in Washington to Take Up
Question increased Wages.
Washington. Dec. 26.—Heads of all
railroads unions will moot here Mon
day to decide their action on the fu
ture demands for wage Increases now
before the Industrial commission here.
The calling of the meeting Is the re
sult of President Wilson's decision,
tnade known Wednesday, to turn the
railroads back to their owners on
March 1 .
Previously, the position of the work
ers has been that their demands must
be answered before- the roads pass out
of government control.
The railroad chiefs who will attend
comprise the heads of the four railroad
brotherhoods, and the 10 railroad un
ions affiliated' with the federation of
labor. Samuel Gompcrs. president of
the federation, will preside.
The meeting will take up the de
mands of the shop men. requests for a
25 per cent increases in wages, which
were made several months ago but post
poned at the request of Wilson, who
appealed to the workers to withhold
their demands until the government
has had an opportunity to smash liv
ing costs.
"The meeting will outline plans in
connection with its request and also
prepare for tin- conference which we
are to hold with Director General
limes of the railroad administration,"
said John Scott, secretary of the rail
way workers' section of the A. F. of 1 a
it is also .stated that the question of
whether the workers would wait until I
March ! to take action to force com
pliance with their demands, would he
considered.
Labor officials indicated they do not
intend to wait until private interests
bed regained tlin railroads before re
ceiving u decision. Union officials
have been informed that Hines is fully
advised b>- the president as to what
he can do and how far he can go.
Workers believe they may be asked
to withhold their demands another two
months. They pointed out that At
torney General Palmer's report on liv
ing costs expressed the belief that an
other two months would see a reduc
tion.
At Palmer's office it was said that
Palmer is considering getting out an
other and more complete statement.
This will be made public before Mon
day if Pulmer decides to issue it.
DANIELS WILL NOT
ANSWER SIMS' LETTER
Washington. Dec. 26.—Secretary
Daniels will leave unanswered the let
ter of Admiral Sims, refusing to accept
the distinguished service medal be
cause o' alleged unfairness in the dis
tribution of naval war honors, officers
close to Daniels believed today.
In view of his official position. Dan
iels could not afford to enter into "an
argument" with Admiral Sims as to tin
right or wrong of his policy In award
ing war decorations, these official«
said. Daniels said he does not know
yet whether ho will answer the Sims
letters as he has not considered it
fully. _
LLOYD GEORGE READYTOFORCE
IRELAND ACCEPTPROPOSAL FOR
SEPARATE LEGISLATIVE BODIES
Understood Passage of Measure
by Parliament Assured Be
fore it Was Presented on
Monday in House.
London, Dec. 26.—Ireland may have
to accept Premier Lloyd George s new
home rule plan introduced in the house
of commons Monday whether she likes
It or "not, an official clone to the Brit
ish premier declared in an Interview.
The premier Is prepared to force ac
ceptance of his measure, this official
asserted. Us passage by parliament
was assured before the measure was
submitted, he added. ,
Lloyd George, according to the offi
cial/ Is "heart and soul" for passage of
some legislation which will start set
tlement of the Irish question he con
tinued. The premier regards this prob
lem as second in importance only to
winning the war.
It was believed In government circles i
according to this source of Information '
that Ulsterites will accept the y re- !
mler's plan, which provides for two |
legislatures, one for southern Ireland j
and another for Ulster, with a co-ordi- j
■sting body to be known -u> .-. national 1
**Jf*Ulster accepts the plan and IU j
parliament Is threatened by the Sinn I
R}. the "entire British army" is!
available to r the protection of Ulster, ;
32
am Page Two)
SIX ARMED THUGS HOLD
UP JAIL AT TOLEDO
Toledo. O., Dec. 26 .—With two of the
gang In jail, Toledo police were scour
ing the country-side in search of oth
ers who took part In a sensational jail
delivery here yesterday.
For nearly an hour yesterday the en
tire Lucas county Jail was at the meroy
of six armed thugs and four prisoners
whom the thugs had released.
At the Jail, the gun men shot down
one man, threatened to kill others, and
boasted of their crimes and past rec
ords.
After the delivery, two of the men
surrendered without resistance when
their automobile stalled, though both
were armed.
SEVEN FORMER
GERMANLINERS
TO THEBRITISH
United States Shipping Board
Will Turn Over Vessels to
Great Britain in the Very
Near Future.
Washington, Dec. 26-—Seven former
German liners now held in New York
harbor will be turned over to the Brit
ish as soon as arrangements can be
made for their transfer, the shipping
board announced today.
Tho announcement was made in a
letter from John Barton Payne, chair
man of the shipping board, to Secre
tary of State Banning.
The seven ships, with the Imperator,
were allotted to the British by the
peace conference. The Imperator was
turned over to the British recently af
ter some delay over proceedings con
cerning American oil tankers seized
in German ports.
The ships to be turned over are the
Graf Waldersee. the Sophelin, Pretoria.
Captain Flnnisterie, Mobile, Prinz
Friederich Wilhelm and Kaiserin Vic
toria.
The seven ships do not include those
to be sold by the shipping hoard. Six
ships ore to bo sold but they will be
kept under American registry.
ARMY LEADERS WILL
MEET ON JANUARY 12
Washington. Dec. 26.—Means for
putting the United States army on an
efficient peace-time basis will be dis
cussed at a conference of department
al and divisional commanders called
today by Chief of Staf^ March for
Jan. 12.
War department plans and policies
for training, distribution and adminis
tration of offices and enlisted person
nel and other important reorganiza
tion problems will be taken up.
Close understanding between the war
department and the departmental and
divisional commanders with regard to
policies for the administration of the
army during the coming year will be
taken up also.
WOMEN'S DEMOCRATIC
CLUB MEETING TODAY
New York, Dec. 26.-—Members of the
Women s Democratic club wili meet
here today to formulate plans for or
ganizing women of the United States
with the announced pur pose of securing
their support for the Democratic par ts
CERTAK SINN
FEIN ELEMENT
"OUT OF HAND"
Dublin. Dec. 2C.—"A certain element
In the Sinn I'eln volunteers Is getting
out i t lu'ntj." a prominent leader of
the moderate Sinn Feiners admitted
today in cn interview.
A cert,-.In clement, he said, threatens
to do Incalculable harm to the cause
of In land both here imd in the opin
ion of the world.
While the loader made no direct ad
mission, it was believed moderate ele
men s b'licie this new radical faction
may bi partly rtsponslble for the at
tempt on the llle of Viscount French,
mid lieutenant of Ireland and the raid
upon tho plant of the newspaper Inde
pendent. The extremists have become
rcetlww l id dissatisfied with the pres
ent policy of the old Sinn Fein leaders,
'.h i speaker said.
"W* are watching events anxiously
oecauss wo are afraid thsy will do In
calculable harm to the cause of Ireland
(Continued on Pago Two >
GREAT BRITAIN
AGAM SEEMS
WORLD'S TRADE
Systematic Campaign Launched
to Regain Leadership Held
Before War—Missions Visit
Every Country in World.
Lsmdon, Dec. 26.—The British com
mercial giant robbed of his supremacy
by four years of war has started a sys
tematic campaign to regain his leader
ehlp of world trade, It waa Indicated
today.
British commercial missions, unher
alded, are working quietly In all the
markets of the world In an effort to
make London again the dictator of
goods and prices, according to author
itative information.
A mission of six headed by H. P.
Mackinder, m. p., and a member of the
advisory committee to the ministry of
reconstruction; and Admiral Sir Roger
Keyes, soon will arrive In South Rus
sia to promote trade relations with
General Denlken's government, It was
learned.
Another mission Is enroute to Si
beria, while trade experts have been
sent to the Balkans, Italy, Germany,
South America and other places where
British made goods may find a mar
ket. That the British manufacturer Is
leaving no stone unturned In his ef
fort to regain trade was Indicated by
the method he has taken, since the de
cline in value of the pound sterling.
The board of trade experts disclosed
their scheme which manufacturers ac
tually have enabled to reap big profits
from the drop In foreign exchange.
They frankly expressed hope It would
fall to $2. British manufacturers, it
was pointed, are buying raw materials
in the United States with already es
tablished dollar credits, transporting
them to England in British-owned
•ships and reexporting to America in
the same vessels. These goods are
manufactured by labor paid In ster
ling, enabling the manufacturer to reap
the difference between the value of the
dollar and the pound in addition to his
regular profit.
When this process has been com
pleted, the manufacturer may continue
to buy on dollar credit in America or
may take his enormous profits in
American dollars and convert them
into pounds—again with advantage of
the exchange rate—and invest his
nearly double money in other British
investments.
The situation which favors the ex
porter, however, has worked exactly
the opposite toward thé Importers of
provisions, and similar goods, which
have not again been reexported.
SEVEN DEAD^RE SU LT
OF CHRISTMAS ORGY
Hartford. >Conn.. Dec. 26.—Seven
men were dead, four others reported
dying:, and Frank Rose, a saloon j
keeper, held by police here today fol- j
lowing 1 a fatal Christmas celebration.
Rose was charged by relatives of the
dead men with selling wood alcohol
which had been colored to resemble'
whisky.
HOLDS NEIGHBORHOOD AT
BAY WITH REVOLVER
Tacoma, Wash., Dec. 26.—Holding
the entire neighborhood at bay with
revolvers, three masked automobile
bandits blew the safe of Sayre & Co.
meat market at Buckley, Wash, a
amall lumber town near here and
escaped with $250 In cash at an early
hour thlw morning.
TRANSLATION OF BIBLE INTO CHINESE IS COMPLETED
Translators of the new
■ibis, photographed in Chins. Rev. Goodrich ie second from left,
More than a quarter of a century
ago, Rev. Chauncey Goodrich be
* an with thé aid of Chinese and
other workers, to translate the Bl
^® ln . t0 Us Chinese language. The
ÏT*Ï. . Ï J»»t been completed Rev.
t/oodrleh, sow 21 years old, worked
MAZTEBUNOK EXPECTS
TO PROVE EXISTENCE
OP IMMORTAL SOUL
New York, Dec. If.—Maurice Maeter
linck. In America to lecture on the Im
mortality of the aoul, la studying the
possibility of communicating with the
spirit worlf, and of the soul's appear
ance In tangible form before mortals.
The Belgian author and philosopher
said he haa "an open mind" on these
theories of spiritualism and ts giving
them muqh thought
"In my lecture." he said, "I win ex
plain to the people of America the first
scientific proofs of the existence of an
Immortal soul."
GEN. PERSHING
HAS QUIET DAY
WITH SISTERS
A. E. F. Commander Makes His
First Public Appearance in
Lincoln This Noon—Recep
tion Also This Evening.
Lincoln Neb., Dec. If. — General
Pershing, Lincoln's guest during tbs
holidays, will make his first publlo
appearance today when he Is enter
tained by the Klwlnl's club at noon. He
has not had time yet to renew friend
ships with old Nebraska friends. Ar
riving Wednesday he went immedi
ately to the home of his sisters where
Christmas was spen£ quietly In a fam
ily reunion—the first the general haa
enjoyed in four years.
The day was marked by old time
simplicity. A Christmas tree, mainly In
honor o t Pershing's son, Warren, and
a family dinner, were the chief fea
tures. A few Intimate friends called
during the afternoon and the general
went for n short walk.
This evening Nebraska will have a
chsnee to meet the American leader
lnfoimally. At a reception In repre
sentative hall of the statehouse city
and state officials will be presented and
all old friends will "talk It over with
Pershing.
Asked about a statement from Chi
cago In which CharlCB G. Dawes de
clared Pershing was not and would not
be a candidate for the presidency, M.
Woods, executive head of the Nebraska
Pershing for president movement, said;
"I have no doubt that Pershing Is
not a candidate. Nobody has ever said
he was and nobody has ever asked him
to be. I wish to make It plain this is
a movement to 'draft' him for the
Republican nomination."
LUCKY BABE.
New York, Dec. 26.—Born 1n the
height of a storm at sea In the steer
age of the Mauretania, Frances Maura
Kllngensmith Asley had a unique
Christmas. Passengers donated $700
and a Ford, which was raffled for
$1801.
WEATHER
Forecast for Boise and Vicinity—
FAIR TONIGHT AND SATURDAY.
For Idaho—Tonight and Saturday,
rain or snow In tho north, fair In the
south portion.
SHIPPERS' FORECAST.
Protect shipments during the next
36 hours against the following mini
mum temperatures; Going west to
Baker, 28 degrees; east to Pocatello,
26 degrees. Minimum temperature In
Boise tomorrow, about 28 degrees.
Highest temperature yesterday.....47
Lowest temperature this morning...28
Mean temperature yesterday........ 40
The sun rises tomorrow at 7:19 a. m.
and sets at 4:13 p. m.
through from tho beginning of tbs
woi* to tho completion of it. Oth
ers who started the work died or
left It for other duties. The hn
meaatty of the task may be real
ised from the statement of the
American Bible society that a*
SUPPERS PUN
COHERENCE M
CHICAGO SOON
Will Take Up Railroad Legisla
tion in Discussion Next Tues
day—Object to the Cummins
Measure.
Chicago, Dec. 26.—Shippers repre
senting 60 per cent of the tonnage
handled by American railroads will
meet here Dec. SO to dlecues pending
railroad legislation.
"Shippers have been conferring sep
arately with representatives In Wash
ington," Alonso Thorne, their attorney,
said today. ''The time haa arrived for
united action. Railroad labor and rail
road security holders long since
learned that lesson."
Thome offered no prediction as to
what action the shippers will take.
.Unes of business ranged from asphalt
to vegetables. The conference was de
scribed as "the most representative
gathering of shippers held since the
beginning of the war."
The conference undoubtedly will dis
cuss the Cummins and Each railroad
bills, Thome said. He personally of
fered objections to Cummins' bill on
Its features of guaranteed returns for
the roads, a tribunal to decide rates
without healings, and compulsory
consolidation of roads.
"We say to the packers and coal
operators, "you must not combine'; but
Mr. Cummins proposes to say to the
railroads, 'you must combine,' " Thorne
said.
HERBERT KAUFMAN
EDITOR OF M'CLURE'S
New York, Dec. 26.—Herbert Kauf
man has become owner and editor of
McClure's magazine, It was announced
today. The publication was established
by S. S. McClure In 1893. Kaufman,
who is a writer, served as assistant
secretary of the interior during the
war and will resign from that office
Jan. 11.
j ETERNAL TRIANGLE, JR. ]
Chicago. Dec. 26.—Bennie Sokolow
skl. 12, and fair, the victim of a chil
dren's triangle love affair, will recover,
the doctors believed today.
Because Bennie was good to look
upon, he won the love of Annie Barzyk,
18 years of age. When Annie saw him
playing at the home of Florence
Moeller, also 13, she wrote the follow
ing note;
"My Dear Husband Bennie: I know
you love Florence. I know you don't
love me. Do you love me, Bennie? If
you inly knew how I love you. O boy,
I love you so, X could kiss you now.
Don't tell Florence I love you or she'll
be mad. If you know how she loves
you.
'i hate her but If you love her better
than you do me, you can have her.
"I love you dear. I love you dear.
"ANNIE BARZYK."
When Bennie received this note, he
derided life with two "women" on his
hands wasn't worth living. He hid in
the ash can, where he was found un
conscious from the cold by a police
man. The note from Annie was
clutched tightly In his little fist.
When Bennie was asked If he loved
either of the girls he shook his head,
"no."
He was told that he would have to
make a choice between them when he
went home from the hospital.
"I guess I'll stay here quite a while,"
he concluded.
average of several hours total time
for each translator was required
*®r each of the 21,172 verses in the
Bible. The new Bible will be
■nown as the "Revised Mandarin
Bible." and will be distributed to
"tore persons than any other
translation •* a. book.
DISPOSITION BODIES
OP AMERICAN SOLDIERS
BURIED nr PRANCE
Washington, Dec. 26.—Bodies of
American dead burled outside the tone
of armies In France which are not to
be returned to this country will be
burled In the cemetery at Suresnes,
near Parle, the war department an
nounced today. Bodies outside of the
rone of the armies will be returned
to the United 8tates when desired by
relatives.
All bodies of American eoldlere bur
led In Europe outside of France will be
returned to the United States for per
manent burial In national cemeteries or
for disposition by relatives when so de
sired.
NEW TRIAL IS
RESUMED TODAY
IN IDS ANGELES
Alleged Common Law Son of
United States Senator May
Not Hear Verdict Before
New Year.
Loe Angeles, Cal., Dec. 26.—-Harry S.
New, accused of killing hie sweetheart,
Frieda Lasser, may not know the ver
dict of 'the Jury until New Year's.
That was the Indication when court
opened today after allowing only a
single day of rest to celebrate Christ
mas.
Defense attorneys, always retlceni as
to tholr plans, admitted this morning
that they still have a number of wit
nesses to be called. These will be
chiefly jail mates of New, jailers and
others who have been in close touch
with him, all testifying in support of
the insanity plea.
Testimony of two leading witnesses
for the defeuse probably will come
next week. Miss Kdna Clahcy, New's
half-sister, will be called first. New's
mother. Mrs. Lily Burger, will follow.
Attorney Le Compte Davis, for the
defense, conferred with Judge Craig
today with regard to published state
ments that before the trial a plan had
been offered by defense whereby New
would plead guilty. The statement had
been attribut od to District Attorney
Woolwine. Davis maintained it was
grounds for a new trial.
POSTPONE EXECUTION
OF TWELVE NEGROES
I
Little Rock, Ark., Dee. 26.—Elec
trocutions of six negroes condemned
to die tomorrow for participation in
the uprising at Elaine. Arkansas, last
October, were postponed at least 60
days today when attorneys filed notice
of appeal to the supreme court. The
negroes scheduled to die Jan. 2 are also
affected.
GRAIN HAS PRIORITY
ON WESTERN ROADS'
___ \
Chicago, Dec. 26.—Grain today had
priority on western railroads over all
other commodities, following an order
Issued by Regional Directors B. H.
Aishton, northwest region, and Hale
Holden, central west region.
The order will remain in effect until
the present grain crop has been dis- i
tribute)!.
»ISON'S POSTPONEMENT RETURN
RAIItOADS APPARENTLY MAKES
THE PROBLEM POLITICAL ISSUE
POLICE OBTAIN
NEW ANGLE ON
Mt. Clemens, Mich., Dec. 26.—A story
of clandestine trysts told the authori
ties by a Battle Creek girl, promised
to throw some light on the mystery
surrounding the death of J. Stanley
Brown, wealthy son of a former De
troit cigar manufacturer.
Brown's body, with four bullet holes
In his neck and head, was found In
his car on a lonely road near here
wedneaday.
While county officials were reticent,
it was learned today that valuable ev
idence was procured during the ques
tioning of the Battle Creek girl, said
to have been the sweetheart of one
of Brown's closest friends.
It was reported Brown had visited
this girl recently, and she and her
sweetheart had "split.''
Authorities learned Brown vu to
have met the girl last Tuesday In De
troit, but tailed to do bo. Bhe came
(Continued am
Tate)
COALTMBUNAL
WIL MEET ON
MONDAY NEXT
Operators Making Preparations
to Cooperate With Commis
sion Which Will Probe Mine
Conditions Over the Country.
Washington, Dec. 26.—The first
meeting of President Wilson's coal
tribunal will bo held here Monday,
when the three members will lay the
basis for future sesslone which will
be held after Jan. 1, it was learned at
the White House today.
The operators are making prepara
tions to cooperate with the commis
sion, In an effort to arrive at a deci
sion with regard to wages and hours,
which will bo acceptable to both sides.
However, the operators' representa
tives today were careful that their at
titude would not be taken as "accept
Ing the commission's findings in ad
vance." They want to do everything
possible to get a settlement, they said,
and if the commission's verdict is not
considered just to them, they are going
to refuse It, according to all indica
tions today. The commission, so far,
has not been invested with any flower
to enforce Its awards. This power
must he conferred upon It by congress
und there are a number of congress
men who are ready to resist any effort
to put the control of the nation's bi
tuminous mines in the hands 'of three
men, appointed by the president.
In its work, the commission probably
will summon Thomas T. Brewster head
of the operators and John L. Lewis,
acting president of the United Mine
workers, as its first witnesses.
GOVERNOR REFUSES
TO SEND TROOPS TO
QUELL MINERS' RIOT
Tacoma, Wash.. Dec. 26.—A email
miners' Christmas celebration In which
a few blows were exchanged was the
extent of the "rioting" reported be
tween union and non-union miners a$
IVUkesqn, a mining town near herd;
late yesterday, according to »ports*
made today by deputy sheriffs who fax
vestlgaled.
Everything was peaceful during the
night and this morning at the mining
town and at the mine of the Wllke
son coal and coke company, which sent
a hurry call to Governor Hart for state
troops yesterday afternoon, the officers
said.
Governor Hart announced today that
he had no Intention of sending any
troops to Wllkeson.'
•T received word last night from
Sheriff Morris that hts office was fully
able to cope with the situation," he
said.
"1 have no authority to call out
troops unless there should be serious
disturbances which the sheriff and his
deputies could not handle."
NO RELIEF FROM THE
SHORTAGE OF SUGAR
■ New York, Dec. 26.— Although 80,
oon.ooo pounds of sugar were received
by eastern refineries last week from
i'uba. there seems to be no relief in
the shortage on the retail market. Last
week's shipments are four times greater
than the preceding week and three
times greater than a year ago. It takes
only a few days to put the refined
article on the market but grocers say
they are still unable to buy.
Workers Believe They Have
Better Chance for Increased
Wages Than if Roads Had
Been Turned Back.
Washington, Dec. 26.—President Wil
son's decision to turn the railroads
back to their owners March 1 today
brought Into prominence two phases of
the already complicated railroad prob
lem.
First the president's action ap
parently postponed the "near crlaig*
brought on by requests of railroad la
bor for more money with the demand
that they receive an answer to these
requests before the roads pass out of
the government's hands.
Second, the government railroad '
question has apparently been a
political Issue.
The two phaaes are Interwoven sines ,
the railroad workers are threatening
to carry their agitation for continua- :
tion of government control to the '
lot box. ,
Until Wednesday night whan UM
president's railroad proclamation was
issued the workers had gone on the as
sumption that the roads would go
by Jan. 1. The shopmen were acL
pressing demands for an Increase
fore that date.
Other railroad worker«, who
watching the outcome of the '
effort before pressing their ««Mai
--- " ' «I
mande, believe their
(Continued on Page T««*-.

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