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The Owyhee nugget. ([Silver City], Idaho) 1905-1984, September 15, 1905, Image 3

Image and text provided by Idaho State Historical Society

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn88056038/1905-09-15/ed-1/seq-3/

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patent medicines
LOADED WITH ALCOHOL
A Proposition to Tax Them Ac
cording to the Amounts of
Whiskey Contained.
Washington, D. 0., Sept. 5.—
(Special)—Serious consideration is
being given by several members of
congress to the question of pressing
at the coming session a bill provid
, ing that patent medicines bearing
above a certain percentage of alco
hol, shall pay a stamp tax equal to
the proportion of alcohol contained.
Prohibition leaders are inclined to
agree with the proposition, but just
how to go at it is the problem. The
prohibitionists have begun to find
out what the "antis" have long ago
known—that so soon as prohibi
tion is established in a community
the outgo of money for certain pat
ent medicines is exceedingly large,
and the drug stores immediately
place extra orders for the addition
al trade they are sure to get. Be
sides handling the well advertised
patent medicines, the druggist puts
on the market compounds of his
own preparation that have a won
derful effect in curing all kinds of
diseases. Their chief ingredient is
alcohol. In many instances the
drugs used along with the alcohol
are harmful to the human system,
doing incalculable damage, not to
take into consideration the appe
tite that is created for opium, pare
goric, laudanum and similar drugs.
Government officials have re
cently received analyses made by a
prominent physician in a large
city, who says he found exactly the
same percentages of alcohol in cer
tain well known patent medicines
as found in the analyses made by
the Massachusetts state board of
health several years ago. It is
shown that hardly a single one of
the best known medicines con
tained less than 12 per cent of al
cohol and some of them went close
to 50 per cent. A half dozen of
them averaged above 40 per cent,
and another half dozen above 30
per cent. Various samples of or
dinary bar room whiskey averaged
below 50 per cent of alcohol, while
all samples of beer showed below
4 per cent, a revelation to the phy
sician who had thought beer con
tained much more alcohol. Ten
years ago it was found, according
to the Massachusetts figures, that
300,000 bottles of a certain highly
advertised patent medicine were
sold in Massachusetts alone. Near
ly one third of the contents of the
bottle was pure alcohol. Most of
the sales were in prohibition com
munities and the larger the per
centage of alcohol contained the
larger the sales.
The suggestion is made that the
amount of the tax shall be in ac
cordance with the amount of whis
key contained in the medicines,
and this would have to be determ
ined by requiring the manufactur
ers to file with the commissioner of
internal revenue sworn statements
of the alcohol they use. At inter
vals inspectors would procure sam
ples and make analyses. Some of
the medicines are said to be so
strong with whiskey that they
would have to pay a high tax.
Authorities of the internal reve
bureau are unconcerned about
nue
it all. They say that the alcohil
contained in the medicines has al
ready paid a tax to the govern
ment; and, further, that so many
medicines contain alcohol to a
large extent that the taxation plan
would probably have to be an ex
tensive one. They poiut out that
the chief basis laudanum is alcohol,
to which opium is added.
Mrs. C. E. Worthington Dsn.d.
The many Owyhee people who will
remember Dr. and Mrs. C. E. Worth
ington, who removed from here to Mos
cow, gome three years ago, will be
pained to learn that this most estim
able lady died in that town on the 5th
instant. Mrs. Mills, who has known
her since girlhood, they having grown
up together in the same neighborhood
in Missouri, has contributed the follow
ing sketch in memory of her lifetime
friend'
"On the death of my dear friend, Mrs.
C. E. Worthingion, I would like to
write just a line in hehalf of the many
noble qualities I knew her to possess;
having known her from my childhood,
being reared together in the east. She,
as a girl, was Sallie Busey, a rosy
cheeked, merry, bappp lass, a girl be
loved and admired by all who knew
her, those considering themselves very
fortunate who were on her list of ac
quaintances. Later in life her health
failed her, but never her kind-hearted
disposition. She was a friend to every
one, and especially to the sick and dis
tressed. It can truly be said of her,
she did her part faithfully. For years
she has beeu a constant sufferer but
she bore it with patience and fortitude,
always cheerful and willing to help
others. Her death, to me. has beeu a
very sad blow; my sympathy goes out 1
to the bereaved ones, her husband and
two children, that are left to mourn
her loss. Besides her family, there are
friends innumerable who will be sad
dened to hear of her untimely death.
All through her girlhood life and her
married life, as wife and mother, I
dou't remember aver hearing au un
kind word spoken of her; in losing her
I feel that I have lost a true and tried,
loving friend, but
"We are wonderiDg home as time glid
eth by
And weaveth its garland of years,
To a beautiful home that is better by
far
Thau the one in this valley of tears.
Wandering home, yes wuudering home,
Soon shall we wander no more;
And oh! may we meet each other at
last,
At home on that beautiful shore.
M. Mills.'
Home Atfadn.
W. J. Hill, editor aud proprietor of
the Index, arrived home on the 9:55
traiu Sunday night from the east, hav
ing been absent just a month. He
spent some time at his boyhood's home
in Prescott, Ontario, and visited rela
tives in New York, Niagara Falls and
Chicago. Returning over the Union
Pacific route to Salt Lake City, he
went thence north over the Oregon
Short Line railroad and visited his old
home in Silver City, Idaho, which he
and his family left when they came to
Salinas, thirty years ago. He also
visited old friends in Boise City, the
capital of Idaho, and came atound by
Portland, Oregon, where he "took in"
the Lewis aud Clark Exposition, aud
then came home by rail, having trav
eled about niue thousand miles since
leaving here on the second of August.
He saw much good country while away,
but returns more in love with Cali
fornia thau ever.—Salinas (Cal.) Index,
Sept. 5, 1905.
Battleship Idaho.
There will be launched at the
Cramp's shipbuilding yards in Phila
delpbia, next fall, a battleship which
will be one of the most effective in the
world. The battleship will be the Ida
ho, aud belongs to what is known
the Mississippi class. The Idaho will
be a ship of 13,(100 tons, with a water
line at 375 feet, 77 feet wide, and have
a coal bunker capacity of 1750 tons and
17 knots speed. Her maiu gross draft
will be 27 feet. When completed it will
have cost nearly $6,000,000.
In drawing the plans and specifica
tions for this ship the navy depart
ment have taken advantage of the les
sons proffered by the Japanese Russian
war. The Idaho will have but one mast
which will have three fighting tops. To
protect the ship from torpedo attacks
the water line will be protected by a
inch belt of steel and water tight
compartments, which it is figured, will
make the boat well nigh uusiukable.
The maiu battery of her armament
will consist of four 12-inch breech-load
ing rifles, eight 8-inch aud eigtit 7-inch
breech-loading rifles. In addition the
Idaho will be supplied with two 18-incti
submerged torpedo tubes. Her second
ary battery will consist of twelve 3
inch 1.4-pouuder rapid firing guns of 50
calibre, six 3-pounder automatic guns,
two 1-pounder rapid fire guns aud six
automatic guus of 30 calibre each. The
13-inch guns will be placed in two elec
trically controlled, balanced, elliptical
turrets, on the ceuter line, one on the
upper deck forward and one on the
main deck aft. This arrangement, it is
figured, will give the two turrets an arc
of Are of about 270 degrees and 250 de
grees respectively. The 8-inch guns
will also be placed in electrically con
trolled turrets, the 7-inch guns in
broadsides, and the secondary battery
will be placed in a commanding posi
tion so as to protect the vessel from
torpedo boats. All the 7-inch guns will
be so arranged that their muzzles will
train inside the line of the side armor,
thus leaving a clear and unobstructed
side when it is desired to go alongside
a pier or vessel.
According to E. W. Parker's statis
tics in the U. S. geological survey's re
port on "Coal production in 1904,"
Idaho produced 3330 short tons, with a
spot value of $12,230. The only coal
areas of Idaho from which any produc
tion has been obtained are found in
the Horseshoe Bend and Jerusalem
districts, occupying the lower portion
of a ridge between the Boise and Pay
ette rivers, in front of the Boise moun
tains. In the Horseshoe Bend district
there is one seam of high grade lignite
of about 3 feet in thickness. The Jeru
salem district, which contains four dif
ferent seams averaging from 3 to 8 feet
in thickness, also contains lignite of
about the same character as that of
the Horseshoe Bend district. There
are two other occurrences of coal in
the state—one near Salmon City, the
other at the northern ed,e of the state,
where the Sublette field of Wyoming
extends across the line. No mining is
carried on in either of these districts
at the present time. The production
from the Horseshoe Bend aud Jerusa
lem districts has beeu very irregular,
never reaching and commercial im
portance.
To Butter Makers.
For Rubber Stamps and an ink that
will not run nor injure butter, write to
Will D. Candee, Weiser, Idaho.
163
My complete stock of heating and
cook stoves will be sold at cost.— Theo.
H. Philipp.
Try an El Sidelo, all Havana tobacco
cigar for a first class smoke. You will
find them at Tremewan's fruit and
candy store.
Le^a.1 Notices.
Notice to Creditors.
Estate of William J. Clegg.
Notice is hereby given by the undersigned,
administrator of the estate of William J. Clegg,
deceased, to the creditors of, and all persons
having claims against the said deceased, to
bibit them with the necessary vouchers, within
ten months after the first publication of this
notice, to the said administrator, at his resi
dence in Pleasant Valley, Owÿhee counts',
Idaho, the same being the place for the trans
action of the business of said
Dated August 17, 1905.
deceased.
ex
estate.
Philip Clegg, Administrator.
J. F. Nugent, Attorney for Administrator. 13-5
Dissolution of Co-Partnership.
Notice is hereby given that I have sold my
interest in the property known as the Scales &
agener arastra mill property, at Silver City,
Mr. James Ingles, and that the co-partner
ship heretofore existing between myself and
Mr. John Wagener, in the ownership of the
said property, has been dissolved.
Silver City, Idaho, September 1,1905.
V.
John Scales.
in ..
XX
i. W. ROWETT
W. W. BARTOW,
WATCHMAKER
AND JEWELER.
Carries a complete
-stock of
High Grande Watches
Jewelry O. Silverware
Location 1st door east
of Postoffice V
SILVER. CITY. IDA.
2 £
i
The DEWEY DAIRY
»-Pure Cream and Milk delivered every
morning to Silver City and other camp«.
Bottle System Adopted.
Proprietor
PROFESSIONAL CARDS
'
Vs
THOS. FÄRBER, M. I).
PHYSICIAN & SURGEON
Calls answered any hour of the day or night.
De Lamar, Idaho
R. C. Cunningham
ATTORNEY AND COUNSELOR
Office near Idaho Hotel. Prompt and carefnl
attention given to all legal business
Silver City,
Idaho
W. R. HAMILTON, M. D.
PHYSICIAN AND SURGEON
S1I.VEB ClTT.
Idaho
DR. F. S. HEER
-DENTIST
SILVER CITY,
IDAHO
JOHN F. NUGENT
ATTORN E Y-AT-LAW
8ILVER CITY
IDAHO
JOHN LAMB
NOTARY PUBLIC
SILVER CITY. IDAHO.
George 0_ Sampson
LIVERYMAN
-RROPRIETOR OF
MURPHY, SILVER CITY, DEWEY and DELAMAR
STAGE LINES
ISf-The best facilities for transportation between the railway ter
minus to and from Silver City, DeLamar, or other points in Owyhee.
Keep good mountain rigs, with good stock aud Careful Drivers.
Stables at Silver City and Murphy
George O. Sampson
Proprietor
J
..The Capvtol Hotel..
BOISE CITY , IDAHO
FIRST-CLASS THROUGHOUT
HEADQUARTERS FOR. OWYHEEITES
*
r*RA.JVK 'BLÆCK.IftGEI*^
Manager
THE BEST EQUIPPED HOSTELBY IN OWYHEE COUNTY
Ghe
DEWEY HOTEL
DEWEY. IDAHO
HEATED THROUGHOUT BY STEAM. LIGHTED BY ELECTRICITY.
MARK COLBORN
Proprietor

1
SALOON
Eating House
&c Feed Barn
Is now prepared to furnish first-class
meals and lodging for man and beast
Wines
Liquors
cigars
- F. Branca I
SOCIETY CARDS
K NIGHTS OF PYTHIAS, SILVER CITY
iiOdge No. 25, K. of P. Regular meeting«
every Tuesday evening at 7:30, in Masonic Hall.
All brethern in good standing are cordially in
vited to attend. August Grete, C. C.
John Grete, K. of R. and S.
f*YRUS CHAPTER NO 2. R. A. M.-Meets
every fourth Wednesday of each months. So
journing companions cordially invited to attend.
R. H. Britt, Ex. H. P.
R. H. Leonard, Jr., Secretary.
CILVER CITY LODGE NO. 13, A. F. & A. M.
Meets the Second Wednesday of each month.
Sojonrning brethern cordially invited to attend.
Frederic Irwin, W. M.
J. 8. St. Ci, aie. Secretary.
K nights of pÿthias, delamar lodge.
No. 29. MeetingB Tuesday evenings at
7:00 p. m. in Castle Hall.
Mix* Walls, C. O.
H. 8. Simhons, K. of R. and 8.
I/LLA REBEKAH LODGE, NO. 31, meets
v the second and fourth Wednesday in
each month at Odd Fellow's Hall. Visiting
members in good standing cordially invi
ted.
Mrs. T. D. Farrar, N. G.
Dorothy Helm. Secretary.
r^WYHEE LODGE NO. 2, I. O. O. F., Silver
City, Idaho. Meets every Friday night.
8ojourning Brethern always welcome.
C. G. Breedlove, N. G.
R. H. Leonard, Jr., Secretary.
F lorida mountain lodge no. 42 k. of
P., meets every Wednesday at their Castle
Hall, in Dewey, Idaho. Visiting brothers are
cordially invited.
William Inglïs, K. of R. and 8.
W. H. Best. C.C.

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