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The silver blade. (Rathdrum, Idaho) 1895-1903, July 21, 1900, Image 1

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THE SILVER BLADE.
OFFICIAL PAPER
OP KOOTENAI
OOtJNTY. IDAHO.
COMMERCIAL ' i
PRINTING OP ! !
ALL KINDS. ! !
%
* I
$1.60 PER YEAR.
RATHDRUM, IDAHO, SATURDAY, JULY 21, 1900.
YOU. VI.
NO. 14.
CARDS
PROFESSIONAL CARDS
EDWIN Me BEE,
Attorney at Law,
RATHDRUM, IDAHO
]1) HN B. GOOD E
ATTORNEY AT LAW
I
Office* st Rathdrum aud Oueur d' Alene
Oscar C. Stone,
ATTORNEY-AT-LAW
COEDS D'ALENE, IDAHO
Special attention given Land Office practice.
EUROPEAN PLAN.
FREE BUS.
Hotel Gadilteic.
EDGAR K, SCHMITT. Prop.
Newly Fitted. First Class.
410 RIVERSIDE AVE.
SPOKANE, WASH.
ï
- Phone Hain 718.
SCHOOL BOARDS
Can save money for their
district by purcnaslng school
furniture from me.
I HANDLE
EVERYTHING
Required iu a school room
Write for Prices.
J. C. BRADY, Rathdrum, Idaho.
NORTHWESTERN
BUSINESS
COLLEGE
Powell Hlock, opposite Review bnililldg, Spokane, Wash.
I'ublle Opinion and
Patronage pronounce It
LEAPING EDUCATORS. BANKERS and MERCHANTS
THE BEST
INDORSED
BY ALI, THK
FOUR COURSES OF STUDY
COMMERCIAL,
NORMAL,
SHORTHAND AND TYPEWRITING.
CIVIL SERVICE,
This College will continue to do the highest urade of work witl, additions
to the teaching force, with facilities Increased, with accommodations improved
and with the same push and progressive spirit that have given it the leading
position You will probably atteud hut one Commercial School. It pavs to se
ed the best. Will occupy an entire building after Nov. 1st. Send for prospectus.
Address,
E. H. THOMPSON, Principal
H. P. SHEEL.
WASHINGTON
F. SWANSON,
MONUMENTAL AND CUT STONE WORKS
Manufacturers and Dealers In
AND
Cemetery
und
Building
Work of Every Description.
Office and works, 1508 to 1630 Second Avenue, corner Maple st. N. P. R. R. Tiacks
SPOKANE. WASHINGTON.
GRANITE
MARBLE
THE BLAIR
Colter
Bookkeeping.
Shorthand,
Business Methods,
Typewriting,
Telegraphy, . Assaying
English,
MODERN METHODS.
MODERN TEACHERS.
Five Hundred Students Enrolled During Past Year.
SEND FOR 1899 CATALOGUE
E
H. O. BLAIR, A. B., Principal.
Subscribe for the Blade.
F, WENZ, M. D
•Ï
Physician and Surgeon,
BAIDORUH, IDAHO
p SKTlSTRY
In all Its latest branches by
DR. D. F. H0LL1STÈR,
EXAMINATION FREB
RATHDRUM
IDAHO
James g raham .
ATTORNEY-AT-LAW.
Notary Public.
Coeur d'Alene City,
Idaho
ions
ing
ver
and
of
in
ing
ied
in
of
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a
to
in
IXW8 OF THE WOULD DT BRIEF.
l Complete Review of the Hveot, of
the Poet Week—la Title on« For
elm Lands—'Token From the Lot
est Dispatches.
There is a coal famine at Dutch har
bor.
Captain Coghlan, who commanded
the Raleigh in the battle of Mannlla,
is critically 111.
Jack Moffet, of Chicago, got the de
cision of Al. Neil of California, In the
twentieth round of a glove contest at
San Francisco, recently.
A terrific electrical storm, accom
panied by a rainfall of 1.72 inches rag
er in Dubuque, Iowa, for three hours
recently. Nellie L. McQullllan, aged
16, was killed by lightening.
The transport, Hancock, has arrived
in San Francisco, 24 days from Man
ila, via Nagaski. She brought 101
passengers and 647 soldiers. Five
deaths and two suicides occurred on
the voyage.
Senator Gear, the venerable statesman
from Iowa, is dead. He had not enjoyed
health for a year or more, but was not
considered dangerously ill until the final
summons came. He was beloved by all
associates.
Captain Healy, Master of the Mc
Culloch came to Port Arthur under
guard insane. He first attempted to
jump overboard, then attempted to op
en a blood vessel with a piece of a
broken medicine bottle.
The directors of the Dime Savings
bank of Newark, N. J., has closed the
institution's door until its affairs can
be straightened out. Charles West
ervelt/ the bank's secretary and treas
urer has been arrested.
Six coal and ice storehouses, three
stables, a frame dwelling, a number
of outbuildings and six Pennsylvania
freight cars were destroyed by fire re
cently at Sewlcklex, a suburb of Pitts
burg, Pa. Samuel Woods, a stable
man, was burned to death and eight
horses were creamated. Loss $50,000.
Announcement is made that that
George H. Davis has been appointed
manager of the New York baseball
club, displacing "Buck" Ewing. The
change, it is stated, was necessitated
by the Inability of Ewing to suppress
the feeling of factionalism that has ex
isted among the players during the
present season.
Four men were caught in the act of
robbing Mason & WhltehiU's general
store at State Center, Iowa last week.
A number of citizens surrounded the
building and a pitched battle ensued.
Ben. Whitehill, one of the proprietors,
was shot In the leg. One of the rob
bers was also wounded, and with one
of his associates was captured. The
other two .escaped.
. ,. . ,, I
The gold democrats, will not put a
ticket in the field this year, says W. j j
D. Bynum, chairman of the gold dem- 1
ocratic executive committee In 1896.
of
"We cannot get our electors on the of
ficial ballots in New York, because the
votes were cast for the party candi
date for governor in 1898 and the state i
law requires that a certain number of ,
votes shall have been cast for state of
fleers in the preceeding election before c
the nominees of any party can go on l
the official ballot In the pending con
test,
Charles W. Barnes, suspected of be
Ing one of the robbers who stopped the
Illinois Central train and looted its ex
press car of $10,000, three miles south
of Wickliffe, Ky., recently, has been
arrested at his home in St. Louis.
John Nelson, of 3658 Finney avenue,
Barnes' partner, escaped from the de
tectives, leaving a trail of blood,
shots were exchanged between the fu- j
gitive and the officers, who pursued
him to Vandevanted station, where he j
40
eluded them.
Fire destroyed five large and three
small buildings formerly used by the |
Chicago Great Western railroad as re
pair shops at West Park, just outside
St. Paul.
About three carloads of
Loss, $200,
There was a high wind blowing, '
and the flames spread from the oil j
house to the adjoining buildings and t
freight cars, of which there were a
great number in the yard. The shops I
had been used as store houses by the
Coast Shingle company, and 300 car-|
loads of their product were in the
buildings.
shingles were destroyed.
000 .
Among the cadets for West Point ap
pointed during the past week under in
crease provided by recent legislation from
states at large, are the following: Torrey
B. Maghee, Rawlins, Wyo.; Henry Point
ing, Laramie, Wyo., alternate. Kendall
Fellowes, Spokane, Washington; Leo P.
Quinn, alternate, Spokane, Washington;
Edward Lee Compte, Park City, Utah; R.
L. Irvine, alternate, Logan, Utah; Rupert
Dunford, Salt Lake City, Utah; Gerald
Childs, alternate, Ogden, Utah; Arthur W.
Lane, Portland, Oregon; Henry R. Adair,
alternate, Astoria, Oregon; Hugh L.
Waltham, Modesto, Cal.; Oarl H. Adams,
alternate, New Ontario, Cal.; Lowe A.
McClure, Carson City, Nev.; Fred A.
Garges, alternate, Reno, Nevada.
The secretary of the treasury has
received a letter from G. Rudolph, 826
Broadway, Brooklyn, N. Y., on the sit
uation at Cape Nome,
ment sees no reason to doubt the trust
The depart
worthiness of the story told by Ru
dolph. It is becoming dally more ap
parent to the officials that the condit
ions in the new gold fields are almost
certain to result in great suffering dur
ing the coming winter, especially as
epidemics of smallpox and typhoid fe
ver are threatened. Rudolph takes a
very gloomy view of the outlook at
Nome, where he arrived on June 12,
and whence he departed on June 20.
The members of the Texas state guard
have tendered their services to the gov
ernment in case they are needed in the
Chinese war.
There will be no further withdrawals
of troops .from the Philippines for service
in China; that is the policy determined
upon and it will be adhered to.
The war department has received a
cablegram from General MaeArthur, say
ing that Colonel Liscum's body was bur
ied at Tong Ku on the 17th instant.
Further news from Colombia is to the
effect that up to July 13 Panama was
still held by the government. The rebels
in the vicinity were expected to begin
operations soon.
Thomas Cahill, western representative
of the Cosmopolitan, was killed in the fire
that destroyed the Vrerayer broom-corn
works at Chicago. Firemen searching the
ruins came across his mangled an S' char
red remains. The portion of the building
he was sleeping in was caught by the
blaze and fell into the ruins of the ware
house.
The principal news from Dawson is that
a dozen cases of smallpox have broken out
there. The disease has been prevalent re
cently at Nome and people are supposed
to have carried the infection from the
beach Helds to Dawson.
The steamer Cutch has arrived from
Skagway, bringing the largest gold
shipment received at Vancouver this sea
son from the north. There were $300,000
in gold dust on board, besides a large
amount in drafts. The majority of the 00
passengers brought large packages of
gold, some of more weight than one could
carry off the boat unaided. There were no
very wealthy winners of the yellow metal,
but there was a fair distributnon.
At Cayuse station, on the main line of
the O. K. & N., the west bound Portland
Chicago fast passenger train crashed into
the rear end of a freight train which was
standing on the track at the station. A
light engine was also at the rear of the
freight train and was crushed into the ca
boose. Doth engines, the caboose and three
cars were badly wrecked. Kngineer Math
enson and Fireman William Guion of the
passenger train and Prakeman Sanders
were slightly injured. No passengers
were badly hurt.
An amalgamation of the American Fed
eration of Labor and the Western Feder
ation of Labor is proposed.
After a bitter contest the Idaho state
democratic convention voted to seat the
Woods, or ani-Steunenberg delegation from
Shoshone county by a vote of 122 to 110.
Major John C. Caperton of Louisville,
one of the Wealthiest and most prominent
I men of Kentucky, died in Chicago of heart
failure. Major Caperton -made his start
j j n pf e ; n California and was the fiist mayor
1
of San Francisco,
sent to Louisville.
The body was today
i
,
, , .
c J° th * the 8old,ers ,n tl,e Ph,1, PP , nes for
l * ie changing seasons,
The commission of Brigadier General A.
R. Chaffee as major general of the Chinese
expeditionary forces has been made out at
the war department and sent to the White
house for the president's signature. Cable
notice of the appointment will meet Gen
eral Chaffee on his arrival at Nagasaki,
of the American River Land & Lumber
company, 12 miles north of Plaeerville,
j tail a loss running into the millions. In
addition to many houses and 15 miles of
j railroad, over 12,000,000 feet of logs aid
lying out and barked in the woods await
The, government depot in Jeffersonville,
Ind., has received orders from Wasiiington
to begin making 150,000 flannel blouses
and 300,000 pairs of drawers. This is in
anticipation of operations in China and to
A great forest fire is raging on the lands
Cal. Should the fire continue it will en
ing a drive,
| The post house at Nome is full and ovor
flowing with patients afflicted with small
pox and the government officials are
erecting two other large structures, one
of which, with adjuncts, will cover an
' acre of ground. The disease has spread
j rapidly and lots of cases are for the present
t quarantined in the tents in which they
were discovered.
I Jud 0 f the United States cir
cu ; t C ourt, New York, rendered a decision
jn the cas(J of charle8 F . w . Neely> charg .
ed with having defrauded the postoffice
department in Cuba, in which he declared
that the mere presentation of an indict
ment can not be held sufficient for Neely s
extradition and that further testimony will.
be heard when the case comes up on uuly
23.
Executors of the will of George M. Pull
man have turned over to the board of di
rectors of the free school of manual train
ing $1,250,000, the amount decreed for
building that institution and to carry into.
execution the stipulation of the wifi. The
board of direeors of
the proposed institu-1
tion have effected permanent organization,
aud as soon as the officials, together with
the board of trustees, can determine w.iat
the scope of the school will be work will
-
begin.
Half the time when a man lies to his
wife, he does it because he knows he
can get up a story that will sound a (pt
more reasonable to her than the truth.
II HUNG CHANG'S STATEMENT.
Sold He Had Received Definite New«
That Foreigner« Were Alive (ex
cept Von Ketteler — Boxers Are
Movlnir South.
New York, July 20.—A dispatch to the
World from London says:
, u -, ,
Gieat bodies of Boxers and regular
h
Chinese troops are known to be marching |
southward from Pekin, murdering all
Christians they Uind and destroying their
possessions. ,
'It is feared that same of the viceroys
who, as a whole, have hitherto shown
themselves most friendly disposed toward
foreigners are now wavering in their sup
port and with the government of several
provinces are going over to the rebels.
'Many people regard Li Hung Chang's
eagerness for his present journey from
Canton to Pekin witli suspicion and urge
that he be detained when the steamer car
rying him reaches Shanghai.
The Shanghai correspondent of the Lon
don Express cables:
"The consuls acting as representatives
of the powers have unanimously agreed
that Liukanyih, the viceroy of Nanking,
shall be regarded as the emperor of China
so far as the collection of the revenue is
concerned. Liukanyih has always been
friendly toward foreigners and the consuls
believe they may place implicit faith in
him."
The Express correspondent at Tokio
cables:
"The Japanese government is now seri
ously discussing whether in view of the
attitude of some of the powers it would
be advisable to dispatch the division of
troops already mobilized. It ia feared
that Russia and Germany may not accept
the command of the Japanese senior of
ficers who would necessarily take charge
of the army corps. Japan desires assur
ances on this point before giving orders
for the embarkation of troops. This may
mean further delay of several weeks."
Baron Murdoch, the agent of Pritchard
Morgan, M. P., in Corea, who has just
reached London after a CO day's journey
by way of Valdivostoek over the trans
Siberian railway to Moscow, says Russia,
before he left, was actively mobiliz
even
ing troops in central Russia and west Si
beria.
veying close on to 300,000 men to Man
churia or its borders. In diplomatic cir
cles in Ixmdon tonight the fate of the
legations is no longer considered of first
importance. The perilous international sit
uation is looming on the horizon.
'the trans-Siberian railway is con
At War With the World.
London, July 20.—The action of Count
Buelow, the German minister of for
won
eign affairs, in informing the Chinese le
gation at Berlin that all telegraphic
sages must he in plain language and sub
mitted for approval by the censor, and the
suggestion of M. Deleasse, the French min
ister of foreign affairs, that the exporta
tion of arms to China be prohibited, whicli
generally regarded here as long steps
in the direction of treating China as a
state engaged in war, have -been supple
mented this morning by the official an
nouncement from St. Petersburg that cer
tain portions of the Amur territory, in
cluding parts of the KhabarovZk district
and the coast territory, as well as the
towns of Blagovestchensk, Khabarovsk and
Nikolskussuri, have been declared in a
state of war since July 17.
Russia's announcement is regarded in
London as at least foreshadowing a speedy
unconditional recognition of the fact that
a condition of war exists between China
and tiie civilized world, and the general
opinion seems to favor such recognition as
the best means of meeting the barbarian
upheaval, while at the same time endeavor
ing to isolate the independent viceroys
from the general conflagration.
The revelation of the ability of the Chi
nese forces in the north to stand their
ground against the internationals is pro
ducing the inevitable results in the south.
At Shanghai it is announced officially
that the foreign women and children have
been requested to leave the ports along
the river.
mes
of
are
.
Serious rioting has occurred at Po Yang
misaion
lake, near Kiu Kiang. Several
aries have been killed and chapels burned.
The telegraph between Kiu Kiang and
Hankow is interrupted.
In connection with the story that Prince
Tuan's forces have been ordered to march
s U) ^y e j jj a j w e i ( it is considered as sig
niHcant that Indian troops arriving
at
Bong Kong have been expected to pro
ceed to Wei Hai Wei.
A Shanghai dispatch also reports that
Russia has been in secret negotiation
with Prince Tuan's government with the
connivance Q f Li Hung Chang,
In a dispatch from St. Petersburg it is
stated that Russia's anxiety to minimize
t ) 1(J alarming nature of the news from
\j a nehuria is dictated by fears of the in
j ury the confirmation of such news might
eause j n the matter of arrangements al
] (1 gg d to have been made in the United
States for money with which to complete
the Manchurian railroad.'
A dispatch from Shanghai received here
reports that the losses of the Chinese in
the fighting at Tientsin was upwards of
3000. It is understood that Lieutenant
!
General Sir Francis Grenfell will have
command of the British forces in C hinu.
SuNpicftouM of l»i Huiik Chang.
Hong Kong, Wednesday, July do.— Li
Hung Chang and his suite have anived
here. The Chinese were received with a
salute of 17 guns, and with a guard of
honor from the Welsh fusileers, and a
band, proceeded to the government house,
where he was received by the governor, Sir
Henry A. Blake, General Gazele, Uradow
and other officials.
Li Hung Chang was
extremely reticent. He stated that he
had recei J ved d f flnite ne "' 8 that the min
,8ters and foreigners at Pekin, with the
w ° T - .. ' , _
exception of Baron von Ketteler. the G er
| nian nliniâ ter, were safe July 8. The im
perial edict calling him to Pekin, the vice
roy said, was due to the empress and em
peror and not to Prince Tuan.
IDAHO.
The Northern Pacific Hospital at Oro
Flno has been closed.
Thomas Birch, one of the pioneer and
leading citizens of Wilford, is dead.
The receipts for the past fiscal year at
the Lewiston postoilice were $10,330.
VV. F. Kitten^ach has "been chosen man
ager of tiie Lewiston Athletic association
bull club.
The Vollmer flouring mill is run
ning day and night. Duthle ft Carrin
are building a large cold storage ware
house 33x80 feet
Lieutenant I. M. Bushy of Wardner,
who was an officer of the First Idaho
volunteers, has offered to raise a com
pany of 120 men for service in China.
The governor has been informed that
the government has approved the bill of
$4850.48 for transportation of volunteers
to Boise at the time of the mobilization of
the Idaho regiment.
The mystery surrounding the disap
pearance of Agnes and Metha Monlken
thln has been cleared up by the pres
ence of the girls at Valley City, N. D.
and the capture there of Gust John
son, who had abducted them.
Harrison, on Lake Coeur d'Alene,
Idaho, Is having quite a boom. Two
large manufacturing industries, a
mammoth sawmill and a large plan
ning mill, box and sash and door fact
ory, are to be erected there in the im
mediate future.
July 11th was miners' union day, for
merly a greater day than the Fourth
of July in the Coeur d'Alenes, but this
year it passed unnoticed. There was
no demonstration of any kind at Wal
lace, nor at any other point in the
Coeur d'Alenes, so far as heard from.
Dr. G. A. Dorsey, curator of the an
thropology of the Field museum, Chicago,
has been at Spalding and vicinity looking
up and collecting Indian relics and curios
and studying the modes of living of the
reservation Indians. He secured many
interesting articles of Indian manufac
ture.
is
in
of
of
Si
cir
the
sit
Harvesting is in progress in the vi
cinity of Troy. Timothy cutting In
the timbered sections has been under
way for a week. The crop, both as re
gards quantity and quality, is far above
the average. Fall wheat will yield 30
bushels to the acre, oats and barley
will average 50 bushels to the acre.
Spring wheat, while still presenting a
fair appearance, needs rain. Blades
on much of the spring wheat are turn
ing yellow, the cause of which Is caus
ing considerable discussion, some at
tributing it to rust and others to In
sects.
for
le
the
a
an
cer
in
the
and
a
in
as
Chi
pro
Attack by Boer».
London, July 19.—The war office has
received the following dispatch from Lord
Roberts :
"Pretoria, July 18.—The enemy made a
determined attack on the left of Pole
Carew's position and along our left flank,
commanded by Hutton. The positions
held by the Irish Fusileers and the Cana
dian mounted infantry, under i-lieutenant
Colonel Anderson were most gallantly de
fended. The enemy made repeated at
tempts to assault the positions, coming in
close range and calling to the Fusileers to
surrender. The enemy suffered severely.
They had 15 killed and 50 wounded, and
four were taken prisoners. The British
casualties were seven killed, including the
30 wounded and 21 missing.
"Ian Hamilton's column advanced to
Waterval yesterday unopposed and pro
ceeded to Hamms Kraal.
"Fifteen hundred Boers with five guns
managed to break through the cordon
formed by Hunter's and Rundle's divis
ions between Bethlehem and Ficksburg.
They were making toward Lindley, be
ing closely follow ed by Paget's and Broad
wood's brigades."
In the dispatch dated today Lord Rob
erts pays a tribute to Lieutenants Borden
and Rich, whom in his dispatch given
above he reported killed. Lord Roberts
says:
"They were killed while gallantly lead
ing their men in a counter attack on the
enemy's flank at a critical juncture of
their assault on our position. Borden was
twice before brought to my notice in dis
patches for gallant and intrepid conduct."
and
sig
at
the
is
in
al
Reese Was Illegally Imprisoned.
St. Louis, July 16.—Judge Amos Thay
er of the United States court of appeals
has handed down an opinion declaring
that John P. Reese, the Iowa miners' union
official, who was sentenced to imprison
ment in Kansas for violation of a strike
injunction, was illegally restrained of his
liberty and granted a writ of habeas cor
pus releasing him. Judge Thayer ruled
that the lower court erred in including
Reese under the injunction.
in
of
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