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The Rathdrum tribune. (Rathdrum, Idaho) 1903-1963, January 10, 1919, Image 1

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn88056093/1919-01-10/ed-1/seq-1/

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THE RATHDRUM TRIBUNE
RATHDRUM, KOOTENAI COUNTY, IDAHO, FRIDAY, JANUARY 30, 1919
«1.00 PER YEAR
vol. xxiv, no. aa
•T
Li
Career Was Full ol Créât
Achievements.
His
in
just
into
the
was
ed
our
is
a
on
From 1884 to 1886
,
In 1 897 Presi
Colonel Theodore Roosevelt died at
his home, Oyster Bay, N. Y., ear'y
Monday morning, Jan. 6 . The news
came as a surprise to the country, as
he had not been considered seriously
ill, although he had been suffering
from rheumatism lor some lime.
Embolism, or a blood clot on one
lung, caused by inflammatory rheu
matlsiu, is said to have been the
direct cause of his death.
Flags throughout the nation were
put at half mast as a mark of respect
10 the great American citizen, and
world over paid
public men the
tribute to his memory.
Theodore Roosevelt, the 26th presi
dent of the United States, led a most
acti ve career, and was described bv
Grover Cleveland as the "best equip
ped politician of his time." Born in
New York city, Uct. 27, 1858, Roose
velt's early education was received by
private tutor at home and in travels
abroad. He was graduated from
Harvard university in 1880, and after
a trip to Europe, served in the New
York assembly,
he spent bis time on his cattle ranch
es in the west. Returning to New
York he reentered politics. President
Harrison appointed him a member of
the United States civil service com
mission, in which he was continued
by President Cleveland. He resigned
in 1895 to become police commission
er of New York city,
dent McKinley appointed him assist
ant secretary of the navy in which
position lie bas been credited with
instituting many reforms making for
greater efficiency. He entered the
Spanish war in 1898, and became
colonel of the Rough Riders while
serving in Cuba. After serving one
term as governor of New York he was
elected vice president in 1900, and
succeeded to the presidency upon the
death of McKinley. Rjosevelt was
the youngest president, being but 42
when be entered that office Sept. 14,
1901. He was elected in 1904 by the
largest popular vote ever received by
a president, and crowded the succeed
ing four years with achievements stall
fre-h in the public mind. On retim
ing from this office March 4, 1909, he
made a bunting trip to Africa. Re -
turning from this trip he evinced
great dissatisfaction at the policy of
Taft, his successor, and organizing
the Progressive party caused a split in
the republican party which resulted
in the election of Wilson in 1912.
In 1914 Roosevelt headed an ex
ploring expedition in South America
and discovered a large river which
the Brizilian government named for j
him. His later years have been spent
chiefly in peaking, lecturing and
writing. Especially since the Europ
can war broke out, his activity in the
welfare of America and Americanism
Iris been most marked. He voiced
strong arguments for preparedness
since 1914 and was tireless in warn
ing the country of the German
menace to world liberty.
□ Roosevelt leaves a widow, four sons
and two daughters. His sons all
served in the war. One son, Quentin,
was killed in au air battle in France
last summer, and Archie was severely
wounded inaction. Theodore, Jr.,
is a m»jor;and Kermit a lieutenaot iu
the British army in Mesopotamia.
United
Gold production in the
States in 1918 fell to 3,313,000 tine
worth $68,493,000, the lowest
ounces,
in 20 years, and silver production
dropped to 67,879,000 floe quotes,
worth $67,879,000 at the standard
government price of $1 an ouuce, the
smallest record since 1913.
LETTERS FROM SOLDIERS
Mark W. Egbers.
Following is a part, of a letter
written to Attorney Miles Egbers by
His brother, Mark W. Egbers, private
in Co. F, 303d Infantry, « 1 st division,
just prior Lu starting on the march
into Germany to form part of the
army of occupation. (Since that time will
the orders were, changed and the « 1 st road
was brought back to France, scbedul- a
ed for eurly return home ) ed
Meaulbeke, IJelgium, Dec. 1, 1918.
Dear Brother: We marched from
our billets in the country (barns) to
billets in the edge of this town. It mo
is cold here hut we expect to move q U
soon ' be
1 have been in Belgium now about
- , , ,
a month and a half. We have fought
. »
on three different fronts. Have done
much hiking. The last front was
easy. No one in our company was e< 3
killed. The Germans merely left
rear guards We were scheduled to levy
advance on them the morning hostii
itics ceased. The news came just in
time. When word came many would e( j
not believe, but the silencing ol the 0 f
big guns was convincing and the
losing boys were happy to pay their
little bets.
The worst and toughest siege of all
was in France in the Argonne forest.
Machine gun tire was bad. The
artillery also claimed a large toll in
some places. Many'of the boys who
were wounded there are now return
ing to the company again. We are tax
sure glad to see them back looking so
well, but some of them who were
more severely wounded died in the
hospitais. Two of my closest friends,
, . . »
theories I associated with most, were
, .... , >
both killed in the held onlv a few
yards away from me. It was the day
of seveie artillery tire. We were dug
in in the open tleld. They were in
the same hole together and were
slruek with the same fatal shell. The
man in the hole next to me nut more
than seven feet away was wounded by
shrapnel but has returned to the
company. Mam of the boys could
not endure the fatigue and exhaus
,
tion and were taken to the hospitals.
o
. ..Some were shellshocked. Most
of the less severe cases have returned
to the company in the last week or
two. Neither my corporal or sergeant
have returned yet. Our lieutenant
was shot the tlrst morning over the
top, so I have all new officers now.
\
Our captain was also wounded and
, , . , rr „_. . ,
sent to the hospital. This happened
,, . •
in France. The succeeding captain,
who was then a second lieutenant,
was wounded herein Belgium. lie
probably will not return, as we have
still another captain now. Our major
was also wounded but was away from
us but a short time.. .
We weie a long time comiug over
We encountered sub
The
lioat we came over on, the ' City of
Cairo," was sunk on her return trip.
trip.
.. ..Some one asked me at Halifax if
I got sea sick. To use the yankie
language, I "fed the fish" along with
a good many others.
42
by
he
-
of
in
for j We were about 16 days ou the
on the boat,
marines but no one was lost.
and
the
sons
all
Jr.,
iu
Paul Wickertsheimer.
Paul Wickertsheimer, gunner of
Battery It, 146th Held artillery, writ
ing to his father, Chas. Wickerts
heimer of Rathdrum, under date of
Nov. 28, from Blercourt, France,
gives an account of the work of his
battery ftom the time it first went
into action:
We arrived at the front on July 8 ,
within hearing distance of the big
guns, and went into position July 12
on the Chateau Thierry front. Did
but little tiring until the 15th. Took
part in the most successful 6 -inch
barrage ever pul over in the war on
the morning of July 18. The gun I
worked on fired 102 rounds, blowing
out the primer holder on the 102 nd
round. The gun was sure hot,
being rapid lire» From theu on we
^CONTINUED ON LAST TAGE)
tine
the
all
WANTS TAX LEVY
•and
school
from
but
on
on
war
Highway Commission Makes
Request to Solons.
Boise, Idaho.—A tax levy which
will provide $ 700,000 annually for
road construction and maintenar.ee,
a revolving fund of $ 10,000 design
ed to make unnecessary delayed
warrant payments to laborers, the
construction of an interstate bridge
across the Snake river and the re
mo val of present restrictions re
q U i r j nR that state highway work
be done by contract are among the
, . ,, , » »,
recommendations addressed to the
. , ,
legislature by the state highway
" 1 J
commission in its recently publish
e< 3 biennial report,
The commission suggests that a
levy of one and one-half mills be
made in view of the fact that
Idaho's $ 2 , 000,000 bonded indebt
e( j nes s does not permit the raising
0 f further funds by that medium,
Adequate construction , recoostruc
, • ,
tion, reconstruction and mainten
, , , , .
ance deniand at Ieast the ^ 00,000
wllich such a lev >' would P rov,d
according to estimates made,
Affirming that trucks damage
improved roads unreasonably, the
commission suggests that a truck
tax be assessed and also advises
so that the law enacted in 1917 for
the licens i n g of auto stages be
made more effective by amend
ment.
_ , , , r , ,
Other states and the federal
government have found it adv.sa
ble to do state highway work by
in force account instead of by contract
the commission argues in its rec
omendation that the present re
striction demanding contract work
by otdy removed,
the Final suggestions touch upon
reduc tj 0 n 0 f the bond demand
. ( __ ___
ed of contractors from ioo.per
», 1
cent to 50 per cent of the total
J '
contract estimate and upon a suit
or able law compelling the use of
non-glare headlights,
legislature was organized
the Monday with M . A K iger of
„ .___,
Kootenai county elected speaker
and f ...
, of the house, and E. W. Whit
, ..
comri of Lemhi county, president
v
P ro tem senate -
lie The house adjourned out of
respect to the memory of Theo
dore Roosevelt after passing a
resolution of sympathy and respect,
over
The
of
trip.
trip.
if
I The
day
a
^
on
FROM OVER THE COUNTY
POST FALLS
Miss Ella Miller and E. C. Brunner
were married at Hauser Lake.
A son was born Christmas morning
to Mr. and Mrs. Win. Overcash of
McGuire.
Mr. and Mrs. A. W. Klein of Mc
Guires are the parents of a daughter
born recently.
A boy was born Dec. 28 to Mr. and
Mrs. Basil Warren.
Joe Cogan has been discharged from
the military service.
A lynx is believed to he stealing
Will Ness' chickens.
Asseesor S H. Smith states he
will not move to Coeur d'Alene, but
will make trips back and forth on
the train,
Mrs. Schinzel of Cedar Creek
received a telegram informing her of
the death of her son, Leo, in France.
He had been wounded iu battle hut
had recovered and died of spiual
meningitis after the armistice was
signed.
of
of
his
went
8 ,
big
12
Did
Took
-inch
on
I
nd
we
all
SPIRIT LAKE
Bonnie, the eldest daughter of .Mr.
•and Mrs. Ebgeoe Snook, passed away
Tuesday morning with the influenza.
William Lowry, Jr., has been dis
charged from the uav.il training
school at Seattle.
Mrs. E. F. Conklin Is recovering
from iofluenza.
P. S. Brown was injured at the
Panhandle lumber yards last week,
but not seriously.
J. P. Isaacs left last week for Boise
on I. O. O. F. lodge business.
There is said to be 8 inches of ice
on the lake at Blanchard.
Spirit Lake raised $21,756 In the
war savings stamps drive of 1918.
,
1
of
of
of
a
to
the
and
for
and
in
Fire completely destroyed the Cozy
theatre at 2 o'clock Sunday morning.
I The loss is estimated
$3000,
covered by insurance except as to the
fixtures.
at
Mrs. Agnes Sizemore died at the
home of her parents Jan. 5. She was
stricken with influenza on Christmas
day and apparently recovered, but
pneumouia developed.
The citizens of Spirit Lake took up
a collection of $500 for Mis. Ham
acher and children, and $200 for
Henry Oldeuburg, who wen recently
bereaved by death from influenza.
HARRISON
^ A basket ball game and dance were
held in the "Y" at Rose Lake Jan. 4.
The Harrison schools re-opened
Jan. 2 after being closed two months
on account of influenza.
On account of high cost of fuel to
generate the power, electric lights in
Harrison are turned off between 12:30
and 4:30 a. m. each day.
The influenzi ban in Harrison Las
been lifted from all pubi c gatherings
excepting dances.
Ice up the St. Joe is delaying tl e
boats.
CŒUR D'ALENE
Ice is nine inches thick on Fernan
lake.
A. A. Foote, age 68, and Mrs. Jos.
Perry, age 20, died of pneumonia
Monday.
Clarence S. Sowder, age 20, son of
County Auditor-elect C. O. Sowder,
died of pneumouia at Washiogtou,
D. C. He was iu the student army
training corps io George Washington
university, and contracted influenza
there.
Dr. John Bushy recovered his
stolen Haynes ear at Wilson Creek,
Wash., where it was abandoned by
the thieves.
The Kootenai county council of
defense appointed II. II. Beicr, T. J.
Stonestreet and C. D. Stevens to
work with R. G. Wearne to secure
employment for the soldiers and
sailors.
.»1 J r, i»- „ f .1
Roland B Spam of the air service, I
„ . . . . I
who died in New York, was buried 1
, . I
Jan. 4. The pallbearers were sailors
, ,
and the Bring squad was composed of
...
returned soldiers.
#
of
Mc
and
from
he
but
on
Creek
of
hut
spiual
was


♦ FIRST CALL TO FOOD ARMY. ♦
+

This co-operation and aervlco *
4 I ask of all in full confidence *
♦ that America will render more ♦
♦ for flag and freedom than king ♦
♦ ridden people surrender at com- +
♦ pulsion.—Herbert Hoover, Au- +
♦ gust 10, 1917.
«
A year ago voluntary food control
was a daring adventure in democracy;
during tin* year an established proof
uf democratic etllcleucr.

+

GOVERNOR'SMESSAGE
Synopsis ol Davis' Recom
mendation to Legislature.
Following is a synopsis of the
message of Governor D. W. Davis
to the Fifteenth Legislature, which
convened at Boise Monday.
Favors organization of the state
council of defense as a permanent
body, officially recognized, to be
called into action and dismissed by
the governor as emergencies arise
and subside.
Advocates permanent memorial
for Idaho soldiers and insists on
employment for returning soldiers.
Urges that only English be
spoken at public assemblages and
taught exclusively in the grade
schools.
Asks ratification of the national
prohibition amendment and favors
national equal suffrage.
Advises a wise and constructive
policy of employment anj state
and community development in
highway work, building, reclama
tion, etc.
Asks co-operation with tjie fed
eral government in education,
agriculture, roads and wat*r
measurements.
Urges completion of the capitol
building and asks Boise toproceed
in that event, with program to
make its surroundings a civic
center.
Points out that there is no
4.
machinery
budget-making
present and suggests that study
and preparation of budgets be
made the duty of some official re
to
in
e
sponsible to the governor.
Recommends reorganization of
the land board and the fish artd
game department; a better system
of accounting for departmental
fees; consolidation of departments
to avoid duplication of effort and
lack of co-ordination, and urges
that responsibility be strictly fixed.
Favors organization of state
constabulary; increase in member
ship of the supreme court.
Favors the short ballot.
Urges that the powers of the
governor be increased to harmon
ize with the responsibilities.
Favors adoption for Idaho of
national departmental plan and
application of modern business
methods.
Urges that the bureau of farm
markets be made of practical ben
efit to the farmers, especially as to
marketing conditions.
Recommends rehabilitation of
the department of immigration and
labor; urges that present schedule
of compensation for workmen be
increased in some cases.
Jos.
of
his
by
of
J.
to
and
Wealthy men arc suspected of sell
ing $250,000,000 of Liberty bonds at
I * ' ' ». _ T „ ,
. . I a heavy discouut on the New York
1 . , ». , ,
I stock exchange during the closing
, .
, , days of 1918 in order to claim a loss
of , . . , ». ,
and thereby evade the locome tax.
_....»» T) , . ».
District Attorney Brogan claims the
loss is fictitious because the parties
selling arranged to buy back at the
# same price.

+
The 91st, or Wild West division
has been returned from the American
army of occupation in Germany to
Le Mans, France, preparatory to
being sent home the latter part of
January. This division composed of
northwestern tueu, was trained at
Camp Lewis and did much heavy
fighting in France and Belgium.
*
*


+
+
«
control
proof
+
Great Britain built 1245 ships dur
ing 1918.
.

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