OCR Interpretation


The Rathdrum tribune. (Rathdrum, Idaho) 1903-1963, August 06, 1920, Image 1

Image and text provided by Idaho State Historical Society

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn88056093/1920-08-06/ed-1/seq-1/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for

i - - Stat * Historic*! Society
erathdrum tribune
«» •
m
VOL. XXVI, NO. 10
HATHDRUM, KOOTENAI
COUNTY, IDAHO, FRIDAY,
AUGUST 6, 1920
11.50 PER YEAR
OUR WATER SUPPLY
Ash from total extinction.
OUR WATER SUPPLY
Figures By Colonel Edelblule
Worth Studying.
In your last issue you suggested a j
discussion of the water question and
I presume that your suggestion car
ried with it an offer to publish any
article that might seem readable.
With this in mind I offer the fol
Mr. Editor:
lowing
Last Sunday (Aug. 1st) being too
warm for loafing, and having found
entertainment in the columns of
the Spokesman-Review, I wandered
into the hills in search of adventure.
My course took me up' Spring
Branch creek and I took a look at
the city reservoir. I was amazed at
the conditions there.
It is not the purpose of this article
to call attention to the mudhole for
it has its advantages, as no self
respecting bad boy is apt to select
such a swimming place so long as
cleaner and purer water can be found
in the irrigation ditch that flows
through the town. One cannot help
marveling, though, as to why the
water should taste so good when
drawn from the faucet after passing
through that dam.
I made a few measurements of the
flow of the stream which furnishes
this supply and I give them here.
First let me state that these measure
no
a
the
was
and
of
:
any
ments are not absolutely accurate, as
I had with me no device for making
them other than a six inch rule. They
are sufficiently reliable, however, to
draw some conclusions from and
should be so taken.
Weirs were
constructed by placing flat stones on
edge and forming a sort of dam
around them. These figures cannot
be off more than 20
per cent.
1 found a flow of twenty miner's
inches at a point about 20 feet above
(continued on page twoY
Idaho State News Items.
■The Lewiston valley cherry
totaled 80 carloads.
crop
Troop E, Idaho cavalry,
tered in at Boise Monday.
was mus
age
The Yukon Gold
company at
array resumed mining operations
August 1
and
Extensive logging operations on the
Wurth Fork of the Coeur d'Alene
flv er are to begi
n soon.
A contract has been let
,lle Kose Lake
to furnish
Lumber company
•600,000 feet of logs from the North
T°rk district.
n cooperarion with from
county farm bureau is
the use of sodium team
at
of
,
had
They
Wa-h
the
D.
two
'Dodder in Idaho" is the title of a ! officer
'* e Un issued by B. F. Sheehan, freely
^6 seed commissioner, in which he
lbat dodder is threatening the in
a11 seed industry of Idaho.
Sheep scab
rut » Idaho
E Carpenteri
'he Latah
demonstrating
'"' ! ' , "uite as a Canada thistle eradica
tor.
id
. , Condie of Carey was fined $25 and
'«8 July 30 by Judge H. K. Lewis
ailey fyr shouting sage heos out
season.
In
a squirrel drive conducted on the
Sl| f Loiiell valley under direciio
""he Benewah
■5,000
one day.
n
county farm bureau,
were poisoned in
acres of land
an
'told
They
the
■ s practically eradicated !
wi tb the exception of the
»i, u Ealls country and Twin Falls
h"iQ l1 ' ° n "bich the
■'lab
to
quarantine is
continued.
secure
I bis
l, 1Vc " e Adams county sportsmen j
'"PorUou ' 011 ^ 10 hdVe the streatus ! and
' F °rty-flv
county closed to j
8 UntiI J uoe 1 , 1923, to save the
flshi
sa
very
f
Ash from total extinction.
In one Fremont oounty community
111 whit!b the P ps t' control law was not
enforced, one farmer lost 30 acres of
wheat to the squirrels. It Is estimated
that the yield would have been 20
bushels to the
acre.
Labor shortage in the Utah and
Idaho beet fields has been relieved in
a j large part this year by importation of
and laborers from Mexico
car- arrangement through
any ^ epHrt ment at Washington,
fol
under
an
the
state
On account of being infected with
weavil, Idaho alfalfa
from Arizona,
hay is barred
British Columbia,
California, Montana, Nevada, Oregon
and Washington.
too
of
at
at
for
as
Colorado has
quarantine against alfalfa from
Idaho counties.
a
six
In an inspection
county potato delds it was ascertained
by E.R. Bennett,field horticulturalisi
of the university extension division,
aDd County Agent J. H. Ileardan
that 95 per cent of the flelds
from disease. Indications pointed
a good crop.
of 22 Kootenai
were free
to
All the lands in the Coeur d'Alene
Indian reservation in Benewah
Kootenai counties,
and
otherwise
appropriated, will be sold at public
auction on Sept. 8 .
not
There are
acres to be
There are also 481 lots in
Plummer. 11 2 lots In DeSmet
five lots In St. Maries townsites to lit
sold.
approximately 20,000
offered.
aun
The twofold problem of making tht
cut over lands
productive and of securing a p;otltable
supply of forage is reported to lie most
important in the timbered sections ot
Benewah county,
undertaking its solution by
extensive use of legumes in
rotation. Clover, sweet clover, alfalfa,
peas, beans and vetches
used.
Nonuan B Adklson, a member of
the faculty of the Idaho technical
institute at Pocatello, was forced to
withdraw bis name as a candidate for
state representative when a ruling
was adopted by Commissioner Bryan
and I. E. Rockwell of the state board
of education forbidding any
: holding a position on the faculty of
any institution from holding public
office.
of north
Idaho
as
The farmers are
the
the
are crops
erl
ooe
Fined For Stealing Hack.
Robert Groelzinger, giving his
age as 20 years, pleaded guilty in the
Ilatbdrum justice's court Tuesday
afternoon to the petit larceny of a
per
on
the
was
hack belonging to J. F. Woodward,
and was fined $25 and
Having no money, he was sent to the
costs.
county jail at Coeur d'Alene.
Young Groetzinger and William
Bloom, age 19, according to the
accounts given, arrived in Rathdrum
Mouday evening with an old team
which they claimed they were taking
from Sagte to the farm of William
Bloom, near Valleyford, Wash. The
team was equipped with a dilapidated
harness, and when they saw the back
at Mr. Woodward's place, the boys
decided to appropriate it under cover
of darkness and complete tbeir
journey in greater comfort than they
had experienced in riding bareback.
They had r ached Spokane Bridge,
Wa-h , when they were overtaken by
the owner of the hack and Constable
D. Ü Cleiand, who made the trip in
auto driven by A. A. Berges. The
two boys willingly accompanied the
! officer back to Rathdrum, Groetzinger
freely confessing his guilt but
claiming his companion bad no part
in thecrime. Bloom said Groetzinger
the
close
the
to
kept
lor
id tbe horses the boys had were hand
old and hardly able to travel.
an
'told him he had bought the back.
They said they were cousins.
Young Bloom left Wednesday wiih
the team, saying he would deliver it
and
!
father at Valleyford,
to his
funds to obtain the release of
secure
I bis cousin.
j Mr. W'oodward recovered his back
! and brought it back to town
He
j
sa
very
not
of
20
HAD NARROW ESCAPE
Two Cirls Saved From Drown
ing In Twin Lahes.
and
in
of
Miss Mina Pilkeoiou
Cora Brophy, members
and Miss
of neighbor
ng families residing northeast
Rathdrum.
an
of
state
narrowly escaped death
by drowning at the foot
T'wln lake last Saturday
They were
of lower
with
afternoon,
io wading and Miss
Uilkenton dropped out of
deep pool. Miss Brophy going to her
aid also got beyond her depth and
soon both
barred
Oregon
sight io a
a
were struggling, neithei
six
being able to swim.
Rollie Hurretl,
a 15 year-old Rathdrum boy,
'he hero of the occasion
proved
swimming
to the drowning maidens and bring*
ng them to shore and then assisting
the work
getting help in
resuscitation.
of
«Miss Pilkenton
<aid to have gone down Tor
time when rescued.
is
free
the last
to
Mrs. Reland Young is also reported
to have aided in the
jse of a boat,
vicinity were called
Wenz was called from town.
rescue by the
Men working In the
and
public
upon, and Dr.
are
be
in
lit
FROM OVER TRE COUNTY
aun
POST FALLS
The Advance states that the
ation of Post Falls is approximately
$700,000.
O- W. Schilling has retired from
the meat bumqess.
tht
most
ot
of
to
for
of
valu
are
the
On account of low
East Greenacres
irrigation .districts are
water supply,
and Post Falls
installing
pumps to get water to their land.
the
crops
The fall grain fias all been harvest
erl and some of the spring grain. The
yield will be surprisingly good, taking
into account the extrerue'drouj^H.
SPIRIT LAKE
It is claimed the game of ball
bitween Spirit Lake and Newport
has been arranged. The teams are to
play for a $2000 purse at Natatorium
park, Spokane, Aug. 8 .
A. L. Eario Is ill at Coeur d'Alene
with smallpox.
ooe
his
the
a
HARRISON
he
The Y. M. C. A. building is being
torn down and the lumber sold at $20
per 1000 feet.
John Nordquist has started work
on bis contract to build 12 miles of
the north and south highway from
Half Round hay to Beauty bay.
Tony Daruiana and family lost
tbeir house by Ore. All the contents
were saved except the raoge which
was too big to be moved tbrough the
doorway.
the
bis
and
for
Mrs.
was
the
by
in
CŒUR D'ALENE
Conditions in the county are very
favorable to the creation of range
associations such as are already
operating in other section of the state,
according to E. F. Rinehart, Held
animal husbandman of the Idaho
agricultural extension division, who
spent two days last week looking over
the county. He stated that through
these associations the farmers in
close or relatively close proximity to
the ranges are able to pool tbeir
interests to such an extent as to be of
mutual benefit to all concerned.
Mr. arid Mrs. D. E. Daoby left
Saturday for Thompson Falls, Mont.,
to visit their daughter. Mrs. Day
Reynolds and family.
Claude W. Hodge was last week
designated as recruiting officer of
Troop K, cavalry, the roster being
kept open a short time fur applicants
lor enlistment who could not be 00
hand when tee troop was mustered in.
tion
July
Obio,
Tbe
J.
the
ed
for
owiog
made
of
not
held
ed
it
Mrs F G Furgeson has returned
■Seattle, after a visit with her broth' r,
T L Quarles,
Her niece, Katherine Quarles,
panied her borne and will spend
several weeks visit!ng at Everett
Seattle.
i<
and other relatives
accom
Drown
ann
Andrew Blackburn died
home Saturday afternoon at the agi
of 72 years.
at h>
Miss
He leaves a widow and
stepson, Harold Purdy of this city,
and three sons.
of
death
lower
Miss
her
and
Rathdram Primaries.
Fifty-eight votes were cast
election
at th>
io a
republican primary
Rathdrum precinct Tuesday
it
after
noon, While only eight votes were
recorded at the democratic primär).
The cootest betweeu McFarland
Wearne for prosecuting attorney
the chief factor in bringing
neithei
and
was
out so
proved
bring*
many
gave McFarland 40 and Wearne
voteä.
republicans. The
precinct
H
of
S.
is
Dr. F. Wenz was reelected republi*
can precinct committeeman,
Ernest Reiniger was chosen
that position for the democrats.
Delegates elected by the
to the republican county conveuliot
are C. P. Evans, W. II. Edelblute
Lottie C. Farnsworth and Emma II.
Greenup. The democrats elected E.
F. Reiniger. Il H Mitchell. O W.
Stooe and Geo. W. Flemming.
following is the republican vote i
Rathdrum Tuesday afternoon:
State Senator, E. V. Bought
Stale Representatives:
A. W. Burleigh
James W. Keating
C. A. McDonald
Commissioners:
IstdUt. Hans Johnson
2nd dist. J. W. McCtei
3rd dis*. Frank A. Morris
Treasurer, H. F. Cleiand
Assessor, S. H. Smith
County Supt. of Schools, Eg bers
Coroner. R. B. Mooney
Probate Judge; M G Whitney
Prosecuting Attorney:
W. B. McFarland
Roger G. Wearne
Precinct Committeeman,
F. Wenz
Precinct Delegates:
C. P. Evans
W. H. Edelblute
Lottie C. Farnsworth
Emma II. Greenup
last
ann
again 1
the
the
preciuct
Dr.
A
to
n
from
42
on
valu
28
35
25
49
tes
Falls
49
56
56
39
for
ger
es
ers
The
63
44
48
40
14
ball
to
52
51
53
49
49
i.
are:
ern
and
Nez
Sc
pany.
and
rates
no
Rimrock Farmer Killed.
David E.
Toiler was killed
iostautly, Monday, wheQ the team
he was driving to a load of bay took
fright and overturned the
$20
of
lost
the
wagou at
bis ranch borne on the Rimrock.
throwing Mr. Tobler to the ground
and breaking bis neck.
Mr. Tobler bad lived on Rimrock
for a number of years, and leaves bis
widow and a child, his
brother in California,
Mrs. Ed. Moore, at Chatcolet.
was a member of the Koights of
Pythias lodge in Coeur d'Alene.
mother,
and a sister.
Hi
in
to
of
of
Minor Parties.
Tbe prohibition national
tion in session at Lincoln, Neb ,
July 21 named Aaron S. Watkins of
Obio, as its candidate for president.
Tbe nomination was offered to Wrn
J. Bryan but he declioed.
A new political party, styling itself
the Farmer-Labor party, was organiz
ed recently at Chicago aod nominated
Parley P. Christensen of Salt Lake
for president. The convention was
stormy one. according to reports,
owiog to wide difference of views and
radical ideas expressed by the various
elements and factions represented
among the delegates. An effort was
made to Dominate Senator LaFolleltc
of Wisconsin, but tbe platform could
not be made to meet with his senti
ments.
Early in the year the socialist party
held a convention and again nominat
ed Eugene Y. Debs.
conven
on
labor
tion
for
cent.
a
the
rates.
r,
BAN WORMY FRUIT
i<
v J. Klepfer Cives Dealers
Renewed Warning.
h>
The law against selling or offer
ing to sell wormy apples except to
a licensed by-products plant, is
gain being brought to the
tion of dealers.
atten
S. J. Klepfer, fruit inspector for
the five northern counties,
Rathdrum Monday. He said be
had received notice from the
department of agriculture to make,
the rounds of his district and give
renewed warning that the law will
be enforced,
heretofore, as it is presumed that
dealers are by this time sufficiently
acquainted with the statute, and
that violations hereafter must be
intentional and not due to ignor
ance. Under the law any infected
fruit found on sale may be seized
and destroyed,
violation will incur the extreme
penalty which ranges from 1 25 to
$300 fine.
was in
state
more strictly than
Persistance in
Mr. Klepfer says the time is due
for orchardists to
time for coddling moth,
spray the latt
as the
worm is soon to emerge from the
cocoon as a full fledged moth. He
lias been busy all spring,
far this summer, with his duties
inspector and is not through yet.
A few new orchards have bet
planted this year, although
now charge $1 to >1.25 for
trees that formerly sold for
to 25 cents apiece.
and so
as
n
purser
tes
seven
Railroads Apply For Increase.
Boise, Idaho.—Eleven railroads
operating in the state of Idaho filed
Friday a joint supplementary
petition before the public utilities
commission which asked for a
hearing on the railroads' petition
for increases in freight and passen
ger rates corresponding to increas
es prayed for before the interstate
commerce commission. Petition
ers ask that rates in Idadobc made
effective not later than September
i.
Railroads named as petitioners
are: Oregon Short Line company,
Oregon-Washington Railroad &
Navigation company, Great North
ern Railroad company, Northern
Pacific Railroad company, Gilmore
and Pittsburg Railroad
Chicago, Milwaukee and St. Paul,
Nez Perce and Idaho Railroad
company, Craig Mountain Railroad
company, Camas Prairie Railroad
company, Caldwell Traction com*
pany, Utah-Idaho Central Railroad
company, Spokane International
Railroad company, Intermouutain
railway company, Boise Valley
Traction company, and the Pacific
Sc Idaho Northern Railroad
pany.
Roy L. Black, attorney general,
and Raymond L. Givens, special
attorney for the public utilities
commission, filed a protest Friday
which asked that no increase in
rates be made at this time and that
no hearing be held until after the
commission
company,
cou -
interstate commerce
action is announced.
Increase of wages by the railway
labor board is the basis of the
railroads' petition for immediate
hearings.
Railroads in western classifica
tion territory have filed a petition
for freight increases of 23.91
cent.
per
Aug. 19 has been set for hearing
the applications for increase of
rates.

xml | txt