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The Rathdrum tribune. (Rathdrum, Idaho) 1903-1963, December 31, 1920, Image 1

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THE RATHDRUM TRIBl
S(at * Historical Sn
Society
iTlw
***** ffP
VOL. XXVI, NO. 31
RATHDRUM, KOOTENAI COUNTY, IDAHO, FRIDAY, DECEMBER 31, 1920
fl.GO PER YEAR
S above
died
f UiT THREE MILLION'
for Slate Educational Institu
tions 1121-22.
county
wiih
figures given out last week over j cents
auditor of the
the signature of the
tmitrd of education at Boise,
J.
ça te
indicate that the hoard is asking the
of the Idaho state
coin in tf session
|Hiilslat,ure to appropriate from direct
$2, «74. 093 79. which amount
cial
The
taxation
In addition to
fideral government, interest on in
vestments and endowment funds, will
«well the grand total of available
funds for the biennium
man three millions. This is
what accrues from the
the
from
in
in
office
on
W.
is
is
is
of
as
1921-22 to
B) »re
$ 940,000 more than for the previous
two year term.
Of the mure than two and one-half
that Is being asked for by
six hundred
millions
taxation
«eventy-uine thousand Is to be used
for capital additions, or permanent
buildings at the various state educa
practically
tional Institutions.
Six different schools are included in
the request that ihe board is making;
four of which are known as higher
educational institutions and the other
educational
eleemosynary
two as
Institutions.
For maintenance of the first kind
the board has asked the following;
$ 1 , 000 , 000.00
196,645.11
120,000 00
UnlveriOtv of Idaho
Lewiston normal school
Albion normal school
Idaho Technical institute 265,519 35
Total for higher educa
tional institutes
This includes two hundred fifty j
$1,582,164.46
thousand dollars for extension in ;
agriculture and home economics none j
of which is expended at any iustitu- j
tiuo, and $54.000 expended on experi j
mental farms lu various parts of the j
slate.
For capita', additions the
hoard asked the following:
j
slate ; ta
$239 100 00 ■ "I
!
!
i
Idaho Technical institute 285,000.00 1
_-— - j
« Knn ou 1 or ; H
' J
;
University of Idaho
Lewiston normal school
Albion normal school
31.881 25
45,000 CM) j
Total capital additions
Total appropriation asked for by I
education fur
the stale board of
maintenance aod capital additions > n
for the four higher educational iosii- j
j
1
tulions, $2,183,145 71.
The
institutions:
Fur maintenance:
Deaf aud blind school
Industrial training school 257,158 65
educational
eleomosyuary
n
$156,039 43
;
$413,198 08
Total for maintenance
Capital addition-:
D^af and blind school
Industrial training school
25,050 00
52.700.1*0
Total for capital additions $77,750 00
Grand total as asked for by the
$2,674,
state hoard of education is
093 79.
Idaho State News Items.
Moscow has bought a new pumping
phut.
A new irrigation project is perfect
I >g organization at Idaho Falls.
Weiser has voted $150,900 bonds
water
municipal
to improve the
sjs eaj.
in
There were 2,856,270 sheep
Idaho last January, according to the
This was
250,099 1
«•'•risus bureau
hi oft- than In 1910.
Frank R Gooding, U. S. senator
« lecl, will become Junior senator from
Idaho on January 15. upon appoint
Davis, according
:
j
tuent by Governor
l*i announcement
Friday.
from Boise last
Indian, was
Dan Redh<*art, an
nil* ta ken for a deer and 6hot by
J,antes Moore while the latter was
bunting on Elk creek, about lo miles
above Ahsahka,
died in the afternoon.
Dee, 20. Redhearl
Wag» r»d union« in 'he
districts
Shoshone
become
mining
county
effective January 1.
All companies
announce reduction« or $i
wiih exception of the Bunker Hill &
Sullivan, which has reduced wanes 50
per day.
cents a day.
J. G. Fralick, couiniiss'oner
commerce and industry
of
to
Went
Mountain Home last week, where on
Thursday depositors of the Commer
cial & Savings btnk were paid In full.
The hank has been
closed
September 27, when an examinant».,
showed that, loot: time loans formed
Si lice
the greater part of its resources.
Crop« worth $3,461,339 were saved
from destruction by ground squirrels
in 1919 and 1920, through the rodent
control work of ihe extension division
in cooperation with the federal
government, counties and farm
bureaus, says a statement from the
office of the extension division, based
on the hienuial report of Director L.
W. Fluharty. Rodent control work
is under leadership of W. E. Crouch.
The weekly Indurtrial Review for
Idaho says: A labor surplus is rapidly
building up in various districts with
lumber
railroads laying off men and farm help
beixg reduced, but with the surplus
is coming a great Increase in
efficiency Most of the metal mining
is being carried on at a loss and cost
of production of western lumber is
more than the selling price As fast
as wage adjustment can be made,
however, there is every reason to
believe that these industries will
increase their output.
of
and
ail
use
the
curtailing,
cutnpanies
j
; STANDARD THE WORLD NEEDS
j -
j High Moral Example Set by Robert
Louis Stevenson Well Worth
Living Up To.
T.
If
to
j
j
j Robert Louis Stevenson, refusing to
; ta k e ,,u that was offered him for n
poem lie did not think his best, wrote:
■ "I do not live much to God and honor.
! but I will not willfully turn my back
! on both."
i In the modest words lies deep the
1 on |y standard by which a man can
j hope to satisfy himself with his life.
or ; H is a standard the world today sore
J |y needs. We hear of unrest and shall
; hear of It.
men
j
by I
Why not, with so many
and women trying to live up to
> n standard set by someone else?
j they succeed, there is no happiness In
j it, for it has do sanction from their
1 own hearts.
If
65
count successful In
The man we
material affairs and expect to find
who has readied
happy is never one
n certain place. But when a man
mark for himself in posses
43
lias set a
slons and has kept that mark in view
until he reached It we call him suc
cessful. U may have been a .ouo
; home; It may have been one ml lion
dollars. But It was bis own goa .
less true of his Inner life.
mau who
08
00
It Is not
We do not expect much of n
has no standard for himself of right
and wrong. And he cannot cla m any
right to contentment. If his only n
til standard is the law, he
the minimum of satisfaction. s
refusing money which he needed
thought he had not earn
thousand tiroes more to be
who takes a hun
dollars he has not
law will punish
00
the
son,
because he
ed It. Is a
envied than the man
dred or a million
earned, because no
him.-—Milwaukee Journal.
exterminate crop pests
TO
Use Flame Throwers
Methods to De
Enemies.
Scientist Plans to
and Other
stroy
In 1918 and 1919 the terrât 7«*«
the delta of the 0 Sïïeî
*Th ^lUpned so excessively as to
nf Steat JTSZ French*Aeadem y
reC Sdence e s a report was made by M.
sciences a v "flame
Vayssiere on e , tbe war for
throwers, emP'oyeü eltermlnat e
throwing Hqoldfl ^ apparatus hold .
î ,,eS «lroÜt twelve liters of petroleum
lng about twe meters can be so
extent o w ith flames as to kill
thoroughly swep . . gases
had out ulL1 _were much
TXe? .»«A ft* ««a**- 5 «
in
the
1
from
w
:
j tie
of
an
last
was
by
was
miles
A RESOLUTION.
T
O be patriots, rath« r than partisans; to win
the peace by reviving the idealism which
won the war; to broaden our outlook and nar
row our animosities; to carry into national and
international affairs the maxims which guide
gentlemen and gentlewomen in their daily con
duct; to practice thrift that we may be able to
practice charity; to recognize that each of us is
and always must be his brother's keeper; to
work well that there may be plenty of goods in
the world and think well that they may be
rightly distributed; to go forward each day to a
higher level of purpose and effectiveness, and
live as one afraid of no man, and of whom no
just man is afraid. — Chicago Journal.
been
duties
as
an
Bank
only temporary. Lastly, M. Vayssiere
made use of poisoned bait with a basis
of arsenic like that employed in Italy
and In the United States and obtained
good results. lie proposes to utilize
ail three methods—first the flame
throwers to exterminate the hordes of
young larvae in all cases where their
use does not involve danger of Are;
secondly, chloroplcrin powder where
the flame throwers would be danger
ous; and thirdly poisoned halt In Irri
gated meadows where ao cattle are
pastured.
FROM OVER TBE COUNTY
than
said
POST FALLS
According to W. I. Ba««et,t, deputy
state engineer for Idano.and St. Clair
T. Thomas, of the U. S. bureau of
public mads, the paving of tbe
highway through Pint Falls isa-sumd
If congress makes »he appropriation
that is expected. It is estimated that
the cost of paving from the state line
to Coeur d'Alene would be $400,000,of
which half would come frotu federal
funds.
bly
In the double header basket hall
Dec. 23, Coeur d'Alene high
game
school won over Post Falls high, 33
to 14, while the Coeur d'Alene town
lost to the Post Falls Bears, 24
If
team
to 36.
The tovfn is to take over the water
system tbe first of the year, paying
the old water company in bonds.
The sum of $120 was raised toward
the purchase of a piano
McGuire school.
In
011
as
for the
at East Greenacres
Tbe grange
received four new members.
be
not
HARRISON
James C. Scully is the newly elect
ed president of the commercial club
J. W. Kooney is secretary.
M. A. Kiger, O. R. Williams, Oscar
Delay and Wrn. Honsowetz got a buck
deer above St. Joe.
Several cars of alfalfa bave been
shipped In from southern Idaho by
the dairy farmers of Medimout.
programs were given a»
the Baptist and Methodist churches
The Export planers were operating
last week.
Several hundred piling are
gotten
railway.
w
Christmas
being
out at Medlmont for theO-W.
to
y
M.
for
e
.
so
kill
«
CŒUR D'ALENE
and Eastern Star bad
The Mason«
joint installation.
The holidays gave impetus
sale of marriage licenses at t he county
recorder's office.
to the
an
The Salvation Army money box at
Houk's Cafe was stolen, including the
money it contained.
Judge John M. Flynn, who has
tirely
share.
been seriously ill, has resumed bis
duties here, Judge Dunn having
moved to Boise to take his new office
as Justice of the supreme court.
Judge R. N. Dunn Friday signed
an order appointing Eane F. Browne,
former president of the Coeur d'Alene
Bank & Trust Co. to handle the real
estate belonging to this lostitution
during the receivership proceeding.
man
on
effort
part
paid
and
able
cent
that
he
Had A Rough Crowd.
A rougher crowd from out of town
than usual, was reported present at a
public dance given In Rathdrum
Christmas eve. These celehraturs are
said to have hruught. considerable
"moonshine" of which they Imbibed
freely to the detriment of their
conduct and tbe annoyance of those
with whom they »ought to associate.
Although the moonshine element bad
been in evidence'lo some exieot at
previous datices and a marshal had
occasionally been on duty to keep
order, there was no local police at. the
affair last Friday night. The sheriff
was called from Coeur d'Alene and
was observed to evict one alleged
inebriate from the hall and to selzt
twelve bottles of bootleg from an
auto and drive awày. But, présuma
tax,
be
bly on account of no local complaint*
being filed—however there was ample
provocation according to persons who
were there—aod no local officer being
m
011 duty, uo arrests were made so far
as Is known.
At the close of the affair, It is
reported by those In charge,
part of the rough element, to
injury to iuault, forced the dour of
the check room aod took a $50 over
coat. the property, however, of «
Coeur d'Alene man.
From all accounts, the disturbers
ail from Coeur d'Alene and other
a
add
at
It.
were
outside points, and belong to an
element, whose members have beeo
reported to make the statement that
this Is the only town in the county at
w hich they could attend dances and
drink moonshine
without police
I
j
Interference.
Installed Officers.
25,
At their regular meeting Dec.
Twin Lakes local No. 46, Farmers'
Uniou. elected and
installed the
following officers fur 1921:
Roscoe Satcbwell, president; Bertha
Sloutenburg, vice president; F. L.
secretary-treasurer: Geo.
conductor;
Runyon,
Humphrey,
Bropby, doorkeeper; C. H. Sheffield,
W. L Northway and E R. Pilkeoton,
Frances
executive committee.
Installation was
oyster supper and a program of songs,
Instrumental tuusic, recitations and a
old
to which
followed by an
short debate.
The unton will
at
the
has ibeir families are Invited.
give an
fashioned dance January 1.
members of any Farmers' Union and
OPPOSE SALES TAX
Farm federation Points Out
Injustice of Proposition.
Boise, Idaho.—Farmers were
urged to stand squarely lor the
present excess profits tax aod
against a proposed new sales tape,
at the recent meeting of the Amer
ican Farm Bureau federation at
Indianapolis, which was attended
by B. F. Sheehan, field agrono
mist of tlie University of Idaho ex«
tension division,and R. H. Musser,
assistant director.
Behind the proposal, it was de
clared at the convention, is an
effort to shift the burden of tax,*»
tion directly upon the consumer,
and it was said that, with the
changes that are being advocated,
corporations earning up to ioo per
cent and over would escape with
the payment of a nominal tax en
tirely out of proportion to their
share. A"
An analysis of all the substitut
es,'said H. C. McKenzie, chair
man of the federation's committee
on taxation, "shows invariably ab
effort to free incomes of a large
part of the burden they are now
carrying and substitute for them
consumption taxes,which would be
paid largely out of the living wage
and which would fall on those least
able to pay."
"Refuting the claim (hat tbe
excess profits tax has added 23 ptr
cent to the cost of living is the fact
that the corporations and not the
public are advocating its repeal,
he remarked.
Discussing the proposed sales
Mx. McKenzie said:^ r "The
99
tax,
basis of tbe tax would be gross
income, and the tax would have to
be paid, whether there was any
profit in the business or not. In
any cases it would be paid out of
capital—a dangerous expedient.
A tax o{ i per cent on the
farmers'gross overturn of approxi
mately twenty-five billion dollars
would be two hundred and fifty
million dollars, he said, and this
would have to be paid out of
capital, as much of the farmer s
overturn is without profit.
m
11
far
is
of
«
W. R. C. Elect Officer«.
a
The following officers were elected
at the last regular meeting of the W.
It. C : President, Mary Jacobs; senior
Mary Humphrey; Junior vice,
vice,
Bertha Stoulenburg; treasurer, Libby
Taylor; secretary, Belle Tucker; chap
lain, Julia 1 * 01680 »; conductor, Fannie
Hrophy; guard, Ellen Gaston; musi
cian, Gertrude Woolery; patriotic
Instructor, Marv Post; color bearers,
Kllco Richmond. Mrs. Webster,Sarah
an
at
and
Overbey aud Cora Sheffield; assistant
conductor. Ora Lyon; assistant guard.
Mary Gaston.
The next regular meeting will be
I held January 16. A dinner will be
j served at noon to the members aod
their husbauds.
25,
Miners Get More Time.
the
Washington, D. C.—Congressman
Burton L. French reports to his Idaho
constituents that the House 00 Dec.
20 passed ihe hill extending to July
I, 1921, the time 10 which to do the
1920 assessment wotk 9.0
The bill passed the Seoate
L.
Geo.
mining
claims.
Dec. 11.
a
The Argentine confederation of
commerce, industry and production
has sent a protest against the new
tariff measure passed by the American
old house of representatives, which, it Is
which claimed,virtually prohibits the Import
an
and of wheat, flour, coro,wool and various
meat products by the United Stau*.

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