OCR Interpretation


The Coeur d'Alene press. (Coeur d'Alene, Idaho) 1906-1907, November 15, 1907, Image 1

Image and text provided by Idaho State Historical Society

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn88056096/1907-11-15/ed-1/seq-1/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for

The Cceur d'Alene
VOLUME NUMBER 86
OOEUR D'ALENE, IDAHO, FRIDAY EVENING, NOVEMBER 16. 1907
PRICE FIVE CENTS
LUMBERMEN
PILE SUIT
Ask U. S. Court to Restore For
mer Freight Rates
MOSCOW, Idaho, Nov. 15.—In a
proceeding commenced today before
Federal Judge Dietrich, In the United
States circuit court at Moscow, Ida
ho, the lumbermen of the northwest,
east of the Cascades will open their
light against the rise in the lumber
rates which became effective on all
railroads operating in this territory
November 1. Attorney H. M.
Stephens, representing the mills
identified with the Western Pine
Lumber Manufacturers' association
and other concerns will appear before
the federal court with a bill of com
plaint asking that the railroads
named as defendants be ordered to
restore the rates which were In effect
rior to the advance in the lumber
ariffs.
The concerns and persons appear
ing In the complaint as petitioners
re the Potlatch Lumber company,
he St. Joe Lumber company, the Mc
oldrlck Lumber company, Lamb
avis Lumber company. Fidelity
.umber company, Washington Mill
ampany, Orrln S. Ford, National
umber company, Springfield Lum
company, William Musser Lum
~r company, Phoenix Lumber com
any, Standard Lumber company,
A. Humpnrey,' Buckeye Lumber
ompany, Lindsley Brothers com
any, Gerhart & Bradick, S. H. & L.
umber company and the Idaho Pole
Railroads Named.
The defendants sought to be en
ined are the Northern Pacific, Great
orthern, Chicago, Burlington &
ulncy; Union Pacific; Oregon Rail
:>ad & Navigation company; Chi
go & Northwestern; Chicago, Mil
aukee & St. Paul; Canadian Pacific;
)okane International; Coeur d'Alene
Spokane; Spokane & Inland; Soo
Idaho & Washington Northern
roads. The Chicago, Milwaukee
8t. Paul of Washington also Is
de a party to the suit.
The bill of complaint charges that
e defendant railroads have by cou
rted action entered into a conspir
j to raise the lumber rates. It Is al
jed that the Northern Pacific and
e Great Northern are owned and
ntrolled by the same interests and
at these roads, which are known
the Hill lines, have Joined the
rriman lines In an agreement to
reel out the lumber producing ter
whlch combination Is In res
int of trade and in violation of
federal statute known as the
ernian anti-trust law.
The complaint declares that the
EFINES HIS POSITION
JNCOLN, Neb., Nov. 15.—Wil
J. Bryan will accept the demo
de nomination for president in
S, but he will neither ask nor
le a fight for it. He says that for
ear or more he has been pressed
xnswer the question. "Will you
'Pi the nomination?" and he be
es the public is entitled to an an
and to know the position he
.lies.
he question that ought to weigh
he says, Is whether his nomin
wlll strengthen the demoerat
■arty more than the nomination
one else. Not only will he
seek or ask for the nomination,
he win not assume to decide the
lion of availability, and If the
f falls to another he will neither
dsappointed or disgruntled. At
same time, he denies that he has
ed this long in a desire to see
m the republicans are likely to
inate or to ascertain the chances
ictory.
F, says bailey.
i Will Meddle With
mey Situation.
■ex., Nov. 15.—United
Joseph W. Bailey la
iwtoy^befo^
following statemeat:
new tariff advances the rate on lum
ber shipments to the east from 5 to
12 H cents a hundred pounds; that
the advance is unreasonable, dis
criminatory and will result in mak
ing it Impossible for the lumbermen
io ship any but the highest grades
of lumber from the northwest to east
ern points.
AMERICAS IN PEACE MEETING
Five Republics Represented in the
Washington Conference.
WASHINGTON, Nov. 15.—In the
red room of the Bureau of American
Hepublics the peace conference of
the five Central American republics
convened yesterday. The ceremonies
incident to the opening of the con
ference were informal.
In addition to the conferees and to
the officials directly Interested In the
conference there were in attendance
officials of the American state de
partment and others.
Addresses were made by Secretary
Root, Ambassador Creel and Senor
Anderson of Costa Rica.
Permanent organization of the
conference was effected by the elec
tion of Senor Luis Anderson as per
manent president and Senors Madriz
and Rodriguez as permanent secre
taries.
The conference then adjourned.
The sessions hereafter will be exec
utive.
MILWAUKEE RUSHES WORK
Thousands of Men Building Road
in Washington.
TACOMA, Wash.. Nov. 15.—A. M.
Ingersoll, a personal friend of Pres
ident Barling of the Milwaukee, re
turned yesterday from a visit to the
railroad magnate In St. Paul, and as
a result Is positive In his statement
that the railroad intends to rush con
struction work in Its extension to
Puget sound.
"The Milwaukee will not be delay
ed a day by financial conditions,"
said Mr. Ingersoll. "The road has
completed financing of the extension
and the railroad contractors are now
employing 10,500 men on the Mil
waukee work, and of this number
6,500 are employed west of Butte.
As soon as work now progressing on
bridges between Tacoma and Seattle
is completed tracks will be laid be
tween the two cities."
"I have been asked what Is con
gress going to do about the money
question. Unless the coming con
gress is wiser than most of them
since I have been there, the leas It
does the better off the country will
be. Congress never has understood
the money question, and It Is doubt
ful if cougresa ever will."
NICHOLAS M. BUTLER.
President of Columbia univer
"*» im » fonner Prmidmi
National Ido o ati ona1 sm mrili c m
HOVEL PASSENGER COACH
Union Pacific's Hew All-Steel Pas
senger Coaches.
The departure from ordinary de
sign in the new steel pamenger
coaches made for the Union Pacific
road has already been noted In these
columns.
The Railway and Engineering Re
view says of the new steel coaches:
"The experience gained by W. R.
McKeen, Jr., superintendent of mot
ive power and machinery, Union Pa
cific Railway, In designing gasoline
motor coaches, has led him to apply
the Ideas evolved therein to the
standard coach of steam train service.
The first embodiment of these plans
has just appeared from the Omaha
(Neb.) shops.
"In practically every particular
there Is a wide departure from con
ventionality. As the roof contains
no upper deck, the channel poets
rising from the slde-sllls are contin
uous across the inverted U roof.
This enables a most substantial yet
light system of bracing. In this con
nection It will be noted that the ab
andonment of the end entrances In
favor of a center entrance enables
a very deep form of Bide truss, while
the spaces usuully taken up by the
vestibule platforms are used to a
much better advantage. This Is
brought out by the fact that the
coach weighs no more than the ordin
ary coach of the same total length
but of eight persons less capacity.
The resulting 1,145 pounds weight
per passenger Is claimed to be 200
pounds per passenger less than is true
of any other all-steel coach yet built.
"The 24-inch circular windows
have aluminum sash and In their
rubber caslugs are weather and dust
proof. The supply of fresh air Is
taken In at the ends and screened
through dust boxes before being let
into the car by means of a ventilator
system which has been patented.
The efflux of air is through the roof
ventilators. By reducing the thick
ness of the walls an Increase of 7
Inches in the width of the aisles has
been made possible, and the general
appearance of the lntrior has been
made most inviting. The lavatories
have been located on either side of
the center entrances, thus dividing
the car Into two compurtinents which
may easily be made seperable If de
sired. The car Is lighted electric
ally and heated with steam. In all,
It la not only a most interesting de
parture from the usual designs, but
one which offers many excellent sug
gestions at a time when great atten
tion Is being given to the possibili
ties of steel In passenger-coach de
sign."
HEUTTER BRIDGE.
Construction Work on New Bridge
Being Pushed Rapidly.
Work on the proposed Heutter
bridge, which will span the S|iokane
river at that place, was begun In ear
nest Tuesday. The County Commis
sioners had determined Its location
but when the contractor and com
missioners arrived. It was found there
was some difference of opinion
among the settlers of that locality
E. L. Oerrlsh was quite anxious to
have It placed at another point. Fm
a time It looked as though then
might be things doing bnt the com
missioners allowed the settlers to
rote where it should be located and
almost without sxception tbs citi
zens agreed with the location desig
nated by the county officials. Every -
thing was amicably settled.
It is claimed the bridge will be
completed within (0 days. The Car
scalleu brothers have the contract
STREETCAR HEN OH STUDEE
Louisville Employes Out This Morn
ing-Can Stop.
LOUISVILLE,Ky., Nov. II.—By a
vote which was finished at an early
hour this morning the local union of
the Amalgamated Street Oar Employ
es reaffirmed their decision to go on
strike against the Louisville Railway
company today. All cars will have
stopped running at I o'clock this
mors lag. The decision of the men to
strike came within a few hours after
It was supposed that compromise
measures takes by Mayor G(instead
had proved effective. Mayor Grin
stead' proposition, however, when ex
laed. was rsj ss i i S by the men so
PLANS HANDSOME DEPOTS
Warehouse and Passage Tracks
Each One-Fourth Mile Long
Plans for the yards and depots
which the Chicago, Milwaukee A fit
Paul will build uniformly nt all of ita
stations have been received at the
local laud offices of the company,
showing that the St. Paul is to be
omre generous In the character of
depot building than any other road
in the northwest. Regardless of the
size of the town If only a station and
a switch, a depot building costing
not less than 13600 will be erected.
The building will be two stories
high, 75 feet In length end
will have a wide platform. The de
sign, while holding to the usual type
of depots, has a number of original
und artistic featureae. These depots
will be placed at an average of about
15 miles apart on the line through
the state, and more than 9100.000
will be expended by the company In
erecting them In Washington alone.
This does not Include the larger de
pots that will be erected at divis
ional points and ths larger cltlee.
Besides the commodious depot
building there will be a 700-foot
platform, 12 feet wide , extending
along the track on each aide of the
depot. Warehouse trackage will be
amply provided and also a passage
one-fourth of a mile In length, mak
ing It possible for the longest freight
trains to take the aiding without In
terrupting passenger traffic. The
paasage track la next to and at the
rear of the depot, while 40 feet fur
ther out la the warehouse track, leav
ing room for the warehouses to be
built between the two aide tracks.
K. P. STAG PARTY
The Mem ben Met and Enjoyed a
Social Time.
The Knlabts of Pythias lodge held
a genuine stag party laat night at
Fraternal hail. Over 70 were pres
ent. Cards and smoking afforded
the enjoyment of the evening. An
elaborate luncheon was served, re
flecting credit upon the committee
on entertainment. Several addreaaee
were given, calculated to amuse and
to uplift the hearers. Among the
speakers were W. A. Andrew, O. E.
lisrr, H. A. Barton, Elmer Van Fred
enberg and E. V. Uougbton. The
social session closed at i a. m.
RAILROADS PAY DIVIDENDS
Union Pacific and Southern Pacific
Make Announcement.
NEW YORK, Nov. 15.—Directors
of the Union Pacific railroad com
pany yesterday declared a quarterly
dividend of 2 V4 per cent on the com
mon stock, which la separate from
the rate of dividend of 10 per cent
annually established about a ysar
ago.
The directors of the Southern Pa
cific company declared a semi-annual
dividend of 3 Vi per cent on the pre
ferred stock and a quarterly dividend
of Vfc per cent on the common stock.
These dividends are unchanged from
the last quarter.
METHODIST HOME MIS810MS
Thirteen Bishops in Attendance at
Portland Meeting.
PORTLAND, Or*., Nov. 16.—The
general board of home missions and
church sx tensions of the Methodist
Episcopal church met yesterday.
Thirteen bishops of the church were
In attendance, as wall as tbs officer*
of the board, several prominent di
vines and editors. A business session
was held yesterday afternoon at
which Robert Forbes of Philadelphia
was elected corresponding secretary.
Prison Awarded.
The preeentaUon of prizes for the
fruit examination growing out of the
display which was recently Held at
Wtnn-Barr-Chalney company was
made at ths public schools. Much
Interest was taken la ths subject and
the assays written Indicated much
care and thought. The examinations
were conducted by Fruit Inspector
William Buckley. The results were
most satisfactory.
The winners were: eighth grade,
Florence Williams; seventh grade,
Ethel Cope; sixth grade, Helen Pat
terson; and fifth grade, Emma Than
TESTIMONY
FOR DEFENSE
Mason, Alleged Accomplice of Ad
ams on the Stand
RATHDRUM. Idaho, Nov. 16.—The
case of Steve Adams charged before
Judge W. W. Wood with the murder
of Fred Tyler In the Marble Creek
country In the summer of ) 604, drag
ged along slowly and tediously today.
The defense swore nine wltnea
and placed Alva M. Mason on the
stand. Mason related the history of
his early life, giving Pennsylvania
as his place of birth. He came to the
Marble creek oountry In 1901, bring
Ing his wife and family with him
He said he took a homestead In that
locality, the patent for which he had
received from the government. He
ran a boat up and down the river as
a matter of business to earn his liv
ing. In 1904 when he returned to hla
claim he found It had been divided
by four jumpers who had erected
cabins and were making Improve
ments. These four men were Lind
say, Boule, Griffith and Qrlffsth'a
son. each one taking a 40 acre tract
of his homestead, combining It with
other land which they had jumped.
In 1904 Steve Adams came and made
himself useful by working for Maaon.
Tyler waa In the locality assisting
the claim jumpers In Improving the
claim held by Jack Simpkins. He
claimed Tyler always went armed
with a revolver and a rifle.
Attorney lleitmaa asked, "Do you
know that Tyler la dead?" "No. air,"
replied Maaon. "Did you know of
the killing of Boule?" "Yae, air."
"Did you have anything to do with
the killing of Tyler and Boule?" No,
sir. I did not." Did you take any
other than legal steps to rid your
self of the jumpers who were located
up there?" "No, air, Inever did?"
"From whom did you you first hear
of Route's death?" "From Frank
Price who called It out from the river
as he came along." "Did you aea
Adams and Blmpklna after that?"
"About one hour after I heard of
Boule'a death. Adams and Blmpklna
came down and passed my claim."
Nothing developed from the cross
examination during the morning ses
sion.
During the afternoon Maaon waa
kept upon the stand by the prosecu
tion'! croas-examlnation. The proa
ecutlon endeavored to ahow that Maa
on had no right to the land In 1904,
although he now had a patent to It
Maaon stated he saw Orchard In
1905 In that locality about the lime
and after the skeleton of Fred T yler
had been found.
The defense endeavored to show
TRADE ON SOUND BASIS
NFW YORK, Nov. 16.—-Compara
tively sound conditions In commercial
and manufacturing interests are In
dicated by special reports to K U
Dun A Co., from to or more of the
leading cities of the country. Con
servatism In accumulating stocks la
reported In most cases, and there are
BIB THOMAS UPTON.
Famous Irish sportsman, who
1 mm brand another challenge for
the America's cup.
that the Information in Orchard'*
confession waa obtalaed by haartag
the stories and going over the noun
try after 1905.
Maaon said he aaw Blmpklna and
Adams several times la August, 1994.
Hs aaw them both on August SO at
Price's ranch 10 mliea from Boule'a
cabin which waa Intended to show
that It waa quite impossible for Ad
ams and Blmpklna to have been pres
ent nt Uoule'e death. I n as m uch as the
trail was rough sad would require
a return trip making 40 miles. He
waa asked, "Did you attend the meet
ing at Buasle crash?" "No, Mr."
"Did you ever have say trouble
with Archie Phillipa?" "Yea sir; Mr.
Phillips twirled an ax ovsr Mr. Rus
eell'e head or,# day intending to hill
him and It same nearer hitting me
then Russell and 1 ordered him aev
*r to come on my place again."
Entertains Friaada.
Meedames George Steals and E. N.
LaVelne entertained about 60 of their
friends this afternoon at the former's
home on Lakeside street.
The rooms were artistically decor
ated, causing the home to present a
beautiful appearance. The color
scheme waa red, green and yellow,
reminding the visitor that Thanks
giving dsy is drawing nigh. Moun
tain ash, Oregon grape, cedar sad
ktunlklniu ware tastefully blended,
producing n pleasant affect
Refreshments ware served, consist
ing of several tempting courses.
A physiological research, with prises
swarded, afforded the amusement
CITY IN BRIEF
R. H. Webb, of the B. R. Lewis
Lumber company, is confined to hla
home, being etch.
Messrs D. York and Anderson have
purchased the Majestic theater and
will move It to the room vaonted by
the lakaelds furniture company, on
Becond street.
Frank 1-etutuer was sailed to fit.
Maries yesterday to take charge of
the body of Charles Moateadon, who
died (here. He waa one of the
oldest settlers In that locality, hav
ing taken a ranch on the rivar over
20 years ago. A eon was formerly
Interested In a local livery stable.
The particulars cannot he obtained.
many la which working hours are
being reduced and men laid off. Aa
a rule, however, the reduction la pro
duction la taken rather aa a measure
of precaution than because of great
ly diminished orders. All New Eng
land points report reductions la pro
duction of cloth, but do not Indicate
any serious crisis Oa the contrary
the usual report la that Industrial
conditions are fair.
In all the New England cltlae ade
quate currency Is reported to meet
payrolls and to carry on himlnam.
although the banka ate not
new loans The check system has
been Introduced la a tew casm la
New York sad Pennsylvania.
Western Conditions Better.
Conditions farther warn are more
favorable than when the money
stringency first became acuta. Worn
Orand Rapids, the largest furniture
center. It is reported that nil factor
ies are running tally. Some reduc
tion* tn output and la the number of
men employed are reported tram De
troit and Milwaukee. It to reported
at Detroit that confidence to return
ing tn the monetary situation, white
at Orand Rapids sufficient cash Is
available tor payrolls. Clearing boons
cheeks are la nee at Milwaukee fir'*
email denomiaattoae. Ootl actions
are generally reported good through
out the west. .nirfiTu

xml | txt