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The Challis messenger. (Challis, Idaho) 1912-current, December 04, 1918, Image 1

Image and text provided by Idaho State Historical Society

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn88056159/1918-12-04/ed-1/seq-1/

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Hm inlltUtl in <»«• ttrrii t '
THE HOVER S ME V 1
for tin ptrxoJL
Of THE It 'A HI
ESTABLISHED 1NH1.
VOLUME 38.
LEADING. OFFICIAL A MJ
fmi
EVER Y MAS 8 P LE DOS:
Am* rim HA all
I Hn this Wbr
Therefore. 1 Kill work, 1 mill
**•**. f " Hl eacrißrt. J trill e*
din. / r-ilt ß'jht— rhterJully
ar.dto toy ut mot!-a» if Iht
» hol* 1 er nt of the tlruggU
ilep* a util ori tut alone. - -
OLDEST NEWSPAPER OF CUSTER COUNTY, IDAHO.
' P allis - Meantime
CHALLIS. IDAHO, WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 4, 1918
82.50 PER YEAR
NO 14
'
I
E i'~ -
The Dubois Banner, ofXo
▼ember 23, under the caption
"District Judge Can't Raise
Flu Quarantine", hasthefol-.^r
lowing to nay:
rrx u ■ <.U . „
They are having a "heck'
of a time at Challis over the
"flu"quarantine. Thattown
" d immediate vicinity is un
der quarantine and roads
leading into that district are
strongly guarded. Two or
three fellows drifted into the
forbidden place and were
quickly placed in quarantine.
They appealed to District
Judge Cowen, who called up
on the sheriff, mayor and ev
erything else in Challis to re
lease these men. The good
judge's orders fell upon ears
that were deaf to little things
lika that. Challis wa9 un
d* r quarantine. She is still
under quarantine and that is
ill there is to it.
Judge Cowen became "ril
ed" and all "het up" and he
borrows a friend and pro-1
ceeds to Chaliis to show
those guys what real law
and order looks like. But he
didn't get clear into Challis,
He was stopped at the regu
lar place and was told to cle
part hence—backwards. The
judge's passion then became
something approaching
drophobia. He sent in a hur
ried call to the governor for
the Idaho National Guard to
come over and help straight- !
en out thiugs in and around
r
vf

k
Checks
A Convenience
A checking account at
your command enables you to
pay bill« without leaving your home—
to Mad remittances anywhere with
the laaat effort on your part.
And every check when can
celled aad returned to you at
theeedef each month is an
uoquMttonable receipt.
Open an ac
count with us
NOW.
Sshtv —Hunestv-Cou rtesy-Service
J L - Reece, pw e. w. hovey. c«uhw
^ J- MICHAEL. V.Preat. H. E. HAWORTH. A«t. Cash
T ® FIRST STATE BANK
CHALLIS" IDAHO
P allis - Meantime Challis
1 ept on sawing wood. The
attorney general of the state
took a hand and said, " no -
i thing doing Judge." The na
tional guard is off on a visit
to Germany and therefore
the torrid judge is cooling off
■ as / as ^ as time will allow,
/ CauUnie Challis is going
.. >U f Ultb * Kr quarantine
" U l ° ns ' tll<: heauti
Mpartof.t„ public senti
mcnt 19 with Challis. Health
, laws and quarantine rcnl.
tions are t ' h hi . » *'
j this lan(1 ofthe t" "
brave and the thing that
* -
tonishes the populace in gen
eral is why in the name of
Sam Hill did the judge want
to butt in on something that
was too hot for him to han
dle?
Challis is right and all Ida'
ho will back her up. Quar
antine them, whenever the
occasion demands and even
the president of this old U. S
A. cannot break tha rules, if?
make
and a
the enforcers thereof are
, made of the stuff they
; them out of over in'
! rounf i Chilli«
Zboî s hoül d take a le.
son from Challis. Lots of
1 people rave and become un*
happy because they are
j quarantined, but the rules'
should be strictly adherred
to- Health laws and rules
are above everything else.
and the sooner the people in
general get this thru their
heads the better it will be for
all concerned."
hy---
Thei n e ' there ' litHe Tbrift Stamp
Y ouTl°be a War^Bcnd
! i> ve a nd Byp,
SHE KEPT TOEMOïTTHËJÔB'
'jÊiir Hi«»
Mil ïs
4ii > *.
J-f-M- —— •
vPI -
13
V
J
A
Y
„'.a
/.
Billig
SI
'M
jiLü
1
!
;
SAVE 16,000,000 BUSHELS
OF WHEAT THAT FORMERLY
WAS LOST IN THRESHING
"armera, CrçoH by Fcod Administra
tion, Provide Seven Extra Leave»
of Qrc-ad for Every American.
I'.v adopting «Tenner threshing meth
ods a:.«J L«y lito: liy combing harvest
fic-Uls to g a ■ 1. c r grain formerly was;
ed, threshermen and farmers cf the
L'uited S atc-s this rear saved fully
10.00 .«"Xi bushels of wheat, estimated
as equivalent to about seven one-pout; J
loaves of bread for every person in
the. o tv. This result, accompanied
by ci-rre.-r- nding savings of barley,
oats rye r.J other grains, is shown by
reports from 33 grain states to -J>* U
>. V 1 A li -«ration. Oilier stat"?
although not prepared to furnish deli
lite figures oi conscrvatioii In the
grain field«, report greatly reduced
harvest losses.
This rural food saving achievement,
accomplished in scarcely sis months'
time, was in direct response to a*
quests by thtf Food Administration,
which ashed farmers and threshermen
to reduce harvest losses from about
3-1 per cent.—the estimated average
in normal times—to tire lowest possi
ble minimum. Country grain thresh
ing committees carried into every
grain growing community the oillcia!
recommendations for accomplishing
the results desired.
in numerous instances drivers of
rucks with leaky bottoms were sent
from the fields to repair their equip
ment and frequently bad order thresh
ing machines were stopped until the
cause of waste was removed. But in
proportion to the number of persons
engaged in gathering the ration's gYnii.
crop, caaes of compulsion were com
paratively rare. The Food Ada inis
tration freely attributes the success of
the grain threshing campaign to pa
triotic service by farmers, thresher
men anil their crews. Incidentally
grain growers of the United Slates are
many miiiions of dollars *'in pocket'
as a result of the grain saved.
NO ONE SUFFERED HERE.
The marvel of our voluntary food
saving, now that we are "getting re
sults,'' is that ue one ever actually
suffered any hardship from it; that
we nil are better in healtn and spirit
and better satisfied with ourseives bo
cause'of our friendly seif-denial.
1 control in America held the
price c-f breadstuff's steady, prevented
vicious speculation and extortion and
preserved traaquiiiity at home. »
In no other nation is there so willing
a sense of voluntary self-sacrifice as
in America—that was shown
abstinence from wheat.
the
Find -more wheat. It came; more
pork, it came; save sftgar, it was done.
So Americans answered the challenge
of German starvation.
Good will rules the new world ns
fear governed the old world. Through
sharing food America helps make the
stholo world kiu.
Voluntary Basis of Food Saving
Showed Heart of America
Boat True for Freedom.
To the voiuntnrv service and sacri
fice of the American po«-n!e must I s
attributed the continued heuitli,
strength and mora'e of the Aili-.-J ar
mies and the civil populace.
Upon this spirit oi service and sac
r.iice will depend Lumpes faie in the
months to come. In the past year we
nave carried out an export program,
the magnitude of widen is almost be
yond comprehension. But with the
i.ivv demands that have come, with
the liberation of nations freed from
German oppression, our exports must
l e almost doubled. Instead of ll.SLO,
(Xk) tons, wo must snip twenty million
tous of foot! to Europe in the coming
year—as much as can be pushed
through our ports.
It the Allies had not been fed by
America, it would have been impos
sible for them to maintain
tense against Germany.
Meeting UUs world need on a purely
voluntary bast», the American people
have conclusively proved that democ
racy is a success ana that in time of
need it will rise to its own defense.
If there were no other accomplish
meut to its credit the very fact that it
bus shown lite strength of democracy
has in itself more than justified the
existence of the Food Administration
in tlie eyes of the world.
Less than four months after the
United States declared war Ute United
States Food Administrator expressed
his determination to meet America's
food problem cn a basis of voluntary
action and reiterated it's confidence
that awakened democracy would prove
irresistible.
"Many thinking Americans," said
Mr. Hoover, "and the whole world
have been watching anxiously the last
four months in the fear that demo
cratic America could not organise to
meet autocratic Germany. Germany
has beeu confident that it could not be
done. Contrary proof is immediately
at our door, and our people have al
ready demonstrated their ability to,
mobilise, organize, endure and prepare
voluntarily and efficiently in many di
rections and upon the mere word of
inspiration aside from the remarkable
assemblage of our Army and finances."
The history of the Food Administra
tion has clearly shown that the trust
of those who put their faith in democ
racy has not beeu misplocvii.
Food control made sufficiency from
shortage, kept tile reiu on food prices,
gave ^lie nation's iuil sUeugih exer
cise.
Starvation by Germany challenged
nil the world ; food conservation in
America answered the challenge.
Food conservation In America has
boon the triumph-of Individual devo
Uuu to the uatioual cuuso, ________
At the age of 93, George
Harlaml, a pioneer of the
west, passed away at St.
Patrick's hospital on Mon
day. Old age was the cause
of deatJi. Nothing is known
of Harland here except t.iM
he was born in 1825 and
has been at the hospital for
some time.—Missoulian.
George Ilarland was one
of our most highly respected
pioneers and has many old
friends here who mourn his
death.
GEORGE EMERY
f
George Emery, one of onr
prominent mining men, re
cently died at his old home
in Maine. He has extensive
mining interests here and
will be greatly missed in the
mining circles in the west.
CORPORAL JOHN
KIRK IN A RED
CROSS HOSPITAL
France, November 5th, 1918
Dear Mother:
Just a line tcv

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