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The Challis messenger. (Challis, Idaho) 1912-current, December 01, 1920, Image 6

Image and text provided by Idaho State Historical Society

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn88056159/1920-12-01/ed-1/seq-6/

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EXPECT TO AVOID
BREAK WITH JAPAN
•TATC DEPARTMENT WILL CON
TINUE NEGOTIATIONS FOR
A NfW TREATY.
It I« Not Bollovod That Sattlemant of
Vaxod Problama Will be Effected
Until Special 8eaaien of Con
greaa Haa Been Called.
Washington. — Although Tokio la
pressing for a settlement of the Immi
gration and California land controver
sy before President Wilson goes out
of office, It la declared that there la
no real expectation of definite action
before the Harding administration
comes In and a special session of con
gress Is called.
The object of the Wilson adminis
tration, It is said, Is to avoid a break
with Japan and smooth matters over
pending the change to the Republican
regime, when Mr. Harding will decide
whether to follow the line of compro
mise takeh by Mr. Wilson or to adopt
a more radical policy.
In accord with this purpose, the state
department will continue the negotia
tions with Japan fr a new treaty defin
ing the rights of Japanese now In this
country, and for a broader "gentle
men's agreement'' under which Japan
would undertake to prevent the migra
tion of any Japanese to the United
States for permanent residence. Even
If the negotiations should produce a
formal treaty submitted to the senate
before March 4, action upon It by that
body before the meeting of the new
congeess will be an extremely remote
possibility.
By that time, however, the Califor
nia legislature probably will have en
acted the proposed hew law approved
by the referendum, further restricting
the property holding rights of Japan
ese, and will have brought the con
troversy to a head.
Senator Harding has Indicated that
he views with sympathy the desire of
the Pacific coast to exclude Japanese
by statute and to prevent Japanese
now here from extending their land
control. To exclude the Japanse by
Statute would require termination of
the existing treaty, which Is possible
upon six months' notice.
LEAGUE INVITES WILSON'8 AID
President Is* Asked to Become
Armenian Mediator.
Geneva.—The council of the league
of nations on November 25 cabled
President Wilson at the same time
as messages of the same purport were
sent to the various powers asking
whether he will accept the role of
mediator between Mustapha Kemal
Pasha, the Turkish Nationalist leader,
and the Armenians.
After the membership committee had
decided to make all the new Russian
states wait for admission, and the
amendment and disarmament commit
tees had expressed themselves In
favor of delay, the committee on fin-,
ances and economics decided Wednes
day It would not act at present on
the suggestion of the Brussels finan
cial congress that a committee of fin
ancier be chosen to lay plans for an
international credit Institution.
If the assembly approves the com
mittee's decision another International
financial conference will be held next
year before anything is done on the
suggestions made at the Brussels con
ference. This Is understood to be the
plan advocated by the British.
Austria Is the only former enemy
state which Is likely to be admitted
to the league without serious opposi
tion.
GREY PLEAD8 FOR MODERATION
Suggests That Falling In Control, Ire
land be Left to Own Devices.
London.—The debate in the house of
lords on Irish, home rule Wednesday
night was made memorable by a nota
ble appeal frdm Viscount Grey, former
secretary for foreign affairs, to the
government for an eleventh-hour at
tempt by generosity to Ireland to
fashion the bill Into an acceptable
measure.
In a speech displaying no resent
ment and taking full account of the
government's extreme difficulties In
Ireland, he urged that unless the gov
ernment was able to secure effective
control In Ireland It would be better
to withdraw all the armed forces and
leave Ireland to find her own salva
tion. Whether the appeal will be
heeded time will show.
Expect Uprising In Germany.
Halle, Saxony.—German rudlcal lead
ers declare that a program has been
prepared with the aid of prominent
Russian communists to start a revolu
tion In Germany to set up a dictator
ship of the proletariat.
Ran Into Open 8witch.
Bellefontaine, Ohio. — Twenty-three
persons were Injured, two probably
fatally, when Big Four passenger train
No. 10, northbound, ran Into an open
switch at West Liberty, near here, and
crashed Into a freight train.
Kills His Stepfather.
Sioux City, Iowa.—William Hane
line, aged 29, shot and killed his step
father, Rodney J. McGookini, aged 54,
after, he alleges, hla stepfather had at
tempted, to kill hla mother, sister,
brother-in-law and two brothers.
LEAGUE CHIT
BALFOUR DECLARE8 IT 18 TOO
EARLY TO ATTEMPT
8UCH A 8TEP.
South American Delegates Are of the
Opinion That Any Amendments
8hould Await Propositione Ex
pected From United 8tates.
Geneva.—There will be no amend
ments to the covenant of the league
of nations at this session of the as
sembly if the decision of committee
No. 1—that of general organization—
which has been considering amend
ments, is approved in full session.
Arthur J. Balfour, chairman of the
committee, suggested to the committee
on November 23, that It was too early
to draw conclusions as to the working
of the league or to form an idea as
to how the covenant may be improved.
He proposed that the committee rec
ommended the appointment of a spe
cial committee to consider amendments
and report to the next meeting of the
assembly.
The Scandinavian delegates on the
committee insisted upon consideration
Immediately of amendments they pro
posed, but they were outvoted. The
South American delegates accepted Mr.
Balfour's recommendation the more
readily because they are of the opinion
that any amendment of the covenant
should await propositions that are ex
pected from the United States after
President-elect Harding's consultations
on the subject. They declared It would
be entirely out of order to revise the
covenant In the absence of one of
the most important nations of the
world.
BAKER REVOKES PERMIT.
Drastic Stsp Taken In Dispute With
Telegraph Company.
Washington.—Secretary Baker an
nounced Tuesday that he had revoked
permission granted the Western Union
Telegraph company last May to lay
certain cables at Blscayne bay, Miami,
Fla. The permit was issued by the
district engineer at Jacksonville, Fla.,
and Mr. Baker directed Its withdrawal
by telegraph.
Mr. Baker made no explanation of
his action. He merely authorized,
through his secretary, the statement
that the permit had been recalled. The
announcement followed, however, the
statement In New York by Newcomb
Carlton, president of the Western
Union company, that his company had
not only rights granted by act of con
gress, but specific permission of the
war department to do certain cable
work In the vicinity of Miami with
which "the navy department has for
months arbitrarily Interfered" at the
request of the state department.
Youths Confess Train Robbery.
Council Bluffs, Iowa.—Two youths,
Orville Phillips and Fred Poffenberger,
neither over 20 years of age, planned
the robbery of the Burlington mall
car, committed November 13, accord
ing to confessions they have made,
Postoffice Inspector Claude Glenn of
Council Bluffs said Saturday.
Poet 8tarts Hunger Strike.
Havana.—Horaclo Blanco Fombona,
held prisoner by the American mili
tary authorities ln San Domingo, has
started a hunger strike, according to
word received here. Fombona Is a
newspaper man and has gained con
siderable fame as a poet.
JENS JENSEN
■G.
Jens Jensen, consulting landscape
architect of the West Chicago parks,
author of the comprehensive plan for
the roadside planting of the Lincoln
highway by the General Faderytlon of
Women's Clubs, promoter of llllnole
state parks and president of the
Friends of Our Native Landscape.
8ix Men Are Cremated.
Jasper, Ala.—Six men were burned
to deuth In a fire at the Parish mine
of the Railway Fuel company, nine
miles south of here, following a gas
explosion in the mine. Ten others
were injured, six of them seriously.
Leygues and Lloyd George to Confer.
Paris.—Premier Leygues, It was an
nounced Tuesday, has decided to be
gin his conference with Premier Lloyd
George of Great Britain over the
Greek and other situations earlier than
at first Intended.
u
The End Of A Perfect Day
ûte*e
r
Get iff
TIE MAP
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HPffihP
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cow
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WESTERN PACIFIC
BOYS RIO GRANDE
NEW OWNER8 PAY $5,000,000
CASH AND ASSUME OBLI
GATIONS OF $141,175,000.
Road Is Sold on Fifteenth Anniver
sary to Satisfy Judgment of $36,
400,000, the Sale Completely Wip
ing Out Stock of the D. A R. G.
Denver.—On the fifteenth anniver
sary of the organization of the Denver
& Rio Grande Railroad company, No
vember 20, all the property and hold
ings of the organization were sold to
three men representing the Western
Pacific Railroad corporation for $5,
000,000. The purchasers also assumed
obligations of the Denver & Rio
Grande, amounting to $141,175,000.
The sale completely wipes out the
stock of the Denver & Rio Grande,
amounting to $87,775,670, according to
John F. Bowie of New York, general
counsel for the Western Pacific and
one of the three purchasers. The oth
ers associated with him were John B.
Marsh and Ralph M. Arkush, both of
New York.
The road was sold to satisfy a judg
ment of $36,400,000 obtained by the
Equitable Trust company of New York
as trustee for holders of bonds issued
by the Western Pacific Railroad com
pany and guaranteed by the Denver &
Rio Grande. The sale is subject to
confirmation by the United States dis
trict court.
Following the sale, Mr. Bowie an
nounced that although the Western
Pacific Railroad company corporation
now owns both the Western Pacific
and Denver & Rio Grande railroads,
the lines would be operated separately.
"Of course," said Mr. Bowie In a
statement, "there will naturally be a
tendency to favor the Western Pacific
on through business to and from the
Pacific coast."
The Rio Grande Western Railroad
company, recently Incorporated In
Delaware with a capital of $150,000,
000, will be the holding company for
the road sold, Mr. Bowie said, and an
operating company, with a name simi
lar to that held by the old company,
will be organized soon.
Books of both the operating and
holding companies will be opened In
New York January 1, at which time
officers of both companies will be
unnounced, Mr. Bowie said. He de
clared It would be the policy of the
new owners to continue the services
of the present officials and employees.
The headquarters of the road will re
main in Denver, he said.
POLI8H-RUS8 PARLEY ENDS.
Russia Charges That Poland Has
Failed to Ksep Pact.
Riga.—Peace negotiations between
soviet Russia and Poland were inter
rupted Sunday.
Adolph Joffe, head of the bolshevik
delegation, told M. Dombskl, chief of
the Polish representatives, that the
work of arranging for a permanent
peace could not proceed until Poland
loyally fulfilled her promise to with
draw troops to her borders. He added
this declaration was a result of action
of Colonel Rtbuk, head of the Polish
section of the joint mllltury commis
sion at Minsk.
Plans to'Feed the Starving.
Chicago. — Formal announcement
of the organization of a European re
lief council, composed of eight Ameri
can organizations, was made by Her
bert Hoover at a dinner Tuesday
night. Continuation of American sup
port in feeding the undernourished
people of Europe was urged by Mr.
Hoover, who will act as chnlrman of
the council.
Park Guard Shot to Death.
St. Louis.—Charles J. Backer, a
gunrd In one of the city parks, was
shot to death by Mrs. Marie Scott,
when Backer and another guard halt
ed an automobile occupied by Mrs.
Scott and her husband.
Hanson Foara Immigration.
New York.—Ole Hanson, former
mayor of Seattle, returning after a
two months' tour of England, France,
Sweden, Poland, Germany and Den
mark, sounded a warning of the Im
mediate uerlls of Immigration.
T
MEMBERS OF THE LEAGUE OF
NATIONS PLAN TO PUT END
TO HOSTILITIES.
Possibility of American Aid for the
Armenians Touched Upon in
Debate by the Assembly of
the League of Nations.
Geneva.—A resolution presented by
M. Vivianl, inviting the council of the
league of nations to confer with the
various powers with the view of con
stituting a force sufficient to put an
end to hostilities in Armenia, which
was joined to Lord Robert Cecil's reso
lution along the same lines, was adopt
ed by the assembly of the league Mon
day afternoon.
The possibility of American aid for
the Armenians was touched upon in
debate Monday by the assembly of the
league of nations on resolutions de
manding intervention by the league in
Armenia.
Supporting Lord Robert Cecil's de
mand that the assembly appoint a com
mittee to examine into means for end
ing the hostilities between the Turkish
nationalists and the Armenians, M.
Spalekjovitch of the Serbian delega
tion recalled that the United States
senate at one time had approved the
use of the American fleet to succor the
Armenians. It was recalled here in
this connection that Senator Harding
was the senator who reported the
resolution.
A. J. Balfour of Great Britain,
speaking on the resolution, said that
If the United States had been willing
to take the mandate for Armenia, she
had the men, money and spirit to make
her an ideal mandatory. The league
has been unable to accomplish any
thing with regard to the Armeninn sit
uation, Mr. Balfour admitted, because
the condition of Armenia, he argued,
was not such as the league was or
ganized to deal with.
More Trouble for Chase.
Cincinnati.—Mrs. Anna M. Chase has
entered suit for divorce from Hal
Chase, former first baseman of the
Cincinnati and New York Nationals,
now under indictment In Chicago In
connection with the alleged fixing cf
the 1919 wot id series.
FRANK W. MONDELL
Representative Mondell, of Wyoming,
is confined to his bed as the result
of the third accident he has suffered
since congress adjourned last June.
Turks Demand Treaty Revision.
Constantinople.—The defeat of the
Venlzelos government in the recent
election In Greece has resulted In the
Turks formulating demands which are
equivalent to a request for a revision
of the treaty of Sevres.
I. W. W. Referendum.
Chicago.—A referendum Is beln*
conducted by the Industrial Workers
of the World to determine whether
that organization shall indorse the
program of the third Internationale,
formulated at Moscow In March. 1919.
BN OF no
BEGUN
CIVILIANS AND SOLDIERS 8HOT
DOWN IN CLASH BETWEEN
WARRING FACTION8.
Small Bodies of Men Enter Homes and
Murder Victims in Bed or While
at Breakfast—Ten Killed
at Football Game.
Dublin.—This city became the scene
Sunday of far-spread murder and re
prisal. Not since the first outbreak
of the vicious civil warfare that has
been shedding blood In Ireland have
the assusslnutions been so concerted
or the retaliation so swift and pro
nounced.
Not less than fourteen men are
known dead n the attacks arranged
simultaneously all over the city Sun
day morning. The method was the
same in each case, and all the men
assassinated were officers or former
officers, or otherwise in the service
of the government.
Shooting began again in the streets
Just before midnight and a number of
persons are reported killed.
The casualties in Croke park, where
a football game was in progress, are
officially given as ten killed and sixty
five injured, eleven seriously.
Small bodies of men, numbering
generully from six to eight, presented
themselves nt varions houses, called
their victims out or entered and shot
them in bed, while dressing or at
breakfast. The districts in which the
murders were committed are In some
Instances close together; others are
separated by miles; but all the as
sassinations took place about the
same hour, 9 o'clock In the morning.
In the afternoon at Croke park six
teen lorries filled with auxiliary po
lice moved swiftly up and surrounded
the place.
Accounts differ as to what happened
when, after mounting muchlne guns
on heights above, the police broke
through the gates. The auxiliaries
were hooted and, according to eye
witnesses. first fired into the ui r and
then into the crowd. It is declared
from another source that the Sinn
Fein pickets first fired oiFiiie govern
ment forces when they were seen ap
proaching and that the fire was re
turned.
Within the park the great assembly
of 15,000 became panic-stricken. Sev
eral are reported to have been
trampled to death.
PLAN FOR BETTER TIMES.
National Move to Encourage Employ
ment Is Outlined.
St. Louis.—A national move to pre
vent business stagnation and encour
age employment has been launched
by local merchants and manufaîturers,
Melville Wilkinson, president of the
Associated Retailers of St. Louis, an
nounced Tuesday.
The plan was suggested by David
May, head of several large department
stores. Mr. Wilkinson said he would
appoint a committee to enlist the co
operation of business men throughout
the country.
Mr. May explained that the plan wns
to keep factories operating by retailers
making Immediate purchases for
spring trade.
HARDING GIVEN WELCOME.
Seaplanes and Submarines Greet Pres
ident-elect at Christobal.
Colon.—With submarines and sea
planes joining In the welcome, Presi
dent-elect Harding and his party en
tered the canal zone on November 23
nt Christobal. Governor Harding of
the canal zone, accompanied by a dis
tinguished party, welcomed the vis
itors.
The steamship Parlsmlna, carrying
the president-elect, arrived in Christo
bal harbor at 3 o'clock in the morning
and docked an hour later. Early In
the forenoon Senator Harding came
ashore and rode to his hotel through
flag-bedecked streets. Cheering crowds
turned out to welcome him.
BANKER KILLED AT CROSSING
Engine Went Dead and Auto Is Struck
by Train.
Price, Utah.—James Montgomery
Whitmore, president of the First Na
tional bank of this city, was fatally
Injured Sunday when an eastbound
Denver & Rio Grande passenger train
struck his automobile at a crossing
just outside of the city. Mr. Whit
more was coming from his farm to
obtain supplies for the men working
there when the accident occurred. He
wns nlone in the car.
As the automobile drove upon the
rnilrond track the engine apparently
went dead and before the trouble could
be corrected the collision took place.
Bread Prices Reduced.
Chicago.—Several Chicago bakeries
on Saturday reduced their price of
one-pound loaves of bread to 10 cents,
and their twenty-four ounce loaf to 15
cents and 14 cents, a reduction of 2
to 3 cents.
Constantine le Awaiting Vote.
Athens.—The Greek people will vote
November 28 on the question of the
return of ex-King Constantine to the
throne. The cabinet has decided for
a plebiscite on this question on the
date named.
SALT LAKE
BUSINESS DIRECTORY
NEWHOUSE HOTEL
400
ROOMS
400
BATHS
HOST MODERN HOTEL WEST OF CHICAGO
30 l«w WR M-0« XT»" »I SO; Tw, penmt 12-50
7» Rmm WM tak-Ow «tin »«F Tw mmm »00
125 1mm fit Ink-Oat pmm $2.50; Tw mnm $ »50
100 1mm Wkk Ink-Oat pm »00; T*t pmi »00
75 1mm m lnk-0it m*m »00; T« m*m» »00
Ffcihr Priced C.ffe Shop umI Dims Rom
Hodqurten far Utah, Itt*. Wjmfaj, Nmd» K*fh
The Thanksgiving Seaton suggest* dainty
table silver. Let us furnish your service. Our
reasonable prices ease the way.
BOYD
JEWELERS
BOYD PARK BLDG ICO MAIN CTREE!
PARK
LERS y<L
Francis l u"e ou. ^ nttji lc wiitttorr
, General Manager of HonestDebts
jURooms Continental BanK
„•SALT LAKË City, UTAH Wlh ull V
WALKER'S BEAUTY PARLOR
Switch transformation or hair by inail: cutsample
from center of head. Switches worth $7.50 for »
Transformation worth $12 lor $8.50.
CLEANERS AND DYERS
QL
cLi
UAUTY SERVICE
OTilES INSURED WORK GUARANTEED
We pay return postage. Price list on request.
MYERS CLEANERS AND DYERS
114-110 East Broadway Salt Lake City
WHO DOES YOUR CLEANINCT Have your
garments "Mastercieaned." It is the economic,
sanitary and scientiflc way. Send your clothes by
parcel post We pay return charges. Regal
Cleaning A Dyeing Co-, 15 04so h. S econd so.
MONUMENTS
STANDARD MARBLE AND GRANITE CO.
Write for catalog. 117 W. Broadway, Salt Lake.
TYPEWRITERS
DUhribatora Corona Portable and RoyaL
All other makes sold, repaired and exchanged.
Utah Typewriter Exchange Co. Salt Lake
FLOWERS FOR ALL OCCASIONS
MORRIS FLORAL CO.
K East Second South Street. Salt Lake City.
MILLER FLORAL CO.
10 E. Broad way.__ Salt Lake City
ART EMBROIDERY CO.
RUBBER STAMPS AND STENCILS
Seals and Ear Tags also manufactured. Send for
■amples, prices, etc. SALT LAKE STAMP CO.
15 West Broadway, Salt Lake City, Utah.
CALI LAKE BUSINESS COLLESE
w Save lodging; work after school; enroll anytime
ACFNTC 800 percent; $1 a pkg. Everybody buys.
nULHId sample Free. Dodge Bros. Salt Lake.
CREAM BOUGHT
Best prices. Western Creamery Co. tu W. 4th So.
VULCANIZING
WELDING. AUTO aad MACHINERY
Auto Radiator, built and repaired beet and
cheapest Potter Welding and Repairing Co.
551 S. State Street Salt Lake CityTutab.
OLDSMOB1LE DISTRIBUTORS
Cars and Trucks. Used Car Bargains.
A. K. Toureeen. «"'S. Main Street Salt Lake City.
RUBBER HOSPITAL
We cure injured rubber articles— Boote. Shoe«.
Hot Water Bottles, Tire*, Tubes, etc. Satisfaction
R iaranteed. Ketum chargee prepaid. Western
ubber Sales Co. 154 East Broadway.
ELASTIC STOCKING MFRS.
POULT RY BOUGHT
For best remits strip your Poultry. Eggs and gam»
to Fulton Market. Correct weight. Prompt re
turns. Write for prices.
HATS CLEANED AND BLOCKED
Write For Prices. Return Charges Prepaid.
Smyt he Hot Factory, na E. Second South Si.
THE STATE CAFE— Headquarters for out o#
town people. Quality, service. 45 W. Broadway.
PIPE AND MACHINERY.
Western Machinery Co., Judge Building.
QUALIFY AS BAKBEK in few weeks. MOLER
BAKBi H COLLEGE, 45 S. W. Temple.Salt Luke
CANCERS, Tumors and Eczema Removed,
A. M. Free bairn. 2'id Utah Savings A Trust Bldg.
Hemstitching, Pleating. Machine and Hand Em
broidering. Buttons marie. Expert Bear! Work.
The Embroide ry Shop, 554 Clift Building.
MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS
- DAYNSSEMEnSuSlCCOr
Everything kno wn in music. Sait Luke City.
L. D. S. BUSINESS COLLEGE
School of efficiency. All commercial branches.
Catalog fr ee. «0 N. Main Street. Salt La ke City.
KID FITTIN G CORSET PAR LORS
Specialists in designing, making, Otting Corseta.
Hemstitching, embroidering, btaiiling, accordion
and side pleating. Buttons made. 40 E. Broadway
THE VANITE SHOPPE
Marcel permanent wave. Color restored to hall
by scientific method. Switches and transf-irma
tions. 5511 S. State Street. Salt Lake City.
Scandalous.
A Virginia editor threatened to pub
lish the name of a certain young man
who was seen hugging and kissing a
girl in the park unless hls subscription
to the puper was paid up in a week".
Fifty-nine young men called and paid
up the next day, while two even paid
a year in advance.—Fourth Estate.
Sarcasm From the Legit.
"All that the motion picture lacks
Is the mere matter of human speech."
"Well," replied Mr. Storralngton
Barnes, who never will forget the
palmy days, "that's all a deaf and
dumb asylum lacks."
Repartee.
Jennie—Dick didn't blow hls brain!
out when you rejectei* him. He cuim
around and proposed to me,
Jeanette—Well, he must hnve gottei
rid of them some other way, then.
Stanford ChaporraL

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