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Cottonwood report. [volume] (Cottonwood, Idaho) 1893-1901, August 10, 1900, Image 4

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn88056164/1900-08-10/ed-1/seq-4/

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! Subscription SI- SO pel
IN ADVANCE
fintered in the Pottoffice at Cottonwood
Idaho, at Second-clam matter.
In this state there are 30,000 acres
of orchards. Of this number 10,
000 acres are apple trees, 12,000
prune, 3,000 pear, 2,000 peach, 1,000
cherry, 1,000 apricot, nectarines
and almonds, 300 grapes and 700
small fruits. This is a splendid
showing for a new state, in the way
of fruits, and coupled with the fact
that the north part of the state is
now harvesting an immense crop of
grain, especially that part rapidly
becoming known as Camas Prairie,
one of the garden spots of the Pa
cific coast, and juBt now beginning
to attract the attention of home
seekers from other states.
Rural mail delivery in many sec
tions of the Northwest has passed
■the experimental stage and has now
become a permanent feature of the
of the postal department. In some
localities the new system has so les
sened the amount of business for
merly transacted at local offioes
that it haTdly pays to continue them
r fhe post office at Lafayette, a small
place seven miles east of Sparta
Wis., has lost so much patronage
owing to the success of the rUral ser
vice recently established there, that
it has actually been closed, the town
itself now receiving its mail by car
rier. It is said that the carrier sya
■ cm, thus applied to sm^ll towns,
is vastly more satisfactory than the
previous service, the cairiSrs being
prompt and faithful, and the citi
zens no longer subject to the slow
going and ofttimes Unaccommoda
ting methods of village postmaster.
Not for many years has so dry a
season as this been known through
out the great wheat-growing states
of Minnesota and the Dakotas. At
. first it was thought that a few late
rains would so fill the heads of
wheat and other cereals that a fair
harvest Would result, but recent ie
{»rts of experts, and the latest in
formation from farm sections gene
ally, indicate a very poor yield,
■t
»rebably less than one-hàlf the av
age yield. In some parts of these
ites, doubtless, the crops will be
air, but in other portions the loss
11 be marked. In Washington,
egon abd Idaho, however, the out -
ok for both fruits and grain is ex
promising.—Northwest
Ine.
expei
University of California,
has just returned from the
" iv fossil fields in eastern
reports the discovery of a
of new species of extinct
'Wè found thfe fossil re
a tapir," said Prof. Joseph
»n, the head of the expi
a.n animal whose presence
gon basin in ancient times
efore suspected. Among
fcere the hones of a rhino
penary, an extinct species
e, an extinct cat and many
im&ls, the modern relatives
lieh art today found only in
fical countries. We foiihd also
I fossil remains of a mastodon."
Hiä Hohie Paper.
*'It'B Strang*/' Said a celebrated
author recently, "and yet not
Strange, how these old associations
cling to us. 1 was born 5 h a rural
district, and, forty years ago, the
little country weekly was the only
Was
when
everybody was in aflurty. Well,
I have not visited nir birthplace in
twenty years, but dtlring all that
tim« I have been a subscriber to
that little country weekly. I've
crossed the seas and it fias followed
me faithfully to foreign capitals.
I'vO taken it from my pocket in the
clubs of London and l'ank, and halre
read, with all the intetest of old,
how Colonel Bo-arid so is in our
midst, how 'John Jones Sundaved
with us,' how 'our esteemed coroner
sat ou three dead men yeèterday,'
and hew 'ihe editor is thankful for
a mesa of cabbage, but needs sotne
bacon to. boil it with,'etc. Yéè, that
little country weekly is a positive
joy to me yet. And the editor
doesn't have to dun me for my sub
ription, either .''^Atlanta Coneti
iwi
would
Immédiat
,lad>
ÏP
Srmon
he hoped the roof
!1 who were sinners,
the roof orabhed in,
stampeded, except
who remained in her
iy
he looked up at the parson
Imly remarked, "Parson, I
t think you were in earnest."
That is about the situation of the
democrats and Populists. The
democrats provoked the wrath of
the their superiors and when the
crash came, the democrats, like the
old lady, were too dazed to leave
their seats and just simply said "we
didn't think you were in earnest."
Now, if there is a man or woman
in tfc,e state of Idaho who dues not
admire the populists for the back
bone they exhibited in the (contu
sion convention, there is something
wrong in their attic. Notonly nam
ing their demands and placing a
ticket in nomination after their de
mands had been disregarded, but
the resolution in their platform
which prohibits the naming of any
democrat advocating the permit
system, to any vacancy that might
occur on the populist ticket.
A word about the populists: While !
the editor of this paper was in the I
democratic ranks, we entertained !
the kindliest feeling for the popu
lists brethern. They were never
given their proper sphere in politics.
Now we stand square upon the re
publican platform and we admire
the populist more than we did be
fore, and we offer no apology for
saying that they have good men and
good ideas» And while they cannot
win out single-handed, we do not
believe they will fuse with either of
the old patties.
The populists have reached a
point which muBt determine their
strength and standing) where neith
er shall be under estimated by de
mocrats nor republicans. They have
walked along quietly while the dem
ocratic carriage rolled past and
splashed'mud upon them. But. that
is past, and, without offense to our
own great party, we trust they will
permit no political organization to
besmirch thuni or grind thgm iiito
dust. It they must force state and
national recognition at a sacrifice,
let them do it. However, we feel
safe in saying, and if it was necee
sary to take au oath, we would
place our hand upon the Bible and
say that the republican party today,
while it has not bid or beckoned for
the populist vote, has a greater re
gard, upon a higher plane, for the
individual populist than the great
est wreath ever placed upon its
brow by democracy—a wreath of
thorns which not only pressed
down upon the brow of labor, but
would bave crucified labor itself
upon a cross of fusion.
The present disturbing element
in the railroad situation in the Lew
iston valley Is the C. B.&Q., inter
est. That road is Seeking a Pacific
coast connebtion and the Léwiston
valley is on the route that is being
considered. The Union Pacific in
terests are threatened by this road
on the east of the Rockies and the
jealously is extended to this side.
If the C. B. & Q., should appropri
ate the Clearwater pass thfe North
*rn Pacific is menace^ as well as
well as the O. R. & N.j and Union
Pacific. The two systems regard
this opposition road a common eue
my. The trvlce of the past vear
wnfe the resuli of an effort to placate
the C. B. & Q. The Northern gave
the strong rHal the best end Of a
great traffic bargain by granting a
Pacific terminal to this opposition
road. The price paid for a truce is
almost unprècedent in railroad
maihpulation .Even this purchased
péaoe has a viMble end The next
solution will be » race for the oceu
panby of the'terrltory in contention.
The Clearwater country Is the piize
fob which this railroud war has been
waged. The big crops and the great
developeinent of mining interests
havemadfe the contention more stren
uous in the past six months, bo that
a truce will no longiifr restrain the
Contending powers. The Clearwa
ter country will be a three cornered
Waterloo. Who will be the Wel
lington?—Teller.
Frank E. Johnefae, superintend
ent of thd Idaho Exploration and
Copper company, abrived from Ida
ho county last evening eh route to
Spokane on a business trip. For
several weèks Mr. Johness* has had
Bit
a force of men developing the Blue
Jacket claim, which his company
has Under bond, and the results
have exceeded the high expectations
entertainëd regarding the property.
The surface showing indicated the
predomlnehcs of copper in the ledge,
but with depth workiugt. the ore has
Changed end the higher values are
now shown to be in gold and silver,
although an average of seven per
cfev' r iv found tn the aSeayf
Im i e nones i, pay an . .»
lue Jacket iB located faivveci.
Little Salmon and 8ni$e rivers
a heavily mineralize4^Cnstrict,
and all indications now point almost
conclusively to a dividend payer
being developed there. A shaft 100
feet in depth has been sunk on the
property and the ledge crosscut at
that depth, showing 55 feet of ore.
Of this ore 47 feet gives an average
value of $5 to $7 in gold and silver,
aud the remaining eight feet, con
stituting the rich pay streak, gives
surprisingly fine values in gold and
silver. The result of assays made of
this pay streak the company refuses
to disclose. Samples, however, have
been exhibited showing free gold,
and it is reported that the company
are now contemplating taking up
the entire bond at an early day,
although the first payment is not
due until August 15. An expert
employed by the company will ar
rive in a few days for the purpose,
it is understood, of making a final
examination of the property prepar
atory to taking up the bond.—Lew
iston Tribune.
The situation in China causes
very grave concern in Washington,
and in fact, throughout civilization..
The legations ha ve been cooped up
in Peking, and now the imperial
edict has gone forth that all foreig
ners must leave- Which means that
they would simply g ) forth to their
death. Hurry on the troops.
Fourteen hundred Cuban teach
ers, not many of whom can speak.
English, arc sailing for this coun
try in a government transport with
the object of receiving a course of
instruction at Harvard College
Instruction will be uiven free, and
large sums of money for their en
tertainment have been raised by
subscription) the total sum at the
present time being $64,211 T>
idea and the organization of ttiu
undertaking belongs to Alexis E
Frye) Superintendent oi Schools in
Cuba. It is thought that thi in
fluence of this movement will be
Widespread, and do much toward
establishing confidence with the
Cubans In the American people,
and also diasemihatfe northern ideas
of living and more friendly inter
oourse. l'he Cubans aro extremely
imitative, and little will escape
their observation A society f.»r re
ceiving and entertaining »he te .;h
ere has been formed, and many
plans advanced for their amuse
ment. They will be under the be t
chaperonage, ;.Bd th«ir he. ho il ;
bean especial bare i..: F. e
system for hafidliu^ fe eathèr.
without ceiifusidn is u fin , '• and
effective o e. Hr has nuumeren
them, and each has bfc u ^iveh e
button with his or hfef number on
it in black against a white ground.
This button is to be worn in a con
spicuous place at all tiuifes.-^Tbe
Household;
Apportion merit of sc Haul oiuney
made August 4, 1900, by Lewis 1S1
seuSohn. County Superintendent.
of District
AmowiiJ
1 .......
. . -t g9.0î>
2 ..........
206.80
3 ..........
81 79
4 ..........
ai 1 7«>
5 . . . . ■.....
Ii ........
11 oo
8 ........
. 88.78
10 .........
20.li
11......
n.&fi
12 ..........
20.46
13 ........
... •). .6b
14 ..... . ..
89.57
15 ...... . .
30.97
16......
28.32
17......
. . 39 09
17 ..........
... 30 97
18........
40 55
19 ........
45 SO
20.....
23 33
21.....
29.53
22.......
. 31.45
........ .
*21
25
. . . 19.98
26........
19.50
27 ..........
. . . 23.32
28
18.54
29
20.84
.m..........
. . . 22.37
31 ..........
. . . 28.10
32 . : j ....;
27 15
3K *
84.31
34 .......
23 80
oO . i ......t '
. . . 29 53
36........
57.70
87 ..........
30.49
38 .........
. 34.79
39 .......
36.22
40.........
. . . 81.92
41 ......
... 44,34
42 ..........
. 19.02
43 .......
. . . 23.81
44 ........
. . . 20.46
45 .......t. .
36.22
46 . .'......
. . 80.97
47 .........
. . 21.89
48 .........
30.49
49 ..........
. . . 26.19
50.........
25.23
51 ..........
... 18.55
52 .........
.. 18.55
53 ..........
. . . 18.55
70 ....^_____
12.80
iw"
#1627.09
iil'ilftt!' > Homes!' ..-.I iTivi
L oiled jv .
isiou Idaho, Au:-.. .-•» I, l.W - Any
person who has hereto fore tlieo a
homer tead entry and thereafter
commuted the same is now under
"Act June'5,1900" entitled to make
another entry the jame as though
the former entry had not been made.
Also any person who before June
5, 1900, filed a homestead entry or
thereafter relinquished the same is
entitled to make another homestead
entry.
Applicant will he required to fur
nish an affidavit designating the
former entry by number, date, de
scription and office where made.
This will be gl minus news to a
great many persons who under the
law are now entitled to file another
homestead.
J. B. West, Register.
The above was taken from the
North Idaho Star.
For Sale.
WE II WE A NUMBER W
FARMS
T HA
VV K W
CAMAS PRAIRIE
.REAL ESTATE
AGENCV.
WOLBERT & BUTLER
\ i-RFE PATTERN
to every «ubeertbtr. Beaut 'ql dol
• d ht.'i.bjra.j'i Ntlee »«J till at ions t rlnei
st, artistic, e* iOigiU end er.ictiy up-UMlet» JeairfM
MS CALLS
MAGAZINE
DreMmnklnsf économie«, fentejr work, liou*»*holti hint«,
short >ri<*. current topic», etc Sulm-rlb* to-day.
Only fiOc.yearly. Lady agents wanted. Send for term«.
for IndlM, mleeee. girl« ami little children. That oe£>
fain atvlieh " chic " effect not attained by the nee of any
--------— Have no equal feretyleand perfect dl»
other pattern*
MSCALL«Titk
fÀmmW
BmIIt put together Only lb and 1« cent» each-nop«
higher Bold ia nearly cTtry city and town, or by ptaM»
Aak far them. Absolutely eery Intent,up-to-date style«*
*H* IUcCALL COHPÀlty» , ,
iM-t«« f«l 14th It reel, .... New Teth Ofay, I. t
Professional Cards.
J. F. AILSHIE
Attornéy-àt-Law.
Main Rt. opp. Ilk. of Cain an Pf-airie.
Orangeville, Idaho;
CLAY MI-S YMEE Y. 1,. MORUAS
MeN AMBE & MORGAN
Attorney'sat-Law.
Mt. Idaho and Orangeville.
JAS. W. REID D. WORTH
i.K.Msrox i.RANosvrir.E
REID & WORTH
Attorney's-àt-Lpw.
Practice iri tlie State und Fédéral Courts.
Mr. Reid will attend all terms of the
District Court at Mt. Idaho.
GEÖRGE W7GÖGDE
Attorney-at-LaW.
(IraniseviUe, tdaho.
J. M. WOLBERT
Attorney-at-Law.
Practice* before the Interior Depart
ment in Land cases.
RkpobT OflFlee
Cottonwood, Idaho;
...Russell Tamitt -
ECLECTIC PHtsiCIAN i StjRGÊON
Oiflls answered ptdmptly, in toWh
and surrounding country.
Office at Idaho Drug Store.
Residence : In rear of drug store.
Cottonwood. - - Idaho
I
ßiußBm
A Minister's Hobd Work
'• I ad . Vi , \ ,k f bilious
a ii,-. got h buttle of Luauiberlain'e
Co. ie, (he;, id Diarrhoea Item
eby, took two doses and was entire
ly cured," says Rev. A. A. Power,
of Emporia, Kan. "My neighbor
across the street was sick for over a
week, had two or three bottles of
ujfldicioe from the doctor. He used
them for three or four days without
relief, then called in another doc
tor who treated him for some days
and gave him no relief, so discharg
ed him. I went over to see him the
next morning. He said his bowels
were in a terrible fix, that they had
been running off so long thatit was
almost bloody flux. I asked him if
he had tried Chamberlain's Colic,
Cholera and Diarrhoea Remedy and
he said, 'No.' I went home and
brought him a bottle and gave him
one dose; told him to take another
dose in fifteen or twenty minutes if
he did not find aelief, but he took
■ >-e and was entirely cured."
For sale by all druggist.
When you see an animal goin'
thr rdi -in orchard eatin' all the
.-s yin' on the ground and
f in all the lime, 'thout ever look
in ii o to see where they Come from,
i it's a hogj an* when you
-in' through lifea-pick
!.. id's mercies an'
•ikin' or sayin'"re
i n v.bilged," it's a
s ...U ». ii n's a poZkerof Amer
ika!) perswasion,''Solomon Straw
band.
"Through the months of June
and July our baby was teething
and took a running off of the bow
els and sickness of the stomach,"
says t>. P. M. Holliday, of Demingj
Ind "His bbWels would move from
five to eight titnes a day. I had a
bottle of Chamberlain's Colic, Chol
era and Diarrhoea Remedy ill the
house and gave him four dropB in a
teaspdonftll of water and he got bet
ter at onfie." Sold bÿ all druggist.
Some Signs.
\V hen a couple, that's vfhat you
cull ynubg) is goin' along the stfeet,
aii* i;'s rainin', an' he's boldin' the
■ >inbezel So that all the drippin's
falls on him, it's a sign o'courtshipi,
■uid when he's hold!«' the umberël
so 'at all the drippin's fall on lifer,
it's ii £igh ; marriage.
"My baby (Vas tferriblv sick with
" . rb. '.,." says J. H. Doak; of
' ■ tu,.', ('rtgon. "We were hn
.ib.i- ;o cure him with the dootbrs
HsriS'crce and as a last resort we
tried Chamberlain'* Cfelic, Chdlera
and Diafrhoea Remedy. I am hap
py to fcay it gave immediate rfelief
and a complete curé:" For salfe by
all druggist,
Ëureka Haines. Oil Is the best
preservative of new leather
mill the best renovator of old
leather. It oils, sevens, black
ens and protects.
renovator
s, softens,
s ta. Use
Eureka
Harness Oil
on your best ha mean, your old bar
uesa. and your carriage top, and they
will not only look better but wear
longer. Sold everywhere in cane—all
else» from half pints to five gallons.
Made by STANDARD OIL CO.
Gd to the Idaho drug store fof
school supplies.
c
1 ÖTTONWÖOD
BËEWERY
feALOÖN;
^CHOBER «t pÊTERsêN
PROPRIETORS.
AX****V'
Manufacturers of the famous "Cot
tonwood Bèér/' add dealers in the
very best brarids of wines, vttiiskifes
and cigats.
A rfebL AISOBtitHT or w"lN*B / Nil
noroRs scitabÜ roR rAMtiT
uss w ax ax alKays oh h/sd.
I Edinburg Brand, Prize White M'hiskey.
O
Beer by the keg' quart or slil«le driu>
COTTONWOOD, IDAHO
!
We have some lands at exactly
one-half value. They must be
taken soon. The owners are non
residents and need money.
Report office.
A train on the Ulster and Dela
ware Railway was stopped recently
on account of the caterpillars which
collected on the tracks in sufficient
numbers to stop the train bv the
lubrication of the rails, which re
sulted from the crushing of their
bodies under the wheels. According
to the Railway Review, it is neces
sary for men to sit upon the cow
catcher and sweep away the obstruc
tions by holding brooms on the rails.
General Warner is quite a pro
phet. During the Kansas City can
wntion he said: "I tell you the
question of 16 to 1 is going to qut
hut little figure in the campaign.
The issues will be aqti-imperialism
and trusts and what we should do
for humanity, and the question of
ratio will sink into insignificance."
COTTONWOOD
\
HOTEL
NEW MANAGEMENT. BEST SERVICE. REASONABLE RATES.
MAIN STREET COTTONWOOD IDAHO
A
IDAHO DRUG STORE.
New Stock Of
Patent Medicines, Soaps, Perfumery, Drug'
gists Sundries.
Also Fine Stationery) Nuts) FrhitS) Cigars, and Notions.
Dr. Ri TRUITT, Manager.
King St. Cottonwood Idaho.
iE>. ». SWBBTj
Manufacturer Of, and Dealer In I
LUMBER.
mi w
H Have A Dry kiln In UseÉ
And can süPPly aLl, with U
DRY IitJMBER. |I
MILL and YARD kt 8HIS8LER, INGR ANJ '& Go's OLD (STAN 1).^';
THE NEW MILL,
BEN. BORGER
MANUFACTURER OF & DEALER IN
I have the very best rough dimension, rough boxing and rotrfeh fencing
to bë had. I do riot cull. I can saw timbers from
10 to 50 feet in ieiigth
Mill Jniile south of Keuterfelllë. Idaho
KIPPEN SHINGLE
MtLL § ^
^4
Kippen
Idaho*
Proprietors.
MANUFACfÜHER of SHINGLES of HIGH GRADE, and will delive*
to any {joint on CAMA& PRAIRIE ot the reservation.
Corrèspdttdenee Solicited
-A---fegnTTfi-———:--
UOÜ8B.
MORROW IDÂHOi
tyr. Tt. X5IÎXON
Proprietor. \ Jjir
13 Miles fium CotitmWood on Ulk-wfa'
to liewiaton
Best Accommodations
I8t;
M
a °3feinj-.
,e sizes tor
Customer (to
"This coat is ak;
big" __
Mr. I8aac£teuwpregsi re j„i__
"Mine frient, dfl* mate y OU
proud you will fj^to it."
A cyclone has been doing an ex
tensive business in Dakota aDd
Minnesota, lately.
The intense heat in Chicago ou
Hunüay and Monday proved fatal
in a great many cases.
Ashland Wisconsin has lately had
a $1.000,000 fire, principally cap
tinea to lumber. ^
The battle recently fought at Pei
Tsang, Chipa op Sunday morqjpg
the 5th inst, resulted in the defeat
of the Chinese by the allied forces,
with a loss to the allies of 1.200
men in killed and wounded,Chiefly
Russians and Japanese.
WiLLOW-CREEKiCottonWOOlf
I
ACENCÏ. r ""
Lands
A SPECIALTY
Eroxr OFFICE

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