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COTTONWOOD CHRONICLE
VOLUME 25. NUMBER 38.
COTTONWOOD, IDAHO, FRIDAY, SEPT. 21, 1917.
$1.50 A YEAR.
LOCAL ITEMS
OFJTEREST
In and Around Cottonwood
and Camas Prairie.
Geo. M. Robertson spent Tuesday
in Lewiston on business.
L. C. Hoffman and William Schaef
fer are in Spokane this week.
Deputy Sheriff Wm. Eller of
Grangeville is in town'today.
Mrs. Aichlmayr and family have
moved to Clarkston for the winter.
Today, Sept. 21, the days and
nights are exactly the same length
Carl Rheder has returned from a
trip to the upper Salmon river country.
Mrs. Stevens of Nezperce is a guest
at the Strickfaden home here this
week.
Frank Kelsey, with an auto party,
enjoyed Sunday at the village of Mt.
Idaho.
Mr. and Mrs. J. F. Strickfaden left
Tuesday for a few weeks' visit at Mis
soula, Mont.
A. L. Creelma.n, the merchant,
made a business trip to Lewiston the
first of this week.
Geo. F. McKinney and his partner
W. T. Simon were Nezperce business
visitors Tuesday.
J. V. Baker and family motored to
Nezperce Sunday and enjoyed the day
with friends there.
T. A. Bayliss of Grangeville, man
ager for our electric light system, was
in the city yesterday.
Dr. J. E. Smith is now snugly lo
cated in his new office next door to
Baker's store. See his card
Joe Kolbeck treated himself to a
fine new Buick car this week, bought
from the Hoene Hardware Co.
J. B. Fehlhaber of Spokane has ac
cepted a position with the Hoene
Hardware Co. as automobile expert.
Edwin Nelson of Fenn was in town
yesterday. , He is thinking of selling
out this fall and moving to Grange
ville.
Miss Grace Fargo returned to her
home at Lewiston Monday, after a
pleasant visit here with the Jessup
and Dye families.
Dr. Shinnick reports the birth of a
bouncing baby boy this morning to
Mr. and Mrs. Carl Casand, three miles
north of town.
Ira Gentry left this morning for
Palo Alto, Cal., where he will begin
his third year in the law course at
Stanford University.
John Maugg and Dome Romain of
Keuterville, with their families, spent
a couple of days this week with theiV
relatives at Grangeville.
Max Rader returned Wednesday
from Casper, Wyoming, where he had
been several weeks attending to his
extensive farming interests.
Editor Smith of the Grangeville
Globe was seeing the sights in Cotton
wood a 'few minutes Monday, and
made this office a friendly call.
Miss Evelyn Porter, our accom
plished music teacher, returned last
night from a few days' visit with
friends and relatives at Lapwai.
Of course every farmer in the coun
ty and his family and all of their
neighbors will attend the Farmers In
stitute at Cottonwood on Oct. 2 and 3.
A. R. Johnson of Lewiston, local
manager of the Pacific Telephone and
Telegraph Co., made his regular
monthly visit here the first of the week.
Ira E. Smith, former deputy game
warden, is being tried today at Grange
ville on the charge of embezzling
$700—money collected for game li
censes.
Mr. and Mrs. Doc Warden of Sal
mon river left Wednesday for Port
land, where Mr. Warden will remain
for awhile under expert treatment for
rheumatism.
O. D. Hamlin went to Ilo today to
act as witness in a horse-stealing case
which occurred in this vicinity several
months ago. He will also go to Nez
perce for a short visit.
Leonard Huffman of Greencreek
left Monday for a visit with relatives
at several points in Montana, after
which he will report at American
Lake as one of the new National army
Jim Butcher, who has been helper
at the local depot for a month, left
Tuesday for Austin, Minn., where he
will railroad with one of the big East
ern companies.
According to letters received here
from members of the Second Idaho
regiment, the Idaho troops will leave
Boise next Monday for the training
camp at Charlotte, N. C.
Hill brothers, former residents of
this place, came back here this week
from their homes in Montana and took
back with them this week a car of
horses, which they will sell up there.
Arthur McSpaden and wife and
Kenneth Barrett of Doumecq, P. L.
Keener of Joseph and Sam Jones of
White Bird are among the Idaho
countyites attending the Roundup at
Pendleton this week.
Henry Mager and several other
men returned yesterday from Elk
City, where they had been fighting
forest fires for several weeks. The re
cent heavy rains assisted them greatly
in putting out the fires.
J. A. Bushue and family of Ferdi
nand left this week for Joseph, Ore
gon, near where they have purchased
a 500 acre farm. Mrs. Bushue was
here the last of the week visiting her
parents, Mr. and Mrs. B. L. Hussman.
Ed Blake was in town yesterday
from Westlake. He reports a fire
scare in his neighborhood Wednesday,
when A. S. Leister set fire to some
brush in a clearing. It required some
pretty hard work by several men to
keep the fire from spreading and doing
damage.
Miss Helen Johnson of Vollmer,
who spent several days here this week
visiting her friend, Miss Bernice Ed
wards, left this morning for Spokane,
where we understand she is soon to be
married to a prominent young busi
ness man of that city. Miss Edwards
accompanied Miss Johnson to Spokane
for a short visit.
B. Tacke arrived home Wednesday
from a few days' visit with his rela
tives near Carter, Montana. His
three sons—Joe, Tony and Barney,
and nephew, Lou Tacke, and son-in
law Fred Funke, are all prosperous
farmers at that place and getting
along nicely. The Cottonwood Chron
icle is a welcome weekly visitor to all
of their homes.
Gus Seubert, wife and baby and
Pete Bies arrived home last night
from a record-breaking auto trip to
Spokane, having made the round trip
in his Ford car in just 32 hours, v^ith
12 hours' rest in Spokane. The ob
ject in making the hurry-up j,rip was
to get some extras for the Bies thresh
er—which would have, taken 4 prK)
days to get by express. ^
Ex-Editor Wijper is now a full
fledged farmer,•♦'and takes to the wofk
like a duck to water. This week he
bought 8 good horses—4 from Geo.
Killmar, 2 from Theo. 'Poennis and
one each from Fred Pfannebecker and
Andy Rustemeyer. Frank has been
busy all week hauling all kinds of new
machinery out to his farm, and in fact
is as busy as the proverbial cat.
P. H. Sallee and Miss Elsie Gray,
both of Westlake, were married Sun
day at noon, Sept. 16th, at the bride's
home by Ed Blake, Justice of the
Peace. Only members of the family
and a few friends were present and en
joyed a fine wedding dinner. Mr. and
Mrs. Sallee have gone to Olympia,
Wash., where they have relatives and
where they will spend the winter.
Wes Hockersmith, who conducts
the Rice creek ferry and stopping
place, was in town Saturday. He ex
pects to circulate a subscription paper
among our citizens within a few days
for the purpose of raising funds with
which to improve the Grave creek
road. Last spring the road was wash
ed out for a distance of about five
miles, making it impassable for autos
or wagons, and the many people of
that part of the Salmon river country
are forced to use pack-horses in com
ing out to Cottonwood to do their
trading. Mr. Hockersmith thinks
the washed-out portion of the road can
be put in shape for wagon travel for
less than $500. He says this road
has been sadly neglected by the coun
ty court, although some of the heavi
est taxpayers in the county live in
that locality._
Mrs. J. Matthiesen has a number
of 8. C. White Leghorn cockerels for
sale at $1.50 each. 40
BIG STOCK SHIP
MENTJÜESDAY
Forty-four Cars go Out From
This Vicinity.
A total of 44 cars of stock were
shipped out from this section Tuesday
—32 cars of cattle and hogs over the
Camas Prairie line and 12 cars of cat
tle, hogs and sheep over the Clearwa
ter road.
The stock was billed out to three
different firms—Carsteen Packing Co.
of Tacoma, Fry & Co. of Seattle and
E. H. Stanton & Co. of Spokane.
All the stock was extra good stuff
and brought top-notch prices, the Far
mers Union paving as high as $17.15
per hundred for hogs in this shipment.
A contract has been awarded for a
$27,575 administration building for
the Lewiston State Normal. Con
tracts have been let at Moscow for
two University buildings, one to cost
$7,995 and the other $11,698.
Lee Strickfadden, who is engaged
with his brother Charles in the farm
ing of 1000 acres of land a few miles
north of Cottonwood, was in Lewiston
Tuesday and to a Lewiston Tribune re
porter said: "Our crop this year re
turned about 25 bushels of marquis
wheat, 23 bushels of forty-fold wheat
and 20 bushels of barley to the acre.
The crop will bring about $25,000,
whereas with normal climatic condi
tions the yield would have been such
as to have brought the figure up to
about $60,000. AVe consider the show
ing made by the marquis wheat as be
ing most remarkable. It received not
a drop of rain from date of planting, yet
matured 25 bushels of sound hard
wheat. Up to the early part of July
the stand of barley could not have
been better, but the drouth then began
to affect, conditions and while the heads
seemed normal, when threshed the re
sults showed how serious the blight
had been."
FARMERS INSTITUTE
AT COTTÖNWOOD
-® PROGRAM ®
OCTOBER 3
9:00 a. m. Band Concert.
10:00 a. Lecture on,Smut, by A. E. Wade, County Agri
culturist Lewis county.
11:00 a. m. Pleas for the Camas Prairie Farmer, by Prof.
Rpy.
1:30 p. m. Band Concert.
2:30 p. m. Tractor Demonstration.
2:30 p. m. Home Economy Demonstration and Lecture.
» 7:30*p. m. Band Concert.
8:00 p. m. Farm Markets Dept., by Chas. Waggoner.
OCTOBER 3
9:00 a. m. Band Concert.
10:00 a. m. Lecture on Dairying by U. of I. Dairyman. ,
11:00 a. m. Lecture on Soils by University Expert/ i
11:30 a. m. Clover Seed, by A. E. Wade. 4
1:30 p. m. Band Concert.
2:00 p. m. Stock Judging, followed by Livestock Sale.
2:30 p.m. Home Ecomyny Lecture.
7:30 p.m. Band Concert.
8:00 p. m. Control of Weeds, by A. E. Wade, followed by
an organization of farm bureau.
— —A ----- « ---
' ft First National Bank Report *
No. 7923 ..
Report of the condition of the First National Bank, at Cottonwood, in the State of Idaho, at
the close of bu^iess on Tuesday, Sept. 11th. 1917.
RKSOURCKS.
Doans and Discounts (except those showu on b and c)..........................$239,162.71
Total loans...............................*.........................................
U. S. Bonds deposited to secure circulation (pai value)..........................
liberty Doan Bonds, unpledged.................................................
Securities other than U. S. bonds (not including stocks) owned unpledged......
Stock of Federal Reserve Bank (50 per cent, of subscription) .................
Value of banking: house..........................................................
Furniture and fixtures............................................................
Dawful reserve with Federal Reserve Bank.......................................
Cash in vault and net amounts due from national banks.........................
Redemption fund with U. S. Treasurer and due from U. S. Treasurer..........
$239,162.78
25.000.00
1.050.00
6.898.00
1 . 200.00
6 . 200.00
2,800.00
24.Z52 36
92,669.06
1,250.00
Total # . $400,482.20
diabiditiks
Capital stock paid in........................................................... * 25,000.00
Surplus fund................................................................ 15,000.00
Undivided profits.................. ..............................................$10,844.78
Dess current expenses, interest, and taxes paid............................ 3,221.10 7.623.68
25.000.00
54.671.15
500.00
1,419.94
Circulating: notes outstanding....................................................
Demand deposits:
Individual deposits subject to check.............................................
Certificates of deposit due in less than 3u days (other than for money bor
rowed ...............................;.........................................
Certified checks.................................................................
Cashiers' checks outstanding:....................................................
Total demand deposits subject to reserve. Items31.32.33.34.35,36. 37,38 $328,001.70
Time deposits subject to Reserve [payable after 30 days, or subject to 30
days or more notice]:
Certificates of deposit (other than for money borrowed) ..................... 98,856.82
Total $400.482.20
State of Idaho. County of Idaho, ss:
I, Geo. M. Robertson, Cashier of the above-named bank, do solemnly swear that the above
statement is true to the best of my knowledge and belief. GKO. M. ROBERTSON. Cashier.
Subscribed and sworn to before me this 17th day of Sept., 1917.
Herman H. Nuzoll, Notary Public.
CORRECT— attest: W. W. FDINT, B. D. PARKER. J. P. MANNING. Directors.
Raise Wheat, Not Smut.
Wm. Shockley, a prominent farmer
from the Nezperce, in a recent inter
view on the smut subject with County
Agricultural Agent A. E. Wade, re
marked that smut could be entirely
eliminated from the country by re
plowing the summer-fallow after the
fall rains.
He says that in this way the smut
spores that have fallen on the ground
during the smut shower are buried so
deep that they cannot infect the
sprouting grain.
Mr. Shockley has followed this plan
for 20 years and has never raised any
smut to amount to anything.
He says that the plowing should be
fair'y deep, the furrow being turned
bottom side up with care, and seeding
should follow as closely after plowing
as possible and that the seed should
be treated in the usual manner.
This is the only possible method
that can be followed this year with
any degree of assurance that we may
raise a clean crop.
The present indications are for the
smuttiest crop of wheat next year that
the prairie has ever seen if this meth
od is not followed out.
Mr. Wade will deliver an interest
ing lecture on smut in the afternoon
of the first day—Oct. 2—of the Farm
ers Institute at Cottonwood.
RED CROSS DOINGS.
(Contributed)
The Red Cross room will soon have
to be supplied with fuel. Those not
able or prepared to help with the sew
ing should donate a sack of coal.
Watch for the date of the Home
Talent play to be given early in Octo
ber for the benefit of the Red Cross.
The instruction and needles for
woolen knitting are here. Lewiston
chapter has notified us that the wool
will be ready in a few days.
Coming — "The Old Home
stead."
This high-grade special in motion
pictures will be shown next Wednes
day afternoon and evening-*<6ept. 26,
for the regular prices of 10 antW5c.
ENTERPRISES
The Biggest Little Town on
the Map for Its Size.
Ia order to give the outside reader
some idea of the immense volume of
business done at Cottonwood we here
with publish a list of the town's enter
prises and resources.
Cottonwood, a live up-to-date mod
ern little city with less thkn a thous
and people, is located on Camas Prai
rie on the Northern Pacific brandi
railroad in Idaho county, 61 miles
southeast of Lewiston, Idaho, in the
heart of the richest grain and stock
country in the United States. No
where in the entire country can be
found a more intelligent, energetic and
prosperous class of farmers and stock
men than in this community.
West of here is the Craig mountain
country and a nice belt of timber, with
half a dozen sawmills operating within
ten miles of the town. Farther west
and south is an immense stock country
along the Salmon and Snake rivers,
nearly all of which is tributary to this
town and ships its stock from here.
Railroad people say that, as a produc
ing district, more stock—especially
hogs—is shipped from here than from
any point west of the Mississippi river.
The town has electric light and
power, and a splendid gravity system
of pure mountain water piped from
Cottonwood Butte, a distance of about
three miles. For an elevation of 3,
400 feet the winters are not severe,
the mercury seldom going below zero,
and then only for a short time. J ust
enough snow falls to insure good crops.
The work of putting in a sewerage
system has been postponed until next
year, as was also the work of complet
ing concrete sidewalks and street pav
ing, which was begun Borne time ago.
In the town we have two of the
strongest i^anks in the state, with de
posits of nearly three-quarters of a
million dollars; three immense grain
warehouses, two large grain elevators,
two of the largest and best flour mills
in the state with n daily capacity of
about 200 barrels; two big lumber
yards, one with a planing and wood
working mill in connection; a thor
oughly equipped creamery and cold
storage plant erected little over a year
ago which already has turned out
over 100,000 pounds of butter, be
sides during the summer months sliip
[ >ing to outside points over 1000 gal
ons of ice cream monthly; two of the
biggest hardware and farming imple
ment stores in the state of Idaho;
four well-stocked general merchandise
stores; one of the finest cold storage
meat markets in the entire Northwest;
two hotels, three restaurants, two drug
stores, furniture store and undertaking
parlors, harness shop, moving picture
show, two confectionery stores, three
garages/ two livery stables, two black
smith shops, two ^asftcr shops, two
plumbing and tii^shops, two pool halls,
thsee soft-drink parlors, two jewelry
stores, photo gallery, millinery store,
second-hand store, tailor Bhop, shoe
shop, laundry, three doctors, two den
tists, veterinary surgeon, occulÎBt,
newspaper, two real estate offices, Cot
towv»d«Farm Loan Association with
Eugar Fry as president and Felix
Martzen secretary and treasurer; two
exdfellefi, jcIiooIb— public and Paro
chial, cachgvith an enrollment of about
160 pupils and with the same num
ber of teachers; three churches—Meth
odist, Catholic and Baptist; two tele
phone systems; lodges represented—
I. O. O. F., Rebekab, K. of C.,
K. of P., and Moose.
Members of the City Council—J. V.
Baker, mayor; Geo. M. Robertson,
John Hoene, Geo. F. McKinney and
John Funke, councilmen; M. M. Bel
knap, clerk; E. J. Terbaar, Treas;
Ed Malerich, marshal.
Justice of the Peace, B. L. Huss
man; constable, Oscar D. Hamlin,
who is also our drayman and stock in
spector.
We have a live commercial club,
with Geo. M. Robertson, president,
and Walter W. Flint, Sec. and Treas.
Excellent band of 20 pieces; rod
and gun club, fire department, etc.
Two daily stage lines-one to Keu
terville, the other to Winona and
Greencreek.
Among the new enterprises contem
plated for next summer is a firstelass
hospital, the stock for which is already
subscribed; a large modern brick ho
tel and a city hall.
Cottonwood's ambition to become a
county seat will soon be a reality—
and then watch us grow with leaps
and bounds into one of the largest and
most flourishing cities in the state of
Idaho.
Cottonwood Public Schools
(By Prof. Skinner)
The high school last F riday organ
ized a literary society which will hold
its meetings twice each month in the
high school room. The first meeting
will be held Tuesday evening, Sept.
25th. The public is cordially invited
to attend. Caroline Terbaar was
elected president; Euclid Rice, vice
president; Anna Peterson, secretary;
Miss Sloneker, treasurer; Lee Gentry,
sergeant-at-arms. The following pro
gram will be given at the first meet
ing:
Song, The National Air, by the school
Reading, German dialect
August Schroeder
Duet Celia and Katherine Nacke
Harold Simon
Katherine McDonald
Anna Peterson
Bertha Terbaar
Floyd South
Olen Hamlin
Arno Buettuer
Reading
Reading
Piano Solo
Reading
Violin Solo
Reading
Reading
School paper
Carolyn Terbaar and Myrtle Rhett
Wong by six girls
Piano Solo Mary Byam
Aim of Literary Society Prof. Lustie
Owing to teachers' institute at
Grangeville, there will be no school
during the first week in October.
Floyd South entered school last
Monday bringing the Senior enroll
ment up to nine. The Senior dass
organized last week and elected Myr
tle Rhett president, Aloysius Wagner
was chosen vice-president, Caroline
Terbaar suc-treas. Anna Peterson and
Francis Hattrup were elected mem
bers of the social committee. The
class intends to give a party to the
F re8hmen in the near future.
Those having drills accepted in the
high school to date are: Aloysius
Wagner, Caroline Terbaar, Euclid
Rice, Anita de Courcey, Catherine
Nacke, Wallace Rhett, Ferdie Nacke,
Henrietta Manwaring, Myrtle Rhett,
Frances Hattrup, Olin Hamlin, Ade
line Gaul and Arthur Peterson.
No department grades will be issued
this year in the high school. Instead
a merit grade will be given which
c untunes good behavior in school and
punctuality. Watch for the names of
those who secure the high averages.
Those having high averages will be
excused from examinations.
The domestic science department
has been having lessons in canning
during the past week. The manual
training boys are making work bench
es this week.
In 7th and 8th grades four new pu
pils arrived whom we most heartily
welcome. We would like many more.
The drawing and penmanship class
es are progressing nicely and expect
to accomplish much more than last
year. Watch us.
In the 6th grade not a word was
missed in spelling during the entire
week. Keep up the good work.
Burdette Belknap has entered school,
Market Report.
Wheat, Marquis, per bu.........$1.82
Wheat, Bluestem, per bu.......... 1.82
Wheat, white Russian, per bu..... 1.80
Wheat, club, per bu.............. 1.76
Wheat, white Oregon............. 1.75
Oats, per hundred................ 2.20
Barley, white, per hundred.......2.20
Barley, blue, per cwt......*.......2.20
Barley, feed, per hundred........ 2.20
Butter, per pound.................85
Eggs, per dozen............ 35
Flour, per Back, Tip Top........... 2.80
Flour, per sack, Union............ 2.80
Hogs, topBtuff, per hundred.....17.15
Cattle, prime steers, per cwt......8.00
{^Corrected erery Thursday P. U
Ban k Re port
(Official Publication.)
No. 67. -
Report of the Condition of The German State
Bank at Cottonwood, in the State of Idaho, at
the close of business Sept. 11. 1917.
RESOURCES
Cash on hand..........................$ 11.138.98
Due from banks....................... 77.796.14
Checks and Drafts on other Banks..... 3.25
Doans and discounts................. 163,228.00
Overdrafts.............................. 54.54
Stocks. Bonds, and Warrants........ 8,697.76
Banking house, furniture and fixtures • • 7.800.00
Total ............................$268.718.67
DIABIDITIKS
Individual deposits sub
ject to check............$131.930.60
Time Certificates of Deposit- 97.757.10
Cashier's Checks........... 6,101.23
Total Deposits $235.788.93
Capital stock paid in................. 25.000.00
Surplus................................. 5,000.00
Undivided Profits, less expenses, inte
rest and taxes paid................. 2,929.74
Total ............................$268,718.67
State of Idaho, County of Idaho, ss.
I, H. C. Matthiesen. Cashier of the above
named bank, do solemnly swear that the above
statement is true to the best of my
knowledge and belief.
H. C. Matthiesen. Cashier.
Subscribed and sworn to before me this 18th
day of Sept.. 1917.
I certify that I am NOT an Officer or Director
of this Bank. Geo. M. Robert son.
Notary Public.
Correct—A ttest:
Herman Von Bargen.
M. M. Belknap.
Directors.

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