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Cottonwood chronicle. [volume] (Cottonwood, Idaho) 1917-current, May 26, 1922, Image 1

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Cottonwood Chronicle
VOLUME 30. NO 22
COTTONWOOD, IDAHO, FRIDAY, MAY 26, 1922
$2.00 PER YEAR
TOURIST PARK
COTTONWOOD
PLANS ARE NOW UNDER
W AY FOR PARK IN
COTTONWOOD.
The Cottonwood Commercial
club, held a very interesting
meeting at the Cottonwood
Hotel, Tuesday and besides en
joying a splendid miday meal
prepared by J. R. McFadden,
discussed the advisability of pro
curing a tourist park to be used
by automobile tourists traveling
through the country. The senti
ment of the meeting was unani
mous in favor of such a proposi
ton and a committee composed of
Fred Simon, William Frick and
Charles Johnston was appointed
by Chairman Belknap to investi
gate different sites for such a
park and to report at the next
meeting which will be held on
May 31st.
That Cottonwood needs such
a park was forciably brought to
the attention of a numt>er of
business men within the past ten
days. Several automobiles have
stopped here and the occupants
thereof have asked if Cotton
wood had a tourist park. Had
we had such a park every one of
these cars and their occupants
would haw at least spent one
night in the town.
Cottonwood is going to have a
tourist park and it will be second
to none on the prairie. The com
mittee in charge has several
locations in sight, but none have
been decided upon definitely.
Those present at the Commer
cial Club luncheon Tuesday
were: Chairman Belknap, Secre
tary Flint, Fred Simon, Charles
Johnston, J. F. Brown, William
Simon, R. A. Nims, Roy Speck,
Lloyd Turner, Geo. Medved. B.
Malerich, W. A. Ferguson, Wil
liam Frick, Barney Seubert, J. E.
Richards, Vern Dye, Herman
Weigand, and J. R. McFadden.
Everyone interested in this
movement is urged to be pre
re t at the meeting to be held
Wednesday noon at the Cotton
wood Hotel.
Be there. Let's put Cotton
wood on the map.
TEACHERS LEAVE .
By Sunday morning, most of
the teaching force of the Cotton
wood public school will have left
the city for various destinations
to spend their summer vacations,
after nine months of hard work.
Supt. Swanger will renjain here
for a short time only and will
then move his family to Craig
mont where he has accepted the
superintendency for next year.
Prof. Bossinger will remain in
this section until fall and will
then attend college. Miss Baker
will leave with her mother and
sister for Montana to spend the
summer with a brother. Mis3
Hanson, who has taught here
three years, will spend the sum
mer with her parents at Potlatch
Miss Myers will leave for Salt
Lake city to spend her vacation
with her parents. Miss Tiffany
for Culdesac, Miss Green for a
point in Washington and Miss
Coolidge for Craigmont. Miss
Tiffany is the only member of
this year's teaching force who
will return this fall.
TO OBSERVE DAY.
Memorial day will be observed
in Cottonwood by the leading bus
iness houses. Their places of
business will be closed all day.
Those who have signified their
intentions of closing for the day
are: J. V. Baker & Son, Leggett
Mercantile Co, Cottonwood Mer
cantile Co., Cottonwood Hard
ware, Hoene Hardware, First
National Bank. Cottonwood
State Bank, J. E. Richards and
Son
The Cottonwood Post of the
American Legion will commem
orate the day in conjunction with
the American Legion at Grange
ville. An appropriate program
will be given by the legion boys
at Grangeville.
COURT OPENED AT
ORANGEVILLE MONDAY.
Jurors to Report at Orangeville
At 10 A. M. Today
Twenty-four jurors have been
drawn to serve at the May term
of the district court for Idaho
county now in session at Grange
ville. The jurors will report at
the courtroom today at 10 a. m.,
when the case of the State of
Idaho vs. Everett Rambo, charg
ed with burglary, is slated for
trial. There are four other
criminal cases to follow. The
jurors called to report Friday are
Shell Deimage, William B. Ri- g
er, Frank Byrne Frank Van
Deventer, A. J. Barth, W. G.
Peacock, Charles W. Hindman,
Ralph Hovey, VV. E. Gibier, O. D.
Hamlin, Peter Aschenbrenner,
William N. Nissen, Charles Mat
lock, Thomas D. Martin, John
Fox, Oscar Asker, Lee DoMoss, 1
Charles R. Campbell, Hugh R.
Campbell. Hugh Brady, Albert J.
Woods, Robin Lamb, John A.
Johnson. Willie A. Wood and J.
L. Clute.
Thirty witnesses were calk'd
Tuesday to appear for the de
fense ip the trial of H. S. Boles
and Jack Rooke, charged with
grand larceny for the alleged
theft of a steer from W. A.
McMahon last fall. The sub
poenr.eing of the 30 defense
witnesses brings the total to be
examined during the trial to*
over 50.
"POLITICAL BEE BUZZING"
W'hile there still remains a few
days before the first day for fil
ing nomination papers, for the
primary, June 1, the "political
bee" in Idaho county has began
to buzz in such a manner that
some of the would-be candidates
names can be distinctly under
stood.
Only two of the present county
officials have declared them-;
selves as candidates for re-elec- !
tion as "stated in the Chronicle
two weeks ago, Henry Teicher i
for county auditor and Calvin
Hazelbaker for county assessor, j
both on the Republican ticket.
"Political gossip" however, has ;
connected the name of William j
Eller and O. D. Hamlin of Cot
tonwood and Chester Arnold,
nresent deputy sheriff and Nate j
Pettil)one as probable candidates
for the sheriff's office. The
names of Dale Clark, Nate Petti
bone. Ed Vincent, Aug Schrooder
and Lafe Yates for the berth of
county commissioners. Bert
Auger and F. E. Fogg for county
attorney. Wilbur Campbell and
John Bvrom for probate judge
Nate Pettil*one and Henry Teich
er for county auditor. Cal H»z
elbaker and William Ingram for
county assessor. Lloyd Fenn,
Edgar Fry for state representa
tive. Seth Jones for state sena
tor. Mrs. Otie Cone for county
treasurer. We also understand
that the nresent county superin
tendent. Mrs. Lyons, will not be
a candidateior re-election.
The names mentioned above,
with the exception of Teicher
and Hazelbaker, have come to us
not from any authentic source j
but from the "buzzzing bee" or
"political gossip."
MOVING CRUSHER.
The mammoth rock crusher,
the property of Ira Dole of Lew
iston. located two miles north of
Cottonwood and which has been
used for crushing rock to ballast
the tracks of the Camas Prairie
railroad, is being dismantled this
week and will be shipped to
Winchester where the machine
will l>e used to crush rock for the
Culdesac hill by Dole and Col
lins of Lewiston who were re
centy awarded this work by
Grant. Smith and Co., the main
contractors. Dole and Collins
will also crush rock for the road
leadhig from Winchester to the
top of the hill.
In the last run made by the
crusher, in the rock pit north of
town, 176,000 yards were crush
ed. The "rock smasher" is
propelled by an 80 horse power
gasoline engine. The crusher
will l>e shipped to Winchester on
a flat car.
The graduation exercises at
the Orpheum theatre last night
were attended by a large crowd.
Graduation Exercises
Cottonwood High School
Thursday. May 25th, 1922
Invocation........................................................R ev . F. M. Cars
Solo: "Old Pal, Old Gal"............... Mrs. T. C. Keith
Oration: "Not Evening But Dawn"......................
.......................................................... Jeannette Greve
Duet : "The Moon is Beaming O'er the Lake"........
..............................Elza Matth iesen and Hazel Eller
Essay: "Education of Women" ...............Laura Hattrup
Trio: "Come Where the Lilies Bloom" ................
.......... Miss Myers, Miss Tiffany and Mr. Swanger
Address
Supt. F. E. Lukens, of Grangevilk
Presentation of Diplomas to Graduates: Freda Asker,
Mae Asker, Agnes Eckermann, Jeannette Greve, Laura
Hattrup and Karsten Schroeder.
Songs: (1) Sailing. (2) Anchored ................
..................-.....................By the High School Choral
At the piano: Miss Bernice Simon and Miss Fannie Rink
Floral offerings and congratulations
Eighth grade class diplomas granted: Donald Belknap
$ Eleanor Brown, Hazel Eller, Katherine Hanley, Bllza Mat
|! thiesen Helen Michels and Irene Simon.
♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦♦ ♦♦♦ ♦ ♦ ♦♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ » ♦♦ ♦♦ ♦ ♦t
!
i
j
;
j
j
j
LOCAL BOYS
WIN AGAIN
DEFEATED KOOSKIA O N
THEIR HOME GROUND
SUNDAY.
STANDING OF LEAGUES.
Idaho County Natonal.
Kooskia Indians Sunday on their
Won
I-rOSt
Cottonwood......
3
0
Grangeville......
2
1
B'erdinand
...... 1
2
Kooskia ...........
0
3
Idaho County American
Winona
3
0
Fenn ................
.......... 1
2
St ites
1
i
Greencreèk ......
0
2
Cottonwood
defeated
the
home ground thereby placing
them in the lead for the pennant
in the Idaho County National
League, having won three games
and lost none.
The game on the Kooskia
diamond, which resulted in a
large score, 12 to 18, at times
according to those witnessing
the contest was very exciting
and interesting.
The following summary of
Sunday's game was prepared for
us by Lloyd A. Fenn, manager of
the Kooskia team, for
which
we
are very grateful.
Kooskia
AB
R
H
PO
A
K
Morris 3b
6
1
1
1
0
0
Pablo J., 2b .
4
1
0
3
1
5
Moffit ss-p
4
1
0
2
l
3
Canfield c
5
1
1
7
1
i
Parsons J. cf
5
0
1
1
1
0
Corbett lf-rf
4
1
0
1
0
0
Judd lb
4
3
1
10
0
1
Harrison p-ss 5
2
1
1
4
0
Smith If
.2
1
0
1
0
0
Pablo S., rf
.2
1
1
0
0
0
41
12
6
27
8
10
Cottonwood
AB
R
H
PO
A
b:
Albers ss ...
6
2
2
0
0
r.
Bossinger 3b
6
3
1
1
4
O
u
Terhaar J., cf 6
S
2
2
0
0
Lange lb.....
5
2
0
10
0
0
Schober 2b
6
3
3
1
1
1
H'ersmith cf
6
2
2
2
0
0
Rhoades c .
6
1
0
6
0
2
Terhaar L. rf 5
1
2
2
0
0
Speck p ......
4
1
1
2
3
0
South p ______
.1
0
0
1
0
0
51
18
13 27
8
11
Two base hits, Harrison, Bos
(Continued on page 5)
!
STATE OPENS
BID ON HIGHWAY
BOISE COMPANY MAKES
LOWEST OFFER ON CON
STRUCTION OF ROAD.
Ten bids, one of which was
from a Minneapolis construction
company, were opened Saturday
in the office of W. J. Hall, state
commissioner of public works at
Boise, for the construction of a
section of the North and South
highway in Idaho county be
tween Whitebird and Lucile. The
total length of the project is 9.91
miles.
D. F. Murphy and company ol
Boise were the lowest bidders for
the work, but the contract will
not be awarded until a thorough
check is had on all bids submit
ted. The Boise company bid
$137,336.21.
State officials were pleased
with the bids received, as most
of them were far under the engi
neers' estimate of the cost of the
work. The state's estimate was
about $185,000 with 10 per cent
of this amount additional for
engineering and contingencies.
The Winston Brothers com
pany of Minneapolis were the
high bidders. Their estimate
was $229,850.29. K. L. Goulter
and company of Waterville,
Wash., was the bidder next to
the Boise company with a total
of $151,599.44.
The piece of highway to be
constructed runs through the
Salmon river canyon and a great
part of the work will 1« in soli«!
rock. It is estimated that there
are more than 75,000 cubic
yards of this material to remove.
Loose rock is estimated at about
half this amount and the earth
excavation is placed at nearly
100,000 cubic yards.
The project is l>eing paid for
partly by state funds and partly
by federal funds and is through
one of the roughest parts of the i
state. Also, it closes one of the
remaining large gaps in a contin
uous improved highway connect
ing the northern and southern
pails of the state.
In all the state and federal
government have spent hundreds
of thousands of dollars in im
provide a highway connecting
the two sections of the state that
will be open the year round. It
4
: will also eliminate the necessity
of traversing Washington and
Oregon when motoring between
the northern and southern parts
of the state.
SCHOOLS CLOSE.
Both the public and the St.
Joseph's parochial school closes
this week for their summer va
catons. Both schools commem
I orated the closng of their schools
with appropriate progiams and
social events. On Tuesday of
this week the entire public school
e.< a picnic near the Hussman
■saw null which was enjoyed by
both teachers and pupils. On
w?,î iy e n en . ,np the of st ;
s p l sch° o1 gave then-annual
play at the Oi-pheuni theatre
nih was attended by a large
crowd and the little children did
themselves justice in presenting
their annual plav under the able
üüt&ä
Tcrhäal
lerhaar, Iresa Altman, B rancis
Nosh, Jake Jenny, Henry Aynu w,
and John Gehring.
The final c'imax of the public
school from the standpoint of
social activities was reached
Wednesday evening when the
Juniors gave their prom in honor
of the graduates. The affair was
a grand success. The prom w'aa
held in the gymnasium, which
was beautifully decoratel in the
junior colore for the occasion.
On Thursday afternoon the
grade dusses of the public school
gave an interesting program in
the gym.
Last night in the Orpheum
came the climax of the year, the
graduation exercises, the details
of which are given in this issue.
WILL TEACH MUSIC HERE,
Mrs. M. Reese Hattabaugh, of
Grangeville, spent Tuesday in
Cottonwood making preparations
to teach both vocal and ipstru
mental music in the city during
the coming summer and will be
at the Cottonwood Hotel on
Tue Tday of each w ek.
J rs. Hatto'jauj h, is by no
me is a ;trar< *r i Co.tom >od
and is regarded as one of the
finest musicians in the county. :
She spent three years at the Me
B'all school of music^n Washing
ton, D C. also one year under
Signe Lund of Washington Col
e . Washington, D. (. She
also holds a state music teachers
certificate issued by the state
Ijoard of education of Idaho and
has had fourteen years actual
experience in vocal and instru
mental instruction.
Arrangements have also been
made by Mrs. Hattabaugh to
take charge of the class hereto
fore instructed by Sister B'or
. . , e
tunato, but only for the summer
m ousî3' h ij
( hildion as well as oldei peo
plel.vmg in and near Cotton
wood wishing to learn music are
instru
mental and vocal music.
While in the city Tuesday. Mrs.
Hattabaugh met with very en
couraging results.
CUTTING ALFALFA.
William Rooke, .a prominent
stockman of the Snake river
country spent Wednesday in Cot
tonwood visiting with his par
ents, Mr. and Mrs. A. B. Rooke.
Bill came here from Grangeville
where he had been attending to
business matters. Mr. Rooke
informed us that Tuesday of this
week two mowing machines were
put to work on his Snake river
ranch cutting his firat crop of
alfalfa which he says is tuming
out exceptionally heavy to the
acre. He also stated that this
years, first cutting is no later
than former years. Bill is also
very enthusiastic over the big
celebration to lie held at
Blow, July 4, 5, 6, and 7th.
Fly
-
SHIPPING WHEAT.
Ten carloads of wheat will lie
shipped out by the Farmers
Union Warehouse this week to
coast points according to C. H.
Greve, mnnager of the concern. 1
There still remains 20 carloads
of wheat in their warehouses the
property of the Wheat Growers
association and the farmers,
Efforts are now being made to
clear the floors in order to make
room for the coining harvest 1
NEWS AROUND
THE STATE
Items of Interest From Various
Sections Reproduced for Ben
efit of Our Readers.
:
; -
The nomination of Chas. H«n
dereon to be postmaster at Kam
i a h was sent to the Senate by
President Harding May 9.
I J. P. Pope, chairman of the
Democratic state central com
mittee, has outlined fourteen
points to be considered by the
Democratic state convention, at
Hailey, August 22.
m ... , , ni
"sriÄnr. ä
126,000 fret of lumber is loins
ou«
the **~
Work is now nearing comple
tion on a new bridge, across
Uiwyer creek at the mouth of
Seven-Mile. The Seven - Mile
giade is also being worked on,
and it is reported that both
bridge and grade will in a few
days be ready for use.
Almost a centenarian is a
Lewiston pioneer, Isaac Mounce,
who, on April 28, 1922, celebrat
ed his 98th birthday anniversary
in a reunion of relatives at
Culdesac, where he has recently
been living at the home of his
daughter Mrs. Wm. Ruddell.
T. W. Norcross, chief engineer
of the United Stutes forest ser
vice of the Washington depart -
mont, advises Lewiston that
$475,000 has been appropriated
for the construction of the Lewis
and Clark highway between
Lewiston, Idaho, and Missoula,
Mont.
. Mrs. Loretta Day, widow of
Eugene R. Day, late mine owner
and operator, will receive a tem
porary allowance of $1000 a
month from the Day estate, dat
ing from last February 11, under
an order entered Monday by
Probate Judge John E. Sherrard
of Wallace,
Leonard Garros, aged 34. and
Virgil Malcolm. 26, of Pocatello,
were drowned in the Snake river
] ate Wednesday while attempt
j ng to string wire across the
stream. The two men were em
ployes of a power company. At
an early hour today the liodies
had not been recovered.
Sections east of Twin B'alls
early Saturday afternoon were
struck by hail and rain storm
which observers declared the
most destructive in year8 0mj
fruit grower in the affected dis
tr j ct expressed the opinion that
his had , e P ntirely d
8troyod< Fifty-six one-hun
J^ths of an inch of précipita
tl °? " f «"*•
F - "' ac T k J en - former com
™ and ? r of the Idaho department,
Amencan Legion, received from
United States Senator F. R.
Gooding a telegram announcing
his appointment as prohibtion
enforcement officer for Idaho.
Mr. Bracken has not been advis
ed as to the exact nature of the
duties devolving upon the officer
or the field work.
Charlie George, life-termer at
the state penitentiary and tur
key tender extraordinary, is all
smiles this spring, in contrast to
his pessimism over last year's
turkey crop. With 165 turkey
hens setting, an average of 18
each and the hatching ai
ready commencing, Charlie re
Port* a 95 per cent hatch so far.
That means approximately 2700
more turkeys in his flock this
year.
The estate of the late Fred
Follett, valued at $74,500 has
been awarded the widow, Mrs.
Sadie Follett, under the terms of
a decree of distribution entered
by Judge Adrian Nelson of the
Latah county probate court,
Mr. Follett was a pioneer mer
chant of Genesee who died on
April 4, 1921, leaving his entire
estate to his widow under the
terms of his will. The estate
consists of stocks and bonds
valued at approximately $70.000
and property in Genesee valued
at $4500.

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