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Cottonwood chronicle. [volume] (Cottonwood, Idaho) 1917-current, July 20, 1923, Image 4

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn88056166/1923-07-20/ed-1/seq-4/

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PAUL RÉVEfîÈ RIDES AGAIN
Patriotic Observance In Which City «4
Boston and Other Communi
ties Taks Part.
In a patriotic observance the dty
of Boston, with the co-operation of
several adjoining communities, in ac
cordance with an annual custom, com
memorated the famous midnight ride
of Paul Revere. The celebration In
Boston began the night before April
19. "Patriot's Day," when a descend
ant of one of Paul Revere's contempo
raries hung a lantern In the belfry of
the Old North church. Just as was done
on the night of April 18, 1775. Then
on April 19 the ride to Lexington was
retreated by a man on horseback,
dressed to resemble Paul Revere, and
who followed the route taken on that
historic occasion. The messenger de
parted from the quaint little house In
North Square where the real Paul Re
vere piled his trade us a silversmith,
the crowded Italian quarter the old
house stands undisturbed among the
modern buildings that rise above It on
all sides.
In spite of the momentous conse
quences of that 18-mlle ride In the
Eighteenth century, comparatively few
persons saw Paul Revere ns he raced
from hamlet to hamlet to spread the
alarm of the British advance. The
population, of course, was small ; and
besides, the only thing which the light
est sleepers could have seen as they
tumbled from bed was a flurry of dust
and a dim tlgure disappearing In the
dawn.
TOWN CRIER NOT OBSOLETE
Villages Along the Rhine Still Employ
Hlm as a Dispenser of Gen
eral Information.
The town crier Is still an estab
lished Institution In towns and villages
along the Rhine. With drum and bell
he summons the housewives to the
windows and sings his news In a
whining monotone:
"Officers of the French forces order
that all lights shall be out at 10
o'clock. No one allowed on the streets
after that hour. Herr Bingen has re
ceived a new shipment of women's
underwear and shawls which he will
The dollar Is worth
One German
■ell very cheap.
15,500 marks to day.
killed and two wounded by the enemy
sentries In Essen. Twins were born
at the house of Herr Gortzen, who
lives by the fountain In Blamarck
platz."
Tlie echoes die away down the nar
row streets ; the windows and doors
slam ; the bell rings again as the old
man plods down the rough pavement
to the next corner where the story Is
sung all over again. And so on until
all the village has heard the news.
Dogs Efficient Guardians.
The treasures of the Boston Museum
of Pine Arts are guarded each night by
two giant police dogs who are trained
to refuse to accompany anyone hut the
watchman who has charge of them. At
Intervals each night they are led
through the darkened galleries,
employees have been cautioned against
remaining In the building after hours
because of the danger of attack by the
powerful canines. But for the Inter
vention of the watchman recently, an
official of the museum, who stayed un
til late In the evening, would have been
torn to pieces.
All
The Dance.
Silver wreaths and snow white
waistcoats, tulle and gold-tipped ciga
rettes, satin slippers and pearl studs,
'champagne punch and rubber plants.
Introductions and orchids, waxed floors
and Interminable waltzes. " 'Neath a
South Sea Moon" and three no-trumps,
stepped-on toes and Invitations io
dinner the following Thursday, wilted
collars and strawberry Ice. A gather
ing of stags In the pantry, promises to
telephone the next morning, the host
surreptitiously glancing at the cluck
every five minutes.—From Life.
Handicapped.
A New York friend of mine re
turned from his golfing the other day.
•'Have a good game?" he was asked.
"Rotten I" he replied. "What was the
trouble?" "Oh, It was all my caddy's
fault. He had the hiccups. Every
time he hiccupped, I'd miss ray stroke;
and every time he didn't hiccup, I'd
miss It Just because I was watting for
the hiccup to cornel"—-Christian
Work.
Knew Him Flret.
Our days of courtship were short
and I had met few of my husband's
relatives before we were married.
Jane is fond of her uncle Fred and
had not seen him for several months
when he came home to visit, and I
■aid : "You don't know this man, dear,
do you ?"
Jane readily answered: "That's my
uncle. I knowed him 'fore you did."—
Exchange.
Natural Question.
Two recent arrivals in a small coun
try town entered a druggist's shop to
buy some distemper for coloring a wall
in their new residence.
A nervous-looking assistant
forward.
In reply to the question :
keep distemper ?" he stammered: "la
It, Is It for dogs?"
came
"Do you
Doga Brought Them Together.
A new family had moved Into our
neighborhood. They had a small boy
and also a dog. Our son had a dog.
The first day the boys
chummy.
On being asked how they got
quainted so soon, son said : "O, our
laterduced us."—Exchange.
became
ac
THE NIGH COST
OF CHEAP MONEY
Widows and Orphans Among
Chief Losers From Unsound
Currency.
E. E. AGGER CITES EXPERIENCE
Speculators Rather Than Inves
tors and Producers Win From
Currency Depreciation.
The losses and costa borne by the
government and the people of the
United States from unsound
experiments, from
down, doubtless total more than our
staggering World
tlons. It Is declared by E. B. Agger,
an authority on economics. In the
Journal of the American Bankers' As
sociation.
money
colonial times
War approprla
"Cheap money," he says.
Is very costly, since frenzied finance,
speculation
and business disaster
have Invariably followed In the wake
of unsound currency. He cites his
torical experience showing that wid
ows and orphans were among the
chief sufferers.
"New generations of adults, like
children, have to learn over and over
again that, when playing with fire,
one runs the risk of being burned,"
Mr. Agger says. "Indulging curren
cy heresies constitutes such an adult
playing-with-flre.
A glance over our
own historical experience would dem
onstrate this to the most ardent 'easy
money' advocate, but such advocates
are usually those to whom history Is
'bunk.'
Soft Money Advocates Seek Profit
"Unfortunately those who are will
ing to kindle the kind of conflagra
tion Involved In 'soft-money' experi
mentation are not the only ones hurt.
Indeed, they may extort an advan
tage for themselves.
Is all too clear concerning the
of people.
disorganized production and
ous other evils are Inevitable.
"Unsound money projects impose
heavy costs on the government itself.
The first effect of cheap money Is to
raise prices. Mounting prices mean
that, to meet Us needs, the govern
ment must appropriate always larger
sums. Again, dallying with unsound
money weakens the government's
credit Prospective bond buyers be
come hesitant when currency depre
ciation Is threatened, because there Is
danger of agitation toward the pay
ment of government obligations In the
cheaper money rather than In specie.
Any such weakening of goverment
credit means lower prices received for
bonds, consequently greater burdens
on the Treasury. Assuming that, In
the end, sound principles triumph, the
indulgences of the unsound currency
days leave further costa to be met.
It paper money has been Issued It
must be redeemed. If a government
be unwilling to stoop to repudiation
It must raise much more In taxes to
pay for the paper money than It re
ceived at the time of issue."
The total effect of paper Issues In
Increasing the cost of the Civil War Is
estimated at about $600,000,000, Mr.
Agger says, continuing:
"Much more serious than the costs
of unsound currency to the govern
ment are the heavy direct and indi
rect coats Imposed upon the people.
Our productive system Is controlled
through prices, and the upset of prices,
caused by a depreciating currency, In
terferes with the proper harmonizing
of the different lines of production.
Price changes are not instantaneously
or uniformly effected throughout the
whole system. The result of an In
flationary movement is a stimulation
of speculation and over-investment In
some lines, with Inadequate develop
ment In other lines. The period of
speculation seems a period of prosper
ity, but how false and unsound Is such
prosperity la disclosed In the stress
and agony of the Inevitable period of
liquidation which, Nemests-llke, fol
lows on the heels of the boom."
But the record
mass
Heavy losses, Injustice,
numer
Wealth Unfairly Re-dlstrlbuted
Mr. Agger then describes "the dis
tressing effects of an unsound money
on the distribution of wealth
classes and individuals. Cheapening
money through Inflationary expedi
ents 1s a gigantic fraud upon the cred
itor classes as against debtors. All
those dependent on fixed Incomes,
receiving specified sums in terms of
money, are penalized when the pur
chasing power of money is depressed.
In like manner the stockholder profits
at the expense of the bondholder—a
tact which Implies a reward to the
more speculatively Inclined at the ex
amollit
or
j psnse of the conservative.
"Advancing prices cause discontent
and give rise to agitation and unrest
among those whose Incomes cannot
promptly be adjusted to meet higher
living costs. Strikes are fomented
and production is curtailed,
body shares In these burdens,
at stability In money also undermines
md weakens habits of thrift,
rosion of the moral Integrity of the
people Is Inevitable.
Simulated and a desire to gain by
speculation rather than to earn a live
lihood by productive and useful label
causes a marked deterioration In pop
dar habits and character.'*
Every
Laok
A cor*
Dishonesty Is
côiM'iriiwfiWifr päctüä
Interesting Experiments Have Shown
That Light Paint Is Best for
Ships' Bottoms,
Some Interesting results have been
obtained by J. Paul Vlsscher In his
study of the fouling of ships' bottoms.
These results Indicate that the color of
the paint used Is an Important factor
in determining the amount of fouling.
Plates painted with different colors
were exposed In sea water at the Beau
fort laboratory and the development of
the growths was observed over a pe
riod of several months. The plates
were identical, except for the color
used, and since all factors Influencing
them were the same, It may be con
cluded that any difference In the
amount or the nature of fouling was
dependent on color. These colors In
clude white, black, yellow, red, green
and bine.
The results show clearly that there
was much more fouling on the dark
plates than on those with lighter col
ors. The contrast between the white
and black platés was especially
marked. Barnacles, which constitute
a large percentage of the total amount
of fouling, were especially affected by
color. They were found only on the
blue and black plates and were more
abundant on the black. Hydrolds were
also practically confined to the dark
plates.
The results are apparently explained
by the fact that at the time of at
tachment of the larvae to these forms
the organisms are negatively photo
graphic, that Is. they tend to go away
from the source of light. This experi
ment Is In accord with observations
made on the growth on ships' bottoms
where the densest growths are found
in regions least exposed to light. The
notes and tentative conclusions are at
present based on a limited amount of
evidence, and It Is expected that the
problem will be more thoroughly In
vestigated through experiments In
which many of the less-known factors
be more definitely controlled.—
may
Fisheries Service Bulletin.
PLACED HIS BET AND LOST
Walter Took a Chance, but Evidently
It Did Not Happen to Be Hie
Lucky Day.
An old darkey waiter had served a
modest but quite perfect lunch to two
elderly and thrlfty-looklng guests. He
bad Inquired how each dish suited
their taste, whether It had been sea
soned properly. If It was hot enough
or sufficiently chilled. The check was
presented at the close of the meal,
was $3.40. One of the guests glanced
over It and placed a $5 bill on the tray.
The waiter disappeared, all smiles, and
returned with the change—a $1 bill
and 50-cent piece and a dime. He put
the tray at the guest's elbow and
waited doubtfully,
dollar bill slowly withdrawn and then,
after a painful pause, the 50-cent
piece. The tray, with Its lonely dime,
shoved toward him. He picket! It
up. looked at It sadly and gave a long
sigh. "Boss." he said, "I gambled and
I lost."—Judge.
It
He watched the
u as
Monaco Gambling Metropolis.
Monaco, on the French Medlterra
coast. Is the smallest Independ
nean
ent state In Europe, having an area
of only eight square miles, but con
taining a population of 23,000. The
principality, once considerably larger
than at present, belonged to the Gri
maldi family, but lu 1801 Prince
Charles III ceded the greater part of
Monaco's hereditary
It to France,
sovereign Is a prince, who la assisted
in governing by a council of state. The
principal city Is Monte Carlo, famous
for Its casino, the two others being
Monaco and Condamlne.
Two Good Storie*.
Frederic Almy of Buffalo, N. T.:
"One of my favorite stories la that
of the Frenchwoman who complained
that she had been grossly Insulted by
an American with whom she was truv
On Inquiry It appeared that
eltng.
they had traveled alone In the same
compartment for an hour and that he
had not once looked at her."
"If I may give two, I like also the
story of the suffragist who cried out.
"The Lord Is with us, and with Her
on our side we cannot fall."—New
York Herald.
Boots.
Father bought a pair of bip boots,
In anticipation of the coming fishing
The boots greatly Interested
season.
Ann, his three-year-old daughter, so
one day when mother and father were
preparing for a Journey downtown,
and mother was putting on her Rus
sian boots, Ann turned to father and
said :
"Daddy, why don't you wear your
boots, too?''
Exasperation.
One day while walking home I was
much annoyed to find a dog following
me. I turned two or three times and
tried to frighten It away. When feel
Ing that It was not coming back, sud
denly I heard soft footfalls.
1 turned and said : "Will you go
home?"
Imagine my embarrassment to And
an unknown man walking behind me.
—Exchange.
Forest Map«.
Of the 181,790,997 acres Included
within the boundaries of the national
forests. 20 per Cent Is accurately
mapped and 50 per cent has been cov
ered by rough reconnaissance, saya
the annual report of the forest serv
ie«, United States Department of
Agriculture. On about 24 per cent no
M *fP ln O work baa been doue.
mm
la
&
JOHN DKCHJ
'/77
The Binder that
Stands the Strains
Lodged, tangled, heavy or light grain, rough or
wet fields—these and other severe conditions are
met by the John Deere Grain Binderin away you
will appreciate. And because of its great strength
throughout, the John Deere gives more years of
belter service at lower cost for repair expense.
JOHN DEERE BINDER
I
John Deere Har
vesting machin
ery, including
Grain Binders,
Corn Binders,
Mowers and Sulky
Rakes, give real
satisfaction,
will* like the de
pendable service
they give.
Pulls Lighter—Lasts Longer
ever seen—no particular ef
fort to dump or return to
position-—it. can be adjusted
as wear develops to keep it
la easy-working order.
The Quick Turn Truck Is
another feature you will
like. It keeps the binder
running straight, permits
square turns, tabes off side
draft from the horses, and
because its axle is flexibly
mounted, the wheels hold
to the ground.
It's real economy to buy
a John Deere.
Take the mainframe, for
example. Its strong, wide
steel bars are widely over
lapped and hot-riveted to
gether. The main bearings
are self-aligning
no twisting of the frame and
binding of the bearings.
The wheels are extra high
and have wide traction-giv
ing tires. They furnish am
ple support for the machine
and extra traction in wet
fields.
You
there's
Its bundle carrier is the
easiest to operate we have
Be sure to come in and see it before you buy.
Ö
S]
M
TOT
Jm
AM MA» H OF QUALITY
Cottonwood Hardware
o
Our ads bring big results.
We repair all makes of bat
teries. Cottonwood Garage. 80-tf
We have 16-inch slab wood
for sale at our mill. Hussman
Lumber company.
27-tf
Hemstitching. Mail orders
prompt attention. Pauline Steltz,
Genesee, Idaho
29-4
The Fanners Union Ware
house will receive hogs in Cot
tonwood every Monday morning
at the local stock yards or at any
other time when a carload ship
ment can be made up. Bids will
be received up to 2 p. m. J. M.
Fellers, Manager.
27-tf
HOW'S THIS?
HALL'S CATARRH MEDICINE will
do what we claim (or It—rid your system
of Catarrh or Deafness caused by
Catarrh.
HALL'S CATARRH MEDICINE con
sists of an Ointment which Quickly
Relieves the catarrhal Inflammation, and
the Internal Medicine, a Tonic, which
acta through the Blood on the Mucous
Surfaces, thus assisting to restore nor
mal conditions.
Sold by druggists for over 40 Tears.
F. J. Cheney A Co., Toledo. O.
BRIGHTEN UP
Painting
Papering
Redecorating
Calcimining
|
Estimates on any work gladly
given upon request.
SEE ME FOR SAMPLES FOR
WALL PAPER
Wm. Kelsey, tbe painter
IAAA »*»»*»»v**» »J* •**•*•«*♦ *J»
«V **• **» ***y * <
♦V
!
x
WE HAVE JUST MADE A NICE LOT OF
Unbleached
Ï
I
SILVER LOAF FLOUR
1
I
i
X
X
x
from some of the best wheat available
X
.!
X
:
!
x
I
GUARANTEED TO GIVE SATISFACTION
v
X
Ä
All Merchants carry it
Ask them
X
i;
i
You can also get it at the mill on either ex
change of cash basis.
X
X
A
I
i
Prairie Flour Mills Co.
V
x
il
Kelly and U. S. Tires
m
m
m
30x3Va Fabric ...
32x4 Fabric
33x4 Fabric ...
SOzS 3 ^ Cord .
32x3'/a Cord ...
32x4 Cord .
33x4 .
34x4 .
.$ 9.95
. 19.75
. 20.25
13.25
20.20
. 25.25
. 26.35
. 27.20
.4
m
ü
if
m
1
1
m
m
OTHER SIZES IN PROPORTION
if
Ti—
m
m
Service Garage
1
1
P. H. Dye
Wm. Buettner
V. A. Dye
1
1
DRIVE IN: WERE EXPECTING YOU
MAGNETO AND
GENERATOR WORK
i
1
AUTO
ACCESSORIES
m
Ü
- nl
Phone or Send Us Those News Items.

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