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Twice-a-week plain dealer. (Cresco, Howard County, Iowa) 1895-1913, December 27, 1895, Image 3

Image and text provided by State Historical Society of Iowa

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn88059319/1895-12-27/ed-1/seq-3/

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COmrlBSK, President,
o. a. WAHLKSS, Tlee-PMaMea*.
-, O.A. CBAWFOBD, CMhter.
I
CRESCO, IOWA.
J0ENERAL BANKING BUSI
NESS TRANSACTED.
Safety Deposit Boxes to Rent.
TEREST PAID ON TIME
fS.
DEPOSITS.
ut_ ____
DEM FARKSWORTH, ft.
W. TOURS,
BANK OF NRISCIFT
*. CRESCO, IOWA.
imiat Mill SiekUM. OHH1MM MM
aadaUierjaourttlM anOaoeMfWM »«nt
:•••.. v..
CRESCO, IOWA.
B.
T.
iA.Tii, President and Treas.
B. A.
Holbbook,
HIICH WILL AT ALL TIME!, BE FULLY
SUPPLIED WITH THE BEST THE
COUNTRY AFFORDS,
Terciili ccntime to lie Cash
?~I» Buying and Sallln* WV talc* pleasure
atrona of thla market
bam that wa (bail keep a fall
lit Meats.
Poultry in its Season,
pESH FISH, HAMS and BACON.
paid for Fftt Cattle, 8keepi
Cat res suitable for Market,
jrCentennial Block. C8E CO. 10.
fpnrai & Enright
Are making a specialty of
HORSESHOEING,
Where fine work is required—such aa
track and carriage horses.
Anew tire ahrinker will enable us
to give special attention to setting
IWagon tire. General blacksmithing
«rtu have prompt attention. Mtf
A. BAUUETT, M. D.. C. M.
PHYSICIAN & SURGEON,
CRESCO, IOWA.
Special attention to Surgery. Office over
Clommer's Drug Store. Ofllce open nlebt and
day. ft-tf
QB. O. H. KELLOaO,
DENTAL SURGEON,
obssco, iowa. '-'fi,
I: All work In his lltie will hare prompt and
Kcaraful atientlou. OiBce over Whitt a Moon'o
g«w*. i-sn-it
John MoOook
ITTORKEY AND COUNSELOR AT LAW,
CBK8CO, IOWA.
PT*?,loe 'J" all the courts of the gtstea,
K,*attend' to buying and MlUnf
and seoufit^s.
Lome#over Crosoo Union 8avlajrs Bank*
*. Biuu.
C. C. Upto*.
BARKER & UPTON",
IpORHEfS & COUNSELORS IT LAW.
Till Practice in all State and Federal Couxti
CRESCO. IOWA.
ie Park Hotel
thoroughly renovated and refurnlsiiup
ptiKhoiit. ami with new proprietors is fully
JJimod to provide for the wuuts and comfort
Jlie travollni public.
*Uh its clean rooms, swaet and wholesom
is, and Its well supplied table. Its proprieto
pes to merir and recede his share of publ
ttrouage,
McQ-ina83s, Prop.
mm tf'
Justice of the Peacejf
Cresco, Iowa.
^oe In the Berg Block with J. G.
fibster. Prompt atteation givea to
"fters eatraste^ to him.
si-i
Harness and
Saddlery
The largest and best assortment of
all gouds iu this line in the city,
including such seasonable,^.,
goods as -j
ROBES AND HORSE BLANKETS
Harnesses'made to order by exper
ienced woi kmcn from the best
material procurable.
REPAIR WORK
1i~
•ivM Deposits, and Make* QtV
lectiona. .* .• ,,,|
.. s^.VaV
4,
\Draft* on Europe far Sale,
*4M
Improved and Unimproved RetA
Estate Bought and Sold
Commistion-
., *VVVS
-0~:
Pasare Ticket* at Reduced Rate*.
FT*
AMERICAN
Loan and Trust Co.,
Vice Frea.
M. B. Luro, Sacrotary.
(win til Ptoprlstnr or tk* Only Cam.
plat*
SET OF ABSTRACT BOOKS
la Howard C«uaty.
Abitracts of Title to Lands and Towa
|LoU furnished on short notice.
Special advantages for making Farm
1
ana and selling Real Estate.
'RED. MARTIN
again assumed fall control of
ITENNIAL MEAT MARKET,
of all kinds a specialty.
L. M. GOLE
Tn Centennial Block, ,t,y
Cresco, Iowa.
HOTELS.
TBOTBeR
house.
W. STROTHER, Prtprietor,
0RB800, IOWA.
laa onljr Vlrst-elasa House in Creaoo. Ht
Coal, Wood, Posts,
Lime,_Cement.
At Laidlaw's Stand, Cresco, Iowa.
DELITERED FREE IN TOWN.
2000 LBS.
For a Ton Every Time!
Quality, Honest Weight and Acourata
Measurement Guaranteed.
WM. F. RATHERT.
P. F. McHUGH,
Attorney and Hunselor-at-Law.
I^rle Hall Block.
CRESCO, IOWA.
M.MOON.
JUSTICE OF THE PEACE
CBESCO, IOWA.
Office with W* K. Barker, in Union ftftngt Bank
Bulldlnar.
ELIZABETH A. ALMOND, 1. D.,
Physician and Surgeon,
CRESCO, IOWA.
OOoe over Connolly's dru»r store. Rest
denoe with Mi s. Jno. McCook.
ALL ORDERS ATTEKDED TO PROMPTLY.
FINI
WBWWIBWHBBWWWlffWapSEWWWPilWP
vol.S5 no.4S.
A. E. KELLOGG. D. D. S„
ROOMS 7 & 8, BERG BL'K,
Orosoop Iowa*
All oporatlons rendered painlAss by the ua
of Aerated Hypnotic or Pure Narcotized All,
the boat and safeat Anaeatntiio known to th|
•olantifio world. |SI
We Do The,
WIEI
era
While some stand with hand in pocket
and inflate.
We Have the Trade, Lead in Prices
and Have a Life's Experience.
Yours in narness,
Miller & Cummings
EUROPEAN
RESTAURANT
Market Street, Cresco, la.
Hot or Cold Lunches
Board by the Day or Week,
Fancy Groceries. Candy, Fruits and
Tobacco.
M.BARRETT, Prep
Administrator's Notice-
Estate of Patrick Brophy, Deceased.
Notice la hereby given. Thar, the subscribers
navo been duly appointed Executors to ihe
Eslato of Patrick Brophy. late of Paris Twp. in
J'le °°"nty of Howard, State of town, deceased,
lescawv
nn(j
j,ave taken upon
S, HI Is tliut trust. by
jfivinif bonds as the law directs. All persons
J'3
•'""IS"0? upon the Estate of said do
10
e*hlblt
Ihe same and
KnlrfP? indebted to the said Estate are called
upon to make payment, to
MATTHEW BB0PI1V,
.. JOUN BR0P1IY.
November2", 1895.
2lw
a
Notice.
I hereby notify all persons from
trusting Mrs. Martha Epps or her chil
dren on my account, for I will not pay
any debts of their contracting.
J. J. Epps.
Uat$a Qre&oo, Iowa, Deo, 12, 1896.,
w4
V-
Mr. R. B. Well*
•s "'*4^ Columbus City, Iowa.
rHappytoTel!
New Inflammatory Rheumatism
Was Cured by Hood's.
"I am more than happy to contribute my
mite in praise of Hood's Barsaparllla.
I had inflammatory rheumatism in my
hands and suffered untold misery foi
over one yehr, not being able to dress
myself the most of this time. I read
about. Hood's Earnaparilla and con
cluded to give it a trial. I took eleven
bottles alia can say.it has helped me so
much that I am able to do any kind of
ordinary work and have the full use of
my hands. My wife has also taken
John Byrnes
Ernst & Flood's Old Stand
AMERICA'S S1AVDKRD YEAR-BOOK.
Bigger and Better
Than Mver Before.
584 PAGES.
$ 1,500 TOPICS.
Toll* Everything You Wnnt
to Know When Yon
Want to Know It.
IA VERITABLE CYCLOPEDIA
OP UP-TO-DATE FACTS.
An Invaluable and Unrivalled
Political and Popular
Hand-Book.
f\3»
Saraa
parilla
J-|ood's
Oh!
ures
Hood's Sarsapa
rilla for a weak
ness across her
back and for kidney trouble. It also
did her much good. We think highly
of and gladly recommend Hood's Bar
saparilla." B. B. Wells. Columbus
City, Iowa. Take only HOOD'S.
Hood's Pi I la easy to buy,
easy to take,
ivuu it fills easy In effect. 25c.
Hcfe
BIG
I intend making a change
in my business, and in Ol
der to do this, must reduce
my frtock of Dry Goods,
Boots and Shoes. This is
no sham sale on one article
but 1 will sell you any tiling
or everything in the Dry
Goods line at a margin of 5
per cent. Oomc quick and
get your clioico.
J--
READY JANUARY 1st, 1896
pRjce 25 ceHTS.
(Postpaid 7y Mall.)
THE
/WORLD
Pulitzer Building, New York,
Don't do Without It Thla Presidential Yeas
Administrator's Notice-
Estate of Jauius .llcnrv llciuli'lcka. Dccoas^rl:
Notice is hereby glvo, Tna'. lh« subscriber
has been duly appointed Amnii iatrator to tile
Eslate of Jaiinv llfwi-y Ht'iiMricKs, lute ot
•lamos'own twp In tlie couniy of Howard,
State of lown, rtceensed, lntfsrdte. and h
tiikeu upon Uluisc!( that trust by giving bnnd
as the law direct. All PITSOIIS Uavlug do
mands upon the Kstato of the said deceased are
required to exhibit the same and puison.s ln
debted to the saiu Estate arc called upon'to
make payment to
B. N. IIENDIHOKS.
20w3 Adiuinlitrutor.
December 17. 1835.
Au elegant'line of school tablets at
Pee Dee office nice and cheap,
y' tf
V'
r*
YESTERDAY.
Why should ye treev
About my way,
Ohl pallid ghosts
Of yesterday
W a
v.-
a
,''1
From my fitful sleep,
To think of sorrows
Past, though deep
Shine, brlEhtly shine,
Fair morning sun,
And Rild my darknesa
As I run.
Bloom, sweetly bloom,
Ye flowers of May,
t'- Above the Brares
Of yesterday.
We will not waste
Life's precious time.
In chanting sorrow's
Mournful rhyme
But, as we watch,
And as we pray,
We'll heed the lesson
Of to-day.
1
—Mrs. M. A Kidder, In N. Y. W««kly.
A PICKANINNY PREACHER
Wonderful Doings of a Little
Negro Girl Evangelist.
A South Carolina 8]nlre*a Story of thi
Child Who la Preaching the Oaapel
with Such Power to Black
and Whlta*
About a dozen prominent members
of the southern colony in New York
met in the lobby of a down-town hotel
the other evening to talk over old
times with a genuine old South Caro
lina "squire," who is spending a few
days in the city, says the New York
Sun. This gentleman of the old school
acquired the title of squire in the old
days, when it was a little above that
of "judge," and far above that of
"colonel," as a mark of popularity and
dignity, and he wears it gracefully
stilL
"Squire, suppose we all take some
thing," suggested the big colonel from
Kentucky.
"I can't do it, boys," responded the
squire, and a far-away look came into
his kindly eyes. "You see, I've stopped."
"Wh-e-w," whistled the colonel, with
a long-drawn-out sound like a fall
wind. "I can hardly believe you." And
every man in the party looked as if he
was thinking the same thing, but none
made any comment.
"Uow did such a misfortune come
upon yo»?" Anally ventured a Virgin
ian, after the first great wave of sur
prise had subsided, for they all knew
that for nearly forty years the squire
had taken his toddy three times daily
after meals to aid his digestion.
"Well, boys, it was this way," he
said. "Tho little nigger girl preacher
converted me, and I've dropped a good
many of my old ways, such as eussin',
swearin', and driakin'. I reckon you
maybe all read that little editorial
about her in tho Sunday's Sun suggest
ing that she should come to New York
and preaoh in Madison Square gar-den.
Well, all I've got to say is, if site comes
you must all go to hear her, and if her
sermon don't touch your hearts moro
than all the l'arlchurstian bombs and
Talmngic Roman candles that you've
listened to since you moved to this dis
trict, then {'11 gQ back to my wicked
ways."
"Who'd ever have thought that what
a durned little pickaninny had to say
would influe'ue a man of your com
mon sense, squire?" Bpoike up the old
est man in tho crowds testily. "I
wouldn't have believed it of"you. What
manner of child is «he, anyway, and
where did she aome fromf"
"I don't know a great deal nbout her
past lmtory, which is a very short one,
as she is only nine year* old," com
menced the squire, as he took a long
draw at a corn-cob pipe, "but she was
born near Washington, somewhere in
Virginia, I think, in the fall of '85. Her
daddy was a preacher, and died three
or four years ago. This child, whose
full name is Claretta Nora Avery, has
always eagerly attended religious serv
cn and taken a great interest in the
spiritual welfare of her people. She
says that the love of God entered her
heart when she was a year and a half
old, and has never left it, but of course
you all won't believe that, for no
genuine darky has any idea of time.
I'd been hearing and reading a good
deal about her, and not believing much,
and when business carried me to a
small town in the lower part of the
state, where she was holding a meet
ing, I decided to go arouud to the
church to hear her. It was quite late,
and 1 got there just in time to catcli
the last sentence of her sermon.
"I'm going to stay in the field here
until I die, and when death comes,
some time, 'way over yonder, where
my Jesus is, I'll live there too, singing
always that new song with llim in
glory.'
"Her voice had a mournful ring in it,
and the little creature made a most
pathetic picture as her head bobbed up
from behind the pulpit and her great
eyes roved over the congregation in an
appealing way. She looked about her
wearily and sadly for a moment, but
soon a radiant light fell upon her face,
for her sermon had struck home, and
she knew it the entire congregation
began to sing, and the queer part of it
all was, they began to sing the same
thing. Soon some began to chant,
while others cried aloud, moaning and
bewailing their sins. You talk about
your paid choirs. There isn't enough
money in New Yor'.t to buy such
music ns I heard that night. The
voiecs were rich and full and sweet,
and a minor chord thit touched one's
very soul was tho predominating
sound.
"Sermons and music have a most
electrifying effect upon a colored con
gregation, and this one was soon
wrought up to the highest pitch of
religious excitement. Some of the
mo'ners prostrated themselves on their
faces, beating the baro floor with.theii
hands until they were worn out, when
they wduld lie in what is termed a
trance. Others crawled on their knees
to the pulpit Many of them sat in the
midst of this uproar and appeared
neither to see nor hear, so intent were
they in working out their' own salva
tion. It) the meantime the old sister*.
Who were sure ot lieaven, kepi on
singing to keep things going. The
leader that night was a regular old
time, befo'-the-war mammy, and good
ness fairly beamed from her counte
nance. IMH£i
'I bin a ll-»r so long, so long—
So long, sp long
1 bin a ll-»r so lonx,'
she chanted in a weird, pathetic volee,
and every person in tho congregation
who was able to lift his or her voice
chanted the .refrain at the
end of every
-threelines: 'j\ My
'Gin me a llttl* ti ne ters'pr»y' W
"Every,.one was in motion. Some
swayed their bodies backward and for
ward, some shuffled tbeir 'eet la tUse
fp? ipyWUNftWif'..
.&&•
7
jm
ii~
to the music, and the very happy ones
clapped their' hands and shouted:
'Glory, my Lawdl' This kept up for
hours. Several prostrate forms were
carried out, and a number were left in
the church, where they lay until next
day. When I got tired and went away
that night the little preacher, utterly
worn out, had curled herself up in a
splint-bottom chair, and was enjoying
the sleep of innocent childhood. I
could hardly sleep that night for think
ing about that meeting. I tell you,
boys, I was impressed."
"I always thought you were above
such superstition, squire," remarked
some one, as the squire stopped to refill
his pipe.
"Well, anyway, 1 went back the next
night," resumed the squire, "and for
the first time got a good view of the
little preacher. She is a perfect child
in looks and ways. Her complexion is
about the color of an old mustard
ground ginger cake, her teeth white
and even, the whites of her large,
mournful eyes prominent, and she
doesn't weigh more than sixty or seven
ty pounds. There were a lot of white
people in the congregation, but sho
took no notice of then. Curiosity
prompted me to go to listen to her, but
interest held me there. She spoke
right out in the most earnest way, as
if her only thought was preaching the
Go.«peL Her delivery and gestures
were easy, and, in fact, what she said
and the way she said it beat nine
tenths of the preachers—especially
these evangelists—white or black.
"She opened service with a very good
prayer, and read, or rather recited, a
chapter from tho IJible, which did not
bear on the sermon in the least. Her
one thought seems to be to prepare tor
the Great lleyond, which she desig
nates as 'way over yonder.' She talks
about the hereafter in a most pathetic
way, and 1 remember on that particu
lar night her text was: 'Uusiness in
Heaven.'
'I'll meet you there, sinner,' she
said, 'for I got business with Capt.
Jesus. I must 'tend to it. I must go
where partin' is no mo'. I got to put
on along white robe, a starry crown,
silver slippers, and sit at my Master's
feet. I'll meet you over yonder, way
over yonder, for wo all got to cross
Jordan stream dry shod and go over
yonder. I'll meet you there, sad
hearted mothers. I'll meet you there,
wicked fathers. I'm going to get in
side those peirly gates. Are you? Are
you? Sinner, you must get right.
Learn it now. Now is tho time. Way
over yonder may bo too late for you,'
and so on. Night after night I went,
and each time she had a new sermon,
eaoh one containing a sad strain.
"She made a pathetic figure, always
clad in deepest black without, the
slightest touch of color, that children
love so well, or the faintest suggestion
of an ornament. When occasion de
manded she rebuked thoughtless por
tions for bad behavior in a few clear
out, kind sentences, and went right on
with her sermon. If the Gospel grind
ers would only learn that it isn't these
staggering truths, which cannot be
grasped by tho average mind, but a
doctrine gf simple, earnest faith that
aroused people to better living. Hut
they never will. Now it was the sin
cerity of the little nigger, and tho
earnestness of her followers, that im
pressed me, and, while 1 can't say that
she converted me, she certainly set mo
to thinking, and I concluded to leave
off doing certain things.
"I wasted to give her something, and
oouldn't make up my mind what to
buy her. She reads poorly, and can
scarry write at all, but somehow
she didn't seeui like a child that would
care for toys. Finally, in a. sort of
desperation, I settled on a large wax
doll with highly colored cheeks and a
mass of yellow hair. If you could
have seen her antics of delight when
she fonnd that it was all her own. She
clasped it to her as if she would never
let it go, and then she told me that she
used always to prcach sermons to her
dolls, and that the people who over
heard her persuaded her to preach to
people, which was the very thing she
had always longed to do.
"Everybody agrees that sho is a won
der, and I tell you she is. Many white
people think her inspired, and the
blacks believe that she is sent directly
from God as a warning, and that the
judgment day is coming soon. 1 don't
know, because I've never thought a
great denl about such things. Hut I
do think she is entirely different from
any little child that I've ever seen, and
I shall never, never forget her, with
her solemn ways and her unceasing
warnings about what we must do and
must not do 'if we want to meet each
other when wo get home, way over
yonder.'"
There was a great shuffling of feet,
coughing and clearing of throats
among the squire's visitors as he con
cluded, and the blustering gentleman
from Kentucky began to denounce the
excise law in loud tones. 15ut tho
squire looked at the rings of smoke as
he blow them upward from his corn
cob pipe, and had little to say the rest
of the evening.
—Condemn no man for not thinking
as you think. Let everyone enjoy the
full and free liberty of thinking for
himself. Let every man uso his own
judgment, since every man must give
an account of himself to God. If you
cannot persuade a man into the truth,
never attempt to force him into it. If
love will not compel liirato come, leave
him to God, the judge of all.—John
Wtdley.
Don'tTobacoo Spit or Smoke Your Life Away
TIiptruthfill, startling title of a book about
No-lo-liac. tlie only liiu-mlefH,
ouavanikkd
OL«rs
A *y,
t*
^i"' K^y-jri-nts1T!~
r, -**,
^^J£fhfcLS__frL-ar_y.. j»
to-
baui-o-liabtt citrc. If you want to (pill, ajul
can't, use No-to-bac." Braces up niuotlMzed
Hurvcs. eliminates nicotine poison, makes
weak men gain strength, weight ard vtjror
Pcsitlvecim or money refunded. Sold by l)r.
•I. J. Clcmmer.
U'Hikat druggist, or mailed
tree.
Addrcps
I liu sterling llcmedy Co., Olilcago olllcc, 45
Randolph -it.: New fork. 10 Spruce St. Uyl
I pit KUtSBfcR'S PACE.
A Big Six-Foot Highwayman Gets Some
thing E1m Instead of Blonoy.
Mrs. L. E. Solsbury, of the suburb of
West Indianapolis, Ind., slarted to the
grocery nbout six o'clock the other
night, and just us she entered Hadley
avenue a man stepped out from behind
a. tree, and, presenting a pistol, demand
ed her money. "I want your pocket
book," said the highwayman. Mrs.
Solsbury saw herself confronted by a
man six feet tall and weighing possibly
200 pounds. "Take it." she suid. ns she
extended her hand. Quick as a flash she
struck the would-be robber a stinging
blow in the face, which blinded him for
an instant. The blow was followed by
another and another, and then Mrs.
Solsbury darted down the avenue and
rushed into the house of a friend,
V£2s»-
fS^ZXri
*A
-i
t- -IA—IP
PJ. jsa' 1"^
KATE GARDNERS CHAT.
An Epitomo of the Diota of Fash
ionable Modistes.
The Belgn of tho niouse WhIM Said to B«
Drawing to a Close—Street Gowns
?r Very Pretty Design—3111
llnery Novelties.
Special Chicago Letter.
Is the blouse really going out of fash
Ion? The feminino world stands with
bated breath waiting1 for those high in
authority who are supposed to decide
nil such important questions to give out
their verdict.
Aglancc through the shops shows this
cherished garment to have the warm
support of several well-known dress
makers, who, while admitting that it
has seen its most glorious day, yet de-
FOK A WINTER PROMENADE.
clare it will remain a prominent feature
in tlie domain of fashion for along time
to come.
On the other hand, equally reliable
authorities in the modistic field consid
er it passe, excepting, perhaps, for even
ing wear, und loudly proclaim the Louis
Seiao coat-basque to be its immediate
successor. One may well ask who shall
decide when doctors disagree. If Dame
Fashion elects that we shall give up
this most useful and beloved of all gar
ments it will be a matter of congratu
lation if its mantle of popularity
should, by any manner of means, fall on
the dainty little Louis Seize coat, which
is capable of innumerable adaptations
und endless variations, and is equally
charming whether made of plainest
cloth or costliest velvet. The fancy of
the moment is that it shall match the
material of tlie skirt.
Tho color chosen in this particular
case was a deep rich damson—a most
fashionable shade, by the way—the
short coat-basque sloping away in front
from a full-pointed vest of cream-tinted
cloth with a small jabot of lacc at the
throat. Narrow bands of chinchilla
fur passed over the shoulders, while
the deep flaring cuffs which served to
ornament tlie immense sleeves were
trimmed wil bands of the same fur
and edged with full frills of lace hang
ing over the hand. I might mention
right here that all the late^leeies,
when not cut long enough in them
selves to partially conceal the hand,
are invariably given a trimming with
this purpose in view.
I think perhaps--'the most striking
feattfwasWWstuines intended for mid
and late winter wear is the elegant
materials used in their construction.
So far has this craze for rich, not to say
gorgeous, effects been carried that even
the tailor-made gown has had to suc
cumb to its baleful influence. How-
A CHIC TEAGOWX.
ever, this is a cloud with a silver lining,
and we should rejoice accordingly for
while the severely plain tailor-made
costume had a particularly modish
air, quite irresistible in its way, tlie
majority of women found.it extremely
trying to both face and figure, and its
most ardent admirerB never really
claimed it to be generally becoming.
The faces of most women, in fact I
might say all women, to be at their best
require the softening effect of lace and
bright ribbons as adornment and with
the strictly tailor-made gown of cloth
such dainty garniture was not permis
sible. To-day the proper, up-to-date
dress for shopping and general wear
is either of printed velveteen or cor
duroy, the preference being given, to
the latter.
The fashionable color at present for
these gowns is a rich, dark shade of
green. They are made with a full
gored skirt and tight-fitting jacket
ornamented with carved porcelain but
tons and finished at the neck by a
feather ruche, or else the short coat
opens over a chamois leather vest cov
ered with soutache braiding,with a high
stock collar of velvet draped with
square tabs of lace. These dresses are
at once dressy-looking and suitable for
any ordinary occasion, and best of all,
their wearing quality is well-nigh ever
lasting if the best corduroy is chosen.
Another model for a street toilet is
shown in the picture made of tan face
cloth, velvet and lace being used as
garniture. The very full skirt shows a
hem of velvet, dark brown in color,
while the snug-litting sliort jacket
shows atouch of the same in the pointed
levers and draped collar. Tlie hat ac
companying this rather fetching cos
tume is a dark brown felt with the
flaring brim "lined with velvet. Loops
and bows of velvet ribbon trim the
crown, w:hUe oa ope sidg^ are plqg£{l
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OTtncn rips held in position by two
diamond buckles. This gown would be
decidedly chic if fur were used instead
of velvet, the whole being surmounted
by a dashing Tam O'Shanter hat of
cloth caught down at the side by a
small mink head.
There is nothing strikingly novel in
evening and reception dresses this sea
son. They are mostly fashioned in
some pretty, simple manner, depending
for style on the elt yancc of the material,
tho cut and finish of the superbly hang
ing skirt and the perfect-fitting bodice.
There is a decided tendency toward
trimmed skirts in all gowns and espe
cially those for evening wear and just
now the popular fancy is the panel
trimming. The panels are usual
ly outlined with jet or galloon,
and are placed on the front and
side gores of the skirt. This is a
particularly effective and charming
mode of garniture when the panel hap
pens to be of lace showing a bright color
beneath.
Lace will be much used this winter on
both outdoor and home attire. It is an
f-xtravagant fashion, but a pretty and
becoming one. Of course, the genuine
article is the most desired and lovely,
but it is not all of us who are the happy
possessors of lace heirlooms, and we
must perforce content ourselves with
the imitation. But nowadays im
itation is almost equal to the real article,
and especially is this true of lace. With
in the week I have seen some really
exquisite machine-made lace which
it would be impossible for anyone but
an expert to tell from the genuine.
Mechlin is one of the laces easy of re
production, and is a prime favorite just
now. It has a wonderfully pretty ef
fect on velvet, and is quite as pleasing
on cloth, but the best dressmakers do
UP-TO-DATE HAT AKD BOSSET.
not use it at all on silk, preferring fine
Valenciennes with small leaf pattern.
As the evenings grow shorter we
value the teagown more and more, and,
however fashion may wax and wan,
this useful garment, like the poor, is
always with us. It is, of all gowns, the
most capable of variety, and, when be
coming, makes a beautiful woman more
beautiful, and a plain woman grows
really attractive under its benign in
fluence. A teagown should not be too
elaborate, neither should it err on the
side of too much simplicity. To strike
the happy medium is somewhat diffi
cult, but there are two things one
should always insist upon—a silken lin
ing and a perfect fit. One of the pret
tiest materials for this ideal garment
is crepe de chine, but for winter wear
"Something""Jt,*vier, like velveteen, is
more suital/ijS .."*•••
The gow,
handsome a',
one particulai^^jJiljSmg if
velveteen. The front is cy,fe 1.50
shape und the back a
narrow band of fur at thewTrtSi
nishes the full bishop sleeve, whiL
passing down the front is a stoleliko
arrangement of the velveteen, edged
with fur, which gives that peculiarly
easy, graceful appearance so in
dispensable to the correetly-mado
modern tea-gown. I saw a tea-gown
the other day which was quite a novel
idea in its way, simply because it was
constructed out of an old evening dress,
and the result reflected a great deal of
credit on the ingenuity and excellent
taste of the designer. She o£
course it was a woman—had cleverly
filled up the low-cut bodice with a yoke
of cream-tinted lace, while over the
shoulders she had placed scarves of
black chiffon which reached to the
hem of the gown, both back and front.
The short puffed sleeves were prettily
lengthened by full frills of chiffon,
•while a jeweled girdle concealed the
necessary piecing at the waist. It
seldom repays one to "make over" an
old garment, but in this case the end
certainly justified the means.
f4
1
1.50
From glimpses I caught^-for I really
had not time to properly study them
I found bonnets and hats to vie with
each other in gay and variegated trim
ming, and that a deep red and wonder
ful purple will be the favorite colors
during the rest of the season. The
trimming on all the newest bonnets
is placed all on one side. A lovely pat
tern bonnet made of purple velvet had
the crown encrusted with jet, while on
the left side were two sable tails and
a jetted osprey. This was its sole
garniture, and it looked rather odd
after the two-sided trimmings which
have been en vogu^
A picture hat of pleasing detail of
which I send you a copy was made o£
black silk beaver and trimmed with
clusters of feathers, while beneath tlio
brim, both in back and front, were ro.
settcs of shaded pink velvet.
nothing: so suddenly and completely S
disables the muscles as
LUMI
LAME BACKfMi
STIFF NECK,
and nothing so promptly S
&-
Kate Gardner.
ST. JACOBS 8ILI
p«e—WW8MW91
Their Different Opinions.
"The littlu dear is lost again," she
said, as soon as he got home.
"Oh, that pug!"
"Yes, that pug, if you must talk liko
a brute, and 1 wunt you to advertise for
him."
Annd this is the ad. as it appeared:
"Lost—A sausagc-sliaped yellow dog,
answering, when hungry, to the name*
of 'Baby a reward will be paid for his#
return to 37 Blank street, dead or alive."'
—London Answers.

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