OCR Interpretation


Twice-a-week plain dealer. (Cresco, Howard County, Iowa) 1895-1913, July 14, 1896, Image 3

Image and text provided by State Historical Society of Iowa

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn88059319/1896-07-14/ed-1/seq-3/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for

US-
mm
&*>*•
HOTELS.
NTHOTHEB HOUSE,
W.STROTHEH, Proprietor,
caasoo, IO?TA.
4 ao only Flrat-clafa House In Crneco. Ctl
Coal, Wood, Peels,
At Laidlaw's Stand, Crcsco, low*.
DELIVERED FREE IN TOWN.
2000~LBS.
For a Ton Every Timet
Quality, Houest Weight and Accurate
Measurement Guaranteed.
WM. F. BATHERT.
Attorney and hunselor-at-Law.
I-yrlc HaU Hlock.
CRESCO, IOWA.
M. MOOS.
JUSTICE OF THE PEACE
CRESCO, IOWA.
Office with W. K. Barker, in Ualoa Eavlngi Bank
Building.
ELIZABETH A. ILSOSD, H. D,
Physician and Surgeon,
CIIKSCO, IOWA.
OBo* over Connolly's rirutr store. Rest
donas with Jli8. Jno. McCook.
ALL ORDERS ATTENDED TO FRGMPTLY.
vol.85 ao.43.
A. E. KELLOGG, D. D. S„
ROOMS 7 4 0, BERG BL'K,
Orosoo, Xowa.
All operations rendered painless by the us
Of Aerated Hypnotlo or Pure Nareotized Ah-,
the best And safest autouiuttiiu knowu to tho
•oUniiAo world. &£*
Miss Lauraine lead
-t TEACHKIt OF
ARTiSTiG PIANO PLAYING
Will Give Instruction in
EXPRESSION,
HARMONY
PHRASING
and MUSICAL HISTORY
To Music Teachers and Advanced
pupils.
Special Attention to Beginners.
HATES OF TUITION:
Per term ol 20 lessons of 45 l/ilnulcs each, $10
Use of Instrument lor practice, one hour per
day, free.
Corner of Second and Pino Streets
Cresco, Iowa,
Elma Cooper Bliop
In the Sicco building, iirfet east of
the Opera Ilouee.
Pork Barrels, Butter 7'ttlns,
lour Barrels and Firkins
made to order
All work needing cooperage re
paired promptly repaired at
reasonable prices.
C. A. McCULLGW, Proprietor.
John J. Aim 1. D.
Physician and Surgeon
CRESCO, IOWA.
Office over Kellow's store on Eun
Street.
Residence with John McHugh.
WillardL. Converse
Attorney and Counselor
At Law
Booms 3 and 4 Borg Block.
CRESCO, IOWA.
W.
H. TSIIson
AttornaY and Gounselor-at-Law
•*e
&
Cresco, Iowa-
Office over Johnson Brothers 'Store.
Wanted-Sn Idea
Who can think
of some elmplo
thing to pateut?
Protect your Ideas they may bring you wealth.
Write JOHN WLDDEKUURN & CO.. Patent Attor
neys. Washington, D. C.,for their $i,8uo prise offer
*&4 list of two Uuadrsd iuventlous waut«(l*
3*
S.A.CONVERSE. President.
S. B. CARPKNTKU, VICP Prp.^.
O. G.
WAXLKSP,
Casheir
FIRST NATIONAL BANK
CRESCO, ICVVA.
A
GENERAL BANKING BUSI
NESS TRANSACTED.
Safaty Deposit Ooxss to Rsnt.
INTEREST PAID OEM TIME
DEPOSITS.
JOHN FAENSffOHTD,
Fr.
Vy. TpUNO, Cashier
imrgimi
CUESCO, IOWA.
Receives Deposits, and llakea C»l
lectioua.
Enys asfl Bells Exchange, Gorernaent Bona*
and other MuuriUw and aoes.a fsiicral basnim
bualueu.
Drafts on Europe for Sale.
Improved and Unimproved Real
Estate Bought and Sold
on Commission.
Passage Tickets at Reduced Baton.
AMERICAN
Loan and Trust Co.,
GRESCO, IOWA.
B. P. DAVIS, President and Treas.
8. •. HOLBKOOK, Vice Pro*.
M. B. Lisa, Seoret*ry.
•ma and Proprietor of UII Only Com.
plat*
SET OF ABSTEAGT BOOKS
Xa Howard Const/.
Abstracts of Titlo to Lands and Towa
Lot* furnished on short notice.
Special advantages for making Farm
Loans and soiling Real Kstato.
FRfJD. MARTIN
Ha* again assumed full oontrol of
CENTENNIAL MEAT MARKET,
WHICH WILL AT ALL TIMES BE FULLY
SUPPLIED WITH THE BEST THE
COUNTRY AFFORDS,
Oar Terms will
lis Cask
Gcnlioiie lo
In Buying and Sailing. Wo taka plsasuro
la referring to th* patrons or {hi* market
and assura them that wa shall keep a full
Stock of
Fresli and Salt Meats.
Poultry in its Season,
FRESH FISH, HAMS and BACON,
Cash paid for Fat Cattle, Sheep,
Calves suitable for Market.
Centennial Block, CItESCO, 10.
eniioril & Anight
Are malting- a specialty of
HORSESHOEING,
Where fine work is required—such as
track and carriage horses.
A new tire shrinlter -will enable us
to give speoial attention to setting
jWaffon tire. General blaoksmitiiiag
*nu h»Tfl prompt attention. 83tf
Colan MoCook.
ATTORNEY AND COUNSELOR AT LAW,
CKK8CO, IOWA.
Will praotloe In all the courts of tb« states,
make loans, and attrmd to baying and selling
real eatate and seourif leu.
Office over Cresco Union Saving's Bank.
W. K. BAKKER. C. C. UPTOK.
BARKER ,fe UPTON,
ATTORNEYS & COUNSELORS AT LAW.
Will practloa in all State and Federal Court,
CRESCO. XOWA.
A. BAliUETT, M. D., 0. M.
PHYSICIAN & SURGEON,
CRESCO, IOWA.
Special attention to Surgery. Office over
Clemmsr's Drug Store. OiBue opon nlfcht and
ay.
QB, A. H. KELLOaa.
48-tf
DENTAL SUIIGEON,
OEEBOO, IOWA.
All work In his line will hare prompt and
oar•ful attention. Otilue ever Wiuut A Moou'«
•tor*. t-ln-Lt
The Park Hotel
Now thoroughly renovated and rcfurnlslte
throughout. and with new proprietors is full
erpiippod to provhlo for tho wants and comfor
of the traveling public.
With its«l«an rooms, sweet ami wliolesoni
beds, anil Its well supplied table, its propriety
liapes to morir and receive his share ol publ
patronage.
J. McGimiess, Prop.
Wm Woodward
Justice of the Peace,
Cresco, Iowa.
Office in the Berg Block with J. 0.
Webster. Prompt attention given to
matters entrusted to hiui.
PRESSIE.
BY ELLA S. ATKINSON.
Oil TJRAY and his
wife sat at the
door of their little
home Sunday even
ing. lie was bag
gage master at the
brow station
along the traelc,
and Sunday was
his one night off.
He had tilted his
chair back to tho
wall of the house, his feet were caught
in the rung, and he was drowsily con
tent, sitting there in his shirt sleeves,
his wife beside him and the Jong, pure
twilight deepening into languorous,
fiower-scented night.
"Yer flow'rs is doln' pretty well,
Mary," he began, presently, Alary had
been erouehei] on the step, her elbows
in her knees, her face buried in her
hands, and she had been so long silent
that he wanted to hear her speak, to
now if she were \veej)ing.
"Oh, yes." she answered, without en
thusiasm.
There were no tonre i)i heF voice, but
the tone was hopelessly dmiry,
"Yer 'sturtiums ain't blowed yit," ho
continued, with a wish to enliven her.
"No, jist buddin'."
"An' the sweet peas?" with a move
ment toward the window where the
thrifty, vines were climbipg up their
taut while strings.
"They'll be out in a week," nnd then
tlie si
knee grew around them again.
"There's the down express," John vol
unteered after a long pause. A puff
of smoke rose over the cutting beyond
the bridge, the headlight lenpel }uto
sight, the whistle screeched its warning
and the train thundered by, its window
iights shooting in and out on {he curve
like *|)!»rks tossed on a hurricane.
"There thpy go," Mary said, envious
ly, "eomin' here un' gpin' there, seetn'
tilings an' people, an' enjoyifi' them
selves, an' we jist stick here in the one
place like the bowlders over on the
roadside."
Her tone was hard, tho inflection WS3
a complaining one.
"I guess you git pretty lonely, soma
days,'" John ventured, letting his chair
down on its front legs, and putting his
hand on his wife's shoulder in a half
clumsy earess.
"Oh! it's awful, John," she said,
brokenly, taken off her guard by the
tenderness, "when I've washed an'
cleaned myself an' there ain't nothin'
more lo lo. 'Tain't hut what I could
do liiiittin' or sewin' for winter, but I
can't get the things to do with. Then
ilie trains keep goin' by, an' I hate the
people who kin go to places. I'd go
ravin' mad, ef I didn't, do sometliin', so
I alius go an' scrub up the kitchen floor.
It works oft them feelin's, un' sonic
days I do it morn ill's an' afternoons
too."
"Why don't, you go over an' set with
Jim Lawson's wife?" John suggested.
"I don't like her," Mary answered,
promptly, "fer she's ullus braggin'
"bout her babies."
"ltow many liev they got asked the
husband, carelessly.
"Four," the childless woman at his
side whispered.
Mary
luul been a tailoress before sho
was married. She was ambitious be
yond her fellow-workers, deft with her
needle, quick with her tongue, and she.
dreamed of a future far different than
the life of John Uray's wife. But ten
hours a day at a sewing-mnchiilc wears
upon a woman. John asked her to
marry him, and she thought the little
brown house would be a paradise. She
kept the rooms spotlessly neat, she
planted and tended the flowers, pnd
helped her husband in the strip of land
where their vegetables were. She had
been married four years. John's salary
«as no higher, the house began to look
a littlo shabby here and there, and Mary
pined for companionship and grew bit
ter as she saw her ideals of life being
slowly strangled one by one. John was
"I GUESS YOU GET I'BBTTV LONELY."
away most of the time. When he came
home, he wanted his supper, or his
paper, and his wife dropped all her
merry ways. She thought he despised
them and in that she wus wrong. lie
liked to he am*ised, but he made tha
mistake of accepting without thanks.
She thought him cold and irresponsive.
She thought him changed. It. had come
to him before that Sunday evening that
she was unhappy. Xow he brooded over
it. Sometimes he reproached himself,
more often, as poor human nature goes,
he was out of patience with her. Day
after day, when lie went home for his
noonday dinner, the littlo kitchen
reeked of soapsuds, and the floor waa
damp from scrubbing. Often it was so
nt night. He knew his wife was dis
contented.
"You'll wear that floor out," he said
angrily, one night.
"I'll wear the. heart out of me first,"
was the retort. And John went away
without kissing her good-by.
"Tt's enough to make a man stay out
of his home," he muttered, and then he
raw a train stop, and half-mecliamlcally
he began to run. It had onlv stopped
lor orders ami began to move before
he came up. Luoking along the track,
he saw a woman catch the rail of tho
last car and swing herself on. When,
he reached the place, lie saw a curious
black object on the bank, lie jumped
the ditch and took hold of it. It was
a basket. He opened it, beneath tho
red semaphore light, started back with
muttered words, shut the lids tight
down, and ntn down to his house. Mary
was wijiing the tea things.
"What's up?" she asked.
"See here," lie said, lifting both lids
of the old-fashioned market basket. A
little baby lay there, bliukintr. soulrm-
ing ana crying1 a little.
"Where did you get that, John Bray?"
He told her.
"Take it back," she cried. "I'll have
no girl's brat «iround me."
"Hadn't we bettor keep it till m6rn
in'? I'll let. the constable or somebody
know about it. Then tliey kin take it
away."
"Well," Mary assented, "an' I'll takeit
out it's all crowded up there."
John went off to his work, and Mary's
tea dishe.s stood while ah lifted outthe
tiny baby and tended to it.. There were
clothes and food in the basket and a
note, beseeching the finder to care for
the three weeks' old baby girl. Mary
wept and crooned by turns over tho
wee, dark-haired thing, and presently
it went to sleep in her arms.
Nine o'clock came, ten, half-past ten,
and still Mary sat with the baby in hey
"WUBRE DID YOU GET TIIAT?H
arms. John came in, and she straight
way motioned him to silence.
"Why don't you set it dawn h§
asked,
"I wuz waltln' fer you to turn down
the bed, fer she seemed so comfortable
cuddled up here I hated to rout her up,
doin' the thing myself."
John's boots were noisy, as he stepped
about.
"Hadn't ye better go stoekln'-foptedf
ye'U wake her up," suggested Mary.
John took the oath of allegiance to tho
baby sovereign pjentally pwl drew off
his shoes.
"Ain't she a picture?" asked the wife,
when she had nestled the wco thing
down.
"I guess you liked lioldin' that baby
in your arms," John began, and Mary
hid her face pn his shoulder and pried.
"Vou'll kinder bote to givo it up,
won't ye? An' the constable's goin'to
Bee about It to-morrer. I wuz down
there. That's what kep' me so late.
There dou't seem to be any perticler
place fer to put it, but he'll find out."
Mary was silent for a little, and then
tlie baby stirred. She hurried over to
it, shaded the lamp and tiptoed back to
John.
"Can't we keep her?" Mary began,
Wistfully "her little clothes was in the
bnsket und her food in }i tin can, an'
thin note says about her."
John read tho note, spelling it out,
and absorbing its meaning slowly.
"I guess we kin keep her ef we want
to," he said, judicially, and then, eager
ly: "What'll we cull her?"
"I wuz tliinkin' Express 'ud be a good
name," Mary answered.
"It's too long," John objected, "an'
it's onhandy to say."
"Well, I'rcssie fer short, an'Prcssie's
a real pretty name. It's kinder 'proprl
ate to call her somethin' like that,"
Mary went on, for Mary was romantic
in her notions.
"Poor little mite," John said, solemn
ly, looking steadily at. the same place in
the floor for several minutes.
Mary crept up to bim and sat on his
hnce. "I didn't know what wuz wrong
with pie, nor what I wanted," she
sobbed, "but, John, ef 1 can keep that
baby, there ain't notliin' 1 want. She
won't cost much, John."
"Xo, it won't, take much to boardheT,
an* I guess Pressie'll hcv to stay," John
made answer, and then they rose and
moved together to the door and outbuto
the starlight.
John was moist about the eyes nnd
happy at his heart. lie took a new nnd
strange delight in everything, in his
present, and future, his home, the sky,
nnd his wife beside liini. And they
planned and wondered what Tressie
would be like when she grew up. They
said one to the other wliatcompany she
would be, nnd how careful they would
have to be about t.lie track.
"I'll make a gate fer the door," John
said, and he looked around for timber
ns if he thought he ought to do it to
morrow.
"Ye won't hev time to scrub yer floor
so much now." John's tone was mis
chievous, as he said it.
But Mary only sighed, a long, deep
sigh of contentment. Her childless
misery had passed away. She had put
her lips to the cup of motherhood.—N.
Y. Independent.
Ills Old Master.
"Do ole marstcr what I had befoah
de wall was a gennernian," remarked
old Mose to another aged relic of ante
bellum days.
"You bet dar was high-toned genner
mans in dose days," his friend replied.
"Now vou's talkin". I remember how
time and agin my ole marster kicked me
oflfen de front steps, and a minit arter
wards he had done plum forgot all
about hit. Der ain't no moah sicli gen
nernmns nowadays."—Texas Sifter.
LOVE INDEED.
Angelica—Claude, darling, when wo
tTCt, rich we'll buy each other's pictures.
The Iioy'n Idea.
Mamma/—Flossie, have you said youi
prayers?
Flossie.—Yes, mamma.
Mamma—Freddie, too?
Flossie—No, mamma ho said he
thought I could lis it for both of us.-—
Detroit Free Press.
FAMOUS HOTEL CLOSED.
Tho Brunswick of Now York City
Unable to Stand. Competition.
WM Once the Most Popular and Fa ill Ion
able Stopping 1'laco lu Now York
Story of the Cause of
Its i-oellue.
The famous old Hotel Brunswick of
New York city has been closed, and it
is more than iikely that it will be dis
mantled. Josiuh II. Baker, who was
appointed receiver of the hotel on Jan
uary 27, after a struggle to compete
with tlie newer houses has given up
the contest and lias announced that it
would be impossible to keep the house
open any longer.
Tlio liotel lirunswlek is one of the
most famous hotels that the city has
ever had. In 1S72 James Mitchell, one
of tlie proprietors of the Hoffman
house, and Francis ICinzler, then at
the head of the culinary department of
that hotel, conceive:! the itiea of mak
ing a hotel that should eclipse any
in the city. Mr. Mitchell and Mr. ICinz
ler had jointly about $400,000. The old
Hotel Brunswick was selected, and ar
rangements made
afor
transforming it
jjito tlie greatest "lintel of the tiinei
ju extending' and equipping the hotel
$.'J50,000 were expended. The bar and
cafe became famous at once, and tho
furnishings nnd decorations of tho
dining and ballrooms were greatly ad:
mired. For a time t.hc place WHS pop
tilay with society people, and inuny
foreigners stopped there. Many fash
ionable balls, etc., were given there,
and Mitchell & Ivinzler were rated at
$500,000 by Bradstreet's.
One evepijig, when the rejuvenate^
jiotel was in |he fvili flush of prosperity,
(V mild-mannered man of ministerial
(ippearunoe entered and engaged the
lower ballroom floor for a "select party
of friends." At two o'clock a. m. 30
coaches arrived. They were crowded
with women, young and old, in decol
lette costumcs, who blew tin horns,
smoked cigarettes and otherwise acted
boisterously. The mild-mannered maq
appeared with the "select party," and,
announcing himself as "Billy" Me
PJpry (the then notorious concert hall
keeper), said that nothing was too good
for him and his friends. An offer of
$10,000, it is sakl, was made to McGloTy
to take his party away, but he declined,
The unwelcome guests remained at- the
hotel til] s\inrise and then streamed
boisterously through Fifth avenue
toward their homes In the enst sido
slums. With their departure the pros
perity of the Brunswick began to wane.
Kvcry effort was made to regain lost
ground, but other hotels were opened
and business divided.
1
here is nothing to be learned about
the probable disposition of the ground.
The site, facing, ns it does, Fifth avenue
and Madison square, is an excellent one
for a hotel, and it is hinted that-a new
hotel may be built upon it to compote
with the a.ldorf, the Holland house
find other new hotels that have done
much to bring about the downfall of
the old-time house.
ARE RETIRED BY REQUEST.
Navy Department Loses Two Valuable
9ien from Engineer Corps.
Two chief engineers of the navy line
just been placed on the retired list upon
their own applications, after 40 years'
service, though neither of them has
yet reached the retiring age.
One of theiu, Chief Kngiueer ICutz,
hos been statioued at the Mare island
navy yard, and has been prominently
identified with the construction of the
machinery of the ships of the new
navy, his last duty having been at tho
Union iron works, San Francisco, prior
to which lie was at Cramp's. Chief
Engineer Thomson has been on duty at
Cramp's for several years, and for the
past six months at the Newport News
works, superintending the machinery
of the ICcarsarge and Kentucky, his
previous duty in this line having spe
cially fitted him for this work. Both
of these officers are recognized to be
among the ablest in the engineer corps,
and their retirement is generally re
gretted. Mr. Kutz will engage in en
gineering work in San Francisco and
Mr. Thomson in Philadelphia.
INGERSOLL BLACKBALLED.
Rejected ly Swell Country Clnb Because
of Illy Infidelity.
Because Col. llobert G. Ingersoll is
reputed to be an infidel, the committee
on membership of the New Ardsley Ca
sino association lias rejected him as a
member. The casino lias a beautiful
park between Dobbs" Ferry and Irving
ton, and is the finest and richest country
club in America. About- all the million
aires having homes in this vicinity are
members. One of the members the
other day intimated that-Mr. Ingersoll's
name had been dropped from the pro
posed membership list on account of
liis disbelief In Christianity. The wom
en especially objected to him.
HER LONG REIGN.
Queen Victoria Enters Upon Her Sixtieth
Tear
AH
Ruler of England.
The queen has entered upon the COth
year of lier reign. If she lives to com
plete the year lier reign will have been
tlie longest of any British sovereign,
(.it orge III. reigned 59 years and 9G days.
Beyond the usual ceremonies of Acces
sion day there were no celebrations,
these having been postponed until the
end of the year, when there will bo
jubilee fetes similar to those held in
1SS7, on the occasion of the 50th year of
her majesty's reign.
Largest Locomotive Holler.
What is probably the largest boiler
pf the locomotive type ever built was
recently designed by Mr. F. W. Dean,
mechanical engineer, of Boston. The
boiler is ten fe«t in diameter, has two
corrugated furnaces, and has 5,300
square feet of heating surface.
Siberian Ruiiaways*
Only two per cent, of the Siberian
runaways escape with their lives.
To THE EDITOR :—I have an absolute
remedy for Consumption. By its timely use
thousands of hopeless cases have been already
permanently cured. So proof-positive am I
of its power that I consider it my duty to
send two bottles free to those of your readers
who have Consumption,Throat, Bronchial or
Lung Trouble, if they will write me their
express and postoffice address. Sincerely,
T. A. SLOCTM, M. C., 183 Pearl St., Hew Tori.
*S- The Editorial and Business Management ol
this Paper Uuanutaa tU» gaatreas fropeaitlou.
"BICYCLE HAND" MOV/ EPIDEMIC
Many BufTercra from This Newest of
Wheelmen's Ills.
If a man in a street car drops the
change which the conductor hands
him, if the clerk makes a bad scrawl in
his writing, or if a glass of water sud
denly falls from a guest's lips in a
resturant, don't stare, it is merely the
"bicycle hand."
This latest complaint Inflicted by
Dame Nature on those addicted to the
excessive use of the wheel is rapidly
assuming astonishing proportions in
Chicago. Especially since the season
for country riding lias opened is the
prevalence of the trouble becoming
more marked. Everywhere people are
complaining of the inconvenience, but
few know the cause.
In the middle of the palm, close to the
wrist, the nerves pass on their way to
the fingers. A blow at this point will
set the two smaller fingers tingling as
if the crazy bone" of the elbow were
struck. It is at this point, which pugi
lists call the "heel" of the hand, that
the end of the handlebar rests in rid
ing. Consequently the jolt and jar of
a .rough road keep striking a succes
sion of blows on the nerves, ultimately
producing fi tingling and numbness as
if the Angers were "asleep." This effect
often lasts for days after a hard ride
and causes all manner of Inconvenience
and some degree of pain t« the unfor
tunate rider.
The tuiuses ares Hough roads, fast
riding, inflating front tire too tightly,
putting the handlebars too low so that
too much weight is thrown upon them,
hill coasting and taking a bad grip of
the handles.
The remedies i\re\ Softening the front
hfuicUebarSt ruling slower
and less, and talcing hold of the handles
properly. This last is the best, solu
tion of the difficulty, since if the weight
comes upon the padded portion of the
hands there will be little danger of tho
complaint occuring.
GROWS FAJ QN IRON ORE.
Milieus Daughter Has a 8luKul,«r Foud
uess for Ferraglnous Pood.
Tlie two-yoar-old daughter of James
Gardner, of Bessemer, Mich., has an
uncontrollable appetite for iron ore,
which she eats with great relish. The
ease puzzles physicians. When the
child is kept nwrty from the mine she
has been kiipwn to scrape particles of
ore from her father's boots and de
vour them with great gusto. The fam
ily have tried many plans to break tho
habit, but ns yet without avail. They
mix all kinds of obnoxious drugs with
the ore, but the child, making a wry
face, cats the ore just the same. She
is never allowed to get out of sight a
moment, and an attendant is always
with her. In spite of her strange diet,
the child apparently healthy. Gtrong
nnd bright. The little girl is one of a
large family. Her father and mother
are natives of England, Mr. Gardner
is an industrious, hord-working miner
of irreproachable habits. He is very
much annoyed at his child's stran1**©
habit.
SHOWN GREAT KINDNESS.
Considerate Treatmnnt of Miss Clara Bar
ton at Hands of tho Turks.
Despite nil the trouble in which the
Turks are involved they continue to
show the greatest kindness toward
Miss Clara Barton, president of the
American Red Cross society, and her
assistants. Although the other relief
agencies are subjected to nil sorts of
embarrassments, Miss Barton's agents
are being especially favored and are
not hindered in their work in the slight
est degree. In the dangerous districts
the Red Cross agents are guarded with
the greatest care. Miss Barton is de
lighted nt the situation of affairs and
ascribes the favors shown to herself
and her associates very largely to her
introduction to the porte in the first
instance by United States Minister Ter
rell, upon which occasion she an
nounced that her mission was without
creed or religion, but wns one of hu
manity alone, and declared that the
Red Cross agents would not turn aside
from the suffering Turk to relieve the
Buffering Christian.
STATUE OF GEN. WARREN.
To Bo Unveiled with Imposing Ceremo
nies In Prospect Park, Brooklyn.
A statue erected to the memory of
Maj. Gen. Gouverneur K. Warren, com
mander of the Fifth corps of the Army
of the Potomac, will be unveiled in
Prospect park, Brooklyn, July 4. From
the present outlook the ceremonies will'
be imposing. There will be a full rep
resentation of the Grand Army, the
War Veterans and ths War Veterans
Sons' associations. Maj. Gen. Miles
will be present, and invitations have
been sent by the committee to the gov
ernor of every state and to all uctivc
and retired otlicers of the army. The
statue is almost a copy of that on the
Little Round Top, the spur at Gettys
burg, where Gen. Warren Issued orders
that saved the north from invasion.
The statue stands about 50 feet to tho
right of tlie soldiers' and sailors' mem
orial arch. The figure is eight feet
high, and the granite pedestal 13 feet
high.
CHICAGOAN'S ODD INVENTION.
Devises a 1'idhlng Ro.l That Jerks the
FUh to the i»horo«
A new friend of fishermen has been
found in Chicago in the person of Oscar
Plath, a butcher of 51S South Artesian
avenue. He has been granted a pateut
on a flshiug rod that will meet the ap
proval of latter-day disciples of Izaak
Walton. I'lnth claims to have discov
ered the solution to the problem, how
a man may fish and sleep at the same
time. Tlie rod and holder are poised
and cocked upon a strong spring. In
this position it may be left on the
shore by itself after the owner has
baited the hook and cast it into the
water. When a fish seizes the bait the
tug it gives the line opens a trigger and
the fish is jerked ashore and landed
high and dry by the uncoiling of a
spring
Approximate.
"Wheu did that famous defense of
the pass at Thermopylae tjke placeV"
naked Dolly Cumrox, who is studying
the classics.
"I can't say," her father replied,
"with any precision. I have a bad mem
ory for dates. But it must have been
sinee the interstate commerce com
niiK-'iion was established."—^Washington
SUit
JustiUablo Homicide.
Now, prisoner," Querlrd Justice Gruff,
How eumeH this person dead?"
He asked me If 'twns hot enough."
Discharged," the justice said.
—Kansas City World.
WORK WHILE TIIEY J*
Plana of the Venezuelan Co~
W T\AV\V
sion for the Summer
WIU Have .Meetings as Often as is
Necessary—No Agent to Bo Sen 11
Madrid—Venezuela Furnish-/
Ing Valuable Aid.
The Venezuelan government has pre
sented to the Venezuelan commission
the second volume of its certified copies
of Spanish archives bearing upon tha
boundary dispute and has promised the
third and concluding volume in a few
days. These books consist of about
Justice Brewer has already gone toj
Lake Champlain and Prof. Gilman tol
North East Ilarbor, Me. Both havel
their secretaries with them and expect!
to accomplish more work in the next]
month or so than they could do inj
Washington during the heated term. ed
Prof. Andrew D. White, is now atj
The clerical force will be liept at the!
headquarters in Washington and will1 bee.
be busily engaged in keeping up the rec-
Ords, reports and mail work not yeti
completed.
Commissioner Coudert is the only
CO-EDS JOIN IN A RUSHy
I
300
printed pages each and are so exhaus
tive of the material believed to exist
among Spanish historical records that
the commission has concluded from
their examination that it will be super
fluous, in all probability, to send any
agent to Madrid for original research
as it was at llrst thought to be neces
sary. It will trust
British blue books and the Venezui.ovin„
documents, as it is believed that nei ,.
government has overlooked any
dence at Seville or Madrid. ,low
U8
on
The commission is expecting ft.'^ an*
important results from the inve)f death,
tions of its representatives in Hrfs visitor
find Rome and has decided in vU.
the character of tlie evidence, passed
being developed not to attempt toj.out.e tc
definite conclusions on the
points nt issue with unnecessary
but to wait a few months longer ir0Ve
arriving at a decision of the di.-
Ut
to
Bttt-
All the members will continueie
studies of the evidence, and the re&
which have been presnted by the com- ,,
mission's experts, and although sepa-l
rated much of the time from their col-'
leagues, will each be .in close touqh with!
their offices at Washington during JULYJ
and August. I j.
1
on
Ithaca, nnd Judge Alvey is at IIagers-'\
town, Md. They have agreed to meet JfU
the other members tit any time during^
the summer that a consultation may he®l'
thought desirable, and it is probableijJ:\s
that such a meeting will be held nextiti^.
month at Boston, Secretary Male'
Prevost having taken a cottage net
there at Beach Bluff. Mr. PrevostA%"
be in Washington atleast twice amontfse
during the summer nnd will be in con-ay* 1
a at it is
eioners. iter
0ij(
,nlcU
member who will go abroad, and he,
will visit Rome to examine and repor IJ
upon an interesting collection from
Vatican of material affecting the casie" school
of thei
it
'jtchell.
Prompted by a Fair Freshman Uceu)_i.a 'i.
Ing tho *06 Bench.
A jolly quintet of Chicago universinm
co-eds furnished the residents of
vinity and graduate dormitories w'B^.
lots of fun for about 30 minutes^^e4a^
Other mortiirnr TSo Ain
C.
a£"-
4™
other morning. The fun was in the na-i
ture of a "rush" between four seniors:
and a lone freshman, and when it was
oveir the latter bore the appearance ofI
one who had seen better days.
The "rush" was caused by action of1
the freshman who had snugly ensconsedi
herself on the bench recently placed
In front of Cobb Hall by the class of '90.
The bench was given to the senior col-j
leges with tho understanding that none:
but seniors be permitted to rest them
selves thereon and that if any fresh-'
iunn be found there, quick action should
be taken in removing him or her, as!
the case might be. Little thought thei
proposers of the idea that the first of-i
fender would be a co-ed, and, after thei
first encounter, they area trifle fearful!
of what their harmless intention may'
develop into. The freshman put up a!
plucky fight while the "rush" lasted,
but as the odds were four to oneagainsti
her, she was forced to succumb to cir
cumstances and when last seen was en-.
dcavoring to rid herself of large chunks
of mud and mortar. Tlie residents of!
the adjacent halls were interested wit-1
nesses of the battle royal and encour-j
aged the fair freshman by yelling out|
such phrases as "Go it, freshy!" and]
"Cheer up, '99!"
BOY DIVES FROM EADS BRIDGE.'
De Plunges Head First from the StrucJ
The distance from the top of thej
bridge to the water is 125 feet. Baker
struck the water head first and soon
came up. He swam about 250 feat to
a waiting tug and was taken on board
without having received a hurt.
A Complication.
Enumerator—Married or single?
Madame—Married—twice.
Enumerator Husband living or
dead
Madame—My first husband is living,
The second one is dead.
Enumerator—Come, come, madame,
no trifling.
Madame—I am not trilling. I am a
divorcee by my first husband and
widow by my second.—Bay City Chat.,
Living In Street Cars*".
John V. Bohannon, of Baltimore, and.
his family have for their home fouy un.
used street cars, which lie lias had'
moved to apiece of ground iii tlie sub
urbs, where lie does not have to pay any
rent. He bought the cars for ten dollars
each, and he declares that they make a.
comfortable dwelling.
A Large County.
San Bernardino, Col., is the largest
county in the United States, covering!
21,172 square miles.
Oar "Wool Product*
The estimated wool product of the
United States in 1895, sheared, butchered
«nd pulled, is 300,748,000 pounds.
1
tare to the Water Bela I ek.
Albert J. Baker, aged 19,
with his uncle, J. W. Ginder,
first dive into the Mississippi ri
other day ever taken from the
b^dge.
®s
8
\4
U,
1.
al
ia
1
"f
going
W.
For weeks young Baker lias bee\.i ^uiens^v
fired with an ambition to jump off the
big bridge and has been practicing al
most daily at the natatorium. He was)
particularly anxious to jump head first)
and not feet first, as all tho jumpers be-j
fore him had done. This he did, and he
did it well and successfully, making thei
first bona fide dive ever made from thei
Eads bridge.
V'
.'f
•••'it
Pt

xml | txt