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Twice-a-week plain dealer. (Cresco, Howard County, Iowa) 1895-1913, January 14, 1902, Image 2

Image and text provided by State Historical Society of Iowa

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn88059319/1902-01-14/ed-1/seq-2/

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TUESDAY, JAN. 14, 1902.
J/,a.4F. J. MEAD. PuBUOHt
W. R. MKAD, BDITOB..
Official Paper of Connty.
Who Is the Liar?
Washington, D. 0.
January 2,1902.
Mr. J. 0. Adams,
Oresco, Iowa,
My Dear Sir:—
our
11
iV
v$
Ibv"
gr**
^§§Si
Qi%i
,-r
I-
'•pf
In the absence of Sen­
ator Allison, he requests me to ac
knowledge receipt of yours of the 30tb,
which 1 will bring to his attention
when he returns. A personal call at
the Post Office Dept., elicits a state
ment that no such unwarranted ruling
has been made or contemplated, and
tbat the report is untrue and misrep
resents the attitude of the Depart
ment. Yours truly,
A. F. Dawson.
Private Sec.
The above is from Senator Allison's
private secretary. When we saw it
stated that the Post Office Depart
ment had ruled that papers would not
be permitted the privilege of the mail
unless their subscribers had paid in
advance, we felt that such a step
would be an unwarranted invasion
of our rights as citizens, and contrary
to our constitution that no depart
ment of the government would so
Invade the private rights of a citizen.
When we noticed democratic news
papers talking about "Corrupt repub
£•, lican methods and officials," we made
up
minds that there was an Afri­
can in the wood pile, and wrote to tbe
Senator with the above result.—Oresco
Times.
The only reply needed to refute the
above reply of private secretary of
Senator Allison, and the falsehood
ot the Postofflce Department, that
"no such a ruling had been made or
contemplated", is the letter of the
Third Assistant Postmaster General
making the very ruling charged. The
letter and ruling is as follows:
Washington, Dec. 17,1901.
Sir:—In reply to your letter of the
14th Irak you are informed that the
Department holds it to be not within
a pulishers privilege to mail at the
pound rate of postage as to subscrib
ers, copies of his publication to persons
whose subscription has expired, and the
Inclusion within the number present
ed for mailing as to legitimate sub
scribers of copies addressed to persons
who are not legitimate subscribers,
will deprive the publisher of his pound rate
upon the whole unles the illegitimate
portion is separated therefrom.
JRespectfully,
Edwabd C. Madden,
Third Assistant Postmaster Gen.
The storm that was raised about
that infamous ruling has not only
caused the department to retract, but
even to deny what it had proclaimed,
of the existence of which, there is
abundant proof. The department had
been deluged with earnest protests
from all over the land, even our easy
going cotemporary uniting to swell
that protest and make it emphatic.
The Appeal to Reason, a Kansas paper
was one of the proscribed papers and
It furnished proof of having more than
100,000 advance paid subscribers who
will be glad to know that "no such
ruling had been made or contemplat
ed," although the paper was denied
the the use of the mails on the un
warranted and unlawful ruling of the
department. Three other Kansas pa
pers of weekly and general circulation
are named by the Omaha World-Herald
as having come under the ban of that
department ruling, the existence of
which it now denies.
The surplus that the farm produces
Is the measure of its profit after meet
ing its expenditures for labor, taxes,
and interest on the investment. The
nutriment in aton of hay or a bushel
of grain is not increased by adding to
its price. If the farmer to winter his
stock is compelled to use his entire
food supply for their feed, it makes
no difference to him in dollars and
cents whether it is one price or anoth
er, unless the price of the winter fed
animal has advanced correspondingly
with tbe advance in the cost of its
food. The farmer without domestic
animals to consume his crop of hay
and grain is the tbe one who realizes
the profit from a short crop and the
consequent advance in its price. The
one with a surplus of domestic ani
mals and a short supply of food pays
the profit the other makeB from the
sale of his hay and grain.
The law in Kentucky prohibits rail
ways from charging more for a short,
than along haul. The state courts
sustained
rthe
-V
W*
law. The case was
taken to the United States supreme
court and the law is fully sustained
In the opinion of the court delivered
bylOhief Justice Fnller.
The Talmud says there are fon*
kinds of pupils: the sponge and the
funnel, the strainer and the sieve.
The sponge ia he who taketh up ev
erything, and the funnel Is he who
laketh in at this ear and letteth out
at that the strainer is he that let
teth go the wine and retaineth the
dross, and the sieve is he that letteth
go the bran and retaineth the fine
flour. The student who begins at
least to wish to belong to the last
named class will not have been sent
{to college in vain.
Bistrioaio satisfaction does not
come easily even to the great. Sarah
Bernhardt rehearsed BOO times in the
^xole of Cleopatra before she consid
.ered herself ready to play the part
-'fin public.—N. Y. World.
One of ths things almost sure to be
•Bene at the ooming session of congress
4s the admission of Oklahoma and tihe
ladiaa territory to the list of states
fa the union. They will come in as a
ptaffe |UM,
rtrrriTiiffiin im—mi
THE INTEREST OF EANNA.
Foxy Move of the Decnilent Ilo.s.v to
Gn.ii tlie Gloiwl A. i:. «.i
Senator Hanna lias assumed a new
role ill the interview wlueli lie gave
out prior to his departure for the con
ference of the American Civic federa
tion. The chairman of the republican
national committee as asocial reform
er, pure and simple, is a character to
which the public has not accustomed
itself, says the St. Louis Republic.
For Chairman Hanna has never been
known as a philanthropist. In his in
teresting statement regarding his part
In former strikes and their settlement
one fact stands out clear and distinct.
His appearance in labor troubles has
always been coincident with a pend
ing political campaign where his
friends were arrayed against the labor
organizations.
In the present instance there are
reasons why he cannot lose money or
prestige among the trusts by advocat
ing a "mutual disarmament in the in
dustrial world."
Yet that such a conference as the
recent one in New York should be made
the tool of a political manager is to
be regretted by all true friends'of the
American Civic federation. If Hanna
is using the conference as a stepping
stone to the republican nomination for
the presidency in 1904, or if he expects
to beat Foraker in Ohiobyproclaiming
himself as a social Moses, he is a
trickster in either case.
If Senator Hanna intended his inter
view strictly for Ohio consumption,
he has missed his mark. His agility
in stepping to the breach in labor
troubles only.when his own ends may
be served is too well known. A little
more disinterestedness on the part of
the aspiring republican politician
might after many years change the
public estimate of his character, but a
few days is a time too short.
THE SUBSIDY OUTLOOK.
Probability of the Promoton Log
Rolling Their Scheme Through
Congreai.
It is reported from Washington that,
in spite of the fact that the new sub
sidy bill has been framed with the view
of attracting support that failed to
rally to the original bill, the project
has won little or no additional favor
and can count on very few strong ad
vocates. Those who were the most
earnest and vigorous in opposition to
the former bill are nearly or quite all
as strongly opposed to the new bill,
andi those who were simply cold toward
the scheme at the last session occupy
the same attitude to-day, convinced
they are said to be, that not a single
promise of tbe subsidy promoters is
to be relied on. Comparatively few
republican members care to talk about
the bill, and from such knowledge of
the situation as can be obtained, it is
regarded as unlikely that it will pass
on its merits or popularity, says the
Binghamton (N. Y.) Leader.
It was, however, intimated some
time ago that the subsidy promoters
might succeed in logrolling their
scheme through congress, or Insure its
success by making the security of
other legislative interests depend upon
the fate of the subsidy bill. Such tac
tics as this would, of course, be a sug
gestive indication of the concern of
the subsidy people for the public wel
fare, which they pretend would be sub
served by the success of their scheme.
Nobody will, however, be surprised at
anything the advocates of this meas
ure may do to secure its passage, for
nobody can be in doubt that the sole
purpose of those who are behind it is
to tap the treasury. Overwhelming de
feat is the fate the bill deserves, but
it may not get its deserts.
PRESS COMMENTS.
Cartoonists give Mark Hanna
mighty little hair as it is, but Foraker
seems determined to get a scalp lock
of what's left.—St. Louis Republic.
As it was with Arthur so it will
be with Koosevelt. The influence of
President McKinley has departed from
the republican councils—witness the
swift smothering of reciprocity. That
influence will soon cease to have even
reminders in the administration.—N.
Y. World.
The president is positive in the
opinion that there Khould be no gen
eral revision of the tariff. He adopts
the fallacy that business panics are
created by tariff revisions, and has
that to say as regards the tariff being
framed in the interests of labor which
is more appropriate in partisan ap
peals than in a presidential document.
—Boston Herald (Ind.).
But for the magnitude and im
portance of seemingly neglected in
terests the almost hysterical zeal of
congressmen to enact all manner of
legislation against anarchists and an
archism would be treated as a jest,
It is hard to escape the conviction,
however, that a great many members
would be far less zealous in making
laws to exterminate anarchy if they
did not find in this legislation means
of diverting public attention, in a
way, from reciprocity, trusts, subsi
dies and the war taxee.—Detroit Free
Press.
Unquestionably the president
was justified in hesitating about ac
cepting the Carnegie gift of $10,000,'
000 of steel trust bonds for the uni
versity extension scheme on the
ground that it would place the govern
ment in, the position of being a party
to an unlawful combine. But why
doesn't the president instruct the at
torney general to inquire into the
steel trust's methods as an evidence of
good faith? If the trust is bo wioked
that the government cannot counte
nance it as an associate why not, in
the interest of the people, make it live
up to the laws?—Saginaw News
Sayinu tit* Affable Thing.
Agnes—Dorothy, you don't mind it
that I didn't writs to you while I was
gone, do you?
Dorothy—No, indeed, Agnas I'vs
bssn ao busy mysslf that Td havs
been mad at you if yon had.—Brook*
lyn Life.
Trade with Greenland and Ioeland.
Greenland and Iceland hare the bet
ter of us in the way of trade. Last
year we imported goods from those
oountriei to the value of 982,633, and
sold them only fSSO worth in return.
When I was in Naples in 1897 a New
York man had just climbed Vesuvius
from Pompeii, and
at the "white
house"—the last
chance on that
route to get a
drink—had seen
his guide kill an
other fellow in a
a fight.
UO
I'm reminded of this incident by the
latest social flurry in Washington,
where ladies of official families are
now printing their visiting oards with
out their husbands' titles.
The new fashion is right. For years
people have poked fun at the woman
who describes herself as "Mrs. First
Assistant Deputy Commissioner
Smith but now that the card reads
simply "Mrs. Smith" without even an
address, how is the recipient to know
whether the lady who leaves it is the
wife of the F. A. D. C. aforesaid, or
a congressman's wife from Maine?
The custom arose from too slavish
following of precedent. "Mrs. Koose
velt," "Mrs. Fuller" and "Mrs. Hender
son," the wives of the president, the
chief justice and the speaker of the
house, have by cuBtom no other words
upon their cards. When "Mrs. Dewey"
and "Mrs. Miles" follow the precedent
there is no danger of confusion, but
when everybody follows suit trouble
ensues.
it
SOCIETY ANP SOCIAL
CUSTOMS IN NEW YORK
In New York a lady's name is pre
ceded upon her cards by her husband's
"front names" in full. "Mrs. Zerub
babel Baker Smith" is easily recog
nizable.
A "Quiet" Social Season.
The purse may be flattened as of
old, but the word on everybody's lips
in society is
"quiet."
It is the desired
adjective for en
er tainments,
balls, parties, din
ners, dances. The
newcomer in so
ciety, unless
skillfully advised,
may spend money
extravagantly in
securing a box at
the opera, in hir
ing Sherry's for
a dance, and in
other ways pre
paring to make a
splurge, only to
find that many of the "best people"
are sitting in orchestra chairs this
year, and that a hotel dance is not
"good form."
"Quiet" entertainments do not mean
inexpensive ones. It is in New York
cheaper to' hire half a dozen hotel
ballrooms for entertainments than to
own a house with a ballroom of its
own, after the Astor-Whitney-Vander
bilt plan.
Pittsburg
Since 1870 the
It a an
ment has really
a
when people slay
each other, even
in Naples. The
murderer was ar
rested and the
New Yorker asked
John Smith, u. 8. A.
to give his name and address, so that
he might be called as a witness. With
a winning smile he consented and the
official copied it down:
"John Smith, U. S. A."
Running the Qantl*t
The change has been of service to
common sense in abolishing1 the big
"coming out dance" for debutantes,
Last winter the change began in giv
ing, Instead, "coming out teas mod
est little affairs where a woman'
friends could be apprised that her
daughter was ini the field for invita
tions. This year some smart girls
are brought out without even this
formality. Simply send tbe girl's
visiting cards out with her mamma's,
and the thing is done. Her friends
will, from time to time, give little
dinner dances or theater parties in
her honor.
An instance is that of Mrs. Stuy
vesant Fish, who perhaps next to
Mrs. Astor best exemplifies the New
York idea of a great lady. Her
daughter Marion has been brought
out in this manner this season^
Last year the Fishes were building a
mansion with a huge ballroom, for
the express purpose, it was supposed,
of Miss Marion's debut—but the fash
ion changed.
On the other hand, Mr. Whitney
has for the second time signalized
the entrance upon society life of a
favorite niece by a big ball in her
honor. There is no rule.
The Opening of tlie Opera.
If you take the opening of the
opera as a sign of social activity, the
season was later
than ever in open
ing. In fact, the
a
am it
lights and spark
led with jewels
a
Chris tmas, inr
stead of late No
vember. The No
be season
has never paid.
Why hold it?
There are few
new comers in
the boxes, in part
Society at tha Opera
for the reason I have named, though
the parterre boxes are still of course
fashionable. Taking a box is serv
ing notice of "arrival" to those up
on the watch for new people. Yet
you can hardly call the Townsend
Burdens, the Gould Hoyts, the Bar
ton Frenches and the Oliver Bel
monts new people, though they are
now for the first time parterre box
occupiers. Mrs. Belmont, though,
had her box when she was Mrs.
Sloane. More Interest attaches to
Mr. and Mrs, Dan Lamont, Mrs. St.
John Gaftney, Edward Thaw, Leon
ard Lewisohn and Mr. and Mrs. Gad
ski. The latter Is the famous singer
art twetnr «f ilntiri. Tfenr
cr
"^PSSSSfSBS"^1
A
S
millionaire. Mrs. Gaffney I
is prominent in "woman's club"
movements, with which fashionable
women as a rule have nothing to do.
Dan Lamont is the silent, shrewd, I
wise, shoe-brush mustached little
newspaper reporter who won golden
opinions as Cleveland's private sec
retary in Washington, and who was
"taken up" by street car financiers'.
One must suppose that Mrs. Lamont
is the socially ambitious member of I
this family the husband cares as lit
tle for such things as Cleveland him
seH.
Cditom House
And Standard Oil Banlc.
When the old custom house was sold
to the Standard Oil or City national
a a
planned to erect
upon the site a 20
story office struc
ture, covering 32,
000 square feet.
Thesitecost about
$ 3 5 0 0 0 0 0
in
add $4,000,000 to
the total. Plans
were drawn for
puch a building,
in which the huge
granite columns
of the custom
house, long ago
a N
York by many
A Contratt to Attract
Attention.
yoke of Connecticut oxen, were to re
main a feature of a classic portico.
That -plan is likely to be given up in
favor of remodeling the present build
ing for the bank's uses. It is big
enough, and it resembles in exterior
appearance the Bank of England, the
model upon which Mr. Stillman hopea
to model his institution. You cannot
longer astonish New Yorkers by build
ing a skyscraper. A more daring thing
is to build a modest structure for your
own uses, and make of its low roof line
a costly advertisement. The building
of the New York Herald is only 2%
(.tories high, and it is one of the most
admired in the city. Already one
bank corporation in lower New York
has adopted the policy of making a
low-roofed but beautiful home upon
land so costly as to suggest a sky
scraper for economy's sake, but it is
not an example that will be often fol
lowed. What if you can only get three
per cent profit out of a tall building?
That's better than to have your own
rental cost in interest and taxes $300,
000 a year, as the City Bank's might
easily do, though the bank can stand it.
Tlie Sunday Closing Question,
Let us suppose that the other day a
man awoke from a Rip Van Winkle
20
sleep of—not
years, but one
A er hastily
reading in his
or ning paper
headlines about a
"Sunday opening
bill" at Albany,
he starts down'
town in a pass
and meets at the
Elevated station
Deacon Jones, a
business acquaint
ance, of like viewB
on many points.
on a a
When the Sleeper he, "what are we
wakom. coining to? Have
you read of this villainous plan the
Tammany thieves and robbers have
made to open the saloons on Sunday,
and to open with them the flood gates
of murder, debauchery, waste, profli
gacy, arson, suicide—"
"That isn't a Tammany bill," says
Jones, hitching about uneasily in the
seat he has secured by thrusting a
woman ontof the way. "Er—it's a con
cession to—ah—to the—where've yon
been the past year?"
"Concession to his satanic majesty
and all his imps!" roars Rip. "Do you
dare tell me that this infamous propo
sition emanates from any source ex
cept the corrupt gang that have poi
soned the fonntain of political—"
"Er—" explains the embarrassed
Deacon Jones, in a low tone, "things
have changed since you were—ah—
away. Tammany has been defeated
by a great moral uprising and. the—
ah—theconoeseion—yes, the—er—con
cession to our—ah—cosmopolitan—to
our population, as it were, is proposed
by Mayor Beth Low and the reform
district attorney, and is favored by
such people as Bishop Potter, Dr.
Park—'"
But by this time Rip faints upon
the floor
ot
ConldnU Be Done.
Lady (in dress with long train)—?
wish my portrait taken.
Photographer Take this seat,
madam.
"Oh, but I want it full length."
"HumI Very aorry, madam, but my
panoramic camera is out of order."—
N. Y- Weekly.
Wouldn't Bare Time.
First Teacher—Do you understand
this labor question that everybody
ia talking about?
Beoond Traveler (emphatloally)—
I do not, air.
First Traveler—Well, I will explain
it to you.
Beoond Traveler—You'll have to ex
cuse me. You see, I'm going to be
on this train only IT hours.—Leslie's
Weekly.
Father Wat Willing.
Daughter—Mr. Nlcefello wants me
to play duets with him.
father—Well?
"Have you any objections?"
"Of oourse not. It will pleas* me
to death."
"Will it, really?"
"Yes, indeed.
tot
I've just been aching
ohanoe to get "even with those Icnnnollv
ft jjr^l^nnoUy.
Jt
Hie Gore that
&
Cures
wm
$gm
Coughs,
Colds,
Grippe,
Whooping Cough, Asthma,
Bronchitis and Incipient
Consumption, Is
The GrERMAN HEMEDV
258^50ds/
SHERIFF'S SALE.
STATE OP IOWA.
HOWARD COUNTY".
In tlie District Court of Howard County, State
ot Iowa.
By virtue ot a peneral execution Issued from
tlie ofllce ot the Clerk of the District. Court of
Howard County, State ot Iowa. In favor ot
Mcllugh & Lyons and against J. W. Cady.
dated Deoamber 26tli 1901. and to
me directed, commanding me that of the goods
I chattels, 6tock or Interest In any company,
debts due, property In the hands or third per
sons, lands and tenements (which are not ex
empt by law from execution) ot the said
J. W. Cady I make or cause to
be made the sum ot Forty dollars and 93 cents
five dollars 65 cents, cost ot suit and four
dollars and nine cents atty. fees
with Interest and costs. I havo
levied upon the following described real
estate, lying and being situated In the county
of Howard and state of Iowa, namely:
The south tlrty (60) feet ot the North One
Hundred (loo) leer, of lots No, six, (0), sovon [7)
and eight [8) In block No. fifteen (15) of ore'eo,
Iow:i.
And I hereby give public notice that I shall
otter for sale at public outcry, at the Court
House door In Cresco, County ot Howard and
State ot Iowa, on
SATURDAY, FEBRUARY l«t, 1902
between the hours of 9 o'clock a. m. and
o'clock p. m. of Bald day—sale to commence at
the hour
of
2 o'clock p. m. of said day and
will sell to the highest and best blddi-r there
for in cash, tlie si Dove described property or
sufficient thoreof to satisfy the above debt with
Interest and costs.
Dated this 27, day ot Dec, 1901.
ward A.O.CAMPBELL,
Sheriff of Howard County.
A Profitable Investment.
"1 was troubled for about seven years
with my stomach and in bed balf my
time," says E. Demick, Somerville,
Ind. "I spent about #1,000 and could
et nothing to help me until I tried
£odol Dyspepsia Cure. I bave taken
a few bottles and am entirely well."
Rodol Dyspepsia Cure does tbe stom
ach's work by digesting the food. You
don't have to diet. Eat all you want.
Kodol Dyspepsia Cure cures all stom
ach troubles.—Shuttlewortb Drug Co.
Child Worth Millions.
"My child is worth millions tome,"
says Mrs. Mary Bird of Harrisburg,
Pa., "yet I would have lost her by
croup had I not purchased a bottle of
One Minute Cough Cure." One Min
ute Cough CureisBure cure for coughs,
croup and throat and lung troubles.
An absolutely safe cure which acts
immediately. The youngest child can
take it with safety. They all like the
taste and remember how often it
helped them.—Shuttleworth Drug Co.
Two Papers for Price of One.
Every person who cuts out and sends
this advertisement and one dollar to
the Omaha Semi- Weekly World-Her
ald for one years subscription before
January 31st, will also receive free of
charge the Illustrated Orange Judd
Farmer, Weekly, for one year. No
commission allowed. Regular price
of both is $2.00. Address,
.Weekly World-Herald,
feb 1 1 Omaha, Neb"
Twentieth Century Medicine.
Cascarets Candy Cathartic are as
far ahead of ancient pill poisons and
liquid physic as the electric light of
the tallow candle. Genuine stamped
C. C. C. Never sold in bulk. All
druggists, ioc.
Don't Live Together
Consumption and health never go
together. DeWitt's Little Early Ris
ers promote easy action of the bowels
without griping or distress. Are safe,
sure, gentle, thorough. Purely vege
table.—Shuttleworth Drug Co.
DR. FENNER'S
Blood & Liver
£l|
the car and the guard
jumps off at the next station to tele- I
phone for a physician, hoping it isn't
heart failure. OWEN LANQDON.
Not New In All Lines.
Alcohol is being considered in Paris
as the coming fuel. It already feeds!
the fires beneath a good many burning
questions, suggests the New York
World.
8. A. Oonvkrsk,President,
I 8.
Carpenter,
£.
a a
1 0
REMEDY AHD
NERVE TONIC.
si uck it taw.
T« tv Itc-• Cpn CM.
IJEWIS
SINGLE
BINDER
CIGAR
auiirr«.*cowa.iu.
MwmnfiiilMinNiMH
MWUTHWWWIIII ,111
BSe. Mfc UMIII Mil"' Dnttbta.
Genuine stamped C. C. C. Never sold In bulk.
Beware of the dealer who tries to sell
"something Just at good."
DON
BE
t&TIB
FOOLEDI
Take the genuine, original
ROCKY MOUNTAIN TEA
Made only by Madison Medl
cine Co., Madison, Wis. It
keeps you well. Our trade
mark cut on each package,
Price, 35 cents. Never sold
In bulk. Accept no aubiti
tute. Atk your itrueeiet.
N A. Blackburn
Attorney and Counselor
at Law. Ir.,'
Front Booms over Kellow's Gro
cery, Cresco, Iowa.
Each package of PUTNAM
FADELESS DYES colors
either Silk, Wool or Cotton
perfectly. Sold by Dr. Wm.
... F...
mi
siliiir
Vice-Pres.
O. &. Wanless. Oanhie*
FIRST NATIONAL BANE
OKI BOO, IOWA.
GENERAL BANKING BV&U
NIBS TRANSACTED
Safety
BUM
tan
lepoiit
to
INTEREST PAID ON TIMI
DEPOSITS.
Coal, Wood, Posts,
Lime, Oemont.
At Laidiaw'e Slant, Otwom, I»CS
BRUYEHED FUSE IK TOW!
2000 LBS.
Y«* Etarj Tiaial
Qnallty. Heeevt Weight LroanH
Me48tire»afloi Cua.r*st««4.
WX, Y. EATHS&T.
AT
GUST GENSHOW'S
Restaurant
Customers Find Everything they want
Excellent Meals!
from 6:30 a. m. to 8.80 p. m.
Ttins Qiqars, Rura Qandias
^emparanoe Rrinlls
&U Jiinda of fruits
and (fanned Qoods. Sf
Spociai Rates for Day
week.
Board by the
The greatest solicitors in the world
.tre Quality and Price. Wit, humor,
eloquence and oratory all sit down
ivhen tbey rise to speak. Price and
Quality are the great convlncerB.
Both are ours.
l9*Next door to Anderson & Sobo
lik's Hajdware Store. Kim St.,
CreBco, Iowa.
CHICAGO
GREAT
WESTERN
4. 4:06 a. m. 9:06 a. m. 6:17 p. tt.
9:22 a. m. 6.-83 p.
T:E0 a. m. 11:50 p.m. 10:00 p.
8 2Sa.m, 1:25 p.m, 10:85 p.m
Minneapolis
St. Pau I
Taopl
Molntlre
RleevlllB
Elma
GOING SOUTH.
7:85p.m, 10:45p.m. 7:40a.
8:10p.m. 11:20p.m. 8:10a.
8:44 a.m. 11:80 o.m
4:06 a. m. 11:45 a.
4:18a. m, 11:66p.m
4:40 a. m. 12:16 p.
5:16 a. m, 12:40 p,
7:00a.m. 1:45 p.m
11:40a.m. 9.00p.m
8:10 p.m. 7 00a,
9:05 a.m. 4:00p.m
1:40p.m. 9:80p.m
11:45 p. m,
11:53 p. m.
12:12 a.m.
New Hampton 12:87 a. m,
Oelweln 1:65 a.m.
Des Moines 7 O0a.m.
Kansas City 8:00 p.m
Dubuque
4:03a.m.
onicago 9:80 a. m.
Freeo&alr oara, Pullman standard and com
partment sleeping carB. Dining oars on Euro
peanplan
J. P. KLMKlt G. A a go
Livery and Sale
Stable.
My stable is furnished with New Rigs
with Good Horses and Careful Driv
ers when wanted. I am paepared
to give the public iirst-class service
at reasonable prices.
Barn opposite the Depot, Cresco, Ia
W. C. LENTH, PROP
P. G. BUTTON, V. 3
Honor Graduate of the Ontario Veterinary Cot
lege, Toronto. Canada, mem er of the Onta
rio Veterinary Medical Association.
Treats all diseases of the domesticated ant
mals by the most approved methods. Special
attention given to surgical operations and
horse dentistry. AU calls, day or night, prompt,
ly attended to. Charges moderate.
Office and residence first door east of Baptist
church, Cresco, Iowa.
Northern Iowa Telephone No. 7.
DR. J. J. AHERN
Physicist
and
Surpon.^
Rooms 1, 2, 3 and|4, over Am
undson & Lofthus'.
Hours 1 to 5 p. m. Cresco, Iowa
Amos E. Barker
ATTORNEY IT LAW
Office over the Andrew Johnson
Go's Store, Oresco,Iowa.
DR. R. A. MORTON
DENTIST.
Booms over Miller
&
JOHN FAEN8WOBTH.Fr.
H. W. YOUNG,ICasblei
PflNiTOFp.RESCOL
CRESCO, IOWA
Receives Deposits, and
lections.
Makes
Co
Buys and Sells Exchange, Government Bond
and other securities, and does a general bank
ng business.
Drafts on Europe for Sale
Improved and Unimproved he a
Estate Bought and Sold
on Commission.
"*^1+
Passage Tickets at Reduoed Rates
AMERICAN
Loan and Trust Co.,
CRESCO, IOWA.
j. C. Webster, Pres.
H. T. Rbed, Vice Pres.
B. P. Davis, Secretary.
Owner aud
Proprietor of
plete
tlie Only Com
SET OF ABSTRACT BOOKS
In Howard Connty.
Abstracts of Title to Lands nnd
Town Lots furnished on short notice.
8pecial advantages for making Farm
Loans and selling Real Estate.
Willard L. Converse
Attorney and Counselor
At Law
Boomt 8 and 4 Berg Bloek.
CRESCO, IOWA
JOHN McCOOK
Attorney and Counselor at Law,
OBE8CO, IOWA.
Will practice In all the courts of tbe states
make loans, and attend to buying and selling
real estate and securities.
Office over Cresco Union Savings Bank.
P. F. McHUGH1
Attorney and Counselor at Law.
Lyric Hall Block.
OBEBOO« IOWA*
JOSEPH
sr if
TIMK TABLB—GO SG NORTH.
NOV. 84,1901.
pgf Dally. Dally, Dally
c&loago SCftB:80p. m. 11:0 0p.m. 8:45a.
Dubuque 11:40p.m. 4:08 a. m. 1:67 p.no
Kansas City 10:55 a.m. 7:05 p.m. 10:45 p.m
Dea Moines 8:80 p. m. 8:30 a. m. 8:3u a.m
Oelweln 2:05 a.m. 7:05a.m. 4:15 p.m
New Hampton 8:07 a, m. 8:C8 a, m. 5^0 p.m
Elma 8M38:85a.m. 8:85a. m, 5:47p.m
KICevlMe ii 8:55 a, m. 8:65 a,m. 6:06p.m
Molntlre
Taopl
H.Paul
Wnnoapolls
GRIFFIN
Attorney and Counselor
.v
Law. v.
H. BOWBBS, D.
Webber
Hardware Store,Oresco, la.
Corno Cures Corns
Bunions, Warts and Callouses
OS MOHEY BEFOITSSS.
Price 25o at 0. D. Nichols & Oo's Shoe
Dvrutncati
J?
I.A..
Offloe over Conway's Furniture Store.
Will Praotice in All the Conrts of th»
State
John M. Cannon
Attorney aii Counselor it-Lav
Real Estate Agent and General
In
snranee Business.'
front Booms In Piatt Building.
CRESCO, IOWA
W. K. Barker Lloyd Barker
Barker & Barker
Attorneys and Counselors
Bear of Cresco Union Savings Bank.
Cresco, Iowa.
Will Practice In All the Courts of the
United States.
TVT M. MOON,
JUSTICE OF THE PEACE,
Homoeopathic Fhybioian,
Obbsoo, Iowa. "j
Chronic Diseases a Specialty,
01^c££v,?r I,iomaB
-if
at
Law
i"
5^
$
Jk
OBEBOO, IOWA. 1
Office with Barker & Upton. In sUnlon
lngs Bank Building.
8av
J.Ucriplnre, I.D.
Physician and Surgeon
Cresco, Iowa.
Rooms S and 4, over J. H. Luer4*
Drug Store.
,^1
ft
Hardware store. Besf
SSttoKtellpho^e,
a!'""1"'1
t6l6pllone'"
Office hours 9 tola a. m. and 1 to 4 p. m.
I. E.
MeTAV,
iiuffii
Office, Front over
J.
Luers'BoomsStore.
Drug
E. KELLOGG, D. D, 8.,
Booms 7 and 8 Berg Block,
CBE8CO, IOWA
All operations rendered painless by tbe use
A?ra„tod Hypnotic or Pure Narcotized iS,
£&«SS?%A£E,T
ANA8TH6TL0 KNOWN
^K. a. H, KELLOGG,
DENTAL SURGEON,"
OBEBOO, IOWA.
4-i
**r
+V*
Iwssyjahhi

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