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The Big Stone Gap post. [volume] (Big Stone Gap, Wise County, Va.) 1892-1928, February 02, 1893, Image 2

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn88061179/1893-02-02/ed-1/seq-2/

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The Big Stone Gap -Post.
C. M. Harris, Editor and Manager.
THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 2,1892
Tkm\i? ok SumwRtrriox:
On* \>?r, .... ji.oo
Six Vmith.. ... go
P?vnw?nt sirk-Ov hi suU'nfK*.
BIG STONE GAP'S PROS?
PECTS.
Many people have interests here
at Big Stone Gap who live in dif?
ferent sections of the country who
are naturally anxious to know what
the future prospects of the place arc.
Many of thein?in fact, nearly all?
invented their money here whon al?
most the entire south was shaken to
its very center by a wild cyclone of
reckless speculation. To all who in-1
vested at Big Stone Gap the Post
feels no hesitancy in stating that
they were very fortunate in making
this their selection.
That Bi?? Stone (Jap is to become
one of thf? most important among all
the manu fan tu ring and industrial
towns in the South is only questioned
in the minds of the uninformed.
In cast- yon were going to invest
$10,000 in the goods business, aud
had choice between two points, at
either of which yon could control a
trade of $25,000 per year, but at one
your profits would only net you 10
per cent., while at the other ihey
would run to 25 per cent., as a mat?
ter of course, you would select the
latter. If you, as a farmer, were
going to sow twenty acres of wheat,
and had choice between two fields,
one of which you were satisfied would
only produce fifteen bushels to the
acre, while the other would yield
twenty-five, certainly you would act
the wise part and take that from
which yon knew you would reap
the largest crop. So it is with the
capitalist who is seeking to invest his
money He is not looking for fun,
hut prolit. Why would an iron
manufacturer put money into the
business, say at Birmingham, Ala.,
which has been recognized?until
otherwise proven and demonstrated
at Big Stone Gap?the cheapest iroii
prodncing point in the United States,
when he sees a greater profit by in?
vesting it here? Usually men of that
class are. men of brains, as well as
means, and. as the old saying goes,
"know which side of their bread is
buttered."
Why would a coal or coke opera?
tor put his money into a vein of three
to four feet of inferior coal when he
has the opportunity of working veins
here of from six to fourteen feet of
the finest coking coal in the United
States?
Big Stone Gap docs not expect to
get them all, hut enough are coining
to wonderfully surprise the "doubting
Thomases" in a very few years, and
those who do come will find them?
selves in a position to manufacture
iron and coke at a profit, while simi?
lar enterprises throughout the conn
try, not so favorably located, will be
forced to manufacture at a loss or
close down entirely.
Not only will Big Stone Gap be?
come a manufacturing and industrial
town, but its location will naturally
make ?f it a great commercial center.
Away back in the mountains and
hills surrounding her for miles and
miles in almost every direction, are
little streams of trade that, first one
and then another, gradually empty
into each other and grow larger and
larger as they wind their way to
their mouth and empty into their
natural receptacle at Big Stone Gap.
Year after year these streams will
grow larger and increase in volume,
and Big Stone Gap will become the
recognized business center of the
whole surrounding country.
Now is the time for men of either
small or large capital to come here
and locate. There are many young
mechanics of the different trades who
can only control a small capita!.
Th -*y d ? competent to start up and
m i?ta ,o alii ill factories of different
kinds;, o.u with only their small
in vur. f i brck them they find them
Ki'lve-: e.vv.W out by the wealthy
corporations in old established towns
ant cities. Now is the chance of a
lifetime for them. Let them come
here and establish their business as
the town grows, and success is sure
to attend them,
All are iovityd t > come and in
vosti.?nto for themselves. Any kind
<i.;' a fact -ry into the products of
xvK'ivh no:: or wood enter can make a
.success here if at any point in the
United Slates.
Here in tne finest opening for a
largo tannery of almost any point hi
ihn South, The great abundance
amj eoiAeaicijce of tan-bark, with
M'O *??all expense fhafc woull ho
;te%'ss;j!T .to deliver is an ftdvan-.
c hardiy ei|un!e.l auvwheie.
A veneer mill, to cut ?1 ship ti e
fine, hard-woods of this Station wouioV
be a great success.
The fine oak and-hickory found
here, that can be laid down by the
different Hues of railway running into
this place at sueh a low freight rate,
should, and doubtless will,. induce
the location of wagon, spoke, plow
and farm implement fact?r?<?.?*.
Water power for running pay and
all kind* of machinery, aiittrV/f tfiiuosf
any capacity, can be bad.
With all the advantages possessed
by Big Stone Gap/of which' die above
only go to make up n few, there cer
tainly is no reason or common sense
j in doubting the future prosperity arid
(success of the place, and those who
own property here and hold on to it
a short time longer will iin<] fhat the
Post is not mistaken in the predic?
tion that they will have n<> grounds
for regretting having4 invested their
mone}' in Big Stone Gap real estate.
MEETING OF THE TOBACCO
ASSOCIATION.
Last Monday night tue Big Stone
Gap Tobacco Growers' Association
held its meeting as announced in last
week's Post. The meeting was not
as well attended as it should have
been, but those present manifested an
interest that went to show they did
?not intend to see the undertaking re?
sult in failure.
Ohas. S. Harris was made tempo?
rary chairman and S. II. lessee sec?
retary.
Mr. J. K. Taggart, general super?
intendent of the Virginia Coal and
Iron Company, was present, and
stated that there were at least ten
houses on his company's property on
which he would make liberal leases
to experienced parties who would un?
dertake the culture of tobacco. .Said
he would allow them to fence as much
as fifteen acres of ground, put in 1 lie
dwelling- house and allow neces?
sary timber for tobacco bai ns, etc.,
for the sum of $3G perycar. On each
of these places the rente's would rind
at-least a*, much as live acres of
ready-cleared new land on which they
could go right to work.
He also mentioned the fact that
these places were all located in short
distances of the mines of his company
aud at times, when the tobacco grow?
ers were not at work at their crops,
they could ?nd profitable employment
in ami around the mines.
He also referred to the fact that
the inauv hundreds of stock-cars that
would yearly be brought into -the
coke works in which to shin out
coke, contained thousands of tons of
manure. These cars have to be
thoroughly cleansed before coke can
be loaded into them The manure
taken froni them could be used as a
fertilizer for the tobacco, and at a
very small cost.
A committee, consisting of J. C.
Mavnor, W. T. Kennedv and 0. M. i
Harris, was appointed to solicit funds J
to defray expenses of the association. I
and ordered to report next . Friday
night. I
The Association adjourned, to
meet Friday night next, 8 o'clock, at j
Council Chameer. j
Now, that this important move
ment has been set on foot, our people J
should give it their hearty encour
agement. If we all sit quietly down
and wait for some one else to put the j
necessary push behind the industry
to make it " a go," there will never
be enough tobacco raised in the sur?
rounding country to produce a first
class sneeze. It is necessary that
everybody do some work in pushing
forward this industry. It is not only
necessary that the people of the town
do all they can toward getting the
industry started, nut before buccess
can be hoped for the intelligent aud
enterprising farmers of the surround?
ing country must become t'nlh inter?
ested. If the "farmers of the sur
rounding country will come in and
give the Association the benefit of j
their valuable assistance they will
find the citizens of Big Stone Gap j
ready and anxious to do their part, i
Come in, farmers/all, next Friday
light, and let's got up a big boom in
tobacco-growing.
(j' The Pp&r wouKI like to Itcas from
every farmer throughout, the country
who is willing to undertake tjSe cui-j
tivation of a small er ;:> of' tobijcco,
staring the number of :<^v:; they wiU
put in. Plants, or seed if preferred,
will be famished them free of cost by
the Association, provided notice is
given early enough to enable it to
provide for.all who may apply.
GEN ER ALA Y | RS.
The Xrtrx h.-?j* here'.'l'-oe i 5 <-n u*\qu\ us
to it.- vhoiee for <i..veiu? r, ! ut vi*? voice
fh? sentiment of a hiajority of. rhu eo'ixens
nf Russell county, ?c>:in we sav give us
es-Ateorii?\v GenWn* Aver*, u-.v CUiei
?l?gi?h-Mlr\ lie is ?ejl j.o-h tl in the
affairs ?f the Stute, un-l hi- jui^j rcefH'd as
Attorney Gene ml is without *j ot or blem?
ish. He t* a polished Ihwyeranil in even
way qualified for the ?>osHloo\ ami the j
southwest is eniifb-d tu rh<y<-fn>o. W
.say give us Kufns A. ,\u r, j,,,- (iuv?nir?r
and Judtre ?Jrnliuni. (>)' TiizVeO; for Jiob?.
of the Court of Appeal's, and ti e Ntipk
w?l never have cauw) t,> regret for the
course, .ft took i^ffo wt>?vr,~U'i>nui},
Arm.
r&B KANSAS 8ENATOBIAT, MUDDI.B
i N AN irXSKTTI.?? SKTTJ.KO
CONOlTIOy.
Jaifffe John Martin the Irtan. Hat Ute
LcjjMlltr ?>f Hf? iKHfretlon rjaestloneri.
Tokpi.ka, Kan., Jan. TJie Legisla
turc met is join I session at noon in Rep?
resentative Hali. The republican members,
of both House and Sonnte declined to
answer to their names when the roll w^p
called,as did Senator O'Brien (democrat),
of Wichita. Ninety-one person? respond"
ed to their names however, eight more
than a quorum. Elev.-n of these were
members of the Populinf House and had
been given their seats through, content
proceedings. Without fliese there would
have been no quorum. When, the Senate
roll was called on the ballot for senator
the entire populist strength went to John
Martin, all the twenty-five populist sena?
tors voting for him. O'Brien also voted
for Martin. The result of the vote, as
finally announced, was: Martin, 80; Col.
burn, 4; Hanna, 1; Snyder, .1; Close, I.
President Daniele announced that as Judge
John Martin had received a majority of
the votes, he had heen duly elected United
States senator.
The election of Martin loaves the situ
tion as complicated as before. Though he
is declared elected it ivas done by the vole
of a house'the constitutionality of which
is disputed. The republicans and the stal?
wart democrats claim that the election' is
a farce, because ihe populists House is an !
illegal body, and none of its aefs can . be
legal! ? The republicans find themselves
mi a predicament for the reason that ajiey
are unable to muster a quorum to vote on
senator and will not be able to do so until
l heir rights in I he House have been pass?
ed upon by the court.-. ff the courts de?
cide that the republicans have the consti?
tutional lower House, thou J bey will elect
another senator, who w ill undoubtedly be
a sfraighfout democrat, and the contest
for recognition will be transferred to
Washington.
Judg? Martin has been a leading Demo?
crat in Kansas ever since, there have been
any democrats in the state. He has made
the race for Congress in his. district seve?
ral times, and once, lour years ago, un?
dertook the thankless disk of running for
Governor on the straight democratic
ticket in the face of a republican majority
of H0,000. When the farmer's alliance
dsveloped into the populist party Judge
Marlin urged fjie democrats to unite wilh
them, not so much to secure the victory
of populist principles and populists men
ti3 to beat the republicans; His counsel
prevailed, and the result at the last elec?
tion is well known. To-day {he received
his reward.
the petticoat populist.
Torpeka, Kan.. Jan. :25.?Mrs. Lease
and Mr. Diggs declare emphatically that
the election of Martin means nothing less
than the death of the people's party, both
state and national. Mrs. Lease said:
"This is a death-blow lo 'he people's
party, state and national. It will drive
400,000 populists in the south back into
the democratic party, and in Kansas, in
the north, thousands will return to the
republican party. Judge Martin's election
killed our party, and that is all (here is
to it."
Mrs. Diggs said: "The people's party
committed suicide in Kansas by the elec?
tion of John Martin to the United States
Senate. Another victory may possibly be
gained in this state by fusion and bar?
gaining, but it is the death blow to the
national organization. The party has gone
to pieces upon the rock which it will know
how to avoid another time.
Salaries of High Officiate.
! The President of the United States re?
ceives a salary of $.50,000 a year. The
Vice President and all members of the
Cabinet receive $8,000 per annum each,
while Senators aud Representatives re?
ceive $5,000. The Ministers to England,
FrancCjLJormany and Russia, receive $17,
500; to Spain, China, Japan, Mexico and
Brazil, $1:2,000; to Chili, Peru and Central
America, $10,000; to Venezuela, Turkey,
Sweden and Norway and the Netherlands,
$7,500. The ministers to Denmark,Grecce,
Uruguay, Portugal and Switzerland re?
ceive each $5,000, and the Ministers to
' Liberia, $4,000. The Chief Justice of the
Supreme Court receives $10,500, the As
i sociale Justices $10,000 each; the Circuit
Judges, $({,000; the district Judges from
$3,500 to $5.000; the Judges of the United
States Court of Claims, $4,500. The l)i
j rectors of Geological Surveys is paid $({,
I 000; the Census and the Superintendent
of the Naval Observatory, each receive
$5,000; the Commisioner of Patents and
Director of the Mint receive $4,500; the
Laud Office Commissioner and the Super?
intendent of the Signal Service receive
$4,000; the Superintendent-of the Nauti?
cal Almanac and the Commander of the
.Marine Corps receive $3,5(10; the Com?
missioner of Indian Affairs and the Com?
missioner of Education receive each
$3.000.
The Fastest Lotxg Bun;
There is nothing more common nowa?
days than the hearing of passenger trains
mi our leading lines being run at speeds
vai; ing f'om sixty to eighty miles an hour
rotya few miles, but it is still a novelty lo
find a train running over 100 miles at
higher i-peed than a mile a minute, On
November Sth the Empire State Express
broke the record for long continuous speed
by running J15.7G miles in 110 miuules, an
average veloeiiy of (53.14 miles an hour.
The train consisting of four ciiis, pulled
by Engine No. i>!)3, Engineer Chane, left
Syracuse thirty mitrales late and made up
twenty minutes in the run to Albany.
There was a stop of three minutes at
Urica, For two miles out of Syracuse sta?
tion (he speed had to be held down below
twenty miles an hour, but afler that i%t
train was spun along in great style, for
the run from Sy>arose tunnel to Utica
5h!77 miles, wascovcied in forty-six min?
utes, :m average Speed of 07.38 miles an
hour. The big w heeled engines run so
smoothly and steam so freely that excep?
tionally high speed is easily mainfa:ned.
ii v.oi have not ordered a-photo, yet of
fl-f? tee fountain, you hud better get your
order in. Send fifty cuts aud you will
i?pt your photo, one of the first.
A. B.Fuw.
J<S NOW GOIRTG ON AT THE^
$15,000 WORTH OF GOODS TO BE SOLD AT AND BELOW
A CHANCE OF A LIFETIME'
BUYERS UP J
This Slaughter Sale Shall Be Remembered and Talked Of for Years to Come as Being a Great Revolution in Prices on
GOODS! We are Going to Do Business with You, Because We Have Exactly What You Want, and Our PrkV M!h
are From 25 to 50 Per Cent. Less than You Have Ever Heard of Before!
Such
OUR FALL AND WINTER ATTRACTIONS WILL CAUSE A GREAT TURNOUT!
quantities of New Styles as we show in all departments leaves nothing to be asked for in Quality and Variety. Our Fresh, New Unc \
first Class in every detail. We have the disposition, the ability and the Elegant Goods to please every buyer seeking bargains in the
men's youths'."boys1 and CHILDREN'S CLOTHING, boots, SHOES. ladies and GENT'S FURNISHING GOnnc
MfcJN YUUM? /caps? trunks, VALISES, dry GOODS, notions, millinery, WATCHES and JEWELRY. ??S
Onr complete assortment insures perfect satisfaction in the selection of goods to please individual tastes. You will find our large si
entirely of New Goods, that are trustworthy, serviceable and the best of their class.
EVERYTHING GOES AT AND BEI^OW COSTS
Come in and see how fair we will-treat you, how well we will please you and how much we will save you. Our goods and prices are now
your inspection and will prove this.
The earlv bird secures (he worm, 'ho buyer ?vh'o is cute, The man who buys of us will find he's doubly blessed;
WilJ.be the man who gets in first and picks the slickest suir. lie snyi?s good money on each deal, ifrid ^ets the very best.
Remember we mean what we sny, 'Mid the reason why we say what we <lo is because we have decided to get out of the retail business an<l our stock i- l><
there is nothing like a slim figure to put it in motion. We hstve bought cheap ami we will sell the entire stock :it and below cost.
NOTICE?Anvoiii desiring to purchase our eh lire slock and wishing to step rijplit into an cstiihl;*] ed and profitable business can :ret a bargain as to
will make terms to suit the purchaser. For to it be informntivn address or call on THE NEW YORK CLOTHING AND SHOE HOUSE, Big Stone Gap, Vh.
Thanking a liberal public b>r ihe palr? nag? extended in the oast, and cordially inviting all to come and get the benefit of our slaughter-prices, we are n
NEW YORK C
BRANCH STORES: Coepurn, Va., and Corbm, Ky,
L
:,THING ?ND SH
* HOUSE
I. MORGAN & CO., Proprietors. '
W. W. WOODRUFF.
W. E. GiBBINS.
kstaih.H:m:i> 1803.
W. W. WOODRUFF & CO.,
176 & 178 Gay Street, Knoxville, Term.
HARDWARE.
Cutlery.-Axes, Nails, Locks, Kir.gcs, Tcc!s, Hcrse and Mule
Shoes, &c, &c.
AGRICULTURAL IMPLEMENTS.
Genuine Oliver Chilled Plows, Syacuso Hillside Plovvs, Brown's
?ouble Shovel Plows, Cider Mills, Straw Cutters, Lawn
owecs, Corn Shellers, Hay Forks, Scythes, Cradle, and
Snaths, Barbed wire, Etc., Etc.
CONTRACTORS' SUPPLIES
Dynamite, Blasting Powder, Steel, Iron, Shovels, Picks, Mat?
tocks, Scrapers. Sledge arid Dri'l Hammers, Blacksmith Tools
Wheelbarrows, Etc
AMMUNITION, SPORTING GOODS.
Parker's Shot Cuns, Reminington, Baker and English Shot
Guns, Winchester and Colt's Rifles, Leaded STiells. Rifle
Powder, Shot, Lead, Fish Hooks and Lines, Fishing
Rods, Etc.
SPECIALTIES,
Sash, Doors and Blinds. Rubber ar-.d Lec her Bolting, Circular
Saws, Window Glass , Fire-proof Snfes. Wire Screen Doors and
Window Frames, Paper Bags. Etc.
EVERYTHING ON WHEELS.
Buggies. Phaetons, Carriages, Spring Wagons, Mountain Hacks,
Mitchell Farm Wagons, Two Wheel Carts.
Send for Catalogue and prices
Special attention given to orders by m ill. We respectfully solicit
your Patronage.
W. W. WOODRUFF & CO.,
176 and 178 Gay St., KNOXVILLE, TENN.
TT y*"^v
Appalachian Bank
w. a. McDowell, president.
AUTHORIZED CAPITAL $100, 000.
Incorporated under the Laws of State of Virginia.
Does a Cenr:rc,l Rankirn: Business
Draws Drafts Direct on all the Principal Citi-es cf the World.
p(kk(tok8:
K.J. Bum JR. 4,-P, BPM4TT, j?, J, M.'Got>|m.ob. J. R. F. Mills.
If. C, McUowki.i^ jr. P, M, Fn.Tov. C. \V. F.I:, T, layix?:.
W. A. .Mcf'mvKi.i..
Depository of the County of Wise and the town of Big Stone
Gap, Virginia.
Temporary Quarters, Opposite Post Office. BIG STONE CAP, VA.
BANK OF BIG STONE G?
Capital, $50,000.00
Incorporated under Virginia Stale Laws.
Does a General Banking Business.
INTEREST ALLOWED ON TI3LB DEPOSITS.
W. H. NICKKLS, President. H. If. H?M.ITT, Casld.r.
Wm. M; McEi.wk;:, Tidier.
C. A. Tracy.
A. W. Tracy.
PLANS AND ESTIMATES IN EITHER WOOD OR STONE.
STORE-FITTINGS AND FINE WORK A SPECIALTY,
Office Comer Shawnee Ave. and E. 5th St.
Agents fop Fay's Manilla Building Paper.
8. H. COLLIER'S POPULiRBflR
WYANDOTTE AXEN?E, BIG 8T0XE GAP, VA
BRANDIER, WHISKIES,
WINES ?ND BEER.
The very best grades always kept In stock, which 1 sell In quantities
ranging: from a bar glass up to within a gill of five gallons. Parties
purchasing m quantity will get benefit of lowest possible price,
HOT EGGNOG AND TOM-AND-JERRY.I
Whea yoa waut a i?ood drluk uhv.tyx give me a call, ami yon yfll mver k-avo dlwippoluted. Staun.
Slemp ond UnRlar?tlic gi-istlemea 10 1h> found bvblmt my bar?will alwnys treat y?u courteously, and m?
that'yon have polite attention.
I have recently purchased over 1.000 gallons of Fine North Carolina
Whiskies and Brandies. Bar open from 5 a. m. to 1 a.m.
till
i WILLIAM eOMW??,
Exporter of Walnut Logs 3c Lumber,
BALTIMORE, - - AS 3),
Write for Prices,'naming your Railroad rate of i
I from shipping points to Norfolk and Baltimore.
This Space Belongs to the
BIG STONE GAP HARDWARE COMPABl
Successors to
J. P. Wolfe & Company.
?e*M. F? BHKERf
COKTKACTi s Ei
?AND ?
S ?J I IL iD) E S
Eftimatco Given. Contract
General Jobbing, Fine Work ai
Fittings a Specialty.
I'miiiiiff. S< T"II Sav in?:, ,?.<?., !
Shop on Wood Avenue, no:u l!
3!G STONE CAP. VIRCIr.'IA
BIG STONE GM
CO?L.
Two beds of Coking Coal, euch one over six feet tbiek, makii
Coke as is produced in the United States, will be mined ami col
three miles of the town. Two beds of Gas and Steam Coal.'
feet thick, and a-bed of Cannel Coal-nmletlies the same territory.
? IROM.
Two reliable beds of Red Fossil Iron,-one carrying 48 pet e< ii
a large deposit of Oriskany ore, carrying 5'J per cent Iron,
part tbe town site, and thousands of acres on lines of S. A. A U
and I. & N. ft. R. _ _
TIMBERt
The most valuable area of virgin forests, of Walnut. Hickory. "
Yellow Poplar (white wood), Birch, Hemlock and Chestnut 1
United States, immediately tributary to tbe town.
wat;er?
Supplied by two rapid rivers flowing around the town. W
piping from an elevation 395 feet above the town site n<
tion.
RAILROADS.
Ccnceutration of railroads at this point inevitable. Soutl
Ohio now completed from Bristol, Tenn., and Louisville ?fc N*a>
p[eted from Louisville, Kentucky i Sever;! 1 other roads now
struetion.
Cheap Fuel.-Cheap Raw Material-Cheap Transponatioo j
An $800,000 Iren Plant nearly completed.
Five hundred Coke Ovens to be built at once. J
Klectric Light, Street Railway, Good Hotels, etc., etc,
MORE ADVANTAGES COMBINED THAN CAN BE FOUN? IN
OTHER LOCALITY. 5
Manufacturers wanted. Substantial inducements held out. "
Lots will be sold at schedule rates, deduction's to builders. ^
Prices of lots in Plat No. 5, range from $50 to .$1,000 per J
Address BIG STONG GAP IMPROVKMKXT I'D., 8
Big Stone ?
SOUTH ATLANTIC AND OHIO RAIL?
ROAD COMPANY,
l>u; Stoxj: G.u", Va., Cauj> No.'??j Dkcem
12, ltite?;:<*
Train* Hunt.
No. '1 leave* 0"?9 a. nLr rirnvps jitjlri.
tol 13:.4L> p. in. No. 4 leaves 13:30 p. iuv:
arrives at IlriHtol 4 p. in.
Tr?lH|i Wf*t, '??
No. I leaves 8:45 n. m.; No. 3 leave.*
.">:4."> p. in, ?,.; .
? ('(MUM-o(f??ni?, - ,.
N.?s. 2?mi 4 connect. ?rWIri.ber W.t
and K. T. V. & G.,;*V Brtof?J^ No.. I
iVonneH? **itli UteL. & N.r -.at Double '
Tunnel. Ka>t\?rb kL?im1hh1 time.
" L. A. PRicii?RivAgeuL i\
m mi i .mm i.i.i in -mTi --r'-T j.-in ii .-?
L. R. PERRY, ^]
STONE-CUTTER AND BUILDER, j
vll J jn.N ,,r \v.?rk t:? ' .
vrONE, BHICK, ftnd PLASTERLNC. ;
GRANOLITHIC WALKS. &c.
Big Stone Gap, or G&te City? Va. j
iD.H.SHELEV^- !
;pfil ce and Yard on Wood a?? H?
near Jntermont h.uh<
^Bia: stone Oiip^^
(?;?:?. V i . inj j??t it eopv
l??k. ll \m\ ai'? i i

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